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Sample records for cell cardiopoiesis discovery

  1. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  2. Translating Stem Cell Biology Into Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singeç, Ilyas; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell research has made extraordinary progress over the last decade. The robustness of nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has created entirely novel opportunities for drug discovery and personalized regenerative medicine. Patient- and disease-specific iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated into relevant cell types of different organ systems. As the utilization of iPSCs is becoming a key enabling technology across various scientific disciplines, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed. Here we review the current state and reflect on the issues that the stem cell and translational communities are facing in bringing iPSCs closer to clinical application.

  3. Discovery and rediscoveries of Golgi cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galliano (Elisa); P. Mazzarello (Paolo); E. D'Angelo (Egidio)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWhen Camillo Golgi invented the black reaction in 1873 and first described the fine anatomical structure of the nervous system, he described a 'big nerve cell' that later took his name, the Golgi cell of cerebellum ('Golgi'schen Zellen', Gustaf Retzius, 1892). The Golgi cell was then pro

  4. Single-cell analysis tools for drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James R; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    The genetic, functional or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development. Such heterogeneity hinders the design of accurate disease models and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of virtually all tissues has motivated the development of tools for single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and multiplex proteomic analyses. Here, we review these tools and assess their advantages and limitations. Emerging applications of single cell analysis tools in drug discovery and development, particularly in the field of oncology, are discussed.

  5. Stem cell biology and drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haston Kelly M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many reasons to be interested in stem cells, one of the most prominent being their potential use in finding better drugs to treat human disease. This article focuses on how this may be implemented. Recent advances in the production of reprogrammed adult cells and their regulated differentiation to disease-relevant cells are presented, and diseases that have been modeled using these methods are discussed. Remaining difficulties are highlighted, as are new therapeutic insights that have emerged.

  6. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  7. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  8. Human embryonic stem cell technologies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Janne; Hyllner, Johan; Björquist, Petter

    2009-06-01

    Development of new drugs is costly and takes huge resources into consideration. The big pharmaceutical companies are currently facing increasing developmental costs and a lower success-rate of bringing new compounds to the market. Therefore, it is now of outmost importance that the drug-hunting companies minimize late attritions due to sub-optimal pharmacokinetic properties or unexpected toxicity when entering the clinical programs. To achieve this, a strong need to test new candidate drugs in assays of high human relevance in vitro as early as possible has been identified. The traditionally used cell systems are however remarkably limited in this sense, and new improved technologies are of greatest importance. The human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is one of the most powerful cell types known. They have not only the possibility to divide indefinitely; these cells can also differentiate into all mature cell types of the human body. This makes them potentially very valuable for pharmaceutical development, spanning from use as tools in early target studies, DMPK or safety assessment, as screening models to find new chemical entities modulating adult stem cell fate, or as the direct use in cell therapies. This review illustrates the use of hESC in the drug discovery process, today, as well as in a future perspective. This will specifically be exemplified with the most important cell type for pharmaceutical development-the hepatocyte. We discuss how hESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could improve this process, and how these cells should be cultured if optimized functionality and usefulness should be achieved. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 513-519, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Cell-based assays in GPCR drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siehler, Sandra

    2008-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals into the intracellular space, and play key roles in the physiological regulation of virtually every cell and tissue. Characteristic for the GPCR superfamily of cell surface receptors are their seven transmembrane-spanning alpha-helices, an extracellular N terminus and intracellular C-terminal tail. Besides transmission of extracellular signals, their activity is modulated by cellular signals in an auto- or transregulatory fashion. The molecular complexity of GPCRs and their regulated signaling networks triggered the interest in academic research groups to explore them further, and their drugability and role in pathophysiology triggers pharmaceutical research towards small molecular weight ligands and therapeutic antibodies. About 30% of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which underlines the importance of this target class. This review describes current and emerging cellular assays for the ligand discovery of GPCRs.

  10. Primary cells and stem cells in drug discovery: emerging tools for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglen, Richard; Reisine, Terry

    2011-04-01

    Many drug discovery screening programs employ immortalized cells, recombinantly engineered to express a defined molecular target. Several technologies are now emerging that render it feasible to employ more physiologically, and clinically relevant, cell phenotypes. Consequently, numerous approaches use primary cells, which retain many functions seen in vivo, as well as endogenously expressing the target of interest. Furthermore, stem cells, of either embryonic or adult origin, as well as those derived from differentiated cells, are now finding a place in drug discovery. Collectively, these cells are expanding the utility of authentic human cells, either as screening tools or as therapeutics, as well as providing cells derived directly from patients. Nonetheless, the growing use of phenotypically relevant cells (including primary cells or stem cells) is not without technical difficulties, particularly when their envisioned use lies in high-throughput screening (HTS) protocols. In particular, the limited availability of homogeneous primary or stem cell populations for HTS mandates that novel technologies be developed to accelerate their adoption. These technologies include detection of responses with very few cells as well as protocols to generate cell lines in abundant, homogeneous populations. In parallel, the growing use of changes in cell phenotype as the assay readout is driving greater use of high-throughput imaging techniques in screening. Taken together, the greater availability of novel primary and stem cell phenotypes as well as new detection technologies is heralding a new era of cellular screening. This convergence offers unique opportunities to identify drug candidates for disorders at which few therapeutics are presently available.

  11. Facile Discovery of Cell-Surface Protein Targets of Cancer Cell Aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Tao; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-01

    Cancer biomarker discovery constitutes a frontier in cancer research. In recent years, cell-binding aptamers have become useful molecular probes for biomarker discovery. However, there are few successful examples, and the critical barrier resides in the identification of the cell-surface protein targets for the aptamers, where only a limited number of aptamer targets have been identified so far. Herein, we developed a universal SILAC-based quantitative proteomic method for target discovery of cell-binding aptamers. The method allowed for distinguishing specific aptamer-binding proteins from nonspecific proteins based on abundance ratios of proteins bound to aptamer-carrying bait and control bait. In addition, we employed fluorescently labeled aptamers for monitoring and optimizing the binding conditions. We were able to identify and validate selectin L and integrin α4 as the protein targets for two previously reported aptamers, Sgc-3b and Sgc-4e, respectively. This strategy should be generally applicable for the discovery of protein targets for other cell-binding aptamers, which will promote the applications of these aptamers.

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells: opportunities as research and development tools in 21st century drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowntree, Rebecca K; McNeish, John D

    2010-07-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), when compared with transformed, primary or engineered cells, have unique characteristics and advantages that have resulted in the development of important cell-based tools in modern drug discovery. However, a key limitation has been the availability of human ESCs from patients with specific medical needs and the broad range of genetic variation represented worldwide. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are derived from somatic cells that are reprogrammed to a pluripotent stem cell state and have functional characteristics similar to ESCs. The demonstration that human iPS cells can be derived, with relative ease, through the introduction of transcription factor combinations has allowed the generation of disease-specific iPS cell lines. Therefore, iPS cell technology may deliver robust, human pluripotent cell lines from a wide range of clinical phenotypes and genotypes. Although human iPS cell technology is still a new tool in drug discovery, the promise that this technology will impact the discovery of new therapies can be projected based on the uptake of stem cell applications in biopharmaceutical sciences. Here, the near-term opportunities that iPS cells may deliver to drug discoverers to generate and test hypotheses will be discussed, with a focus on the specific strengths and weaknesses of iPS cell technology. Finally, the future perspective will address novel opportunities iPS cells could uniquely deliver to the preclinical development of new drug therapies.

  13. Macro cell assisted cell discovery method for 5G mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcano, Andrea; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    , and requires a new system design. The aspects concerning the impact of using mmWave frequencies on the medium access (MAC) layer are one of the topics that need to be further analyzed. In this article we focus on the cell discovery process of the MAC laywe for mmWave communications. A new approach assuming...... a joint search of the user equipment (UE) between the mmWave small cell (SC) and the macro cell (MC) is proposed. The performance of this method is analyzed and compared with existing methods. The results show that using the MC as aid during the search process can allow for up to 99% improvement in terms...

  14. Kicking off adaptive immunity: the discovery of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsnelson, Alla

    2006-01-01

    In 1973, Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn discovered an unusual looking population of cells with an unprecedented ability to activate naive T cells. Dubbed “dendritic cells,” these cells are now known as the primary instigators of adaptive immunity.

  15. Neural crest stem cells: discovery, properties and potential for therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annita Achilleos; Paul A Trainor

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory cell population synonymous with vertebrate evolution.They generate a wide variety of cell and tissue types during embryonic and adult development including cartilage and bone,connective tissue,pigment and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia amongst many others.Such incredible lineage potential combined with a limited capacity for self-renewal,which persists even into adult life,demonstrates that NC cells bear the key hallmarks of stem and progenitor cells.In this review,we describe the identification,characterization and isolation of NC stem and progenitor cells from different tissues in both embryo and adult organisms.We discuss their specific properties and their potential application in cell-based tissue and disease-specific repair.

  16. Impact of New Camera Technologies on Discoveries in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuurman, Nico; Vale, Ronald D

    2016-08-01

    New technologies can make previously invisible phenomena visible. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the field of light microscopy. Beginning with the observation of "animalcules" by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, when he figured out how to achieve high magnification by shaping lenses, microscopy has advanced to this day by a continued march of discoveries driven by technical innovations. Recent advances in single-molecule-based technologies have achieved unprecedented resolution, and were the basis of the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 2014. In this article, we focus on developments in camera technologies and associated image processing that have been a major driver of technical innovations in light microscopy. We describe five types of developments in camera technology: video-based analog contrast enhancement, charge-coupled devices (CCDs), intensified sensors, electron multiplying gain, and scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor cameras, which, together, have had major impacts in light microscopy.

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Biomarker Discovery Using Antibody Array Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rob; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving hundreds of pathways and numerous levels of disease progression. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence that the origins and growth rates of specific types of cancer may involve "cancer stem cells," which are defined as "cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the development of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor.(1)" Many types of cancer are now thought to harbor cancer stem cells. These cells themselves are thought to be unique in comparison to other cells types present within the tumor and to exhibit characteristics that allow for the promotion of tumorigenesis and in some cases metastasis. In addition, it is speculated that each type of cancer stem cell exhibits a unique set of molecular and biochemical markers. These markers, alone or in combination, may act as a signature for defining not only the type of cancer but also the progressive state. These biomarkers may also double as signaling entities which act autonomously or upon neighboring cancer stem cells or other cells within the local microenvironment to promote tumorigenesis. This review describes the heterogeneic properties of cancer stem cells and outlines the identification and application of biomarkers and signaling molecules defining these cells as they relate to different forms of cancer. Other examples of biomarkers and signaling molecules expressed by neighboring cells in the local tumor microenvironment are also discussed. In addition, biochemical signatures for cancer stem cell autocrine/paracrine signaling, local site recruitment, tumorigenic potential, and conversion to a stem-like phenotype are described.

  18. Discovery of HeLa Cell Contamination in HES Cells: Call for Cell Line Authentication in Reproductive Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniss, Douglas A; Summerfield, Taryn L

    2014-08-01

    Continuous cell lines are used frequently in reproductive biology research to study problems in early pregnancy events and parturition. It has been recognized for 50 years that many mammalian cell lines contain inter- or intraspecies contaminations with other cells. However, most investigators do not routinely test their culture systems for cross-contamination. The most frequent contributor to cross-contamination of cell lines is the HeLa cell isolated from an aggressive cervical adenocarcinoma. We report on the discovery of HeLa cell contamination of the human endometrial epithelial cell line HES isolated in our laboratory. Short tandem repeat analysis of 9 unique genetic loci demonstrated molecular identity between HES and HeLa cells. In addition, we verified that WISH cells, isolated originally from human amnion epithelium, were also contaminated with HeLa cells. Inasmuch as our laboratory did not culture HeLa cells at the time of HES cell derivations, the source of contamination was the WISH cell line. These data highlight the need for continued diligence in authenticating cell lines used in reproductive biology research.

  19. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.; Slijper, M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. T

  20. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eMackay-Sim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These olfactory neurosphere-derived cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

  1. Discovery and characterization of a new cell-penetrating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chamoun, Ana Maria; McMillin, Thomas; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-12-20

    We describe a new cell-penetrating protein, B1, capable of delivering conjugated proteins and nucleic acids into mammalian cells. B1 is a 244-amino-acid product of a single-base frameshift in the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The molecule has a net positive charge of 43 and a very high charge-to-mass ratio of 1.5. eGFP-fused B1 potently penetrates both adherent and suspension cells with >80% of cells taking up the protein when exposed to concentrations as low as 1 μM. The protein was found to cluster in the paranuclear region of TZM-bl cells. Most importantly, we show that B1 not only facilitates cellular uptake but allows biomolecular cargo to reach sites of biological relevance. For example, baby hamster kidney cells underwent DNA recombination when exposed to B1-tagged Cre recombinase at protein concentrations as low as 2.5 μM, indicating potent nuclear delivery of functional protein cargos. Additionally, B1 delivers noncovalently conjugated RNA and DNA across the cell membrane to cytosolic and nuclear sites accessible to the cellular translation and transcription machinery, as gauged by detection of encoded reporter functions, with efficiency comparable to commercially available cationic lipid reagents. B1 appears to utilize cell-surface glycans and multiple competing endocytic pathways to enter and traffic through cells. These studies provide both a new tool for intracellular delivery of biomolecules and insights that could aid in the design of more effective cell penetrating proteins.

  2. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  3. Sickle cell disease: challenges and advances in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Leandro dos Santos; Chung Man Chin

    2012-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disease characterized by a punctual mutation (GTG - GAG) in the sixth codon of the gamma globin gene leading to a substitution of glutamic acid by a valine in the β chain of hemoglobin. Despite the huge progress on the molecular knowledge of the disease in recent years, few therapeutic resources were developed. Currently, the treatment is mainly done with the anticancer agent hydroxyurea. This review summarizes current knowledge about possible targets and n...

  4. Drug Discovery via Human-Derived Stem Cell Organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangkun; Huang, Jing; Ning, Bo; Liu, Zhixiong; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived cell lines and animal models have proven invaluable for the understanding of human intestinal diseases and for drug development although both inherently comprise disadvantages and caveats. Many genetically determined intestinal diseases occur in specific tissue microenvironments that are not adequately modeled by monolayer cell culture. Likewise, animal models incompletely recapitulate the complex pathologies of intestinal diseases of humans and fall short in predicting the effects of candidate drugs. Patient-derived stem cell organoids are new and effective models for the development of novel targeted therapies. With the use of intestinal organoids from patients with inherited diseases, the potency and toxicity of drug candidates can be evaluated better. Moreover, owing to the novel clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein-9 genome-editing technologies, researchers can use organoids to precisely modulate human genetic status and identify pathogenesis-related genes of intestinal diseases. Therefore, here we discuss how patient-derived organoids should be grown and how advanced genome-editing tools may be applied to research on modeling of cancer and infectious diseases. We also highlight practical applications of organoids ranging from basic studies to drug screening and precision medicine. PMID:27713700

  5. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  6. Single-Cell Mass Spectrometry for Discovery Proteomics: Quantifying Translational Cell Heterogeneity in the 16-Cell Frog (Xenopus) Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard-Banek, Camille; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2016-02-12

    We advance mass spectrometry from a cell population-averaging tool to one capable of quantifying the expression of diverse proteins in single embryonic cells. Our instrument combines capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrospray ionization, and a tribrid ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) to enable untargeted (discovery) proteomics with ca. 25 amol lower limit of detection. CE-μESI-HRMS enabled the identification of 500-800 nonredundant protein groups by measuring 20 ng, or frog (Xenopus laevis) embryo, amounting to a total of 1709 protein groups identified between n=3 biological replicates. By quantifying ≈150 nonredundant protein groups between all blastomeres and replicate measurements, we found significant translational cell heterogeneity along multiple axes of the embryo at this very early stage of development when the transcriptional program of the embryo has yet to begin.

  7. 76 FR 51374 - Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and Therapeutic Evaluation and Development (U01) AGENCY: Food and... will provide the regulatory science to facilitate development and evaluation of direct discovery of...

  8. Transport of lipopolysaccharide across the cell envelope: the long road of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular lipid transport is poorly understood. Genetic studies to identify lipid-transport factors are complicated by the essentiality of many lipids, whereas biochemical and cell biology approaches aiming to determine localization and mechanisms of lipid transport are often challenged by the lack of adequate technology. Here, we review the epic history of how different approaches, technological advances and ingenuity contributed to the recent discovery of a multi-protein pathway that transports lipopolysaccharide across the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Discovery of Drug Synergies in Gastric Cancer Cells Predicted by Logical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flobak, Åsmund; Baudot, Anaïs; Remy, Elisabeth; Thommesen, Liv; Thieffry, Denis; Kuiper, Martin; Lægreid, Astrid

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of efficient anti-cancer drug combinations is a major challenge, since experimental testing of all possible combinations is clearly impossible. Recent efforts to computationally predict drug combination responses retain this experimental search space, as model definitions typically rely on extensive drug perturbation data. We developed a dynamical model representing a cell fate decision network in the AGS gastric cancer cell line, relying on background knowledge extracted from literature and databases. We defined a set of logical equations recapitulating AGS data observed in cells in their baseline proliferative state. Using the modeling software GINsim, model reduction and simulation compression techniques were applied to cope with the vast state space of large logical models and enable simulations of pairwise applications of specific signaling inhibitory chemical substances. Our simulations predicted synergistic growth inhibitory action of five combinations from a total of 21 possible pairs. Four of the predicted synergies were confirmed in AGS cell growth real-time assays, including known effects of combined MEK-AKT or MEK-PI3K inhibitions, along with novel synergistic effects of combined TAK1-AKT or TAK1-PI3K inhibitions. Our strategy reduces the dependence on a priori drug perturbation experimentation for well-characterized signaling networks, by demonstrating that a model predictive of combinatorial drug effects can be inferred from background knowledge on unperturbed and proliferating cancer cells. Our modeling approach can thus contribute to preclinical discovery of efficient anticancer drug combinations, and thereby to development of strategies to tailor treatment to individual cancer patients.

  10. Targeting stem cell signaling pathways for drug discovery: advances in the Notch and Wnt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Songzhu Michael; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, JingYi; Li, LingSong

    2014-06-01

    Signaling pathways transduce extracellular stimuli into cells through molecular cascades to regulate cellular functions. In stem cells, a small number of pathways, notably those of TGF-β/BMP, Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt, are responsible for the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation. During embryonic development, these pathways govern cell fate specifications as well as the formation of tissues and organs. In adulthood, their normal functions are important for tissue homeostasis and regeneration, whereas aberrations result in diseases, such as cancer and degenerative disorders. In complex biological systems, stem cell signaling pathways work in concert as a network and exhibit crosstalk, such as the negative crosstalk between Wnt and Notch. Over the past decade, genetic and genomic studies have identified a number of potential drug targets that are involved in stem cell signaling pathways. Indeed, discovery of new targets and drugs for these pathways has become one of the most active areas in both the research community and pharmaceutical industry. Remarkable progress has been made and several promising drug candidates have entered into clinical trials. This review focuses on recent advances in the discovery of novel drugs which target the Notch and Wnt pathways.

  11. How induced pluripotent stem cells are informing drug discovery in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yishan; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-01-01

    Compared with other medical fields, psychiatry is particularly challenging for rational drug discovery. The therapeutic endpoints are abstract measures of cognitive and behavioral performance, for which we have a very limited understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. Existing preclinical disease models are also limited in their translational fidelity. Recently, there have been active discussions on the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a catalyzing research tool in psychiatry, but very few review articles in the field have given specific considerations to their use at the interface between psychiatric research and drug discovery. Here, we discuss recent perspectives emerging from this interface. For physicians and researchers on the clinical side, we explain how iPSC-based experimental approaches are placed at the crossroads with psychiatric genetics and how representative studies in the field are addressing biological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders. For researchers who directly work with iPSCs and aspire to develop new research techniques, we direct their attention to the utility of this approach for unmet needs in drug discovery workflows.

  12. Evolving towards a human-cell based and multiscale approach to drug discovery for CNS disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eSchadt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A disruptive approach to therapeutic discovery and development is required in order to significantly improve the success rate of drug discovery for central nervous system (CNS disorders. In this review, we first assess the key factors contributing to the frequent clinical failures for novel drugs. Second, we discuss cancer translational research paradigms that addressed key issues in drug discovery and development and have resulted in delivering drugs with significantly improved outcomes for patients. Finally, we discuss two emerging technologies that could improve the success rate of CNS therapies: human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-based studies and multiscale biology models. Coincident with advances in cellular technologies that enable the generation of hiPSCs directly from patient blood or skin cells, together with methods to differentiate these hiPSC lines into specific neural cell types relevant to neurological disease, it is also now possible to combine data from large-scale forward genetics and post-mortem global epigenetic and expression studies in order to generate novel predictive models. The application of systems biology approaches to account for the multiscale nature of different data types, from genetic to molecular and cellular to clinical, can lead to new insights into human diseases that are emergent properties of biological networks, not the result of changes to single genes. Such studies have demonstrated the heterogeneity in etiological pathways and the need for studies on model systems that are patient-derived and thereby recapitulate neurological disease pathways with higher fidelity. In the context of two common and presumably representative neurological diseases, the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, and the psychiatric disorder schizophrenia (SZ, we propose the need for, and exemplify the impact of, a multiscale biology approach that can integrate panomic, clinical, imaging, and literature

  13. Personalized Whole-Cell Kinetic Models of Metabolism for Discovery in Genomics and Pharmacodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; McCloskey, Douglas; Zielinski, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    challenge. Here, we constructed multi-omic, data-driven, personalized whole-cell kinetic models of erythrocyte metabolism for 24 healthy individuals based on fasting-state plasma and erythrocyte metabolomics and whole-genome genotyping. We show that personalized kinetic rate constants, rather than......-induced anemia) and how genetic variation (inosine triphosphatase deficiency) may protect against this side effect. This study demonstrates the feasibility of personalized kinetic models, and we anticipate their use will accelerate discoveries in characterizing individual metabolic variation....

  14. Probing the O-glycoproteome of Gastric Cancer Cell Lines for Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira Campos, Diana Alexandra; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana

    2015-01-01

    biomarker assays. However, the current knowledge of secreted and circulating O-glycoproteins is limited. Here, we used the COSMC KO "SimpleCell" (SC) strategy to characterize the O-glycoproteome of two gastric cancer SC lines (AGS, MKN45) as well as a gastric cell line (KATO III) which naturally expresses...... at least partially truncated O-glycans. Overall we identified 499 O-glycoproteins and 1,236 O-glycosites in gastric cancer SCs, and a total 47 O-glycoproteins and 73 O-glycosites in the KATO III cell line. We next modified the glycoproteomic strategy to apply it to pools of sera from gastric cancer...... with the STn glycoform were further validated as being expressed in gastric cancer tissue. A proximity ligation assay was used to demonstrate that CD44 was expressed with the STn glycoform in gastric cancer tissues. The study provides a discovery strategy for aberrantly glycosylated O-glycoproteins and a set...

  15. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance for theories of embryonic organization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brian K Hall

    2008-12-01

    The neural crest has long fascinated developmental biologists, and, increasingly over the past decades, evolutionary and evolutionary developmental biologists. The neural crest is the name given to the fold of ectoderm at the junction between neural and epidermal ectoderm in neurula-stage vertebrate embryos. In this sense, the neural crest is a morphological term akin to head fold or limb bud. This region of the dorsal neural tube consists of neural crest cells, a special population(s) of cell, that give rise to an astonishing number of cell types and to an equally astonishing number of tissues and organs. Neural crest cell contributions may be direct — providing cells — or indirect — providing a necessary, often inductive, environment in which other cells develop. The enormous range of cell types produced provides an important source of evidence of the neural crest as a germ layer, bringing the number of germ layers to four — ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm, and neural crest. In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of secondary neurulation, and present evidence of the neural crest as the fourth germ layer. A companion paper (Hall, Evol. Biol. 2008) deals with the evolutionary origins of the neural crest and neural crest cells.

  16. An Innovative Cell Microincubator for Drug Discovery Based on 3D Silicon Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Aredia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently employed three-dimensional (3D silicon microstructures (SMSs consisting in arrays of 3 μm-thick silicon walls separated by 50 μm-deep, 5 μm-wide gaps, as microincubators for monitoring the biomechanical properties of tumor cells. They were here applied to investigate the in vitro behavior of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells driven to apoptosis by the chemotherapeutic drug Bleomycin. Our results, obtained by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrated that HT1080 cells exhibited a great ability to colonize the narrow gaps. Remarkably, HT1080 cells grown on 3D-SMS, when treated with the DNA damaging agent Bleomycin under conditions leading to apoptosis, tended to shrink, reducing their volume and mimicking the normal behavior of apoptotic cells, and were prone to leave the gaps. Finally, we performed label-free detection of cells adherent to the vertical silicon wall, inside the gap of 3D-SMS, by exploiting optical low coherence reflectometry using infrared, low power radiation. This kind of approach may become a new tool for increasing automation in the drug discovery area. Our results open new perspectives in view of future applications of the 3D-SMS as the core element of a lab-on-a-chip suitable for screening the effect of new molecules potentially able to kill tumor cells.

  17. Peptidyl hormones of endocrine cells origin in the gut--their discovery and physiological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceranowicz, P; Warzecha, Z; Dembinski, A

    2015-02-01

    In 1902 William Bayliss and Ernest Starling discovered secretin and it was the beginning of general endocrinology as well as, endocrinology of gastrointestinal tract. Ernest Starling was also a first person who introduced a term hormone for the substances which serves to transfer the information between cells of organism. Subsequent years delivered discovery of successive hormones of the digestive tract. Gastrin was discovered in 1905; whereas cholecystokinin in 1928. Ghrelin and obestatin are last hormones determined in the gastrointestinal tract and they were found in 1999 and 2006, respectively. Both above hormones are originating from the common prohormone. In 60s of past century, the biochemical structure of the gastrointestinal tract hormones was determined for the first time. Substantial progress in endocrinology of the digestive tract took place when radioimmunoassay was employed to measure of hormones concentration. Subsequently, radiolabeled hormones were used to localize hormonal receptors. Next breakthrough in the gastrointestinal tract endocrinology happened after introduction to experimental methods the cloning of complementary DNA. This method has allowed, among the others, to establish the full structure of receptors as well as, a genes coding hormones and their receptors. Discovery of genes structure allowed subsequently introducing these genes into foreign cells, what gives a chance to obtain significant amount of recombined hormones possessing species specificity. This review is presenting a history of the gastrointestinal tract endocrinology, as well as a relevance of gastrointestinal tract hormones in the regulation of body physiological activity.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Tan, Lan; Jiang, Teng; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-08-01

    Although most neurodegenerative diseases have been closely related to aberrant accumulation of aggregation-prone proteins in neurons, understanding their pathogenesis remains incomplete, and there is no treatment to delay the onset or slow the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. The availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in recapitulating the phenotypes of several late-onset neurodegenerative diseases marks the new era in in vitro modeling. The iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in these diseases and provides a novel human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics. Modeling human diseases using iPSCs has created novel opportunities for both mechanistic studies as well as for the discovery of new disease therapies. In this review, we introduce iPSC-based disease modeling in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, we discuss the implementation of iPSCs in drug discovery associated with some new techniques.

  19. Rita Levi-Montalcini and the discovery of NGF, the first nerve cell growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi

    2011-06-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) is a signaling protein, discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini in the early 1950's for its effect on growth and differentiation of specific populations of neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Originally identified as neurite outgrowth-stimulating factor, later studies revealed that the purified molecule has a number of target cells in the central nervous system and on nonneuronal cells. Moreover, recent studies showed the potential therapeutic properties of NGF in neuropathies of the central and peripheral nervous system and diseases of the eye and skin. Here I briefly describe the discovery of NGF, the early studies of Rita LeviMontalcini, a pioneer in modern neuroscience, and my scientific and human experience working in her laboratory for over 40 years.

  20. A new era of disease modeling and drug discovery using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Wonhee

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka first reported that in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells toward pluripotency was achieved by simple induction of specific transcription factors. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has since revolutionized the ways in which we explore the mechanisms of human diseases and develop therapeutics. Here, I describe the recent advances in human iPSC-based disease modeling and drug discovery and discuss the current challenges. Additionally, I outline potential future applications of human iPSCs in classifying patients based on their response to drugs in clinical trials and elucidating optimal patient-specific therapeutic strategies, which will contribute to reduced attrition rates and the development of precision medicine.

  1. Antibiotic discovery: combatting bacterial resistance in cells and in biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penesyan, Anahit; Gillings, Michael; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-03-24

    Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored.

  2. Antibiotic Discovery: Combatting Bacterial Resistance in Cells and in Biofilm Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahit Penesyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored.

  3. Single‐Cell Mass Spectrometry for Discovery Proteomics: Quantifying Translational Cell Heterogeneity in the 16‐Cell Frog (Xenopus) Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard‐Banek, Camille; Moody, Sally A.; Nemes, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We advance mass spectrometry from a cell population‐averaging tool to one capable of quantifying the expression of diverse proteins in single embryonic cells. Our instrument combines capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrospray ionization, and a tribrid ultrahigh‐resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) to enable untargeted (discovery) proteomics with ca. 25 amol lower limit of detection. CE‐μESI‐HRMS enabled the identification of 500–800 nonredundant protein groups by measuring 20 ng, or...

  4. In vitro Fab display: a cell-free system for IgG discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ryan L; Matsumoto, Marissa L; Yin, Gang; Cai, Qi; Fung, Juan Jose; Stephenson, Heather; Gill, Avinash; You, Monica; Lin, Shwu-Hwa; Wang, Willie D; Masikat, Mary Rose; Li, Xiaofan; Penta, Kalyani; Steiner, Alex R; Baliga, Ramesh; Murray, Christopher J; Thanos, Christopher D; Hallam, Trevor J; Sato, Aaron K

    2014-04-01

    Selection technologies such as ribosome display enable the rapid discovery of novel antibody fragments entirely in vitro. It has been assumed that the open nature of the cell-free reactions used in these technologies limits selections to single-chain protein fragments. We present a simple approach for the selection of multi-chain proteins, such as antibody Fab fragments, using ribosome display. Specifically, we show that a two-chain trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab domain can be displayed in a format which tethers either the heavy or light chain to the ribosome while retaining functional antigen binding. Then, we constructed synthetic Fab HC and LC libraries and performed test selections against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The Fab selection output was reformatted into full-length immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) and directly expressed at high levels in an optimized cell-free system for immediate screening, purification and characterization. Several novel IgGs were identified using this cell-free platform that bind to purified CEA, CEA positive cells and VEGF.

  5. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  6. Stem cell signaling as a target for novel drug discovery: recent progress in the WNT and Hedgehog pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songzhu Michael AN; Qiang Peter DING; Ling-song LI

    2013-01-01

    One of the most exciting fields in biomedical research over the past few years is stem cell biology,and therapeutic application of stem cells to replace the diseased or damaged tissues is also an active area in development.Although stem cell therapy has a number of technical challenges and regulatory hurdles to overcome,the use of stem cells as tools in drug discovery supported by mature technologies and established regulatory paths is expected to generate more immediate returns.In particular,the targeting of stem cell signaling pathways is opening up a new avenue for drug discovery.Aberrations in these pathways result in various diseases,including cancer,fibrosis and degenerative diseases.A number of drug targets in stem cell signaling pathways have been identified.Among them,WNT and Hedgehog are two most important signaling pathways,which are the focus of this review.A hedgehog pathway inhibitor,vismodegib (Erivedge),has recently been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of skin cancer,while several drug candidates for the WNT pathway are entering clinical trials.We have discovered that the stem cell signaling pathways respond to traditional Chinese medicines.Substances isolated from herbal medicine may act specifically on components of stem cell signaling pathways with high affinities.As many of these events can be explained through molecular interactions,these phenomena suggest that discovery of stem cell-targeting drugs from natural products may prove to be highly successful.

  7. Induced pluripotent stem cells: applications in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vimal K; Kalsan, Manisha; Kumar, Neeraj; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Recent progresses in the field of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) have opened up many gateways for the research in therapeutics. iPSCs are the cells which are reprogrammed from somatic cells using different transcription factors. iPSCs possess unique properties of self renewal and differentiation to many types of cell lineage. Hence could replace the use of embryonic stem cells (ESC), and may overcome the various ethical issues regarding the use of embryos in research and clinics. Overwhelming responses prompted worldwide by a large number of researchers about the use of iPSCs evoked a large number of peple to establish more authentic methods for iPSC generation. This would require understanding the underlying mechanism in a detailed manner. There have been a large number of reports showing potential role of different molecules as putative regulators of iPSC generating methods. The molecular mechanisms that play role in reprogramming to generate iPSCs from different types of somatic cell sources involves a plethora of molecules including miRNAs, DNA modifying agents (viz. DNA methyl transferases), NANOG, etc. While promising a number of important roles in various clinical/research studies, iPSCs could also be of great use in studying molecular mechanism of many diseases. There are various diseases that have been modeled by uing iPSCs for better understanding of their etiology which maybe further utilized for developing putative treatments for these diseases. In addition, iPSCs are used for the production of patient-specific cells which can be transplanted to the site of injury or the site of tissue degeneration due to various disease conditions. The use of iPSCs may eliminate the chances of immune rejection as patient specific cells may be used for transplantation in various engraftment processes. Moreover, iPSC technology has been employed in various diseases for disease modeling and gene therapy. The technique offers benefits over other similar techniques

  8. Live cell discovery of microbial vitamin transport and enzyme-cofactor interactions by chemoproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N; Koech, Phillip K; Plymale, Andrew E; Landorf, Elizabeth V; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank R.; Lipton, Mary S; Romine, Margaret F; Wright, Aaron T

    2016-02-01

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  9. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Landorf, Elizabeth V.; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank; Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-02-02

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  10. An in vivo-like tumor stem cell-related glioblastoma in vitro model for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Nørregaard, Annette

    the effects of new drugs on tumor cells including tumor stem cells. Implantation of glioblastoma cells into organotypic brain slice cultures has previously been published as a model system, but not using a stem cell favourable environment. Organotypic corticostriatal rat brain slice cultures were prepared......The discovery of tumor stem cells being highly resistant against therapy makes new demands to model systems suitable for evaluation of the effects of new drugs on tumor stem cells. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop an in vivo-like in vitro glioblastoma model for testing...... and cultured in a serum containing medium replaced after three days with a serum-free stem cell medium. Thereafter fluorescent DiI labelled glioblastoma spheroids from the cell line U87 and the tumor stem cell line SJ-1 established in our laboratory were implanted into the brain slices between cortex...

  11. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  12. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  13. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  14. Fifty years of Weibel-Palade bodies: the discovery and early history of an enigmatic organelle of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, E R

    2012-06-01

    In 1962, a rod-shaped cytoplasmic organelle of endothelial cells, later called the Weibel-Palade body, was serendipitously discovered by electron microscopy. It contains a set of parallel tubules and is wrapped in a membrane. Subsequent studies in the following decades established the unique localization of this organelle in endothelial cells of all vertebrates studied, meaning that it could serve as a marker of endothelial cells in tissue cultures. However, these studies did not reveal its functional significance, except for an indication that it could be related to an undefined thromboplastic substance. Twenty years after its discovery as a structural entity, it was shown by others that it houses von Willebrand factor and is thus clearly related to the coagulation system. In this review, I provide a personal historical account of the discovery and the subsequent limited work that I carried out on the organelle, putting it in the perspective of the current state of knowledge after half a century of research by many scientists.

  15. Guided Discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Presented are four mathematical discoveries made by students on an arithmetical function using the Fibonacci sequence. Discussed is the nature of the role of the teacher in directing the students' discovery activities. (KR)

  16. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity...

  17. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry: a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Gedye

    Full Text Available Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell

  18. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B K; Kieke, M C; Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1998-11-01

    Opposing cells often communicate signalling events using multivalent interactions between receptors present on their cell surface. For example, T cells are typically activated when the T cell receptor (TCR) and its associated costimulatory molecules are multivalently engaged by the appropriate ligands present on an antigen presenting cell. In this report, yeast expressing high cell-surface levels of a TCR ligand (a recombinant antibody to the TCR Vbeta domain) were shown to act as 'pseudo' antigen presenting cells and induce T cell activation as monitored by increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and by downregulation of cell surface TCR. Similar levels of T cell activation could occur even when a 30-fold excess of irrelevant yeast was present, suggesting that such a yeast display system, by virtue of its ability to present ligands multivalently, may be used in highly sensitive procedures to identify novel polypeptides that interact multivalently with cell surface receptors and thereby trigger specific cellular responses.

  19. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Use of iPS cells in regenerative therapy and drug discovery for cartilage diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated by transiently expressing defined factors in somatic cells such as dermal fibroblasts and blood cells and culturing them in specific medium. iPS cells are expected to provide new tools for research and development of therapies for various diseases because of two important properties : 1) they can be differentiated into any type of somatic cell (pluripotency) and 2) they can be expanded infinitely (self renew). Research for the transplantation of iPS cell-derived cartilage/chondrocytes and drug discovery by iPS cell-based disease modeling are ongoing.

  20. Discovery of Novel Small Molecules that Activate Satellite Cell Proliferation and Enhance Repair of Damaged Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billin, Andrew N; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Holt, Jason A; Kramer, Henning F; McDougal, Alan J; Smalley, Terry L; Wells, Carrow I; Zuercher, William J; Henke, Brad R

    2016-02-19

    Skeletal muscle progenitor stem cells (referred to as satellite cells) represent the primary pool of stem cells in adult skeletal muscle responsible for the generation of new skeletal muscle in response to injury. Satellite cells derived from aged muscle display a significant reduction in regenerative capacity to form functional muscle. This decrease in functional recovery has been attributed to a decrease in proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Hence, agents that enhance the proliferative abilities of satellite cells may hold promise as therapies for a variety of pathological settings, including repair of injured muscle and age- or disease-associated muscle wasting. Through phenotypic screening of isolated murine satellite cells, we identified a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines (e.g., 2) that increased satellite cell proliferation. Importantly, compound 2 was effective in accelerating repair of damaged skeletal muscle in an in vivo mouse model of skeletal muscle injury. While these compounds were originally prepared as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) inhibitors, structure-activity analyses indicated JNK-1 inhibition does not correlate with satellite cell activity. Screening against a broad panel of kinases did not result in identification of an obvious molecular target, so we conducted cell-based proteomics experiments in an attempt to identify the molecular target(s) responsible for the potentiation of the satellite cell proliferation. These data provide the foundation for future efforts to design improved small molecules as potential therapeutics for muscle repair and regeneration.

  1. A review of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for high-throughput drug discovery, cardiotoxicity screening, and publication standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordwinkin, Nicholas M; Burridge, Paul W; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Drug attrition rates have increased in past years, resulting in growing costs for the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. The reasons for this include the lack of in vitro models that correlate with clinical results and poor preclinical toxicity screening assays. The in vitro production of human cardiac progenitor cells and cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells provides an amenable source of cells for applications in drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine, and cardiotoxicity screening. In addition, the ability to derive human-induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic tissues, combined with current high-throughput screening and pharmacogenomics, may help realize the use of these cells to fulfill the potential of personalized medicine. In this review, we discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for drug discovery and cardiotoxicity screening, as well as current hurdles that must be overcome for wider clinical applications of this promising approach.

  2. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Toso, Daniel B.; Muhammad Mohsin Javed; Elizabeth Czornyj; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Hong Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. ...

  3. Discovery and characterization of novel microRNAs during endothelial differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung Ki; Kim, Jumi; Choi, Seong-Jun; Noh, Hye Min; Kwon, Young Do; Yoo, Hanna; Yi, Hyo Seon; Chung, Hyung Min; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2012-07-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that participate in the regulation of genes associated with the differentiation and proliferation. In this study, 5 novel miRNAs were identified from human mesenchymal stem cells and characterized using various analyses. To investigate the potential functions associated with the regulation of cell differentiation, the differences in miRNA expression were examined in undifferentiated and differentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis. Specifically, 3 miRNAs exhibited decreased expression levels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and endothelial cells derived from human ES cells. Putative target genes related to differentiation or maturation of endothelial cells were predicted by seed sequences of 2 novel miRNAs and analyzed for their expression via miRNA-mediated regulation using a luciferase assay. In HUVECs, CDH5 gene expression was directly repressed by hsa-miR-6086. Similarly, hsa-miR-6087 significantly downregulated endoglin expression. Therefore, the roles of these 2 miRNAs may be to directly suppress their target genes, popularly known as endothelial cell markers. Taken together, our results demonstrate that several novel miRNAs perform critical roles in human endothelial cell development.

  4. NMR metabolic fingerprints of murine melanocyte and melanoma cell lines: application to biomarker discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Filho, Arquimedes Paixão de; Jacomasso, Thiago; Riter, Daniel Suss; Barison, Andersson; Iacomini, Marcello; Winnischofer, Sheila Maria Brochado; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer and efforts to improve the diagnosis of this neoplasia are largely based on the use of cell lines. Metabolomics is currently undergoing great advancements towards its use to screening for disease biomarkers. Although NMR metabolomics includes both 1D and 2D methodologies, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding heteronuclear 2D NMR assignments of the metabolome from eukaryotic cell lines. The present study applied NMR-based metabolomics strategies to characterize aqueous and lipid extracts from murine melanocytes and melanoma cell lines with distinct tumorigenic potential, successfully obtaining fingerprints of the metabolites from the extracts of the cell lines by means of 2D NMR HSQC correlation maps. Relative amounts of the identified metabolites were compared between the 4 cell lines. Multivariate analysis of 1H NMR data was able not only to differentiate the melanocyte cell line from the tumorigenic ones but also distinguish among the 3 tumorigenic cell lines. We also investigated the effects of mitogenic agents, and found that they can markedly influence the metabolome of the melanocyte cell line, resembling the pattern of most proliferative cell lines. PMID:28198377

  5. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  6. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs) are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies.

  7. Recent Advances in Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetes Mellitus Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kawser Hossain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a widespread metabolic disease with a progressive incidence of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite extensive research, treatment options for diabetic patients remains limited. Although significant challenges remain, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have the capacity to differentiate into any cell type, including insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, highlighting its potential as a treatment option for DM. Several iPSC lines have recently been derived from both diabetic and healthy donors. Using different reprogramming techniques, iPSCs were differentiated into insulin-secreting pancreatic βcells. Furthermore, diabetes patient-derived iPSCs (DiPSCs are increasingly being used as a platform to perform cell-based drug screening in order to develop DiPSC-based cell therapies against DM. Toxicity and teratogenicity assays based on iPSC-derived cells can also provide additional information on safety before advancing drugs to clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of techniques for differentiation of iPSCs or DiPSCs into insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, their applications in drug screening, and their role in complementing and replacing animal testing in clinical use. Advances in iPSC technologies will provide new knowledge needed to develop patient-specific iPSC-based diabetic therapies.

  8. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Daniel B; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P; Zhou, Z Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Toso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB, is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB, is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.

  10. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  11. Cardiac Regenerative Medicine: The Potential of a New Generation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambria, Elena; Steiger, Julia; Günter, Julia; Bopp, Annina; Wolint, Petra; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Emmert, Maximilian Y

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy holds great potential to prompt myocardial regeneration in patients with ischemic heart disease. The selection of the most suitable cell type is pivotal for its successful application. Various cell types, including crude bone marrow mononuclear cells, skeletal myoblast, and hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors, have already advanced into the clinical arena based on promising results from different experimental and preclinical studies. However, most of these so-called first-generation cell types have failed to fully emulate the promising preclinical data in clinical trials, resulting in heterogeneous outcomes and a critical lack of translation. Therefore, different next-generation cell types are currently under investigation for the treatment of the diseased myocardium. This review article provides an overview of current stem cell therapy concepts, including the application of cardiac stem (CSCs) and progenitor cells (CPCs) and lineage commitment via guided cardiopoiesis from multipotent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or pluripotent cells such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, it introduces new strategies combining complementary cell types, such as MSCs and CSCs/CPCs, which can yield synergistic effects to boost cardiac regeneration.

  12. Differential pathway dependency discovery associated with drug response across cancer cell lines. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effort to personalize treatment plans for cancer patients involves the identification of drug treatments that can effectively target the disease while minimizing the likelihood of adverse reactions. In this study, the gene-expression profile of 810 cancer cell lines and their response data to 368 small molecules from the Cancer Therapeutics Research Portal (CTRP) are analyzed to identify pathways with significant rewiring between genes, or differential gene dependency, between sensitive and non-sensitive cell lines.

  13. Discovery of a Small-Molecule BMP Sensitizer for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Feng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sorely missing from the “toolkit” for directed differentiation of stem/progenitor cells are agonists of the BMP-signaling pathway. Using a high-throughput chemical screen, we discovered that PD407824, a checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1 inhibitor, increases the sensitivity of cells to sub-threshold amounts of BMP4. We show utility of the compound in the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells toward mesoderm or cytotrophoblast stem cells. Blocking CHK1 activity using pharmacological compounds or CHK1 knockout using single guide RNA (sgRNA confirmed that CHK1 inhibition increases the sensitivity to BMP4 treatment. Additional mechanistic studies indicate that CHK1 inhibition depletes p21 levels, thereby activating CDK8/9, which then phosphorylates the SMAD2/3 linker region, leading to decreased levels of SMAD2/3 protein and enhanced levels of nuclear SMAD1. This study provides insight into mechanisms controlling the BMP/transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways and a useful pharmacological reagent for directed differentiation of stem cells.

  14. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer.The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach.I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging,stem cells,and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling.The high expression of aging-or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging,stem cells,and cancer.These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation,metabolic process,DNA damage response,apoptosis,p53 signaling pathway,immune/inflammatory response,and other processes,suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging.Moreover,these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation,proliferation,and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells.These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer.Certainly,the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation.This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  15. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer. The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach. I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling. The high expression of aging- or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging, stem cells, and cancer. These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolic process, DNA damage response, apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, immune/inflammatory response, and other processes, suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging. Moreover, these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells. These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer. Certainly, the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation. This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  16. Discovery of Black Dye Crystal Structure Polymorphs: Implications for Dye Conformational Variation in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jacqueline M; Low, Kian Sing; Gong, Yun

    2015-12-23

    We present the discovery of a new crystal structure polymorph (1) and pseudopolymorph (2) of the Black Dye, one of the world's leading dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, DSSCs (10.4% device performance efficiency). This reveals that Black Dye molecules can adopt multiple low-energy conformers. This is significant since it challenges existing models of the Black Dye···TiO2 adsorption process that renders a DSSC working electrode; these have assumed a single molecular conformation that refers to the previously reported Black Dye crystal structure (3). The marked structural differences observed between 1, 2, and 3 make the need for modeling multiple conformations more acute. Additionally, the ordered form of the Black Dye (1) provides a more appropriate depiction of its anionic structure, especially regarding its anchoring group and NCS bonding descriptions. The tendency toward NCS ligand isomerism, evidenced via the disordered form 2, has consequences for electron injection and electron recombination in Black Dye embedded DSSC devices. Dyes 2 and 3 differ primarily by the absence or presence of a solvent of crystallization, respectively; solvent environment effects on the dye are thereby elucidated. This discovery of multiple Black Dye conformers from diffraction, with atomic-level definition, complements recently reported nanoscopic evidence for multiple dye conformations existing at a dye···TiO2 interface, for a chemically similar DSSC dye; those results emanated from imaging and spectroscopy, but were unresolved at the submolecular level. Taken together, these findings lead to the general notion that multiple dye conformations should be explicitly considered when modeling dye···TiO2 interfaces in DSSCs, at least for ruthenium-based dye complexes.

  17. Discovery of molecular markers to discriminate corneal endothelial cells in the human body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Yoshihara

    Full Text Available The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant number of CECs results in corneal edema called bullous keratopathy which can lead to severe visual loss. Corneal transplantation is the most effective method to treat corneal endothelial dysfunction, where it suffers from donor shortage. Therefore, regeneration of CECs from other cell types attracts increasing interests, and specific markers of CECs are crucial to identify actual CECs. However, the currently used markers are far from satisfactory because of their non-specific expression in other cell types. Here, we explored molecular markers to discriminate CECs from other cell types in the human body by integrating the published RNA-seq data of CECs and the FANTOM5 atlas representing diverse range of cell types based on expression patterns. We identified five genes, CLRN1, MRGPRX3, HTR1D, GRIP1 and ZP4 as novel markers of CECs, and the specificities of these genes were successfully confirmed by independent experiments at both the RNA and protein levels. Notably none of them have been documented in the context of CEC function. These markers could be useful for the purification of actual CECs, and also available for the evaluation of the products derived from other cell types. Our results demonstrate an effective approach to identify molecular markers for CECs and open the door for the regeneration of CECs in vitro.

  18. Discovery of molecular markers to discriminate corneal endothelial cells in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Masahito; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Hara, Susumu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs) on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant number of CECs results in corneal edema called bullous keratopathy which can lead to severe visual loss. Corneal transplantation is the most effective method to treat corneal endothelial dysfunction, where it suffers from donor shortage. Therefore, regeneration of CECs from other cell types attracts increasing interests, and specific markers of CECs are crucial to identify actual CECs. However, the currently used markers are far from satisfactory because of their non-specific expression in other cell types. Here, we explored molecular markers to discriminate CECs from other cell types in the human body by integrating the published RNA-seq data of CECs and the FANTOM5 atlas representing diverse range of cell types based on expression patterns. We identified five genes, CLRN1, MRGPRX3, HTR1D, GRIP1 and ZP4 as novel markers of CECs, and the specificities of these genes were successfully confirmed by independent experiments at both the RNA and protein levels. Notably none of them have been documented in the context of CEC function. These markers could be useful for the purification of actual CECs, and also available for the evaluation of the products derived from other cell types. Our results demonstrate an effective approach to identify molecular markers for CECs and open the door for the regeneration of CECs in vitro.

  19. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  20. Discovery of molecular markers to discriminate corneal endothelial cells in the human body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshihara, Masahito; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Hara, Susumu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji; Clevers, J.C.; van de Wetering, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs) on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant nu

  1. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA fro

  2. Discovery of an inhibitor of the production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin in wild-type cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkunas, Bernardas; Gal, Balint; Galloway, Warren R J D; Hodgkinson, James T; Ibbeson, Brett M; Sing Tan, Yaw; Welch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pyocyanin is a small molecule produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infections by this notorious opportunistic pathogen. The inhibition of pyocyanin production has been identified as an attractive antivirulence strategy for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Herein, we report the discovery of an inhibitor of pyocyanin production in cultures of wild-type P. aeruginosa which is based around a 4-alkylquinolin-2(1H)-one scaffold. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported example of pyocyanin inhibition by a compound based around this molecular framework. The compound may therefore be representative of a new structural sub-class of pyocyanin inhibitors, which could potentially be exploited in in a therapeutic context for the development of critically needed new antipseudomonal agents. In this context, the use of wild-type cells in this study is notable, since the data obtained are of direct relevance to native situations. The compound could also be of value in better elucidating the role of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa infections. Evidence suggests that the active compound reduces the level of pyocyanin production by inhibiting the cell–cell signalling mechanism known as quorum sensing. This could have interesting implications; quorum sensing regulates a range of additional elements associated with the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa and there is a wide range of other potential applications where the inhibition of quorum sensing is desirable. PMID:27559393

  3. Mechanisms of Cell Death and Disease: Advances in Therapeutic Intervention and Drug Discovery--ESH's Eighth International Conference. October 14-17, 2010, Cascais, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Domagoj

    2010-12-01

    The Mechanisms of Cell Death and Disease: Advances in Therapeutic Intervention and Drug Discovery--ESH's Eighth International Conference, held in Cascais, Portugal, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of cell death and cancer. This conference report highlights selected presentations on inhibiting the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, activating death receptors (DRs), and targeting ubiquitins and the Bcl-2 family. Investigational drugs discussed include LCL-161 (Novartis) and navitoclax (Abbott Laboratories/Genentech).

  4. Discovery and characterization of a novel CCND1/MRCK gene fusion in mantle cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chioniso Patience Masamha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The t(11;14 translocation resulting in constitutive cyclin D1 expression is an early event in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL transformation. Patients with a highly proliferative phenotype produce cyclin D1 transcripts with truncated 3′UTRs that evade miRNA regulation. Here, we report the recurrence of a novel gene fusion in MCL cell lines and MCL patient isolates that consists of the full protein coding region of cyclin D1 (CCND1 and a 3′UTR consisting of sequences from both the CCND1 3′UTR and myotonic dystrophy kinase-related Cdc42-binding kinase's (MRCK intron one. The resulting CCND1/MRCK mRNA is resistant to CCND1-targeted miRNA regulation, and targeting the MRCK region of the chimeric 3′UTR with siRNA results in decreased CCND1 levels.

  5. The discovery of oligodendroglia cells by Rio-Hortega: his original articles. 1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Rozas, José R; Garrosa, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Comment on: del Río-Hortega P. Glia with very few processes (oligodendroglia). Clin Neuropathol. 2012; 31: 440-459, originally published in Archivos de Neurobiología. 1921; 2: 16-43 and del Río-Hortega P. Are the glia with very few processes homologous with Schwann cells? Clin Neuropathol. 2012; 31: 460-462, originally published in Bol de la Soc Esp de Biol. 1922; X: 25-28.

  6. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-23

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA from differentiating mouse fetal liver red blood cells and identified 655 lncRNA genes including not only intergenic, antisense, and intronic but also pseudogene and enhancer loci. More than 100 of these genes are previously unrecognized and highly erythroid specific. By integrating genome-wide surveys of chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and tissue expression patterns, we identify multiple lncRNAs that are dynamically expressed during erythropoiesis, show epigenetic regulation, and are targeted by key erythroid transcription factors GATA1, TAL1, or KLF1. We focus on 12 such candidates and find that they are nuclear-localized and exhibit complex developmental expression patterns. Depleting them severely impaired erythrocyte maturation, inhibiting cell size reduction and subsequent enucleation. One of them, alncRNA-EC7, is transcribed from an enhancer and is specifically needed for activation of the neighboring gene encoding BAND 3. Our study provides an annotated catalog of erythroid lncRNAs, readily available through an online resource, and shows that diverse types of lncRNAs participate in the regulatory circuitry underlying erythropoiesis.

  7. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a two

  8. Discovery of a new human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-3 in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahieux Renaud

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell Leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and type 2 (HTLV-2 are pathogenic retroviruses that infect humans and cause severe hematological and neurological diseases. Both viruses have simian counterparts (STLV-1 and STLV-2. STLV-3 belongs to a third group of lymphotropic viruses which infect numerous African monkeys species. Among 240 Cameroonian plasma tested for the presence of HTLV-1 and/or HTLV-2 antibodies, 48 scored positive by immunofluorescence. Among those, 27 had indeterminate western-blot pattern. PCR amplification of pol and tax regions, using HTLV-1, -2 and STLV-3 highly conserved primers, demonstrated the presence of a new human retrovirus in one DNA sample. tax (180 bp and pol (318 bp phylogenetic analyses demonstrated the strong relationships between the novel human strain (Pyl43 and STLV-3 isolates from Cameroon. The virus, that we tentatively named HTLV-3, originated from a 62 years old Bakola Pygmy living in a remote settlement in the rain forest of Southern Cameroon. The plasma was reactive on MT2 cells but was negative on C19 cells. The HTLV 2.4 western-blot exhibited a strong reactivity to p19 and a faint one to MTA-1. On the INNO-LIA strip, it reacted faintly with the generic p19 (I/II, but strongly to the generic gp46 (I/II and to the specific HTLV-2 gp46. The molecular relationships between Pyl43 and STLV-3 are thus not paralleled by the serological results, as most of the STLV-3 infected monkeys have an "HTLV-2 like" WB pattern. In the context of the multiple interspecies transmissions which occurred in the past, and led to the present-day distribution of the PTLV-1, it is thus very tempting to speculate that this newly discovered human retrovirus HTLV-3 might be widespread, at least in the African continent.

  9. Discovery of Power-Law Growth in the Self-Renewal of Heterogeneous Glioma Stem Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiya Sugimori

    glioma stem cell populations. That the data always fit a power-law suggests that: (i clone sizes follow continuous, non-random, and scale-free hierarchy; (ii precise biologic rules that reflect self-organizing emergent behaviors govern the generation of neurospheres. That the power-law behavior and the original GS heterogeneity are maintained over multiple passages indicates that these rules are invariant. These self-organizing mechanisms very likely underlie tumor heterogeneity during tumor growth. Discovery of this power-law behavior provides a mechanism that could be targeted in the development of new, more effective, anti-cancer agents.

  10. Discovery of a low order drug-cell response surface for applications in personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xianting; Liu, Wenjia; Weiss, Andrea; Li, Yiyang; Wong, Ieong; Griffioen, Arjan W.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Xu, Hongquan; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The cell is a complex system involving numerous components, which may often interact in a non-linear dynamic manner. Diseases at the cellular level are thus likely to involve multiple cellular constituents and pathways. As some drugs, or drug combinations, may act synergistically on these multiple pathways, they might be more effective than the respective single target agents. Optimizing a drug mixture for a given disease in a particular patient is particularly challenging due to both the difficulty in the selection of the drug mixture components to start out with, and the all-important doses of these drugs to be applied. For n concentrations of m drugs, in principle, nm combinations will have to be tested. As this may lead to a costly and time-consuming investigation for each individual patient, we have developed a Feedback System Control (FSC) technique which can rapidly select the optimal drug-dose combination from the often millions of possible combinations. By testing this FSC technique in a number of experimental systems representing different disease states, we found that the response of cells to multiple drugs is well described by a low order, rather smooth, drug-mixture-input/drug-effect-output multidimensional surface. The main consequences of this are that optimal drug combinations can be found in a surprisingly small number of tests, and that translation from in vitro to in vivo is simplified. This points to the possibility of personalized optimal drug mixtures in the near future. This unexpectedly simple input-output relationship may also lead to a simple solution for handling the issue of human diversity in cancer therapeutics.

  11. Discovery of a small-molecule binder of the oncoprotein gankyrin that modulates gankyrin activity in the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; O'Connor, Cornelius J.; Zhang, Fengzhi; Galvagnion, Celine; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Stokes, Jamie E.; Rahman, Taufiq; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2016-04-01

    Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat oncoprotein whose overexpression has been implicated in the development of many cancer types. Elevated gankyrin levels are linked to aberrant cellular events including enhanced degradation of tumour suppressor protein p53, and inhibition of gankyrin activity has therefore been identified as an attractive anticancer strategy. Gankyrin interacts with several partner proteins, and a number of these protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of relevance to cancer. Thus, molecules that bind the PPI interface of gankyrin and interrupt these interactions are of considerable interest. Herein, we report the discovery of a small molecule termed cjoc42 that is capable of binding to gankyrin. Cell-based experiments demonstrate that cjoc42 can inhibit gankyrin activity in a dose-dependent manner: cjoc42 prevents the decrease in p53 protein levels normally associated with high amounts of gankyrin, and it restores p53-dependent transcription and sensitivity to DNA damage. The results represent the first evidence that gankyrin is a “druggable” target with small molecules.

  12. Discovery of CTCF-sensitive Cis-spliced fusion RNAs between adjacent genes in human prostate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Qin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genes or their encoded products are not expected to mingle with each other unless in some disease situations. In cancer, a frequent mechanism that can produce gene fusions is chromosomal rearrangement. However, recent discoveries of RNA trans-splicing and cis-splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe support for other mechanisms in generating fusion RNAs. In our transcriptome analyses of 28 prostate normal and cancer samples, 30% fusion RNAs on average are the transcripts that contain exons belonging to same-strand neighboring genes. These fusion RNAs may be the products of cis-SAGe, which was previously thought to be rare. To validate this finding and to better understand the phenomenon, we used LNCaP, a prostate cell line as a model, and identified 16 additional cis-SAGe events by silencing transcription factor CTCF and paired-end RNA sequencing. About half of the fusions are expressed at a significant level compared to their parental genes. Silencing one of the in-frame fusions resulted in reduced cell motility. Most out-of-frame fusions are likely to function as non-coding RNAs. The majority of the 16 fusions are also detected in other prostate cell lines, as well as in the 14 clinical prostate normal and cancer pairs. By studying the features associated with these fusions, we developed a set of rules: 1 the parental genes are same-strand-neighboring genes; 2 the distance between the genes is within 30kb; 3 the 5' genes are actively transcribing; and 4 the chimeras tend to have the second-to-last exon in the 5' genes joined to the second exon in the 3' genes. We then randomly selected 20 neighboring genes in the genome, and detected four fusion events using these rules in prostate cancer and non-cancerous cells. These results suggest that splicing between neighboring gene transcripts is a rather frequent phenomenon, and it is not a feature unique to cancer cells.

  13. Beyond Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Sassmannshausen, Sean Patrick

    2015-01-01

    as their central concepts and conceptualization of the entrepreneurial function. On this basis we discuss three central themes that cut across the four alternatives: process, uncertainty, and agency. These themes provide new foci for entrepreneurship research and can help to generate new research questions......In this chapter we explore four alternatives to the dominant discovery view of entrepreneurship; the development view, the construction view, the evolutionary view, and the Neo-Austrian view. We outline the main critique points of the discovery presented in these four alternatives, as well...

  14. Discovery of TUG-770

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Steffen V F; Urban, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1 or GPR40) enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and currently attracts high interest as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We here report the discovery of a highly potent FFA1 agonist with favorable physicochemical a...

  15. Optogenetics enlightens neuroscience drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Optogenetics - the use of light and genetics to manipulate and monitor the activities of defined cell populations - has already had a transformative impact on basic neuroscience research. Now, the conceptual and methodological advances associated with optogenetic approaches are providing fresh momentum to neuroscience drug discovery, particularly in areas that are stalled on the concept of 'fixing the brain chemistry'. Optogenetics is beginning to translate and transit into drug discovery in several key domains, including target discovery, high-throughput screening and novel therapeutic approaches to disease states. Here, we discuss the exciting potential of optogenetic technologies to transform neuroscience drug discovery.

  16. Predicting Causal Relationships from Biological Data: Applying Automated Casual Discovery on Mass Cytometry Data of Human Immune Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Triantafillou, Sofia

    2017-03-31

    Learning the causal relationships that define a molecular system allows us to predict how the system will respond to different interventions. Distinguishing causality from mere association typically requires randomized experiments. Methods for automated causal discovery from limited experiments exist, but have so far rarely been tested in systems biology applications. In this work, we apply state-of-the art causal discovery methods on a large collection of public mass cytometry data sets, measuring intra-cellular signaling proteins of the human immune system and their response to several perturbations. We show how different experimental conditions can be used to facilitate causal discovery, and apply two fundamental methods that produce context-specific causal predictions. Causal predictions were reproducible across independent data sets from two different studies, but often disagree with the KEGG pathway databases. Within this context, we discuss the caveats we need to overcome for automated causal discovery to become a part of the routine data analysis in systems biology.

  17. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  18. Systems biology discoveries using non-human primate pluripotent stem and germ cells: novel gene and genomic imprinting interactions as well as unique expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Easley, Charles A; Hermann, Brian P; Castro, Carlos; Simerly, Calvin; Orwig, Kyle E; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-08-05

    The study of pluripotent stem cells has generated much interest in both biology and medicine. Understanding the fundamentals of biological decisions, including what permits a cell to maintain pluripotency, that is, its ability to self-renew and thereby remain immortal, or to differentiate into multiple types of cells, is of profound importance. For clinical applications, pluripotent cells, including both embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells, have been proposed for cell replacement therapy for a number of human diseases and disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, spinal cord injury and diabetes. One challenge in their usage for such therapies is understanding the mechanisms that allow the maintenance of pluripotency and controlling the specific differentiation into required functional target cells. Because of regulatory restrictions and biological feasibilities, there are many crucial investigations that are just impossible to perform using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from humans (for example, direct comparisons among panels of inbred embryonic stem cells from prime embryos obtained from pedigreed and fertile donors; genomic analysis of parent versus progeny PSCs and their identical differentiated tissues; intraspecific chimera analyses for pluripotency testing; and so on). However, PSCs from nonhuman primates are being investigated to bridge these knowledge gaps between discoveries in mice and vital information necessary for appropriate clinical evaluations. In this review, we consider the mRNAs and novel genes with unique expression and imprinting patterns that were discovered using systems biology approaches with primate pluripotent stem and germ cells.

  19. Chronicles in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shelley L; Moral, Maria Angels; Bozzo, Jordi

    2007-03-01

    Chronicles in Drug Discovery features special interest reports on advances in drug discovery. This month we highlight agents that target and deplete immunosuppressive regulatory T cells, which are produced by tumor cells to hinder innate immunity against, or chemotherapies targeting, tumor-associated antigens. Antiviral treatments for respiratory syncytial virus, a severe and prevalent infection in children, are limited due to their side effect profiles and cost. New strategies currently under clinical development include monoclonal antibodies, siRNAs, vaccines and oral small molecule inhibitors. Recent therapeutic lines for Huntington's disease include gene therapies that target the mutated human huntingtin gene or deliver neuroprotective growth factors and cellular transplantation in apoptotic regions of the brain. Finally, we highlight the antiinflammatory and antinociceptive properties of new compounds targeting the somatostatin receptor subtype sst4, which warrant further study for their potential application as clinical analgesics.

  20. Discovery Mondays

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Many people don't realise quite how much is going on at CERN. Would you like to gain first-hand knowledge of CERN's scientific and technological activities and their many applications? Try out some experiments for yourself, or pick the brains of the people in charge? If so, then the «Lundis Découverte» or Discovery Mondays, will be right up your street. Starting on May 5th, on every first Monday of the month you will be introduced to a different facet of the Laboratory. CERN staff, non-scientists, and members of the general public, everyone is welcome. So tell your friends and neighbours and make sure you don't miss this opportunity to satisfy your curiosity and enjoy yourself at the same time. You won't have to listen to a lecture, as the idea is to have open exchange with the expert in question and for each subject to be illustrated with experiments and demonstrations. There's no need to book, as Microcosm, CERN's interactive museum, will be open non-stop from 7.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On the first Discovery M...

  1. One decade after the discovery of single-cell C4 species in terrestrial plants: what did we learn about the minimal requirements of C4 photosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Richard M; Offermann, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Until about 10 years ago the general accepted textbook knowledge was that terrestrial C4 photosynthesis requires separation of photosynthetic functions into two specialized cell types, the mesophyll and bundle sheath cells forming the distinctive Kranz anatomy typical for C4 plants. This paradigm has been broken with the discovery of Suaeda aralocaspica, a chenopod from central Asia, performing C4 photosynthesis within individual chlorenchyma cells. Since then, three more single-cell C4 (SCC4) species have been discovered in the genus Bienertia. They are interesting not only because of their unusual mode of photosynthesis but also present a puzzle for cell biologists. In these species, two morphological and biochemical specialized types of chloroplasts develop within individual chlorenchyma cells, a situation that has never been observed in plants before. Here we review recent literature concerning the biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of SCC4 photosynthesis. Particularly, we focus on what has been learned in relation to the following questions: How does the specialized morphology required for the operation of SCC4 develop and is there a C3 intermediate type of photosynthesis during development? What is the degree of specialization between the two chloroplast types and how does this compare to the chloroplasts of Kranz C4 species? How do nucleus-encoded proteins that are targeted to chloroplasts accumulate differentially in the two chloroplast types and how efficient is the CO2 concentrating mechanism in SCC4 species compared to the Kranz C4 forms?

  2. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry : a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gedye, Craig A; Hussain, Ali; Paterson, Joshua; Smrke, Alannah; Saini, Harleen; Sirskyj, Danylo; Pereira, Keira; Lobo, Nazleen; Stewart, Jocelyn; Go, Christopher; Ho, Jenny; Medrano, Mauricio; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Yuan, Julie; Lauriault, Stevan; Meyer, Mona; Kondratyev, Maria; van den Beucken, Twan; Jewett, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Guidos, Cynthia J; Danska, Jayne; Wang, Jean; Wouters, Bradly; Neel, Benjamin; Rottapel, Robert; Ailles, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profil

  3. Implications of Parkinson's disease pathophysiology for the development of cell replacement strategies and drug discovery in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Funk, Richard H W

    2012-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder traditionally characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) at the midbrain. The potential use of adult or embryonic stem cells, induced pluriputent stem (iPS) cells and endogenous neurogenesis in cell replacement strategies has lead to numerous studies and clinical trials in this direction. It is now possible to differentiate stem cells into dopaminergic neurons in vitro and clinical trials have shown an improvement in PD-related symptoms after intra-striatal embryonic transplants and acceptable cell survival rates on the mid term. However, clinical improvement is transitory and associated with a strong placebo effect. Interestingly, recent pathological studies in PD patients who received embryonic stem cells show that in PD patients, grafted neurons show PD-related pathology. In this manuscript we review the latest findings regarding PD pathophysiology and give an outlook on the implications of these findings in how cell replacement strategies for PD treatment should be tested. These include changes in the type of animal models used, the preparation/conditioning of the cells before intracerebral injection, specially regarding backbone chronic diseases in iPS cells and determining the optimal proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration capacity of the grafted cells.

  4. Library synthesis, screening, and discovery of modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) probe for enhanced molecular imaging of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaunt, Adam J; Harmatys, Kara M; Wolter, William R; Suckow, Mark A; Smith, Bradley D

    2014-04-16

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging.

  5. Experiment on ``discovery'' STS 51-C: Aggregation of red cells and thrombocytes in heart disease, hyperlipidaemia and other conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintenfass, L.

    The aim of this experiment was to study aggregation of red cells in the blood of patients with ischaemic heart disease, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, and (silent) cancer, and in two normal donors. Reconstituted blood using IgG was also used. The instrument, the automated slit-capillary photo-viscometer (100 kg weight) was set on the middeck of the Space Shuttle. An analogous instrument was at the Kennedy Space Center. Blood was obtained from donors, anticoagulated, and adjusted to haematocrit of 30% using native plasma. Experiments took place at 25°C, during which blood was forced to flow in the slit formed by two parallel glass plates. Macro and microphotography was carried out at specific intervals controlled by a computer. During stasis, lasting 6 minutes, aggregates (or clumps) of the red cells were formed. Results indicated that red cell aggregates do form under zero-G; that such aggregates are smaller than the ones obtained at one-G; that morphology is different, the zero-G showing rouleaux while one-G showing usual sludge-like clumps of red cells in all severe disorders. Platelets appeared to remain monodisperse under zero-G. Assuming that these data can be confirmed, one could suggest that zero-G affects cell-cell interaction, and may consequently influence the internal microstructure of the cell membrane and of the receptors, as well as their activity. Gravitational studies may thus open a new door on immunology and haematology in general.

  6. Simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of Leishmania and of its hosting mammal cells: A high content imaging-based method enabling sound drug discovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, Claire-Lise; Späth, Gerald Frank; Prina, Eric; Dasari, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease for which only limited therapeutic options are available. The disease is ranked among the six most important tropical infectious diseases and represents the second-largest parasitic killer in the world. The development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of technologies and methodologies that can be integrated into the complex physiological environment of a cell or organism and adapted to suitable in vitro and in vivo Leishmania models. Recent advances in microscopy imaging offer the possibility to assess the efficacy of potential drug candidates against Leishmania within host cells. This technology allows the simultaneous visualization of relevant phenotypes in parasite and host cells and the quantification of a variety of cellular events. In this review, we present the powerful cellular imaging methodologies that have been developed for drug screening in a biologically relevant context, addressing both high-content and high-throughput needs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of intra-vital microscopy imaging in the context of the anti-leishmanial drug discovery process.

  7. Pluripotent stem cells to model Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): Current trends and future perspectives for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Nissan, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), is a rare, fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (p.G608G) of the LMNA, leading to the production of a mutated form of lamin A precursor called progerin. In HGPS, progerin accumulates in cells causing progressive molecular defects, including nuclear shape abnormalities, chromatin disorganization, damage to DNA and delays in cell proliferation. Here we report how, over the past five years, pluripotent stem cells have provided new insights into the study of HGPS and opened new original therapeutic perspectives to treat the disease.

  8. Cholangiocarcinomas: New Insights from the Discovery of Stem Cell Niches in Peribiliary Glands of the Biliary Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Cardinale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peribiliary glands (PBGs are located in the large intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Although they were described many years ago, their functions have been elucidated only in the last couple of years when our group demonstrated that PBGs are niches of multipotent stem/progenitor cells of endodermal origin. These cells express genes of multipotency and can be rapidly differentiated in vitro into hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, and endocrine pancreatic cells. PBGs share common features, in terms of stem/progenitor cell niches, with pancreatic duct glands and colon crypts, glandular structures representing in the adult life the endodermal remnants of fetal life. PBG stem/progenitor cells participate in the renewal of surface biliary epithelium and are active players in chronic pathologies of the biliary tree as well as in cholangiocarcinomas (CCA. Specifically, a large amount of recent evidence indicates that the pure mucin-CCA originates from PBGs; this could explain the similarities with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer, which also originate from transformed gland cells. In this paper, we summarized our recent findings concerning structure and functions of PBGs with the implications for liver pathophysiology and, specifically, for cancers of the biliary tree.

  9. Metabolic labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans primary embryonic cells with azido-sugars as a tool for glycoprotein discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Burnham-Marusich

    Full Text Available Glycobiology research with Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans has benefitted from the numerous genetic and cell biology tools available in this system. However, the lack of a cell line and the relative inaccessibility of C. elegans somatic cells in vivo have limited the biochemical approaches available in this model. Here we report that C. elegans primary embryonic cells in culture incorporate azido-sugar analogs of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc, and that the labeled glycoproteins can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. By using this metabolic labeling approach, we have identified a set of novel C. elegans glycoprotein candidates, which include several mitochondrially-annotated proteins. This observation was unexpected given that mitochondrial glycoproteins have only rarely been reported, and it suggests that glycosylation of mitochondrially-annotated proteins might occur more frequently than previously thought. Using independent experimental strategies, we validated a subset of our glycoprotein candidates. These include a mitochondrial, atypical glycoprotein (ATP synthase α-subunit, a predicted glycoprotein (aspartyl protease, ASP-4, and a protein family with established glycosylation in other species (actin. Additionally, we observed a glycosylated isoform of ATP synthase α-subunit in bovine heart tissue and a primate cell line (COS-7. Overall, our finding that C. elegans primary embryonic cells are amenable to metabolic labeling demonstrates that biochemical studies in C. elegans are feasible, which opens the door to labeling C. elegans cells with other radioactive or azido-substrates and should enable the identification of additional post-translationally modified targets and analysis of the genes required for their modification using C. elegans mutant libraries.

  10. From discovery to approval of an advanced therapy medicinal product-containing stem cells, in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Graziella; Lambiase, Alessandro; Macaluso, Claudio; Pocobelli, Augusto; Deng, Sophie; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Esteki, Roza; Rama, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In 1997, the human corneal epithelium was reconstructed in vitro and transplanted on patients. Later, it became a routine treatment, before regulations considered advanced therapy medicinal products and drugs on the same lines. Manufacturing, before and after good manufacturing practice setting, was established in different facilities and the clinical application in several hospitals. Advanced therapy medicinal products, including stem cells, are unique products with different challenges than other drugs: some uncertainties, in addition to benefit, cannot be avoided. This review will focus on all recent developments in the stem cell-based corneal therapy.

  11. Microscopy Opening Up New Cancer Discovery Avenues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today’s high-powered microscopes are allowing researchers to study the fine details of individual cells and to peer into cells, opening up new avenues of discovery about the inner workings of cells, including the events that can cause healthy cells to tra

  12. Bio-Activity and Dereplication-Based Discovery of Ophiobolins and Other Fungal Secondary Metabolites Targeting Leukemia Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Dürr, Claudia; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize fungal natural products (NPs) with in vitro bioactivity towards leukemia cells. We based our screening on a combined analytical and bio-guided approach of LC-DAD-HRMS dereplication, explorative solid-phase extraction (E-SPE), and a co...

  13. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Serena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency.

  14. Nod2-Nodosome in a Cell-Free System: Implications in Pathogenesis and Drug Discovery for Blau Syndrome and Early-Onset Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Iwasaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (Nod 2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, which recognizes muramyl dipeptide (N-Acetylmuramyl-L-Alanyl-D-Isoglutamine: MDP, a bacterial peptidoglycan component, and makes a NF-κB-activating complex called nodosome with adaptor protein RICK (RIP2/RIPK2. Nod2 mutants are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases, Blau syndrome (BS/early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS. For drug discovery of BS/EOS, we tried to develop Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system. FLAG-tagged RICK, biotinylated-Nod2, and BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants were synthesized, and proximity signals between FLAG-tagged and biotinylated proteins were detected by amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA. Upon incubation with MDP, the ALPHA signal of interaction between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ALPHA signal of interaction between RICK and the BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants was more significantly increased than Nod2-WT. Notably, the ALPHA signal between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased upon incubation with MDP, but not when incubated with the same concentrations, L-alanine, D-isoglutamic acid, or the MDP-D-isoform. Thus, we successfully developed Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system reflecting its function in vivo, and it can be useful for screening Nod2-nodosome-targeted therapeutic molecules for BS/EOS and granulomatous inflammatory diseases.

  15. Usability of Discovery Portals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulens, J.D.; Vullings, L.A.E.; Houtkamp, J.M.; Vanmeulebrouk, B.

    2013-01-01

    As INSPIRE progresses to be implemented in the EU, many new discovery portals are built to facilitate finding spatial data. Currently the structure of the discovery portals is determined by the way spatial data experts like to work. However, we argue that the main target group for discovery portals

  16. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse...... background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS data sets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than 2-fold and is superior...... to traditional “no enzyme” searches of reference proteomes. Our targeted database search promises to uncover otherwise missed novel T-cell epitopes of therapeutic potential....

  17. Transcriptomic-Wide Discovery of Direct and Indirect HuR RNA Targets in Activated CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsharaporn Techasintana

    Full Text Available Due to poor correlation between steady state mRNA levels and protein product, purely transcriptomic profiling methods may miss genes posttranscriptionally regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP methods developed to identify in vivo targets of RBPs have greatly elucidated those mRNAs which may be regulated via transcript stability and translation. The RBP HuR (ELAVL1 and family members are major stabilizers of mRNA. Many labs have identified HuR mRNA targets; however, many of these analyses have been performed in cell lines and oftentimes are not independent biological replicates. Little is known about how HuR target mRNAs behave in conditional knock-out models. In the present work, we performed HuR RIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to investigate HuR direct and indirect targets using a novel conditional knock-out model of HuR genetic ablation during CD4+ T activation and Th2 differentiation. Using independent biological replicates, we generated a high coverage RIP-Seq data set (>160 million reads that was analyzed using bioinformatics methods specifically designed to find direct mRNA targets in RIP-Seq data. Simultaneously, another set of independent biological replicates were sequenced by RNA-Seq (>425 million reads to identify indirect HuR targets. These direct and indirect targets were combined to determine canonical pathways in CD4+ T cell activation and differentiation for which HuR plays an important role. We show that HuR may regulate genes in multiple canonical pathways involved in T cell activation especially the CD28 family signaling pathway. These data provide insights into potential HuR-regulated genes during T cell activation and immune mechanisms.

  18. Auto-fluorescent intracellular sink - A novel Inherent biomarker for drug discovery in pancreatic cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda Lorenzo, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Biología Molecular. Fecha de lectura: 20/09/2013. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the fourth leading cause of cancer-­‐ related death world-­‐wide, is a malignant neoplasm of the exocrine pancreas. It has been hypothesized that a subset of tumor cells with stem-­‐like properties, termed ...

  19. Discovery of novel BRD4 inhibitors by high-throughput screening, crystallography, and cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongya; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhifeng; Xie, Yiqian; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Limin; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Cheng

    2017-03-09

    As an epigenetic reader, BRD4 regulates the transcription of important downstream genes that are essential for the survival of tumor cells. Small molecular inhibitors targeting the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-BD1) have showed promising potentials in the therapies of BRD4-related cancers. Through AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screening assay, a novel small molecular inhibitor was identified, and named DCBD-005, which inhibited the binding between BRD4-BD1 and acetylated lysines with an IC50 value of 0.81±0.03μM. The compound DCBD-005 effectively inhibited the viability, caused cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis in human leukemia MV4-11 cells. Moreover, the crystal structure of compound DCBD-005 with the BRD4-BD1 was determined at 1.72Å resolution, which revealed the binding mechanism of the leading compound, and also provided solid basis for further structure-based optimization. These results indicated that this novel BRD4-BD1 inhibitor DCBD-005 is promising to be developed into a drug candidate in the treatment of BRD4-related diseases.

  20. Bio-Activity and Dereplication-Based Discovery of Ophiobolins and Other Fungal Secondary Metabolites Targeting Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Thorskov Bladt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize fungal natural products (NPs with in vitro bioactivity towards leukemia cells. We based our screening on a combined analytical and bio-guided approach of LC-DAD-HRMS dereplication, explorative solid-phase extraction (E-SPE, and a co-culture platform of CLL and stromal cells. A total of 289 fungal extracts were screened and we tracked the activity to single compounds in seven of the most active extracts. The novel ophiobolin U was isolated together with the known ophiobolins C, H, K as well as 6-epiophiobolins G, K and N from three fungal strains in the Aspergillus section Usti. Ophiobolins A, B, C and K displayed bioactivity towards leukemia cells with induction of apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations. The remaining ophiobolins were mainly inactive or only slightly active at micromolar concentrations. Dereplication of those ophiobolin derivatives possessing different activity in combination with structural analysis allowed a correlation of the chemical structure and conformation with the extent of bioactivity, identifying the hydroxy group at C3 and an aldehyde at C21, as well as the A/B-cis ring structure, as indispensible for the strong activity of the ophiobolins. The known compounds penicillic acid, viridicatumtoxin, calbistrin A, brefeldin A, emestrin A, and neosolaniol monoacetate were identified from the extracts and also found generally cytotoxic.

  1. HPVdb: a data mining system for knowledge discovery in human papillomavirus with applications in T cell immunology and vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Riemer, Angelika B; Keskin, Derin B; Chitkushev, Lou; Reinherz, Ellis L; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causes of many cancers, including cervical, anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal. To facilitate diagnosis, prognosis and characterization of these cancers, it is necessary to make full use of the immunological data on HPV available through publications, technical reports and databases. These data vary in granularity, quality and complexity. The extraction of knowledge from the vast amount of immunological data using data mining techniques remains a challenging task. To support integration of data and knowledge in virology and vaccinology, we developed a framework called KB-builder to streamline the development and deployment of web-accessible immunological knowledge systems. The framework consists of seven major functional modules, each facilitating a specific aspect of the knowledgebase construction process. Using KB-builder, we constructed the Human Papillomavirus T cell Antigen Database (HPVdb). It contains 2781 curated antigen entries of antigenic proteins derived from 18 genotypes of high-risk HPV and 18 genotypes of low-risk HPV. The HPVdb also catalogs 191 verified T cell epitopes and 45 verified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Primary amino acid sequences of HPV antigens were collected and annotated from the UniProtKB. T cell epitopes and HLA ligands were collected from data mining of scientific literature and databases. The data were subject to extensive quality control (redundancy elimination, error detection and vocabulary consolidation). A set of computational tools for an in-depth analysis, such as sequence comparison using BLAST search, multiple alignments of antigens, classification of HPV types based on cancer risk, T cell epitope/HLA ligand visualization, T cell epitope/HLA ligand conservation analysis and sequence variability analysis, has been integrated within the HPVdb. Predicted Class I and Class II HLA binding peptides for 15 common HLA alleles are included in this database as

  2. Identification of a novel MTOR activator and discovery of a competing endogenous RNA regulating autophagy in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Di; Han, Lei; Huang, ShuYa; Peng, Nan; Wang, PengChong; Jiang, Zheng; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhang, ShangLi; Zhang, Yun; Kung, HsiangFu; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing

    2014-06-01

    MTOR, a central regulator of autophagy, is involved in cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Modulating the MTOR signaling balance could be of great significance for numerous diseases. No chemical activators of MTOR have been found, and the urgent challenge is to find novel MTOR downstream components. In previous studies, we found a chemical small molecule, 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3BDO), that inhibited autophagy in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neuronal cells. Here, we found that 3BDO activated MTOR by targeting FKBP1A (FK506-binding protein 1A, 12 kDa). We next used 3BDO to detect novel factors downstream of the MTOR signaling pathway. Activation of MTOR by 3BDO increased the phosphorylation of TIA1 (TIA1 cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein/T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1). Finally, we used gene microarray, RNA interference, RNA-ChIP assay, bioinformatics, luciferase reporter assay, and other assays and found that 3BDO greatly decreased the level of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) derived from the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TGFB2, known as FLJ11812. TIA1 was responsible for processing FLJ11812. Further experiments results showed that FLJ11812 could bind with MIR4459 targeting ATG13 (autophagy-related 13), and ATG13 protein level was decreased along with 3BDO-decreased FLJ11812 level. Here, we provide a new activator of MTOR, and our findings highlight the role of the lncRNA in autophagy.

  3. Co-motif discovery identifies an Esrrb-Sox2-DNA ternary complex as a mediator of transcriptional differences between mouse embryonic and epiblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Choo, Siew Hua; Mistri, Tapan Kumar; Rahmani, Mehran; Woon, Chow Thai; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Jauch, Ralf; Robson, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Transcription factors (TF) often bind in heterodimeric complexes with each TF recognizing a specific neighboring cis element in the regulatory region of the genome. Comprehension of this DNA motif grammar is opaque, yet recent developments have allowed the interrogation of genome-wide TF binding sites. We reasoned that within this data novel motif grammars could be identified that controlled distinct biological programs. For this purpose, we developed a novel motif-discovery tool termed fexcom that systematically interrogates ChIP-seq data to discover spatially constrained TF-TF composite motifs occurring over short DNA distances. We applied this to the extensive ChIP-seq data available from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In addition to the well-known and most prevalent sox-oct motif, we also discovered a novel constrained spacer motif for Esrrb and Sox2 with a gap of between 2 and 8 bps that Essrb and Sox2 cobind in a selective fashion. Through the use of knockdown experiments, we argue that the Esrrb-Sox2 complex is an arbiter of gene expression differences between ESCs and epiblast stem cells (EpiSC). A number of genes downregulated upon dual Esrrb/Sox2 knockdown (e.g., Klf4, Klf5, Jam2, Pecam1) are similarly downregulated in the ESC to EpiSC transition and contain the esrrb-sox motif. The prototypical Esrrb-Sox2 target gene, containing an esrrb-sox element conserved throughout eutherian and metatherian mammals, is Nr0b1. Through positive regulation of this transcriptional repressor, we argue the Esrrb-Sox2 complex promotes the ESC state through inhibition of the EpiSC transcriptional program and the same trio may also function to maintain trophoblast stem cells.

  4. Discovery of a Good Responder Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Signatures Activated by Chemoradiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Tanaka

    Full Text Available Definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT is a less invasive therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Five-year survival rate of locally advanced ESCC patients by definitive CRT were 37%. We previously reported that tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL activation signatures were preferentially found in long-term survivors. However, it is unknown whether the CTL activation is actually driven by CRT. We compared gene expression profiles among pre- and post-treatment biopsy specimens of 30 ESCC patients and 121 pre-treatment ESCC biopsy specimens. In the complete response (CR cases, 999 overexpressed genes including at least 234 tumor-specific CTL-activation associated genes such as IFNG, PRF1, and GZMB, were found in post-treatment biopsy specimens. Clustering analysis using expression profiles of these 234 genes allowed us to distinguish the immune-activated cases, designating them as I-type, from other cases. However, despite the better CR rate in the I-type, overall survival was not significantly better in both these 30 cases and another 121 cases. Further comparative study identified a series of epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes overexpressed in the early relapse cases. Importantly, the clinical outcome of CDH2-negative cases in the I-type was significantly better than that of the CDH2-positive cases in the I-type. Furthermore, NK cells, which were activated by neutrophils-producing S100A8/S100A9, and CTLs were suggested to cooperatively enhance the effect of CRT in the CDH2-negative I-type. These results suggested that CTL gene activation may provide a prognostic advantage in ESCCs with epithelial characteristics.

  5. Discovery of BVDU as a promising Drug for autoimmune diseases Therapy by Dendritic-cell-based functional screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Jinfeng; Cai, Yingying; Zheng, Xinyuan; Xie, Sirong; Liao, Yuhan; Zhu, Yu; Qin, Chaoyan; Lai, Weiming; Yang, Cuixia; Xie, Xin; Du, Changsheng

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, and targeting DCs’ cytokines production is an important strategy for autoimmune diseases treatment. By establishing a high-throughput screening system, we analyzed LOPAC drug library to identify drugs that control the secretion of IL-6 by DCs, we selected the most likely candidate drug, BVDU, and found that it affected not only IL-6 production, but also that of IL-12, IL-1β during the DCs differentiation and maturation. The mechanism studies showed that BVDU treatment restricted the phosphorylation of MAP kinase, which played an important role in DC cytokine production. We further assessed the in vivo therapeutic potentials of BVDU on mouse models including EAE and STZ-induced T1D, and found that BVDU treated EAE mice exhibited significantly lower EAE clinical scores, decreased leukocyte infiltration in central nervous system lesions, and reduced demyelination. As in T1D mice, BVDU treatment also showed promising therapeutic effects based on both alleviated disease symptoms and tissue pathogenesis. More interestingly, the modulating effect of BVDU on IL-6 production was further verified in human primary DCs. The above data supported the promising application of our screen model, and also the potential of BVDU for autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:28272439

  6. Discovery of BVDU as a promising Drug for autoimmune diseases Therapy by Dendritic-cell-based functional screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Zhou, Jinfeng; Cai, Yingying; Zheng, Xinyuan; Xie, Sirong; Liao, Yuhan; Zhu, Yu; Qin, Chaoyan; Lai, Weiming; Yang, Cuixia; Xie, Xin; Du, Changsheng

    2017-03-08

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, and targeting DCs' cytokines production is an important strategy for autoimmune diseases treatment. By establishing a high-throughput screening system, we analyzed LOPAC drug library to identify drugs that control the secretion of IL-6 by DCs, we selected the most likely candidate drug, BVDU, and found that it affected not only IL-6 production, but also that of IL-12, IL-1β during the DCs differentiation and maturation. The mechanism studies showed that BVDU treatment restricted the phosphorylation of MAP kinase, which played an important role in DC cytokine production. We further assessed the in vivo therapeutic potentials of BVDU on mouse models including EAE and STZ-induced T1D, and found that BVDU treated EAE mice exhibited significantly lower EAE clinical scores, decreased leukocyte infiltration in central nervous system lesions, and reduced demyelination. As in T1D mice, BVDU treatment also showed promising therapeutic effects based on both alleviated disease symptoms and tissue pathogenesis. More interestingly, the modulating effect of BVDU on IL-6 production was further verified in human primary DCs. The above data supported the promising application of our screen model, and also the potential of BVDU for autoimmune diseases therapy.

  7. Computational drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-sheng OU-YANG; Jun-yan LU; Xiang-qian KONG; Zhong-jie LIANG; Cheng LUO; Hualiang JIANG

    2012-01-01

    Computational drug discovery is an effective strategy for accelerating and economizing drug discovery and development process.Because of the dramatic increase in the availability of biological macromolecule and small molecule information,the applicability of computational drug discovery has been extended and broadly applied to nearly every stage in the drug discovery and development workflow,including target identification and validation,lead discovery and optimization and preclinical tests.Over the past decades,computational drug discovery methods such as molecular docking,pharmacophore modeling and mapping,de novo design,molecular similarity calculation and sequence-based virtual screening have been greatly improved.In this review,we present an overview of these important computational methods,platforms and successful applications in this field.

  8. Moments of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Devoted teachers and mentors during early childhood and adolescence nurtured my ambition to become a scientist, but it was not until I actually began doing experiments in college and graduate school that I was confident about that choice and of making it a reality. During my postdoctoral experiences and thereafter, I made several significant advances, most notably the discovery of the then novel acyl- and aminoacyl adenylates: the former as intermediates in fatty acyl coenzyme A (CoA) formation and the latter as precursors to aminoacyl tRNAs. In the early 1970s, my research changed from a focus on transcription and translation in Escherichia coli to the molecular genetics of mammalian cells. To that end, my laboratory developed a method for creating recombinant DNAs that led us and others, over the next two decades, to create increasingly sophisticated ways for introducing "foreign" DNAs into cultured mammalian cells and to target modifications of specific chromosomal loci. Circumstances surrounding that work drew me into the public policy debates regarding recombinant DNA practices. As an outgrowth of my commitment to teaching, I co-authored several textbooks on molecular genetics and a biography of George Beadle. The colleagues, students, and wealth of associates with whom I interacted have made being a scientist far richer than I can have imagined.

  9. Cardiopoietic cell therapy for advanced ischaemic heart failure: results at 39 weeks of the prospective, randomized, double blind, sham-controlled CHART-1 clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Beth A.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Radovanovic, Slavica; Beleslin, Branko; Merkely, Bela; Musialek, Piotr; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Andreka, Peter; Horvath, Ivan G.; Katz, Amos; Dolatabadi, Dariouch; El Nakadi, Badih; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Edes, Istvan; Seferovic, Petar M.; Obradovic, Slobodan; Vanderheyden, Marc; Jagic, Nikola; Petrov, Ivo; Atar, Shaul; Halabi, Majdi; Gelev, Valeri L.; Shochat, Michael K.; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D.; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Heyndrickx, Guy R.; Nyolczas, Noémi; Legrand, Victor; Guédès, Antoine; Heyse, Alex; Moccetti, Tiziano; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Hernandez-Garcia, Jose Maria; Ribichini, Flavio; Gruchala, Marcin; Waldman, Scott A.; Teerlink, John R.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Henry, Timothy D.; Metra, Marco; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tendera, Michal; Behfar, Atta; Alexandre, Bertrand; Seron, Aymeric; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Sherman, Warren; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William

    2017-01-01

    Aims Cardiopoietic cells, produced through cardiogenic conditioning of patients’ mesenchymal stem cells, have shown preliminary efficacy. The Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial aimed to validate cardiopoiesis-based biotherapy in a larger heart failure cohort. Methods and results This multinational, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study was conducted in 39 hospitals. Patients with symptomatic ischaemic heart failure on guideline-directed therapy (n = 484) were screened; n = 348 underwent bone marrow harvest and mesenchymal stem cell expansion. Those achieving > 24 million mesenchymal stem cells (n = 315) were randomized to cardiopoietic cells delivered endomyocardially with a retention-enhanced catheter (n = 157) or sham procedure (n = 158). Procedures were performed as randomized in 271 patients (n = 120 cardiopoietic cells, n = 151 sham). The primary efficacy endpoint was a Finkelstein–Schoenfeld hierarchical composite (all-cause mortality, worsening heart failure, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6-min walk distance, left ventricular end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction) at 39 weeks. The primary outcome was neutral (Mann–Whitney estimator 0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.61 [value > 0.5 favours cell treatment], P = 0.27). Exploratory analyses suggested a benefit of cell treatment on the primary composite in patients with baseline left ventricular end-diastolic volume 200–370 mL (60% of patients) (Mann–Whitney estimator 0.61, 95% CI 0.52–0.70, P = 0.015). No difference was observed in serious adverse events. One (0.9%) cardiopoietic cell patient and 9 (5.4%) sham patients experienced aborted or sudden cardiac death. Conclusion The primary endpoint was neutral, with safety demonstrated across the cohort. Further evaluation of cardiopoietic cell therapy in patients with elevated end-diastolic volume is warranted. PMID:28025189

  10. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic and organi......Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...... their performance....

  11. Reliable knowledge discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Honghua; Smirnov, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Knowledge Discovery focuses on theory, methods, and techniques for RKDD, a new sub-field of KDD. It studies the theory and methods to assure the reliability and trustworthiness of discovered knowledge and to maintain the stability and consistency of knowledge discovery processes. RKDD has a broad spectrum of applications, especially in critical domains like medicine, finance, and military. Reliable Knowledge Discovery also presents methods and techniques for designing robust knowledge-discovery processes. Approaches to assessing the reliability of the discovered knowledge are introduc

  12. Discovery of a 29-gene panel in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas using high throughput real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarloni, Laura; Hosseinian, Sahar; Monnier-Benoit, Sylvain; Imaizumi, Natsuko; Dorta, Gian; Ruegg, Curzio

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Early detection of CRC leads to decreased CRC mortality. A blood-based CRC screening test is highly desirable due to limited invasiveness and high acceptance rate among patients compared to currently used fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy. Here we describe the discovery and validation of a 29-gene panel in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for the detection of CRC and adenomatous polyps (AP). Blood samples were prospectively collected from a multicenter, case-control clinical study. First, we profiled 93 samples with 667 candidate and 3 reference genes by high throughput real-time PCR (OpenArray system). After analysis, 160 genes were retained and tested again on 51 additional samples. Low expressed and unstable genes were discarded resulting in a final dataset of 144 samples profiled with 140 genes. To define which genes, alone or in combinations had the highest potential to discriminate AP and/or CRC from controls, data were analyzed by a combination of univariate and multivariate methods. A list of 29 potentially discriminant genes was compiled and evaluated for its predictive accuracy by penalized logistic regression and bootstrap. This method discriminated AP >1cm and CRC from controls with a sensitivity of 59% and 75%, respectively, with 91% specificity. The behavior of the 29-gene panel was validated with a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR platform, commonly adopted by clinical laboratories. In this work we identified a 29-gene panel expressed in PBMC that can be used for developing a novel minimally-invasive test for accurate detection of AP and CRC using a standard real-time PCR platform.

  13. Higgs Discovery Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS & CMS Experiments Celebrate the 2nd Anniversary of the Discovery of the Higgs boson. Here, are some images of the path from LHC startup to Nobel Prize, featuring a musical composition by Roger Zare, performed by the Donald Sinta Quartet, called “LHC”. Happy Discovery Day!

  14. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  15. Friends' Discovery Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  16. Service discovery at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, Vasughi; Scholten, Hans; Jansen, Pierre; Hartel, Pieter

    2003-01-01

    Service discovery is a fairly new field that kicked off since the advent of ubiquitous computing and has been found essential in the making of intelligent networks by implementing automated discovery and remote control between devices. This paper provides an overview and comparison of several promin

  17. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  18. Discovery of a benzofuran derivative (MBPTA) as a novel ROCK inhibitor that protects against MPP⁺-induced oxidative stress and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Shen, Mingyun; Zhou, Zhong-Yan; Pan, Peichen; Hoi, Pui-Man; Li, Shang; Liang, Wang; Ai, Nana; Zhang, Lun-Qing; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yu, Huidong; Hou, Tingjun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2014-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with multifactorial etiopathogenesis. The discovery of drug candidates that act on new targets of PD is required to address the varied pathological aspects and modify the disease process. In this study, a small compound, 2-(5-methyl-1-benzofuran-3-yl)-N-(5-propylsulfanyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl) acetamide (MBPTA) was identified as a novel Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor with significant protective effects against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced damage in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Further investigation showed that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with MBPTA significantly suppressed MPP(+)-induced cell death by restoring abnormal changes in nuclear morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential, and numerous apoptotic regulators. MBPTA was able to inhibit MPP(+)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)/NO generation, overexpression of inducible NO synthase, and activation of NF-κB, indicating the critical role of MBPTA in regulating ROS/NO-mediated cell death. Furthermore, MBPTA was shown to activate PI3K/Akt survival signaling, and its cytoprotective effect was abolished by PI3K and Akt inhibitors. The structural comparison of a series of MBPTA analogs revealed that the benzofuran moiety probably plays a crucial role in the anti-oxidative stress action. Taken together, these results suggest that MBPTA protects against MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in a neuronal cell line through inhibition of ROS/NO generation and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling.

  19. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  20. Serendipity in Cancer Drug Discovery: Rational or Coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-06-01

    Novel drug development leading to final approval by the US FDA can cost as much as two billion dollars. Why the cost of novel drug discovery is so expensive is unclear, but high failure rates at the preclinical and clinical stages are major reasons. Although therapies targeting a given cell signaling pathway or a protein have become prominent in drug discovery, such treatments have done little in preventing or treating any disease alone because most chronic diseases have been found to be multigenic. A review of the discovery of numerous drugs currently being used for various diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and autoimmune diseases indicates that serendipity has played a major role in the discovery. In this review we provide evidence that rational drug discovery and targeted therapies have minimal roles in drug discovery, and that serendipity and coincidence have played and continue to play major roles. The primary focus in this review is on cancer-related drug discovery.

  1. The art of discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie J. Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available "The Art of Discovery" discusses an ambitious educational program taught by the artist which incorporated locative media, contemporary art, site specificity, and creative work as a proposal for the integration of art, technology and science.

  2. The Learning Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, Joan

    1975-01-01

    The learning discovery of youngsters is a do-it-yourself teaching method for clerical, administrative, and accountant trainees at the Bankside House headquarters of the Central Electricity Generating Board's South Eastern Region, London. (Author)

  3. Leadership and Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Goethals, George R

    2009-01-01

    This book, a collection of essays from scholars across disciplines, explores leadership of discovery, probing the guided and collaborative exploration and interpretation of the experience of our inner thoughts and feelings, and of our external worlds

  4. Fateful discovery almost forgotten

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    "The discovery of the fission of uranium exactly half a century ago is at risk of passing unremarked because of the general ambivalence towards the consequences of this development. Can that be wise?" (4 pages)

  5. Discovery Driven Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august......Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august...

  6. Chemoinformatics and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Hagler

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews current achievements in the field of chemoinformatics and their impact on modern drug discovery processes. The main data mining approaches used in cheminformatics, such as descriptor computations, structural similarity matrices, and classification algorithms, are outlined. The applications of cheminformatics in drug discovery, such as compound selection, virtual library generation, virtual high throughput screening, HTS data mining, and in silico ADMET are discussed. At the conclusion, future directions of chemoinformatics are suggested.

  7. Ayurvedic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Premalatha; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2007-12-01

    Ayurveda is a major traditional system of Indian medicine that is still being successfully used in many countries. Recapitulation and adaptation of the older science to modern drug discovery processes can bring renewed interest to the pharmaceutical world and offer unique therapeutic solutions for a wide range of human disorders. Eventhough time-tested evidences vouch immense therapeutic benefits for ayurvedic herbs and formulations, several important issues are required to be resolved for successful implementation of ayurvedic principles to present drug discovery methodologies. Additionally, clinical examination in the extent of efficacy, safety and drug interactions of newly developed ayurvedic drugs and formulations are required to be carefully evaluated. Ayurvedic experts suggest a reverse-pharmacology approach focusing on the potential targets for which ayurvedic herbs and herbal products could bring tremendous leads to ayurvedic drug discovery. Although several novel leads and drug molecules have already been discovered from ayurvedic medicinal herbs, further scientific explorations in this arena along with customization of present technologies to ayurvedic drug manufacturing principles would greatly facilitate a standardized ayurvedic drug discovery.

  8. The Scholarship of Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to a special issue on how the reconsideration of what scholarship is affects the way in which scholarship is assessed. Examines traditional criteria for evaluating faculty research. Identifies activities pertinent to the scholarship of discovery, and the assessment practices in the field of communication as well as in general use. (SR)

  9. Discovery Education: A Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Harold C.

    2002-01-01

    Discovery Education is based on the writings of Henry David Thoreau, an early champion of experiential learning. After 2 months of preparation, 10th-grade students spent 4 days in the wilderness reenacting a piece of history, such as the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The interdisciplinary approach always included journal-writing. Students gained…

  10. Archaeological Discoveries in Liaoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    LIAONING Province, in northeastern China, has been inhabited by many ethnic groups since ancient times. It is one of the sites of China’s earliest civilization. Since the 1950s many archaeological discoveries from periods beginning with the Paleolithic of 200,000 years ago, and through all the following historic periods, have been made in the province.

  11. Discovery through Gossip

    CERN Document Server

    Haeupler, Bernhard; Peleg, David; Rajaraman, Rajmohan; Sun, Zhifeng

    2012-01-01

    We study randomized gossip-based processes in dynamic networks that are motivated by discovery processes in large-scale distributed networks like peer-to-peer or social networks. A well-studied problem in peer-to-peer networks is the resource discovery problem. There, the goal for nodes (hosts with IP addresses) is to discover the IP addresses of all other hosts. In social networks, nodes (people) discover new nodes through exchanging contacts with their neighbors (friends). In both cases the discovery of new nodes changes the underlying network - new edges are added to the network - and the process continues in the changed network. Rigorously analyzing such dynamic (stochastic) processes with a continuously self-changing topology remains a challenging problem with obvious applications. This paper studies and analyzes two natural gossip-based discovery processes. In the push process, each node repeatedly chooses two random neighbors and puts them in contact (i.e., "pushes" their mutual information to each oth...

  12. Creating A Guided- discovery Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田枫

    2005-01-01

    In a guided - discovery lesson, students sequentially uncover layers of mathematical information one step at a time and learn new mathematics. We have identified eight critical steps necessary in developing a successful guided- discovery lesson.

  13. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  14. Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2011-01-01

    Four hundred years ago in Middelburg, in the Netherlands, the telescope was invented. The invention unleashed a revolution in the exploration of the universe. Galileo Galilei discovered mountains on the Moon, spots on the Sun, and moons around Jupiter. Christiaan Huygens saw details on Mars and rings around Saturn. William Herschel discovered a new planet and mapped binary stars and nebulae. Other astronomers determined the distances to stars, unraveled the structure of the Milky Way, and discovered the expansion of the universe. And, as telescopes became bigger and more powerful, astronomers delved deeper into the mysteries of the cosmos. In his Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries, astronomy journalist Govert Schilling tells the story of 400 years of telescopic astronomy. He looks at the 100 most important discoveries since the invention of the telescope. In his direct and accessible style, the author takes his readers on an exciting journey encompassing the highlights of four centuries of astronomy. Spectacul...

  15. Discovery as a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  16. The discovery of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, M

    1992-05-29

    Quarks are widely recognized today as being among the elementary particles of which matter is composed. The key evidence for their existence came from a series of inelastic electron-nucleon scattering experiments conducted between 1967 and 1973 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Other theoretical and experimental advances of the 1970s confirmed this discovery, leading to the present standard model of elementary particle physics.

  17. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  18. Marking 100 years since Rudolf Höber’s discovery of the insulating envelope surrounding cells and of the beta-dispersion exhibited by tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pethig

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Between 1910 and 1913 Rudolf Höber presented proof that the interiors of red blood cells and muscle cells contain conducting electrolytes, and that each conducting core is contained within an insulating membrane.  He did this by demonstrating, in a series of remarkable electrical experiments, that the conductivity of compacted cell samples at low frequencies (~150 Hz was about ten-times less than the value obtained at ~5 MHz.  On perforation of the membrane, the low-frequency conductivity increased to a value approaching that exhibited at MHz frequencies. Apart from representing a major milestone in the development of cell biology and electrophysiology, Höber’s work was the first description of what we now call the dielectric b-dispersion exhibited by cell suspensions and fresh tissue.

  19. The Potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK) Kinase Inhibitor XL413 Has Limited Activity in Many Cancer Cell Lines and Discovery of Potential New DDK Inhibitor Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda Kumar Sasi; Kanchan Tiwari; Fen-Fen Soon; Dorine Bonte; Tong Wang; Karsten Melcher; H. Eric Xu; Michael Weinreich

    2014-01-01

    Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase) is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective fo...

  20. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  1. Causality discovery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Ertl, T.; Jirotka, M.; Trefethen, A.; Schmidt, A.; Coecke, B.; Bañares-Alcántara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Causality is the fabric of our dynamic world. We all make frequent attempts to reason causation relationships of everyday events (e.g., what was the cause of my headache, or what has upset Alice?). We attempt to manage causality all the time through planning and scheduling. The greatest scientific discoveries are usually about causality (e.g., Newton found the cause for an apple to fall, and Darwin discovered natural selection). Meanwhile, we continue to seek a comprehensive understanding about the causes of numerous complex phenomena, such as social divisions, economic crisis, global warming, home-grown terrorism, etc. Humans analyse and reason causality based on observation, experimentation and acquired a priori knowledge. Today's technologies enable us to make observations and carry out experiments in an unprecedented scale that has created data mountains everywhere. Whereas there are exciting opportunities to discover new causation relationships, there are also unparalleled challenges to benefit from such data mountains. In this article, we present a case for developing a new piece of ICT, called Causality Discovery Technology. We reason about the necessity, feasibility and potential impact of such a technology.

  2. The potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK kinase inhibitor XL413 has limited activity in many cancer cell lines and discovery of potential new DDK inhibitor scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Kumar Sasi

    Full Text Available Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA. We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Fast-track applications: The potential for direct delivery of proteins and nucleic acids to plant cells for the discovery of gene function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Michael R

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In animal systems, several methods exist for the direct delivery of nucleic acids and proteins into cells for functional analysis. Until recently, these methods have not been applied to plant systems. Now, however, several preliminary reports suggest that both nucleic acids and proteins can also be delivered into plant cells by very simple, direct application. This promises to open the way for high-throughput screening for gene function in a range of plant species.

  4. The potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK) kinase inhibitor XL413 has limited activity in many cancer cell lines and discovery of potential new DDK inhibitor scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasi, Nanda Kumar; Tiwari, Kanchan; Soon, Fen-Fen; Bonte, Dorine; Wang, Tong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric; Weinreich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase) is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA). We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Discovery of the cell-penetrating function of A2 domain derived from LTA subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Guo, Hua; Zheng, Wenyun; Zhang, Na; Wang, Tianwen; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is a protein toxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). As a bacterial toxin, LT holotoxin can enter intestinal epithelial cells and cause diarrhea. In addition, LT is also a powerful mucosal adjuvant capable of enhancing the strong immune responses to co-administered antigens. However, the LT immunological mechanism is still not clear in some aspects, especially with the respect to how the LTA subunit functions alone. Here, we discovered that the A2 domain of LTA could carry a fluorescent protein into cells, whose function is similar to a cell-penetrating peptide. The transmembrane-transporting ability of the A2 domain is non-specific in its cell-penetrating function, which was shown through testing with different cell types. Moreover, the LTA2 fusion protein penetrated a fluorescently labeled cell membrane that identified LTA2 internalization through membrane transport pathways, and showed it finally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, low-temperature stress and pharmacological agent treatments showed that the LTA2 internalization route is a temperature-dependent process involving the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the macropinocytosis pathways. These results could explain the internalization of the LTA subunit alone without the LTB pentamer, contributing to a better understanding of LTA working as a mucosal adjuvant; they also suggest that the A2 domain could be used as a novel transport vehicle for research and treatment of disease.

  6. Natural product discovery: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Leonard; Baltz, Richard H

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms have provided abundant sources of natural products which have been developed as commercial products for human medicine, animal health, and plant crop protection. In the early years of natural product discovery from microorganisms (The Golden Age), new antibiotics were found with relative ease from low-throughput fermentation and whole cell screening methods. Later, molecular genetic and medicinal chemistry approaches were applied to modify and improve the activities of important chemical scaffolds, and more sophisticated screening methods were directed at target disease states. In the 1990s, the pharmaceutical industry moved to high-throughput screening of synthetic chemical libraries against many potential therapeutic targets, including new targets identified from the human genome sequencing project, largely to the exclusion of natural products, and discovery rates dropped dramatically. Nonetheless, natural products continued to provide key scaffolds for drug development. In the current millennium, it was discovered from genome sequencing that microbes with large genomes have the capacity to produce about ten times as many secondary metabolites as was previously recognized. Indeed, the most gifted actinomycetes have the capacity to produce around 30-50 secondary metabolites. With the precipitous drop in cost for genome sequencing, it is now feasible to sequence thousands of actinomycete genomes to identify the "biosynthetic dark matter" as sources for the discovery of new and novel secondary metabolites. Advances in bioinformatics, mass spectrometry, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and gene expression are driving the new field of microbial genome mining for applications in natural product discovery and development.

  7. Representation Discovery using Harmonic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Representations are at the heart of artificial intelligence (AI). This book is devoted to the problem of representation discovery: how can an intelligent system construct representations from its experience? Representation discovery re-parameterizes the state space - prior to the application of information retrieval, machine learning, or optimization techniques - facilitating later inference processes by constructing new task-specific bases adapted to the state space geometry. This book presents a general approach to representation discovery using the framework of harmonic analysis, in particu

  8. Denton Vacuum Discovery-550 Sputterer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: CORAL Name: Sputter 2 Similar to the existing 4-Gun Denton Discovery 22 Sputter system, with the following enhancements: Specifications / Capabilities:...

  9. Interpretation of a discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Vladan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of the theory of asynchronous motors since Tesla’s discovery until the present day. The theory of steady state, as we know it today, was completed already during the first dozen of years. That was followed by a period of stagnation during a number of decades, when the theory of asynchronous motors was developed only in the framework of the general theory of electric machines, which was stimulated by the problems of the development of synchronous generators and big electric networks. It is only in our time that this simple motor, which was used for a long time just to perform crude tasks, became again the inspiration for the researchers and engineers who enabled it, with the help of power electronics and semi-conductor technology, to be used in the finest drives.

  10. Discovery and Understanding of the Ambient-Condition Degradation of Doped Barium Cerate Proton-Conducting Perovskite Oxide in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, N.; Zeng, Y.; Shalchi, B; Wang, W.; Gao, T; Rothenberg, G.; Luo, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-conducting perovskite oxides such as doped barium cerate and barium zirconate are promising electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Here we report that the typical high performance proton conductor, BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3±δ (BZCY), is prone to physical, chemical and thereby electrochemic

  11. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  12. Discovery Learning Strategies in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, G.

    2012-01-01

    The study substantiates that the effectiveness of Discovery Learning method in learning English Grammar for the learners at standard V. Discovery Learning is particularly beneficial for any student learning a second language. It promotes peer interaction and development of the language and the learning of concepts with content. Reichert and…

  13. 29 CFR 2700.56 - Discovery; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...(c) or 111 of the Act has been filed. 30 U.S.C. 815(c) and 821. (e) Completion of discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery; general. 2700.56 Section 2700.56 Labor... Hearings § 2700.56 Discovery; general. (a) Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or...

  14. Discovery of Sanggenon G as a natural cell-permeable small-molecular weight inhibitor of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Maximilian A; Salcher, Stefan; Rupp, Martina; Hagenbuchner, Judith; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Rollinger, Judith M; Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptosis are one main cause of cancer development and may result from overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). XIAP is frequently overexpressed in human leukemia and prostate and breast tumors. Inhibition of apoptosis by XIAP is mainly coordinated through direct binding to the initiator caspase-9 via its baculovirus-IAP-repeat-3 (BIR3) domain. XIAP inhibits caspases directly making it to an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In the search for novel, non-peptidic XIAP inhibitors in this study we focused on the chemical constituents of sāng bái pí (mulberry root bark). Most promising candidates of this plant were tested biochemically in vitro by a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay and in vivo via protein fragment complementation analysis (PCA). We identified the Diels Alder adduct Sanggenon G (SG1) as a novel, small-molecular weight inhibitor of XIAP. As shown by FP and PCA analyses, SG1 binds specifically to the BIR3 domain of XIAP with a binding affinity of 34.26 μM. Treatment of the transgenic leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP with SG1 enhances caspase-8, -3 and -9 cleavage, displaces caspase-9 from XIAP as determined by immunoprecipitation experiments and sensitizes these cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. SG1 not only sensitizes the XIAP-overexpressing leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP to etoposide treatment but also different neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing high XIAP levels. Taken together, Sanggenon G (SG1) is a novel, natural, non-peptidic, small-molecular inhibitor of XIAP that can serve as a starting point to develop a new class of improved XIAP inhibitors.

  15. Discovery, SAR, and Radiolabeling of Halogenated Benzimidazole Carboxamide Antagonists as Useful Tools for (alpha)4(beta)1 Integrin Expressed on T- and B-cell Lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R D; Natarajan, A; Lau, E Y; Andrei, M; Solano, D M; Lightstone, F C; DeNardo, S J; Lam, K S; Kurth, M J

    2010-02-08

    The cell surface receptor {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} integrin is an attractive yet poorly understood target for selective diagnosis and treatment of T- and B-cell lymphomas. This report focuses on the rapid microwave preparation of medicinally pertinent benzimidazole heterocycles, structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel halobenzimidazole carboxamide antagonists 3-6, and preliminary biological evaluation of radioiodinated agents 7, 8, and 18. The I-125 derivative 18 had good tumor uptake (12 {+-} 1% ID/g at 24 h; 4.5 {+-} 1% ID/g at 48 h) and tumor:kidney ratio ({approx}4:1 at 24 h; 2.5:1 at 48 h) in xenograft murine models of B-cell lymphoma. Molecular homology models of {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} integrin have predicted that docked halobenzimidazole carboxamides have the halogen atom in a suitable orientation for halogen-hydrogen bonding. These high affinity ({approx} pM binding) halogenated ligands are attractive tools for medicinal and biological use; the fluoro and iodo derivatives are potential radiodiagnostic ({sup 18}F) or radiotherapeutic ({sup 131}I) agents, whereas the chloro and bromo analogues could provide structural insight into integrin-ligand interactions through photoaffinity cross-linking/mass spectroscopy experiments, as well as co-crystallization X-ray studies.

  16. ADME Properties Evaluation in Drug Discovery: Prediction of Caco-2 Cell Permeability Using a Combination of NSGA-II and Boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning-Ning; Dong, Jie; Deng, Yin-Hua; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Lu, Ai-Ping; Wang, Jian-Bing; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-04-25

    The Caco-2 cell monolayer model is a popular surrogate in predicting the in vitro human intestinal permeability of a drug due to its morphological and functional similarity with human enterocytes. A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) study was carried out to predict Caco-2 cell permeability of a large data set consisting of 1272 compounds. Four different methods including multivariate linear regression (MLR), partial least-squares (PLS), support vector machine (SVM) regression and Boosting were employed to build prediction models with 30 molecular descriptors selected by nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II). The best Boosting model was obtained finally with R(2) = 0.97, RMSEF = 0.12, Q(2) = 0.83, RMSECV = 0.31 for the training set and RT(2) = 0.81, RMSET = 0.31 for the test set. A series of validation methods were used to assess the robustness and predictive ability of our model according to the OECD principles and then define its applicability domain. Compared with the reported QSAR/QSPR models about Caco-2 cell permeability, our model exhibits certain advantage in database size and prediction accuracy to some extent. Finally, we found that the polar volume, the hydrogen bond donor, the surface area and some other descriptors can influence the Caco-2 permeability to some extent. These results suggest that the proposed model is a good tool for predicting the permeability of drug candidates and to perform virtual screening in the early stage of drug development.

  17. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-02-14

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs). Following our first report of cardiac reprogramming, many researchers, including ourselves, demonstrated an improvement in cardiac reprogramming efficiency, in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming for heart regeneration, and cardiac reprogramming in human cells. However, cardiac reprogramming in human cells and adult fibroblasts remains inefficient, and further efforts are needed. We believe that future research elucidating epigenetic barriers and molecular mechanisms of direct cardiac reprogramming will improve the reprogramming efficiency, and that this new technology has great potential for clinical applications.

  18. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell-cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity.

  19. Method for dense packing discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  20. Discovery Mondays: Surveyors' Tools

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Surveyors of all ages, have your rulers and compasses at the ready! This sixth edition of Discovery Monday is your chance to learn about the surveyor's tools - the state of the art in measuring instruments - and see for yourself how they work. With their usual daunting precision, the members of CERN's Surveying Group have prepared some demonstrations and exercises for you to try. Find out the techniques for ensuring accelerator alignment and learn about high-tech metrology systems such as deviation indicators, tracking lasers and total stations. The surveyors will show you how they precisely measure magnet positioning, with accuracy of a few thousandths of a millimetre. You can try your hand at precision measurement using different types of sensor and a modern-day version of the Romans' bubble level, accurate to within a thousandth of a millimetre. You will learn that photogrammetry techniques can transform even a simple digital camera into a remarkable measuring instrument. Finally, you will have a chance t...

  1. Discoveries in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, James D; Markham, David W

    2015-07-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable gains for outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the USA and many other countries, including the high-incidence areas of Haiti and South Africa. This review article emphasizes the importance of continuing the process of increasing awareness of PPCM and presents details of this evolving picture, including important discoveries that point the way to full recovery for almost all PPCM subjects. In addition, new interventions will be highlighted, which may facilitate recovery. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when the diagnosis of PPCM is made with LVEF > 0.30, the probability is that recovery to LVEF ≥ 0.50 will occur in the overwhelming majority of subjects. PPCM patients diagnosed with severely depressed systolic function (LVEF < 0.30) and a remodeled left ventricle with greater dilatation (LVEDd ≥ 60mm) are least likely to reach the outcome recovery goals. These are the patients with the greatest need for newer interventional strategies.

  2. Chemically diverse polymer microarrays and high throughput surface characterisation: a method for discovery of materials for stem cell culture†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4bm00054dClick here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiz, A D; Smith, J G W; Patel, A K; Langer, R; Anderson, D G; Barrett, D A; Young, L E; Davies, M C; Denning, C; Alexander, M R

    2014-11-30

    Materials discovery provides the opportunity to identify novel materials that are tailored to complex biological environments by using combinatorial mixing of monomers to form large libraries of polymers as micro arrays. The materials discovery approach is predicated on the use of the largest chemical diversity possible, yet previous studies into human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) response to polymer microarrays have been limited to 20 or so different monomer identities in each study. Here we show that it is possible to print and assess cell adhesion of 141 different monomers in a microarray format. This provides access to the largest chemical space to date, allowing us to meet the regenerative medicine challenge to provide scalable synthetic culture ware. This study identifies new materials suitable for hPSC expansion that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge of cell-material interactions.

  3. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  4. Towards 3rd generation organic tandem solar cells with 20% efficiency: Accelerated discovery and rational design of carbon-based photovoltaic materials through massive distributed volunteer computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2016-11-04

    Clean, affordable, and renewable energy sources are urgently needed to satisfy the 10s of terawatts (TW) energy need of human beings. Solar cells are one promising choice to replace traditional energy sources. Our broad efforts have expanded the knowledge of possible donor materials for organic photovoltaics, while increasing access of our results to the world through the Clean Energy Project database (www.molecularspace.org). Machine learning techniques, including Gaussian Processes have been used to calibrate frontier molecular orbital energies, and OPV bulk properties (open-circuit voltage, percent conversion efficiencies, and short-circuit current). This grant allowed us to delve into the solid-state properties of OPVs (charge-carrier dynamics). One particular example allowed us to predict charge-carrier dynamics and make predictions about future hydrogen-bonded materials.

  5. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  6. Coal Discovery Trail officially opens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinger, C. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Sparwood, BC (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    The opening of the 30-kilometre Coal Discovery Trail in August is described. The trail, through a pine, spruce, and larch forest, extends from Sparwood to Fernie and passes through Hosmer, a historic mining site. The trail, part of the Elk Valley Coal Discovery Centre, will be used for hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, and cross-country skiing. The Coal Discovery Centre will provide an interpretive centre that concentrates on history of coal mining and miners, preservation of mining artifacts and sites, and existing technology. 3 figs.

  7. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks.

  8. INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIAN COJOCARIU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge, as intellectual capital, has become the main resource of anorganization, and the process of knowledge discovery, acquisition and storage is a very important one. Knowledge discovery can be easily realized through Data Mining, a Machine Learning technique, which allows the discovery of useful knowledge from a large amount of data, this knowledge supporting the decision process. A proper knowledge management of the discovered knowledge is able to improve the organization’s results and will lead to increasing the intellectualcapital, the result being a more efficient management.

  9. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  10. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  11. The Discovery,Origin,Differentiation and Activation of Regulatory B Cells%调节性 B 细胞的发现、起源和分化及激活

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡舜(综述); 陈思娇; 宋今丹(审校)

    2015-01-01

    B细胞的主要功能是分泌抗体和呈递抗原,并以此起始和活化免疫系统发挥正性调节作用。新近研究表明,一类具有负性免疫调节功能的 B 细胞亚群———调节性 B 细胞(Gregs)可通过细胞间直接接触和分泌白细胞介素10等方式下调免疫应答。 Bregs 在许多疾病中发挥着重要的调节作用。 Bregs 的发现、起源、分化将为全面、深入了解自身免疫病免疫耐受的机制,及寻找更合理的自身免疫病治疗方法提供理论依据和新的研究方向。%The main function of Bcells is secreting antibodies,antigen presentation and activating the immune system,so Bcells play a positive regulatory role in immune responses.Recent studies have shown that there is a B cell subset with the function of negative regulation-regulatory Bcells(Bregs). They can down regulate the immune reaction through direct contact with other immune cells or secretion of IL-10 etc.At the same time,Bregs play an important regulatory role in many diseases.The discovery, origin,differentiation and activation of regulatory Bcells will provide the theory basis and the new research direction for the comprehensive,in-depth understanding of immune tolerance mechanisms of autoimmune disease,and for the more reasonable treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  13. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery – Development of Rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI funded the development of rituximab, one of the first monoclonal antibody cancer treatments. With the discovery of rituximab, more than 70 percent of patients diagnosed with non-hodgkin lymphoma now live five years past their initial diagnosis.

  16. Taxonomy Enabled Discovery (TED) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses the NASA's need to enable scientific discovery and the topic's requirements for: processing large volumes of data, commonly available on the...

  17. Computational methods in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumudu P. Leelananda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The process for drug discovery and development is challenging, time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided drug discovery (CADD tools can act as a virtual shortcut, assisting in the expedition of this long process and potentially reducing the cost of research and development. Today CADD has become an effective and indispensable tool in therapeutic development. The human genome project has made available a substantial amount of sequence data that can be used in various drug discovery projects. Additionally, increasing knowledge of biological structures, as well as increasing computer power have made it possible to use computational methods effectively in various phases of the drug discovery and development pipeline. The importance of in silico tools is greater than ever before and has advanced pharmaceutical research. Here we present an overview of computational methods used in different facets of drug discovery and highlight some of the recent successes. In this review, both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery methods are discussed. Advances in virtual high-throughput screening, protein structure prediction methods, protein–ligand docking, pharmacophore modeling and QSAR techniques are reviewed.

  18. Get Involved in Planetary Discoveries through New Worlds, New Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shipp, S. S.; Halligan, E.; Dalton, H.; Boonstra, D.; Buxner, S.; SMD Planetary Forum, NASA

    2013-01-01

    "New Worlds, New Discoveries" is a synthesis of NASA’s 50-year exploration history which provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of our solar system. As NASA spacecraft head to and arrive at key locations in our solar system, "New Worlds, New Discoveries" provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system to educators and the general public! The site combines the amazing discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of ongoing missions, and connects them to the related planetary science topics. "New Worlds, New Discoveries," which includes the "Year of the Solar System" and the ongoing celebration of the "50 Years of Exploration," includes 20 topics that share thematic solar system educational resources and activities, tied to the national science standards. This online site and ongoing event offers numerous opportunities for the science community - including researchers and education and public outreach professionals - to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students, and the public about planetary science. Visitors to the site will find valuable hands-on science activities, resources and educational materials, as well as the latest news, to engage audiences in planetary science topics and their related mission discoveries. The topics are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved? How did life begin and evolve on Earth, and has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system? Scientists and educators are encouraged to get involved either directly or by sharing "New Worlds, New Discoveries" and its resources with educators, by conducting presentations and events, sharing their resources and events to add to the site, and adding their own public events to the site’s event calendar! Visit to find quality resources and ideas. Connect with educators, students and the public to

  19. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130... Special Rules Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods— (a) Depositions upon...

  20. 37 CFR 2.120 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Procedure in Inter Partes Proceedings § 2.120 Discovery. (a... develop a disclosure and discovery plan, the scope, timing and sequence of discovery, protective orders... foreign countries. (1) The discovery deposition of a natural person residing in a foreign country who is...

  1. 14 CFR 1264.120 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.120 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1264.120 Section 1264.120..., discovery is available only as ordered by the presiding officer. The presiding officer shall regulate...

  2. 31 CFR 16.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 16.21 Section 16.21 Money... to require the creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery...

  3. 38 CFR 42.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 42.21 Section... creation of a document. (c) Unless mutually agreed to by the parties, discovery is available only...

  4. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  5. Metagenomics and future perspectives in virus discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokili, John L; Rohwer, Forest; Dutilh, Bas E

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring the emergence and re-emergence of viral diseases with the goal of containing the spread of viral agents requires both adequate preparedness and quick response. Identifying the causative agent of a new epidemic is one of the most important steps for effective response to disease outbreaks. Traditionally, virus discovery required propagation of the virus in cell culture, a proven technique responsible for the identification of the vast majority of viruses known to date. However, many viruses cannot be easily propagated in cell culture, thus limiting our knowledge of viruses. Viral metagenomic analyses of environmental samples suggest that the field of virology has explored less than 1% of the extant viral diversity. In the last decade, the culture-independent and sequence-independent metagenomic approach has permitted the discovery of many viruses in a wide range of samples. Phylogenetically, some of these viruses are distantly related to previously discovered viruses. In addition, 60-99% of the sequences generated in different viral metagenomic studies are not homologous to known viruses. In this review, we discuss the advances in the area of viral metagenomics during the last decade and their relevance to virus discovery, clinical microbiology and public health. We discuss the potential of metagenomics for characterization of the normal viral population in a healthy community and identification of viruses that could pose a threat to humans through zoonosis. In addition, we propose a new model of the Koch's postulates named the 'Metagenomic Koch's Postulates'. Unlike the original Koch's postulates and the Molecular Koch's postulates as formulated by Falkow, the metagenomic Koch's postulates focus on the identification of metagenomic traits in disease cases. The metagenomic traits that can be traced after healthy individuals have been exposed to the source of the suspected pathogen.

  6. A Mars Exploration Discovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    The Mars Exploration Program should consider following the Discovery Program model. In the Discovery Program a team of scientists led by a PI develop the science goals of their mission, decide what payload achieves the necessary measurements most effectively, and then choose a spacecraft with the capabilities needed to carry the payload to the desired target body. The primary constraints associated with the Discovery missions are time and money. The proposer must convince reviewers that their mission has scientific merit and is feasible. Every Announcement of Opportunity has resulted in a collection of creative ideas that fit within advertised constraints. Following this model, a "Mars Discovery Program" would issue an Announcement of Opportunity for each launch opportunity with schedule constraints dictated by the launch window and fiscal constraints in accord with the program budget. All else would be left to the proposer to choose, based on the science the team wants to accomplish, consistent with the program theme of "Life, Climate and Resources". A proposer could propose a lander, an orbiter, a fleet of SCOUT vehicles or penetrators, an airplane, a balloon mission, a large rover, a small rover, etc. depending on what made the most sense for the science investigation and payload. As in the Discovery program, overall feasibility relative to cost, schedule and technology readiness would be evaluated and be part of the selection process.

  7. The Europa Ocean Discovery mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chyba, C.F. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abshire, J.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Since it was first proposed that tidal heating of Europa by Jupiter might lead to liquid water oceans below Europa`s ice cover, there has been speculation over the possible exobiological implications of such an ocean. Liquid water is the essential ingredient for life as it is known, and the existence of a second water ocean in the Solar System would be of paramount importance for seeking the origin and existence of life beyond Earth. The authors present here a Discovery-class mission concept (Europa Ocean Discovery) to determine the existence of a liquid water ocean on Europa and to characterize Europa`s surface structure. The technical goal of the Europa Ocean Discovery mission is to study Europa with an orbiting spacecraft. This goal is challenging but entirely feasible within the Discovery envelope. There are four key challenges: entering Europan orbit, generating power, surviving long enough in the radiation environment to return valuable science, and complete the mission within the Discovery program`s launch vehicle and budget constraints. The authors will present here a viable mission that meets these challenges.

  8. Supporting knowledge discovery in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Dominic; Arthofer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Our ontology-based benchmarking infrastructure for hospitals, we presented on the eHealth 2012, has meanwhile proven useful. Besides, we gathered manifold experience in supporting knowledge discovery in medicine. This also led to further functions and plans with our software. We could confirm and extent our experience by a literature review on the knowledge discovery process in medicine, visual analytics and data mining and drafted an according approach for extending our software. We validated our approach by exemplarily implementing a parallel-coordinate data visualization into our software and plan to integrate further algorithms for visual analytics and machine learning to support knowledge discovery in medicine in diverse ways. This is very promising but can also fail due to technical or organizational details.

  9. Discovery of the higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.

  10. Discovery of the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.

  11. Towards structural web services discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiang-feng

    2008-01-01

    A syntactic and structural matching mechanism for service discovery was put forward, which tries to exploit the underlying semantics of web services to enhance the traditional syntactic service discovery. We commit WSDL (Web Service Description Language) as service description language. The syntactic matching mechanism is based on the textual similarity among WSDL documents using VSM (Vector Space Model). The structural information is extracted from WSDL document tree or the invocation sequence of a series of services which can be viewed as the problem of graph isomorphism. Then we combine the syntactic and structural similarity linearly to calculate the service similarity. Finally we provide a novel web services discovery framework named SG* to find the exact services meeting the users' goals based on service similarity.

  12. Knowledge discovery from legal databases

    CERN Document Server

    Stranieri, Andrew; Schauer, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge Discovery from Legal Databases is the first text to describe data mining techniques as they apply to law. Law students, legal academics and applied information technology specialists are guided thorough all phases of the knowledge discovery from databases process with clear explanations of numerous data mining algorithms including rule induction, neural networks and association rules. Throughout the text, assumptions that make data mining in law quite different to mining other data are made explicit.  Issues such as the selection of commonplace cases, the use of discretion as a form

  13. Using Aptamers for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Min Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded synthetic DNA- or RNA-based oligonucleotides that fold into various shapes to bind to a specific target, which includes proteins, metals, and molecules. Aptamers have high affinity and high specificity that are comparable to that of antibodies. They are obtained using iterative method, called (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment SELEX and cell-based SELEX (cell-SELEX. Aptamers can be paired with recent advances in nanotechnology, microarray, microfluidics, and other technologies for applications in clinical medicine. One particular area that aptamers can shed a light on is biomarker discovery. Biomarkers are important in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this paper, we will describe ways in which aptamers can be used to discover biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  14. Drug discovery for alopecia: gone today, hair tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Zenildo; Avci, Pinar; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hair loss or alopecia affects the majority of the population at some time in their life, and increasingly, sufferers are demanding treatment. Three main types of alopecia (androgenic [AGA], areata [AA] and chemotherapy-induced [CIA]) are very different, and have their own laboratory models and separate drug-discovery efforts. Areas covered In this article, the authors review the biology of hair, hair follicle (HF) cycling, stem cells and signaling pathways. AGA, due to dihydrotesterone, is treated by 5-α reductase inhibitors, androgen receptor blockers and ATP-sensitive potassium channel-openers. AA, which involves attack by CD8+NK group 2D-positive (NKG2D+) T cells, is treated with immunosuppressives, biologics and JAK inhibitors. Meanwhile, CIA is treated by apoptosis inhibitors, cytokines and topical immunotherapy. Expert opinion The desire to treat alopecia with an easy topical preparation is expected to grow with time, particularly with an increasing aging population. The discovery of epidermal stem cells in the HF has given new life to the search for a cure for baldness. Drug discovery efforts are being increasingly centered on these stem cells, boosting the hair cycle and reversing miniaturization of HF. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune attack in AA will yield new drugs. New discoveries in HF neogenesis and low-level light therapy will undoubtedly have a role to play. PMID:25662177

  15. Trends in Modern Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Jörg; Herrling, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Drugs discovered by the pharmaceutical industry over the past 100 years have dramatically changed the practice of medicine and impacted on many aspects of our culture. For many years, drug discovery was a target- and mechanism-agnostic approach that was based on ethnobotanical knowledge often fueled by serendipity. With the advent of modern molecular biology methods and based on knowledge of the human genome, drug discovery has now largely changed into a hypothesis-driven target-based approach, a development which was paralleled by significant environmental changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Laboratories became increasingly computerized and automated, and geographically dispersed research sites are now more and more clustered into large centers to capture technological and biological synergies. Today, academia, the regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry all contribute to drug discovery, and, in order to translate the basic science into new medical treatments for unmet medical needs, pharmaceutical companies have to have a critical mass of excellent scientists working in many therapeutic fields, disciplines, and technologies. The imperative for the pharmaceutical industry to discover breakthrough medicines is matched by the increasing numbers of first-in-class drugs approved in recent years and reflects the impact of modern drug discovery approaches, technologies, and genomics.

  16. Maximum Entropy in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery applies multidisciplinary approaches either experimentally, computationally or both ways to identify lead compounds to treat various diseases. While conventional approaches have yielded many US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs, researchers continue investigating and designing better approaches to increase the success rate in the discovery process. In this article, we provide an overview of the current strategies and point out where and how the method of maximum entropy has been introduced in this area. The maximum entropy principle has its root in thermodynamics, yet since Jaynes’ pioneering work in the 1950s, the maximum entropy principle has not only been used as a physics law, but also as a reasoning tool that allows us to process information in hand with the least bias. Its applicability in various disciplines has been abundantly demonstrated. We give several examples of applications of maximum entropy in different stages of drug discovery. Finally, we discuss a promising new direction in drug discovery that is likely to hinge on the ways of utilizing maximum entropy.

  17. Macchines per scoprire - Discovery Machines

    CERN Multimedia

    Auditorium, Rome

    2016-01-01

    During the FCC week 2016 a public event entitled “Discovery Machines: The Higgs Boson and the Search for New Physics took place on 14 April at the Auditorium in Rome. The event, brought together physicists and experts from economics to discuss intriguing questions on the origin and evolution of the Universe and the societal impact of large-scale research projects.

  18. Structural Biology Guides Antibiotic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Modern drug discovery programs require the contribution of researchers in a number of specialist areas. One of these areas is structural biology. Using X-ray crystallography, the molecular basis of how a drug binds to its biological target and exerts its mode of action can be defined. For example, a drug that binds into the active site of an…

  19. OPEN DATA FOR DISCOVERY SCIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O; Huang, Kun; Shah, Nigam H; Tenenbaum, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The modern healthcare and life sciences ecosystem is moving towards an increasingly open and data-centric approach to discovery science. This evolving paradigm is predicated on a complex set of information needs related to our collective ability to share, discover, reuse, integrate, and analyze open biological, clinical, and population level data resources of varying composition, granularity, and syntactic or semantic consistency. Such an evolution is further impacted by a concomitant growth in the size of data sets that can and should be employed for both hypothesis discovery and testing. When such open data can be accessed and employed for discovery purposes, a broad spectrum of high impact end-points is made possible. These span the spectrum from identification of de novo biomarker complexes that can inform precision medicine, to the repositioning or repurposing of extant agents for new and cost-effective therapies, to the assessment of population level influences on disease and wellness. Of note, these types of uses of open data can be either primary, wherein open data is the substantive basis for inquiry, or secondary, wherein open data is used to augment or enrich project-specific or proprietary data that is not open in and of itself. This workshop is concerned with the key challenges, opportunities, and methodological best practices whereby open data can be used to drive the advancement of discovery science in all of the aforementioned capacities.

  20. Discovery and development of sulforaphane as a cancer chemopreventive phytochemical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuesheng ZHANG; Li TANG

    2007-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SF) is a phytochemical that displays both anticarcinogenic and anticancer activity. SF modulates many cancer-related events, including suscep-tibility to carcinogens, cell death, cell cycle, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis.We review its discovery and development as a cancer chemopreventive agent with the intention of encouraging further research on this important compound and facilitating the identification and development of new phytochemicals for cancer prevention.

  1. New paradigms in GPCR drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2015-12-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain a major domain of pharmaceutical discovery. The identification of GPCR lead compounds and their optimization are now structure-based, thanks to advances in X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, protein engineering and biophysical techniques. In silico screening provides useful hit molecules. New pharmacological approaches to tuning the pleotropic action of GPCRs include: allosteric modulators, biased ligands, GPCR heterodimer-targeted compounds, manipulation of polypharmacology, receptor antibodies and tailoring of drug molecules to fit GPCR pharmacogenomics. Measurements of kinetics and drug efficacy are factors influencing clinical success. With the exception of inhibitors of GPCR kinases, targeting of intracellular GPCR signaling or receptor cycling for therapeutic purposes remains a futuristic concept. New assay approaches are more efficient and multidimensional: cell-based, label-free, fluorescence-based assays, and biosensors. Tailoring GPCR drugs to a patient's genetic background is now being considered. Chemoinformatic tools can predict ADME-tox properties. New imaging technology visualizes drug action in vivo. Thus, there is reason to be optimistic that new technology for GPCR ligand discovery will help reverse the current narrowing of the pharmaceutical pipeline.

  2. Discovery of charmed particles : Sam Ting

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The great physics event of the year was the discovery of charmed particles in the USA. One of the co-discoverers, Sam Ting, was at CERN involved in an ISR experiment and described the discovery to a packed auditorium.

  3. 5 CFR 185.122 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 185.122 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of... document or of the truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b)...

  4. 40 CFR 27.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  5. 22 CFR 224.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of... document or the truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For...

  6. 15 CFR 25.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  7. TOXICOGENOMICS DRUG DISCOVERY AND THE PATHOLOGIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicogenomics, drug discovery, and pathologist.The field of toxicogenomics, which currently focuses on the application of large-scale differential gene expression (DGE) data to toxicology, is starting to influence drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical indu...

  8. 29 CFR 18.13 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Discovery methods. 18.13 Section 18.13 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.13 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods: Depositions upon oral examination or written questions; written...

  9. 29 CFR 1955.32 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1955.32 Section 1955.32 Labor Regulations...) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS Preliminary Conference and Discovery § 1955.32 Discovery... the remainder. An answering party may not give lack of information or knowledge as the reason...

  10. Improving on daily measures of price discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Fernandes, Marcelo; Scherrer, Cristina

    We formulate a continuous-time price discovery model in which the price discovery measure varies (stochastically) at daily frequency. We estimate daily measures of price discovery using a kernel-based OLS estimator instead of running separate daily VECM regressions as standard in the literature. ...

  11. Does Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Louis; Brooks, Patricia J.; Aldrich, Naomi J.; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning approaches to education have recently come under scrutiny (Tobias & Duffy, 2009), with many studies indicating limitations to discovery learning practices. Therefore, 2 meta-analyses were conducted using a sample of 164 studies: The 1st examined the effects of unassisted discovery learning versus explicit instruction, and the…

  12. 28 CFR 71.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 Implementation for Actions Initiated by the Department of Justice § 71.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 71.21 Section 71.21...

  13. 22 CFR 521.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Discovery. 521.21 Section 521.21 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 521.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents...

  14. 43 CFR 4.826 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Procedures § 4.826 Discovery. (a) Methods. Parties may obtain discovery as provided in these rules by depositions, written interrogatories... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 4.826 Section 4.826...

  15. 7 CFR 1.322 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.322 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production, inspection and photocopying of documents; (2... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1.322 Section 1.322 Agriculture Office...

  16. 29 CFR 1905.25 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT OF 1970 Hearings § 1905.25 Discovery. (a) Depositions. (1) For reasons of... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 1905.25 Section 1905.25 Labor Regulations... discovery. Whenever appropriate to a just disposition of any issue in a hearing, the presiding...

  17. 20 CFR 355.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 355.21 Discovery. (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying; (2) Requests... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 355.21 Section 355.21...

  18. Discovery in Science and in Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, Nahum

    2007-01-01

    A proper presentation of scientific discoveries may allow science teachers to eliminate certain myths about the nature of science, which originate from an uncertainty among scholars about what constitutes a discovery. It is shown that a disagreement on this matter originates from a confusion of the act of discovery with response to it. It is…

  19. 42 CFR 405.1037 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (1) Discovery is permissible only when CMS or its contractor elects to participate in an ALJ hearing... authorizes discovery or disclosure of a matter for which an objection based on privilege, or other protection..., the MAC may review that portion of the discovery or disclosure ruling immediately. (i) Where...

  20. [GWAS of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Drug Discovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Koichiro

    2015-04-01

    We have conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously found that myelin basic protein (MBP) is associated with RA. One of the MBP isoforms (Golli-MBP) is expressed not only in nerve cells, but also in hematopoietic cells, and may negatively regulate T-cell receptor signaling. We expanded the GWAS level by collaborating with laboratories in Japan and then throughout the world. Meta-analysis of GWAS data resulted in the identification of -100 genomic loci associated with RA development. The -100 genomic loci contain -400 candidate genes, and it is not easy to find out which genes actually play important roles in RA. By incorporating available public databases, we succeeded in narrowing down the susceptibility genes from 377 to 98. We also showed that regulatory T cells are associated with RA based on the combination of the histone methylation database and our mega-GWAS results. Protein-protein interaction and drug discovery databases gave us information that some of the drugs have already been developed as therapeutic medicines for RA, and some of them were used for diseases other than RA. These drugs may be used for RA in the near future (drug repurposing). The combination of biological databases and GWAS results may be a novel method to identify new therapeutic targets.

  1. Glycoscience aids in biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenus Hua1,2 & Hyun Joo An1,2,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The glycome consists of all glycans (or carbohydrates within abiological system, and modulates a wide range of important biologicalactivities, from protein folding to cellular communications.The mining of the glycome for disease markers representsa new paradigm for biomarker discovery; however, this effortis severely complicated by the vast complexity and structuraldiversity of glycans. This review summarizes recent developmentsin analytical technology and methodology as applied tothe fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics. Mass spectrometricstrategies for glycan compositional profiling are described, as arepotential refinements which allow structure-specific profiling.Analytical methods that can discern protein glycosylation at aspecific site of modification are also discussed in detail.Biomarker discovery applications are shown at each level ofanalysis, highlighting the key role that glycoscience can play inhelping scientists understand disease biology.

  2. Materials discovery via CALYPSO methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shaohua; Yin, Ketao; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-05-01

    The structure prediction at the atomic level is emerging as a state-of-the-art approach to accelerate the functionality-driven discovery of materials. By combining the global swarm optimization algorithm with first-principles thermodynamic calculations, it exploits the power of current supercomputer architectures to robustly predict the ground state and metastable structures of materials with only the given knowledge of chemical composition. In this Review, we provide an overview of the basic theory and main features of our as-developed CALYPSO structure prediction method, as well as its versatile applications to design of a broad range of materials including those of three-dimensional bulks, two-dimensional reconstructed surfaces and layers, and isolated clusters/nanoparticles or molecules with a variety of functional properties. The current challenges faced by structure prediction for materials discovery and future developments of CALYPSO to overcome them are also discussed.

  3. Enhancing OPAC Records for Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Griffis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes adding keywords and descriptors to the catalog records of electronic databases and media items to enhance their discovery. The authors contend that subject liaisons can add value to OPAC records and enhance discovery of electronic databases and media items by providing searchable keywords and resource descriptions. The authors provide an examination of OPAC records at their own library, which illustrates the disparity of useful keywords and descriptions within the notes field for media item records versus electronic database records. The authors outline methods for identifying useful keywords for indexing OPAC records of electronic databases. Also included is an analysis of the advantages of using Encore’s Community Tag and Community Review features to allow subject liaisons to work directly in the catalog instead of collaborating with cataloging staff

  4. Class Discovery in Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bazell, D; Bazell, David; Miller, David J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, automated, supervised classification techniques have been fruitfully applied to labeling and organizing large astronomical databases. These methods require off-line classifier training, based on labeled examples from each of the (known) object classes. In practice, only a small batch of labeled examples, hand-labeled by a human expert, may be available for training. Moreover, there may be no labeled examples for some classes present in the data, i.e. the database may contain several unknown classes. Unknown classes may be present due to 1) uncertainty in or lack of knowledge of the measurement process, 2) an inability to adequately ``survey'' a massive database to assess its content (classes), and/or 3) an incomplete scientific hypothesis. In recent work, new class discovery in mixed labeled/unlabeled data was formally posed, with a proposed solution based on mixture models. In this work we investigate this approach, propose a competing technique suitable for class discovery in neural network...

  5. Drug Discovery, Design and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    et a I., Immunization by application of DNA vaccine onto a skin area wherein the hair follicles have been induced into anagen-onset stage. Mol Ther...broad project-wide aims are as follows: Demonstrate potential novel compounds to effectively target and treat intracellular pathogens - Novel...the discovery of antibiotics and nanoparticle-based approaches for targeting and neutralizing the pathogenic growth of Bartonella bacteria. We thus

  6. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies.

  7. A New Universe of Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, France A.

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of emerging advances in astronomical instruments, computational capabilities and talented practitioners (both professional and civilian) is creating an extraordinary new environment for making numerous fundamental discoveries in astronomy, ranging from the nature of exoplanets to understanding the evolution of solar systems and galaxies. The National Science Foundation is playing a critical role in supporting, stimulating, and shaping these advances. NSF is more than an agency of government or a funding mechanism for the infrastructure of science. The work of NSF is a sacred trust that every generation of Americans makes to those of the next generation, that we will build on the body of knowledge we inherit and continue to push forward the frontiers of science. We never lose sight of NSF's obligation to "explore the unexplored" and inspire all of humanity with the wonders of discovery. As the only Federal agency dedicated to the support of basic research and education in all fields of science and engineering, NSF has empowered discoveries across a broad spectrum of scientific inquiry for more than six decades. The result is fundamental scientific research that has had a profound impact on our nation's innovation ecosystem and kept our nation at the very forefront of the world's science-and-engineering enterprise.

  8. Anti-cancer drug discovery: update and comparisons in yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangxun; Chen, Liang; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of novel cancer chemotherapeutics focuses on screening and identifying compounds that can target 'cancer-specific' biological processes while causing minimal toxicity to non-tumor cells. Alternatively, model organisms with highly conserved cancer-related cellular processes relative to human cells may offer new opportunities for anticancer drug discovery when combined with chemical screening. Some organisms used for chemotherapeutic discovery include yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish which are similar in important ways relevant to cancer study but offer distinct advantages as well. Here, we describe these model attributes and the rationale for using them in cancer drug screening research.

  9. Method and Application of Comprehensive Knowledge Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Zongyao; BIAN Fuling

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes the principle of comprehensive knowledge discovery. Unlike most of the current knowledge discovery methods, the comprehensive knowledge discovery considers both the spatial relations and attributes of spatial entities or objects. We introduce the theory of spatial knowledge expression system and some concepts including comprehensive knowledge discovery and spatial union information table(SUIT). In theory, SUIT records all information contained in the studied objects, but in reality, because of the complexity and varieties of spatial relations,only those factors of interest to us are selected. In order to find out the comprehensive knowledge from spatial databases, an efficient comprehensive knowledge discovery algorithm called recycled algorithm (RAR) is suggested.

  10. DISCOVERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    新产品 国际家居品牌石家庄勒泰中心店盛大开幕近日,国际时尚家饰家用品牌HOLA特力和乐石家庄首店盛大开幕,正式入驻位于中山路核心商圈的勒泰购物中心。HOLA将以优质精品家居和贴心的服务,

  11. Diabetes mellitus: channeling care through cellular discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Shang, Yan Chen; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling

    2010-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) impacts a significant portion of the world's population and care for this disorder places an economic burden on the gross domestic product for any particular country. Furthermore, both Type 1 and Type 2 DM are becoming increasingly prevalent and there is increased incidence of impaired glucose tolerance in the young. The complications of DM are protean and can involve multiple systems throughout the body that are susceptible to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress and apoptotic cell injury. For these reasons, innovative strategies are necessary for the implementation of new treatments for DM that are generated through the further understanding of cellular pathways that govern the pathological consequences of DM. In particular, both the precursor for the coenzyme beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), nicotinamide, and the growth factor erythropoietin offer novel platforms for drug discovery that involve cellular metabolic homeostasis and inflammatory cell control. Interestingly, these agents and their tightly associated pathways that consist of cell cycle regulation, protein kinase B, forkhead transcription factors, and Wnt signaling also function in a broader sense as biomarkers for disease onset and progression.

  12. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S.D.; Pardo Carrión, Juan Ramón; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, José; Davis, G. R.

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 1_10–1_01 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a "hot corino" environment), we determi...

  13. Object Discovery via Cohesion Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guanjun; Wang, Hanzi; Zhao, Wan-Lei; Yan, Yan; Li, Xuelong

    2017-02-16

    Color and intensity are two important components in an image. Usually, groups of image pixels, which are similar in color or intensity, are an informative representation for an object. They are therefore particularly suitable for computer vision tasks, such as saliency detection and object proposal generation. However, image pixels, which share a similar real-world color, may be quite different since colors are often distorted by intensity. In this paper, we reinvestigate the affinity matrices originally used in image segmentation methods based on spectral clustering. A new affinity matrix, which is robust to color distortions, is formulated for object discovery. Moreover, a cohesion measurement (CM) for object regions is also derived based on the formulated affinity matrix. Based on the new CM, a novel object discovery method is proposed to discover objects latent in an image by utilizing the eigenvectors of the affinity matrix. Then we apply the proposed method to both saliency detection and object proposal generation. Experimental results on several evaluation benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed CM-based method has achieved promising performance for these two tasks.

  14. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-04-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold's topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan's presidency and not from its beginning.

  15. Van Allen Discovery Most Important

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrow, R.

    1959-01-01

    The first step toward the exploration of space occurred approximately 22 months ago as a part of the International Geophysical Year. In the short interval since October, 1957, the new tools of research, the satellite and the space rocket, have produced two unexpected results of fundamental scientific importance. First, instruments placed in the Explorer satellites by James A. Van Allen have revealed the existence of layers of energetic particles in the outer atmosphere. This discovery constitutes the most significant research achievement of the IGY satellite program. The layers may provide the explanation for the aurora and other geophysical phenomena, and they will also influence the design of vehicles for manned space flight, whose occupants must be shielded against their harmful biological effects. Second, the shape of the earth has been determined very accurately with the aid of data from the first Vanguard. As a result of this investigation, we have found that our planet tends toward the shape of a pear, with its stem at the North Pole. This discovery may produce major changes in our ideas on the interior structure of the earth.

  16. Medical knowledge discovery and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Fred

    2009-05-01

    Although the volume of medical information is growing rapidly, the ability to rapidly convert this data into "actionable insights" and new medical knowledge is lagging far behind. The first step in the knowledge discovery process is data management and integration, which logically can be accomplished through the application of data warehouse technologies. A key insight that arises from efforts in biosurveillance and the global scope of military medicine is that information must be integrated over both time (longitudinal health records) and space (spatial localization of health-related events). Once data are compiled and integrated it is essential to encode the semantics and relationships among data elements through the use of ontologies and semantic web technologies to convert data into knowledge. Medical images form a special class of health-related information. Traditionally knowledge has been extracted from images by human observation and encoded via controlled terminologies. This approach is rapidly being replaced by quantitative analyses that more reliably support knowledge extraction. The goals of knowledge discovery are the improvement of both the timeliness and accuracy of medical decision making and the identification of new procedures and therapies.

  17. Metadata-Centric Discovery Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Chung, N. T.; Gangl, M. E.; Armstrong, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is data about data. It is the information describing a picture without looking at the picture. Through the years, the Earth Science community seeks better methods to describe science artifacts to improve the quality and efficiency in information exchange. One the purposes are to provide information to the users to guide them into identifies the science artifacts of their interest. The NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) are the building blocks of a data centric federation, designed for processing and archiving from NASA's Earth Observation missions and their distribution as well as provision of specialized services to users. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC), at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, archives and distributes science artifacts pertain to the physical state of the ocean. As part of its high-performance operational Data Management and Archive System (DMAS) is a fast data discovery RESTful web service called the Oceanographic Common Search Interface (OCSI). The web service searches and delivers metadata on all data holdings within PO.DAAC. Currently OCSI supports metadata standards such as ISO-19115, OpenSearch, GCMD, and FGDC, with new metadata standards still being added. While we continue to seek the silver bullet in metadata standard, the Earth Science community is in fact consists of various standards due to the specific needs of its users and systems. This presentation focuses on the architecture behind OCSI as a reference implementation on building a metadata-centric discovery service.

  18. Discovery of a Makemakean Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Alex H; Grundy, Will M; Noll, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    We describe the discovery of a satellite in orbit about the dwarf planet (136472) Makemake. This satellite, provisionally designated S/2015 (136472) 1, was detected in imaging data collected with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 on UTC April 27, 2015 at 7.80$\\pm$0.04 magnitudes fainter than Makemake. It likely evaded detection in previous satellite searches due to a nearly edge-on orbital configuration, placing it deep within the glare of Makemake during a substantial fraction of its orbital period. This configuration would place Makemake and its satellite near a mutual event season. Insufficient orbital motion was detected to make a detailed characterization of its orbital properties, prohibiting a measurement of the system mass with the discovery data alone. Preliminary analysis indicates that if the orbit is circular, its orbital period must be longer than 12.4 days, and must have a semi-major axis $\\gtrsim$21,000 km. We find that the properties of Makemake's moon suggest that the majority ...

  19. Tools for GPCR drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru ZHANG; Xin XIE

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases.The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR assays that allow the cost-effective screening of large compound libraries to identify novel drug candidates are critical in early drug discovery.Early functional GPCR assays depend primarily on the measurement of G-protein-mediated 2nd messenger generation.Taking advantage of the continuously deepening understanding of GPCR signal transduction,many G-protein-independent pathways are utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs,and may provide additional information on functional selectivity of candidate compounds.With the combination of automated imaging systems and label-free detection systems,such assays are now suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS).In this review,we summarize the most widely used GPCR assays and recent advances in HTS technologies for GPCR drug discovery.

  20. Two Kinds of Discovery: An Ontological Account

    OpenAIRE

    Gilead, Amihud

    2014-01-01

    What can we discover? As the discussion in this paper is limited to ontological considerations, it does not deal with the discovery of new concepts. It raises the following question: What are the entities or existents that we can discover? There are two kinds of such entities: (1) actual entities, and (2) possible entities, which are pure possibilities. The paper explains why the first kind of discovery depends primarily on the second kind. The paper illustrates the discoveries of individual ...

  1. Automation of a phospho-STAT5 staining procedure for flow cytometry for application in drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malergue, Fabrice; van Agthoven, Andreas; Scifo, Caroline; Egan, Dave; Strous, Ger J

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery often requires the screening of compound libraries on tissue cultured cells. Some major targets in drug discovery belong to signal transduction pathways, and PerFix EXPOSE* allows easy flow cytometry phospho assays. We thus investigated the possibility to further simplify and automate

  2. Scientific discovery using genetic programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzer, Maarten

    2001-01-01

    programming paradigm. The induction of mathematical expressions based on data is called symbolic regression. In this work, genetic programming is extended to not just fit the data i.e., get the numbers right, but also to get the dimensions right. For this units of measurement are used. The main contribution...... in this work can be summarized as: The symbolic expressions produced by genetic programming can be made suitable for analysis and interpretation by using units of measurements to guide or restrict the search. To achieve this, the following has been accomplished: A standard genetic programming system...... that are numerically stable and correct. A case study using four real-world problems in the induction of dimensionally correct empirical equations on data using the two different methods is presented to illustrate to use and limitations of these methods in a framework of scientific discovery....

  3. Empirical Adequacy and Scientific Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Simon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show that Bas van Fraassen’s constructive empiricism, such as it is expounded in The Scientific Image, ends up in considerable difficulties in the philosophy of science. The main problem would be the exclusion of mathematics from the conception of science, given its clear absence of empirical adequacy, which is the most important requirement of his formulation. In this sense, it is suggested a more inclusive formulation of scientific theory, aroused from the notion of Da Costa’s (1999 simple structure, considering the notion of scientific discovery in a strict sense, and the validity limit of a theory and the formalism used in a temporal context.

  4. Drug discovery from marine microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwick, William H; Fenner, Amanda M

    2013-05-01

    The marine environment has been a source of more than 20,000 inspirational natural products discovered over the past 50 years. From these efforts, 9 approved drugs and 12 current clinical trial agents have been discovered, either as natural products or as molecules inspired from the natural product structure. To a significant degree, these have come from collections of marine invertebrates largely obtained from shallow-water tropical ecosystems. However, there is a growing recognition that marine invertebrates are oftentimes populated with enormous quantities of "associated" or symbiotic microorganisms and that microorganisms are the true metabolic sources of these most valuable of marine natural products. Also, because of the inherently multidisciplinary nature of this field, a high degree of innovation is characteristic of marine natural product drug discovery efforts.

  5. Data Driven Discovery in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Longo, Giuseppe; Djorgovski, George S; Cavuoti, Stefano; Donalek, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    We review some aspects of the current state of data-intensive astronomy, its methods, and some outstanding data analysis challenges. Astronomy is at the forefront of "big data" science, with exponentially growing data volumes and data rates, and an ever-increasing complexity, now entering the Petascale regime. Telescopes and observatories from both ground and space, covering a full range of wavelengths, feed the data via processing pipelines into dedicated archives, where they can be accessed for scientific analysis. Most of the large archives are connected through the Virtual Observatory framework, that provides interoperability standards and services, and effectively constitutes a global data grid of astronomy. Making discoveries in this overabundance of data requires applications of novel, machine learning tools. We describe some of the recent examples of such applications.

  6. Automating Spreadsheet Discovery & Risk Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Eric

    2008-01-01

    There have been many articles and mishaps published about the risks of uncontrolled spreadsheets in today's business environment, including non-compliance, operational risk, errors, and fraud all leading to significant loss events. Spreadsheets fall into the realm of end user developed applications and are often absent the proper safeguards and controls an IT organization would enforce for enterprise applications. There is also an overall lack of software programming discipline enforced in how spreadsheets are developed. However, before an organization can apply proper controls and discipline to critical spreadsheets, an accurate and living inventory of spreadsheets across the enterprise must be created, and all critical spreadsheets must be identified. As such, this paper proposes an automated approach to the initial stages of the spreadsheet management lifecycle - discovery, inventory and risk assessment. Without the use of technology, these phases are often treated as a one-off project. By leveraging techn...

  7. Computational approaches for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Chen, Chi-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Cellular proteins are the mediators of multiple organism functions being involved in physiological mechanisms and disease. By discovering lead compounds that affect the function of target proteins, the target diseases or physiological mechanisms can be modulated. Based on knowledge of the ligand-receptor interaction, the chemical structures of leads can be modified to improve efficacy, selectivity and reduce side effects. One rational drug design technology, which enables drug discovery based on knowledge of target structures, functional properties and mechanisms, is computer-aided drug design (CADD). The application of CADD can be cost-effective using experiments to compare predicted and actual drug activity, the results from which can used iteratively to improve compound properties. The two major CADD-based approaches are structure-based drug design, where protein structures are required, and ligand-based drug design, where ligand and ligand activities can be used to design compounds interacting with the protein structure. Approaches in structure-based drug design include docking, de novo design, fragment-based drug discovery and structure-based pharmacophore modeling. Approaches in ligand-based drug design include quantitative structure-affinity relationship and pharmacophore modeling based on ligand properties. Based on whether the structure of the receptor and its interaction with the ligand are known, different design strategies can be seed. After lead compounds are generated, the rule of five can be used to assess whether these have drug-like properties. Several quality validation methods, such as cost function analysis, Fisher's cross-validation analysis and goodness of hit test, can be used to estimate the metrics of different drug design strategies. To further improve CADD performance, multi-computers and graphics processing units may be applied to reduce costs.

  8. A Tale of Two Discoveries: Comparing the Usability of Summon and EBSCO Discovery Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Anita K.; MacDonald, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Web-scale discovery systems are gaining momentum among academic libraries as libraries seek a means to provide their users with a one-stop searching experience. Illinois State University's Milner Library found itself in the unique position of having access to two distinct discovery products, EBSCO Discovery Service and Serials Solutions' Summon.…

  9. The journey from discoveries in fundamental immunology to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacques F A P; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-13

    Recent advances in cancer immunotherapy have directly built on 50 years of fundamental and technological advances that made checkpoint blockade and T cell engineering possible. In this review, we intend to show that research, not specifically designed to bring relief or cure to any particular disease, can, when creatively exploited, lead to spectacular results in the management of cancer. The discovery of thymus immune function, T cells, and immune surveillance bore the seeds for today's targeted immune interventions and chimeric antigen receptors.

  10. DISCOVERY OF EVIDENCE IN INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakumenko, V.V.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the different concepts of discovery of evidence, which exist under different legal jurisdictions, with their theoretical analysis to determine the feasibility and rationality of the application of the discovery mechanisms in the frameworks of international commercial arbitration and its fundamental principles.

  11. Time Series Rule Discovery: Tough, not Meaningless

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struzik, Z.R.

    2003-01-01

    `Model free' rule discovery from data has recently been subject to considerable criticism, which has cast a shadow over the emerging discipline of time series data mining. However, other than in data mining, rule discovery has long been the subject of research in statistical physics of complex pheno

  12. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate an approach to mitigating discovery bias in genomic prediction. Accuracy may be improved by placing greater emphasis on regions of the genome expected to be more influential on a trait. Methods emphasizing regions result in a phenomenon known as “discovery bias” if info...

  13. Effective Online Group Discovery in Trajectory Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohui; Ceikute, Vaida; Jensen, Christian S.;

    2013-01-01

    GPS-enabled devices are pervasive nowadays. Finding movement patterns in trajectory data stream is gaining in importance. We propose a group discovery framework that aims to efficiently support the online discovery of moving objects that travel together. The framework adopts a sampling...

  14. Service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blangé, M.J.; Karkowski, I.P.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a possible solution to the problem of service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks. This solution involves introduction of a network independent service discovery layer, with as main goal the improved robustness of applications running on top of it. A possible imple

  15. 42 CFR 430.86 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 430.86 Section 430.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... objection to discovery action initiated under this section. The presiding officer also has the power...

  16. 12 CFR 1780.26 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Constitution, any applicable act of Congress, or the principles of common law. (e) Time limits. All discovery... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 1780.26 Section 1780.26 Banks and... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prehearing Proceedings § 1780.26...

  17. 2015 Update of the Discoveries of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Thoennessen, M

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 update of the discovery of nuclide project is presented. Twenty new nuclides were observed for the first time in 2015. An overall review of all previous assignments was made in order to apply the discovery criteria consistently to all elements. In addition, a list of isotopes published so far only in conference proceedings or internal reports is included.

  18. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  19. Sampling: Making Electronic Discovery More Cost Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luoma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the huge volumes of electronic data subject to discovery in virtually every instance of litigation, time and costs of conducting discovery have become exceedingly important when litigants plan their discovery strategies.  Rather than incurring the costs of having lawyers review every document produced in response to a discovery request in search of relevant evidence, a cost effective strategy for document review planning is to use statistical sampling of the database of documents to determine the likelihood of finding relevant evidence by reviewing additional documents.  This paper reviews and discusses how sampling can be used to make document review more cost effective by considering issues such as an appropriate sample size, how to develop a sampling strategy, and taking into account the potential value of the litigation in relation to the costs of additional discovery efforts. 

  20. Discovery Mechanisms for the Sensor Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Stasch

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the discovery of sensors within the OGC Sensor Web Enablement framework. Whereas services like the OGC Web Map Service or Web Coverage Service are already well supported through catalogue services, the field of sensor networks and the according discovery mechanisms is still a challenge. The focus within this article will be on the use of existing OGC Sensor Web components for realizing a discovery solution. After discussing the requirements for a Sensor Web discovery mechanism, an approach will be presented that was developed within the EU funded project “OSIRIS”. This solution offers mechanisms to search for sensors, exploit basic semantic relationships, harvest sensor metadata and integrate sensor discovery into already existing catalogues.

  1. Human brain evolution: from gene discovery to phenotype discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Todd M

    2012-06-26

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for "phenotype discovery," providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes.

  2. The discovery of the periodic table as a case of simultaneous discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Eric

    2015-03-13

    The article examines the question of priority and simultaneous discovery in the context of the discovery of the periodic system. It is argued that rather than being anomalous, simultaneous discovery is the rule. Moreover, I argue that the discovery of the periodic system by at least six authors in over a period of 7 years represents one of the best examples of a multiple discovery. This notion is supported by a new view of the evolutionary development of science through a mechanism that is dubbed Sci-Gaia by analogy with Lovelock's Gaia hypothesis.

  3. Can biochemistry drive drug discovery beyond simple potency measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Among the fields of expertise required to develop drugs successfully, biochemistry holds a key position in drug discovery at the interface between chemistry, structural biology and cell biology. However, taking the example of protein kinases, it appears that biochemical assays are mostly used in the pharmaceutical industry to measure compound potency and/or selectivity. This limited use of biochemistry is surprising, given that detailed biochemical analyses are commonly used in academia to unravel molecular recognition processes. In this article, I show that biochemistry can provide invaluable information on the dynamics and energetics of compound-target interactions that cannot be obtained on the basis of potency measurements and structural data. Therefore, an extensive use of biochemistry in drug discovery could facilitate the identification and/or development of new drugs.

  4. Assessment of composite motif discovery methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansen Jostein

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational discovery of regulatory elements is an important area of bioinformatics research and more than a hundred motif discovery methods have been published. Traditionally, most of these methods have addressed the problem of single motif discovery – discovering binding motifs for individual transcription factors. In higher organisms, however, transcription factors usually act in combination with nearby bound factors to induce specific regulatory behaviours. Hence, recent focus has shifted from single motifs to the discovery of sets of motifs bound by multiple cooperating transcription factors, so called composite motifs or cis-regulatory modules. Given the large number and diversity of methods available, independent assessment of methods becomes important. Although there have been several benchmark studies of single motif discovery, no similar studies have previously been conducted concerning composite motif discovery. Results We have developed a benchmarking framework for composite motif discovery and used it to evaluate the performance of eight published module discovery tools. Benchmark datasets were constructed based on real genomic sequences containing experimentally verified regulatory modules, and the module discovery programs were asked to predict both the locations of these modules and to specify the single motifs involved. To aid the programs in their search, we provided position weight matrices corresponding to the binding motifs of the transcription factors involved. In addition, selections of decoy matrices were mixed with the genuine matrices on one dataset to test the response of programs to varying levels of noise. Conclusion Although some of the methods tested tended to score somewhat better than others overall, there were still large variations between individual datasets and no single method performed consistently better than the rest in all situations. The variation in performance on individual

  5. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  6. A method for dense packing discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  7. Targeting autophagic pathways for cancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Jin-Ku Bao; Jin-Ming Yang; Yan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process,has drawn an increasing amount of attention in recent years for its role in a variety of human diseases,such as cancer.Notably,autophagy plays an important role in regulating several survival and death signaling pathways that determine cell fate in cancer.To date,substantial evidence has demonstrated that some key autophagic mediators,such as autophagy-related genes (ATGs),PI3K,mTOR,p53,and Beclin-1,may play crucial roles in modulating autophagic activity in cancer initiation and progression.Because autophagy-modulating agents such as rapamycin and chloroquine have already been used clinically to treat cancer,it is conceivable that targeting autophagic pathways may provide a new opportunity for discovery and development of more novel cancer therapeutics.With a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing autophagy,we will have a better opportunity to facilitate the exploitation of autophagy as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.This review discusses the current status of targeting autophagic pathways as a potential cancer therapy.

  8. Accelerators for Discovery Science and Security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M., E-mail: alan_todd@mail.aesys.net; Bluem, H.P.; Jarvis, J.D.; Park, J.H.; Rathke, J.W.; Schultheiss, T.J.

    2015-05-01

    Several Advanced Energy Systems (AES) accelerator projects that span applications in Discovery Science and Security are described. The design and performance of the IR and THz free electron laser (FEL) at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin that is now an operating user facility for physical chemistry research in molecular and cluster spectroscopy as well as surface science, is highlighted. The device was designed to meet challenging specifications, including a final energy adjustable in the range of 15–50 MeV, low longitudinal emittance (<50 keV-psec) and transverse emittance (<20 π mm-mrad), at more than 200 pC bunch charge with a micropulse repetition rate of 1 GHz and a macropulse length of up to 15 μs. Secondly, we will describe an ongoing effort to develop an ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) source that is scheduled for completion in 2015 with prototype testing taking place at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). This tabletop X-band system will find application in time-resolved chemical imaging and as a resource for drug–cell interaction analysis. A third active area at AES is accelerators for security applications where we will cover some top-level aspects of THz and X-ray systems that are under development and in testing for stand-off and portal detection.

  9. Constitutive receptor systems for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G; Jayawickreme, C; Way, J; Armour, S; Queen, K; Watson, C; Ignar, D; Chen, W J; Kenakin, T

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of constitutively active G-protein-coupled receptor systems for drug discovery. Specifically, the ternary complex model is used to define the two major theoretical advantages of constitutive receptor screening-namely, the ability to detect antagonists as well as agonists directly and the fact that constitutive systems are more sensitive to agonists. In experimental studies, transient transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cyclic AMP response element (CRE) luciferase reporter cells with cDNA for human parathyroid hormone receptor, glucagon receptor, and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor showed cDNA concentration-dependent constitutive activity with parathyroid hormone (PTH-1) and glucagon. In contrast, no constitutive activity was observed for GLP-1 receptor, yet responses to GLP-1 indicated that receptor expression had taken place. In another functional system, Xenopus laevi melanophores transfected with cDNA for human calcitonin receptor showed constitutive activity. Nine ligands for the calcitonin receptor either increased or decreased constitutive activity in this assay. The sensitivity of the system to human calcitonin increased with increasing constitutive activity. These data indicate that, for those receptors which naturally produce constitutive activity, screening in this mode could be advantageous over other methods.

  10. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making.

  11. Discovery of Grooves on Gaspra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Simonelli, D.; Belton, M.J.S.; Carr, M.; Chapman, C.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Morrison, D.; Neukum, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery of grooves in Galileo high-resolution images of Gaspra. These features, previously seen only on Mars' satellite Phobos, are most likely related to severe impacts. Grooves on Gaspra occur as linear and pitted depressions, typically 100-200 m wide, 0.8 to 2.5 km long, and 10-20 m deep. Most occur in two major groups, one of which trends approximately parallel to the asteroid's long axis, but is offset by some 15??; the other is approximately perpendicular to this trend. The first of these directions falls along a family of planes which parallel three extensive flat facets identified by Thomas et al., Icarus 107. The occurrence of grooves on Gaspra is consistent with other indications (irregular shape, cratering record) that this asteroid has evolved through a violent collisional history. The bodywide congruence of major groove directions and other structural elements suggests that present-day Gaspra is a globally coherent body. ?? 1994 Academic Press. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge Discovery from Vibration Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The framework as well as the particular algorithms of pattern recognition process is widely adopted in structural health monitoring (SHM. However, as a part of the overall process of knowledge discovery from data bases (KDD, the results of pattern recognition are only changes and patterns of changes of data features. In this paper, based on the similarity between KDD and SHM and considering the particularity of SHM problems, a four-step framework of SHM is proposed which extends the final goal of SHM from detecting damages to extracting knowledge to facilitate decision making. The purposes and proper methods of each step of this framework are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed SHM framework, a specific SHM method which is composed by the second order structural parameter identification, statistical control chart analysis, and system reliability analysis is then presented. To examine the performance of this SHM method, real sensor data measured from a lab size steel bridge model structure are used. The developed four-step framework of SHM has the potential to clarify the process of SHM to facilitate the further development of SHM techniques.

  13. Knowledge discovery from vibration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Li, Jian; Wang, Daoyao

    2014-01-01

    The framework as well as the particular algorithms of pattern recognition process is widely adopted in structural health monitoring (SHM). However, as a part of the overall process of knowledge discovery from data bases (KDD), the results of pattern recognition are only changes and patterns of changes of data features. In this paper, based on the similarity between KDD and SHM and considering the particularity of SHM problems, a four-step framework of SHM is proposed which extends the final goal of SHM from detecting damages to extracting knowledge to facilitate decision making. The purposes and proper methods of each step of this framework are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed SHM framework, a specific SHM method which is composed by the second order structural parameter identification, statistical control chart analysis, and system reliability analysis is then presented. To examine the performance of this SHM method, real sensor data measured from a lab size steel bridge model structure are used. The developed four-step framework of SHM has the potential to clarify the process of SHM to facilitate the further development of SHM techniques.

  14. Discovery Mondays: Zoom on materials

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Following the success of the first Discovery Monday, which had over 100 visitors, the series of evening events in Microcosm continues. On Monday 2nd June, discover the world of materials. Find out how CERN scientists examine, manufacture and study different materials, at different scales. Did you know for example that using electrons you can observe a hair at a scale equivalent to looking at a boat with the naked eye? Also, that using ultrasound, you can measure the thickness of an object that is completely inaccessible? Find out more about these techniques, and also the high-tech machining and soldering that is carried out in CERN's central workshop. Plus, see how engineers can detect tiny leaks through solder points - essential for maintaining the vacuum in the LHC. The evening is open to all, without reservation, suggested age 12 and above. Rendez-vous in Microcosm on Monday 2nd June From 19.30 - 21.00 Free entry For more information : http://www.cern.ch/microcosm Using a scanning microscope, the head o...

  15. The Discovery of Dabigatran Etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne evan Ryn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world and is caused by an excessive stimulation of coagulation. Thrombin is a key serine protease in the coagulation cascade and numerous efforts have been made to develop safe and effective orally active direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs. Current anticoagulant therapy includes the use of indirect thrombin inhibitors (e.g. heparins, low-molecular-weight-heparins [LMWHs] and vitamin K antagonists (VKA such as warfarin. However there are several caveats in the clinical use of these agents including narrow therapeutic window, parenteral delivery, and food- and drug-drug interactions. Dabigatran is a synthetic, reversible DTI with high affinity and specificity for its target binding both free and clot-bound thrombin, and offers a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Large randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that dabigatran provides comparable or superior thromboprophylaxis in multiple thromboembolic disease indications compared to standard of care. This minireview will highlight the discovery and development of dabigatran, the first in a class of new oral anticoagulant (NOAC agents to be licensed worldwide for the prevention of thromboembolism in the setting of orthopedic surgery and stroke prevent in atrial fibrillation.

  16. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating ex- pansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae”. Here it is shown that (i a generic model-independent analysis of this data reveals a uniformly expanding universe, (ii their analysis actually used Newtonian gravity, and finally (iii the data, as well as the CMB fluctuation data, does not require “dark energy” nor “dark matter”, but instead reveals the phenomenon of a dynamical space, which is absent from the Friedmann model.

  17. Mathematical models in biological discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Charles

    1977-01-01

    When I was asked to help organize an American Association for the Advancement of Science symposium about how mathematical models have con­ tributed to biology, I agreed immediately. The subject is of immense importance and wide-spread interest. However, too often it is discussed in biologically sterile environments by "mutual admiration society" groups of "theoreticians", many of whom have never seen, and most of whom have never done, an original scientific experiment with the biolog­ ical materials they attempt to describe in abstract (and often prejudiced) terms. The opportunity to address the topic during an annual meeting of the AAAS was irresistable. In order to try to maintain the integrity ;,f the original intent of the symposium, it was entitled, "Contributions of Mathematical Models to Biological Discovery". This symposium was organized by Daniel Solomon and myself, held during the 141st annual meeting of the AAAS in New York during January, 1975, sponsored by sections G and N (Biological and Medic...

  18. Event Discovery in Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Preston, Dan; Brodley, Carla

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of events in time series can have important implications, such as identifying microlensing events in astronomical surveys, or changes in a patient's electrocardiogram. Current methods for identifying events require a sliding window of a fixed size, which is not ideal for all applications and could overlook important events. In this work, we develop probability models for calculating the significance of an arbitrary-sized sliding window and use these probabilities to find areas of significance. Because a brute force search of all sliding windows and all window sizes would be computationally intractable, we introduce a method for quickly approximating the results. We apply our method to over 100,000 astronomical time series from the MACHO survey, in which 56 different sections of the sky are considered, each with one or more known events. Our method was able to recover 100% of these events in the top 1% of the results, essentially pruning 99% of the data. Interestingly, our method was able to iden...

  19. Serendipity in anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave-Thomas, Emily; Yu, Bo; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-01-10

    It was found that the discovery of 5.8% (84/1437) of all drugs on the market involved serendipity. Of these drugs, 31 (2.2%) were discovered following an incident in the laboratory and 53 (3.7%) were discovered in a clinical setting. In addition, 263 (18.3%) of the pharmaceuticals in clinical use today are chemical derivatives of the drugs discovered with the aid of serendipity. Therefore, in total, 24.1% (347/1437) of marketed drugs can be directly traced to serendipitous events confirming the importance of this elusive phenomenon. In the case of anticancer drugs, 35.2% (31/88) can be attributed to a serendipitous event, which is somewhat larger than for all drugs. The therapeutic field that has benefited the most from serendipity are central nervous system active drugs reflecting the difficulty in designing compounds to pass the blood-brain-barrier and the lack of laboratory-based assays for many of the diseases of the mind.

  20. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  1. NIF Discovery Science Eagle Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jave; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Heeter, Robert; Huntington, Channing; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    For almost 20 years a team of astronomers, theorists and experimentalists have investigated the creation of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds, using a combination of astronomical observations, astrophysical simulations, and recently, scaled laboratory experiments. Eagle Nebula, one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science programs, has completed four NIF shots to study the dense `shadowing' model of pillar formation, and been awarded more shots to study the `cometary' model. These experiments require a long-duration drive, 30 ns or longer, to generate deeply nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. A novel x-ray source featuring multiple UV-driven hohlraums driven is used. The source directionally illuminates a science package, mimicking a cluster of stars. The first four NIF shots generated radiographs of shadowing-model pillars, and suggested that cometary structures can be generated. The velocity and column density profiles of the NIF shadowing and cometary pillars have been compared with observations of the Eagle Pillars made at millimeter observatories, and indicate cometary growth is key to matching observations. Supported in part by a Grant from the DOE OFES HEDLP program. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  3. Discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    As discussed in this document, there are 108 discoveries on the Norwegian continental shelf which so far have not been approved for development. The oil and gas resources of the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea are mostly found in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Eighty-one of the discoveries which are not approved for development are located in the North Sea and more than 60% of the discoveries in this province contain less than 5 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. In the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea there are 27 discoveries which are not approved for development and whose total resources are estimated at 500 mill Sm{sup 3} oil equivalents. About 60% of the oil resources is expected to be comprised by development plans in 1997 or 1998. Another 20% is in new discoveries currently being evaluated or in discoveries containing large volumes of gas. Production forecasts indicate substantial vacant oil processing capacity after 2000. Vacant gas processing capacity will mainly arise after 2005. 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Drug Discovery in Academia- the third way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frearson, Julie; Wyatt, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry continues to re-strategise and focus on low-risk, relatively short term gains for the sake of survival, we need to re-invigorate the early stages of drug discovery and rebalance efforts towards novel modes of action therapeutics and neglected genetic and tropical diseases. Academic drug discovery is one model which offers the promise of new approaches and an alternative organisational culture for drug discovery as it attempts to apply academic innovation and thought processes to the challenge of discovering drugs to address real unmet need. PMID:20922062

  5. Literature mining in support of drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Searls, David B

    2008-11-01

    The drug discovery enterprise provides strong drivers for data integration. While attention in this arena has tended to focus on integration of primary data from omics and other large platform technologies contributing to drug discovery and development, the scientific literature remains a major source of information valuable to pharmaceutical enterprises, and therefore tools for mining such data and integrating it with other sources are of vital interest and economic impact. This review provides a brief overview of approaches to literature mining as they relate to drug discovery, and offers an illustrative case study of a 'lightweight' approach we have implemented within an industrial context.

  6. Two Kinds of Discovery: An Ontological Account

    CERN Document Server

    Gilead, Amihud

    2014-01-01

    What can we discover? As the discussion in this paper is limited to ontological considerations, it does not deal with the discovery of new concepts. It raises the following question: What are the entities or existents that we can discover? There are two kinds of such entities: (1) actual entities, and (2) possible entities, which are pure possibilities. The paper explains why the first kind of discovery depends primarily on the second kind. The paper illustrates the discoveries of individual pure possibilities by presenting examples such as the Higgs particle, Dirac's positron, and Pauli-Fermi's neutrino.

  7. Open PHACTS: semantic interoperability for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Antony J; Harland, Lee; Groth, Paul; Pettifer, Stephen; Chichester, Christine; Willighagen, Egon L; Evelo, Chris T; Blomberg, Niklas; Ecker, Gerhard; Goble, Carole; Mons, Barend

    2012-11-01

    Open PHACTS is a public-private partnership between academia, publishers, small and medium sized enterprises and pharmaceutical companies. The goal of the project is to deliver and sustain an 'open pharmacological space' using and enhancing state-of-the-art semantic web standards and technologies. It is focused on practical and robust applications to solve specific questions in drug discovery research. OPS is intended to facilitate improvements in drug discovery in academia and industry and to support open innovation and in-house non-public drug discovery research. This paper lays out the challenges and how the Open PHACTS project is hoping to address these challenges technically and socially.

  8. History of the discovery of neuronal death in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, V

    1992-11-01

    The German anatomists, M. Ernst and A. Glücksmann, deserve credit for the discovery of widespread cell death in embryonic tissues, including the nervous tissue. In 1934, V. Hamburger described a significant hypoplasia in dorsal root ganglia (DGR) and lateral motor columns, following the extirpation of limb buds in chick embryos. In the early 1940s, Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini in Turin (Italy) repeated the experiment and suggested that the hypoplasia might result from the death of young differentiated neurons. In a joint reinvestigation, published in 1949, large numbers of degenerating neurons were described in brachial DRG, following wing bud extirpations. In the same embryos, Dr. Levi-Montalcini observed massive neuronal death in cervical and thoracic DRG which had not been affected by the operation. This was the discovery of naturally occurring neuronal death. Long after the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) it was recognized that NGF and natural neuronal death are two sides of the same coin: the latter results from an insufficient supply of the former by the target tissues.

  9. Anatomy of the Crowd4Discovery crowdfunding campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlstein, Ethan O

    2013-01-01

    Crowdfunding allows the public to fund creative projects, including curiosity-driven scientific research. Last Fall, I was part of a team that raised $25,460 from an international coalition of "micropatrons" for an open, pharmacological research project called Crowd4Discovery. The goal of Crowd4Discovery is to determine the precise location of amphetamines inside mouse brain cells, and we are sharing the results of this project on the Internet as they trickle in. In this commentary, I will describe the genesis of Crowd4Discovery, our motivations for crowdfunding, an analysis of our fundraising data, and the nuts and bolts of running a crowdfunding campaign. Science crowdfunding is in its infancy but has already been successfully used by an array of scientists in academia and in the private sector as both a supplement and a substitute to grants. With traditional government sources of funding for basic scientific research contracting, an alternative model that couples fundraising and outreach - and in the process encourages more openness and accountability - may be increasingly attractive to researchers seeking to diversify their funding streams.

  10. Specification Editing and Discovery Assistant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will prototype a specification editing and discovery tool (SPEEDY) for C/C++ that will assist software developers with modular formal verification tasks...

  11. Association Rule Discovery and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Data mining, i.e. , mining knowledge from large amounts of data, is a demanding field since huge amounts of data have been collected in various applications. The collected data far exceed peoples ability to analyze it. Thus, some new and efficient methods are needed to discover knowledge from large database. Association rule discovery is an important problem in knowledge discovery and data mining.The association mining task consists of identifying the frequent item sets and then forming conditional implication rule among them. In this paper, we describe and summarize recent work on association rule discovery, offer a new method to association rule mining and point out that association rule discovery can be applied in spatial data mining. It is useful to discover knowledge from remote sensing and geographical information system.``

  12. Combinatorial Discovery and Optimization of New Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Chen; Zhang Xinyi; Yan Dongsheng

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the combinatorial discovery and optimization of new materials, and its background,importance, and application, as well as its current status in the world, are briefly reviewed in this paper.

  13. DNA Coding Based Knowledge Discovery Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-yun; GENG Zhao-feng; SHAO Shi-huang

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA coding based knowledge discovery algorithm was proposed, an example which verified its validity was given. It is proved that this algorithm can discover new simplified rules from the original rule set efficiently.

  14. Indexer Based Dynamic Web Services Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, Saba; Javed, M Younus; Khan, Aihab; Khiyal, Malik Sikandar Hayat

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in web services plays an important role in business to business and business to consumer interaction. Discovery mechanism is not only used to find a suitable service but also provides collaboration between service providers and consumers by using standard protocols. A static web service discovery mechanism is not only time consuming but requires continuous human interaction. This paper proposed an efficient dynamic web services discovery mechanism that can locate relevant and updated web services from service registries and repositories with timestamp based on indexing value and categorization for faster and efficient discovery of service. The proposed prototype focuses on quality of service issues and introduces concept of local cache, categorization of services, indexing mechanism, CSP (Constraint Satisfaction Problem) solver, aging and usage of translator. Performance of proposed framework is evaluated by implementing the algorithm and correctness of our method is shown. The results of p...

  15. Queen's discovery lauded by top scientific journal

    CERN Multimedia

    McGrady, S

    2002-01-01

    A scientific breakthrough at Queen's University's Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has received major international recognition. The journal Science ranked the discovery that cracked the "neutrino problem" second, in the journal's top 10 scientific achievements of 2002 (1/2 page).

  16. 6 CFR 13.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) In general. (1) The following types of discovery are authorized: (i) Requests for production of... Document or of the truth of any relevant fact; (iii) Written interrogatories; and (iv) Depositions....

  17. 34 CFR 33.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying. (2) Requests for admissions of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of...

  18. 22 CFR 35.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... truth of any relevant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For the purpose...

  19. 45 CFR 79.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (a) The following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for... or of the truth of any revelant fact; (3) Written interrogatories; and (4) Depositions. (b) For...

  20. 12 CFR 308.520 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.520 Discovery. (a) The following types of... for admission of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of any relevant fact;...

  1. 10 CFR 1013.21 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... following types of discovery are authorized: (1) Requests for production of documents for inspection and copying; (2) Requests for admissions of the authenticity of any relevant document or of the truth of...

  2. Quasicrystal discovery bags 2011 chemistry Nobel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been awarded to Daniel Shechtman from Technion - Israel institute of Technology for his discovery of quasicrystals, which are materials that have ordered but not periodic structures.

  3. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  4. 29 CFR 1603.210 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.210 Discovery. (a) Unless otherwise ordered by...

  5. Discovery announced of four new elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) have announced the discovery of four new elements: 113, 115, 117 and 118 - completing the periodic table's seventh row.

  6. Group Evolution Discovery in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Group extraction and their evolution are among the topics which arouse the greatest interest in the domain of social network analysis. However, while the grouping methods in social networks are developed very dynamically, the methods of group evolution discovery and analysis are still uncharted territory on the social network analysis map. Therefore the new method for the group evolution discovery called GED is proposed in this paper. Additionally, the results of the first experiments on the ...

  7. The centenary of discovery of radium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, J J; Gerbaulet, A

    1998-12-01

    Henri Becquerel presented the discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie at the Paris Academy of Science on 26th December 1898. One century later, radium has been abandoned, mainly for radiation protection difficulties. It is, however, likely that modern techniques of brachytherapy have inherited to those designed for radium sources, and that radium has cured thousands and thousands patients all over the world for about eighty years. The history of discovery and medical use of radium is summarised.

  8. PTF SN discovery report, April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 19 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  9. PTF SN discovery report, August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Horesh, P. Nugent A.; Cao, Y.; Bellm, E.; Fynbo, J.; Wiis, J.; Olesen, J.; Engedal, L.; Larsen, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Pan, Y.-C.; Graham, M.; Parrent, J.; Quimby, R.; PTF Team

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 12 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  10. PTF SN discovery report, September 8, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Walker, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, O.

    2012-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 8 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  11. PTF SN discovery report, July 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Arcavi, I.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, Peter; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 14 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  12. PTF SN discovery report, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 26 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  13. PTF SN discovery report, October 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.; Hallinan, G.; Kyne, G.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Miller, A.; Fox, O.; Suzuki, N.; Quimby, R.

    2012-10-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 9 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  14. Toward discovery science of human brain function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswal, Bharat B; Mennes, Maarten; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2010-01-01

    Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints...... in the brain. To initiate discovery science of brain function, the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project dataset is freely accessible at www.nitrc.org/projects/fcon_1000/....

  15. The discovery of the structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, G. L.

    2003-04-01

    On 25 April 1953, Nature published a letter by Francis Crick and James Watson, at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, proposing a structure for DNA. This letter marked the beginning of a revolution in biology. Besides Crick and Watson, two other scientists, Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, played key roles in the discovery. After sketching the early careers of the four scientists, the present article gives an account of the physics and chemistry involved in the discovery, and the events leading up to it.

  16. The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bruce S; Gouveia, Kristine; Oprea, Tudor I; Sklar, Larry A

    2014-03-01

    The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD) is an academic research center that specializes in discovery using high throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) integrated with virtual screening, as well as knowledge mining and drug informatics. With a primary focus on identifying small molecules that can be used as chemical probes and as leads for drug discovery, it is a central core resource for research and translational activities at UNM that supports implementation and management of funded screening projects as well as "up-front" services such as consulting for project design and implementation, assistance in assay development and generation of preliminary data for pilot projects in support of competitive grant applications. The HTFC platform in current use represents advanced, proprietary technology developed at UNM that is now routinely capable of processing bioassays arrayed in 96-, 384- and 1536-well formats at throughputs of 60,000 or more wells per day. Key programs at UNMCMD include screening of research targets submitted by the international community through NIH's Molecular Libraries Program; a multi-year effort involving translational partnerships at UNM directed towards drug repurposing - identifying new uses for clinically approved drugs; and a recently established personalized medicine initiative for advancing cancer therapy by the application of "smart" oncology drugs in selected patients based on response patterns of their cancer cells in vitro. UNMCMD discoveries, innovation, and translation have contributed to a wealth of inventions, patents, licenses and publications, as well as startup companies, clinical trials and a multiplicity of domestic and international collaborative partnerships to further the research enterprise.

  17. The Methodological Unboundedness of Limited Discovery Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benjamin Cassel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though designers must understand systems, designers work differently than scientists in studying systems.  Design engagements do not discover whole systems, but take calculated risks between discovery and intervention. For this reason, design practices must cope with open systems, and unpacking the tacit guidelines behind these practices is instructive to systems methodology. This paper shows that design practice yields a methodology which applies across forms of design.  Design practice teaches us to generate ideas and gather data longer, but stop when the return on design has diminished past its cost.  Fortunately, we can reason about the unknown by understanding the character of the unbounded.  We suppose that there might as well be an infinite number of factors, but we can reason about their concentration without knowing all of them.  We demonstrate this concept on stakeholder systems, showing how design discovery informs systems methodology. Using this result, we can apply the methods of parametric design when the parameters are not yet known by establishing the concentration of every kind of factor, entailing a discovery rate of diminishing returns over discovery activities, allowing the analysis of discovery-based trade-offs.  Here, we extend a framework for providing metrics to parametric design, allowing it to express the importance of discovery.

  18. Towards discovery-driven translational research in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Discovery-driven translational research in breast cancer is moving steadily from the study of cell lines to the analysis of clinically relevant samples that, together with the ever increasing number of novel and powerful technologies available within genomics, proteomics and functional genomics......, promise to have a major impact on the way breast cancer will be diagnosed, treated and monitored in the future. Here we present a brief report on long-term ongoing strategies at the Danish Centre for Translational Breast Cancer Research to search for markers for early detection and targets for therapeutic...... biology approach to fight breast cancer....

  19. Integrative discovery of epigenetically derepressed cancer testis antigens in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Glazer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs were first discovered as immunogenic targets normally expressed in germline cells, but differentially expressed in a variety of human cancers. In this study, we used an integrative epigenetic screening approach to identify coordinately expressed genes in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC whose transcription is driven by promoter demethylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our screening approach found 290 significant genes from the over 47,000 transcripts incorporated in the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 expression array. Of the top 55 candidates, 10 showed both differential overexpression and promoter region hypomethylation in NSCLC. Surprisingly, 6 of the 10 genes discovered by this approach were CTAs. Using a separate cohort of primary tumor and normal tissue, we validated NSCLC promoter hypomethylation and increased expression by quantitative RT-PCR for all 10 genes. We noted significant, coordinated coexpression of multiple target genes, as well as coordinated promoter demethylation, in a large set of individual tumors that was associated with the SCC subtype of NSCLC. In addition, we identified 2 novel target genes that exhibited growth-promoting effects in multiple cell lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coordinated promoter demethylation in NSCLC is associated with aberrant expression of CTAs and potential, novel candidate protooncogenes that can be identified using integrative discovery techniques. These findings have significant implications for discovery of novel CTAs and CT antigen directed immunotherapy.

  20. Discovery of a nucleocytoplasmic O-mannose glycoproteome in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Adnan; Larsen, Ida Signe Bohse; Neubert, Patrick;

    2015-01-01

    developed a sensitive lectin enrichment and mass spectrometry workflow for identification of the human O-linked mannose (O-Man) glycoproteome and used this to identify a pleothora of O-Man glycoproteins in human cell lines including the large family of cadherins and protocadherins. Here, we applied...... the workflow to yeast with the aim to characterize the yeast O-Man glycoproteome, and in doing so, we discovered hitherto unknown O-Man glycosites on nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitochondrial proteins in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Such O-Man glycoproteins were not found in our analysis of human cell lines....... However, the type of yeast O-Man nucleocytoplasmic proteins and the localization of identified O-Man residues mirror that of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome found in other eukaryotic cells, indicating that the two different types of O-glycosylations serve the same important biological functions. The discovery...

  1. Telomere and Telomerase: From Discovery to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandari-Nasab

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Cancer is a major cause of death worldwide. It was estimated that 7.6 million people died during 2008 due to cancer and this figure is expected to double by 2030. To conquer this disease, discovery of validated targets and new drugs is a necessity. Evidence Acquisition Telomeres are terminal structures of linear chromosomes in eukaryotes and consist of multiple repetitive sequences. Their main function is to protect and confer stability to chromosome ends and prevent their breakage, end-to-end fusion, and degeneration. Polymerases responsible for replication of DNA in eukaryotes are not able to replicate chromosome ends and, during cell division, chromosomes continuously become shorter from the telomere ends. This shortening will eventually stop cell division. In cancer cells, there is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme called telomerase that allows compensation of telomere shortening and continuation of the cell multiplication process. Results About 90% of cancers need a high level of this enzyme to continue cell multiplication. Since this enzyme set is absent in normal cells, or present at a very low level, use of telomerase inhibitors cannot have significant effects on normal cells. Conclusions Since telomerase is expressed in 90% of cancer cells, its inhibition can be considered as a goal of cancer treatment.

  2. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, p...

  3. Electrochemistry "Discovery" Course for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael Alan; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1997-07-01

    We developed a chemistry selected topics course at Central State University, "Introduction to Laboratory Techniques in Electrochemistry" to: (1) give undergraduates hands-on experience with electrochemical measurements, (2) prepare students for summer research in Fuel Cell and Battery technology. Since students "learn by doing", the course is suitable for undergraduates from sophomore to senior levels. Students complete 6 laboratories, based on a "less is more" philosophy which emphasizes analytic and creative process rather than mandatory topical coverage. Eight electrochemical experiments are available: Construction of Zinc-Copper battery stacks, Lead Acid Battery discharge-charge cycles, Conductimetric titration of aspirin with Ammonium Hydroxide, Ion Selective Electrode determination of Fluoride in water, Cyclic Voltammetry of Potassium Ferricyanide solution, Cyclic Voltammetry of Sulfuric acid on Platinum working electrode, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Lead ion in solution, Differential Pulse Polarography of Lead ion in solution. Topics discussed in lecture include: chemical definitions, electrical definitions, Oxidation-Reduction reactions, Electrochemical series, Electrodes, Electrochemical Cells, direct Coulometry, electrolysis, electrochemical process efficiency, equilibrium Potentiometry, real Cell Voltages, Ion Selective Electrode types and designs, reference electrode designs, working electrode materials, pH buffers, Cyclic Voltammetry, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, Polarography, differential pulse Polarography, and simple electrochemical instrumentation circuits.

  4. High-throughput strategies for the discovery and engineering of enzymes for biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Philippe; Béchet, Max; Bigan, Muriel; Caly, Delphine; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Coutte, François; Flahaut, Christophe; Heuson, Egon; Leclère, Valérie; Lecouturier, Didier; Phalip, Vincent; Ravallec, Rozenn; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Rénato

    2017-02-01

    Innovations in novel enzyme discoveries impact upon a wide range of industries for which biocatalysis and biotransformations represent a great challenge, i.e., food industry, polymers and chemical industry. Key tools and technologies, such as bioinformatics tools to guide mutant library design, molecular biology tools to create mutants library, microfluidics/microplates, parallel miniscale bioreactors and mass spectrometry technologies to create high-throughput screening methods and experimental design tools for screening and optimization, allow to evolve the discovery, development and implementation of enzymes and whole cells in (bio)processes. These technological innovations are also accompanied by the development and implementation of clean and sustainable integrated processes to meet the growing needs of chemical, pharmaceutical, environmental and biorefinery industries. This review gives an overview of the benefits of high-throughput screening approach from the discovery and engineering of biocatalysts to cell culture for optimizing their production in integrated processes and their extraction/purification.

  5. Recent lab-on-chip developments for novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2017-02-17

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro total analysis systems (μTAS) revolutionized the biochemical and electronic industries, and this miniaturization process became a key driver for many markets. Now, it is a driving force for innovations in life sciences, diagnostics, analytical sciences, and chemistry, which are called 'lab-on-a-chip, (LOC)' devices. The use of these devices allows the development of fast, portable, and easy-to-use systems with a high level of functional integration for applications such as point-of-care diagnostics, forensics, the analysis of biomolecules, environmental or food analysis, and drug development. In this review, we report on the latest developments in fabrication methods and production methodologies to tailor LOC devices. A brief overview of scale-up strategies is also presented together with their potential applications in drug delivery and discovery. The impact of LOC devices on drug development and discovery has been extensively reviewed in the past. The current research focuses on fast and accurate detection of genomics, cell mutations and analysis, drug delivery, and discovery. The current research also differentiates the LOC devices into new terminology of microengineering, like organ-on-a-chip, stem cells-on-a-chip, human-on-a-chip, and body-on-a-chip. Key challenges will be the transfer of fabricated LOC devices from lab-scale to industrial large-scale production. Moreover, extensive toxicological studies are needed to justify the use of microfabricated drug delivery vehicles in biological systems. It will also be challenging to transfer the in vitro findings to suitable and promising in vivo models. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. What Does Galileo's Discovery of Jupiter's Moons Tell Us about the Process of Scientific Discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Given that hypothetico-deductive reasoning has played a role in other important scientific discoveries, asks the question whether it plays a role in all important scientific discoveries. Explores and rejects as viable alternatives possible alternative scientific methods such as Baconian induction and combinatorial analysis. Discusses the…

  7. Using C. elegans for antimicrobial drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalermos, Athanasios; Muhammed, Maged; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The number of microorganism strains with resistance to known antimicrobials is increasing. Therefore, there is a high demand for new, non-toxic and efficient antimicrobial agents. Research with the microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can address this high demand for the discovery of new antimicrobial compounds. In particular, C. elegans can be used as a model host for in vivo drug discovery through high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. Areas covered This review introduces the use of substitute model hosts and especially C. elegans in the study of microbial pathogenesis. The authors also highlight recently published literature on the role of C. elegans in drug discovery and outline its use as a promising host with unique advantages in the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. Expert opinion C. elegans can be used, as a model host, to research many diseases, including fungal infections and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, high-throughput techniques, for screening chemical libraries, can also be facilitated. Nevertheless, C. elegans and mammals have significant differences that both limit the use of the nematode in research and the degree by which results can be interpreted. That being said, the use of C. elegans in drug discovery still holds promise and the field continues to grow, with attempts to improve the methodology already underway. PMID:21686092

  8. Facilitating Service Discovery with Semantic Overlay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jin; Hao Wu; Xiao-Min Ning

    2006-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing share many common characteristics.It is believed that the combination of the two emerging techniques is a very promising method in promoting the web services (WS). Because the service discovery plays a key role in the integration, here a P2P-based framework to manage the knowledge of service and locating services is proposed. In this paper, the details of the principle, constructing and maintaining of service semantic overlay architecture have been described, and the way how the semantic overlay facilitates discovery of service resources is illustrated. To enable the semantic web service superiority, Service Ontology, which is considered as the service semantic model, is employed to depict service. The service discovery includes two phases: searching on the service semantic overlay; and local discovery in peer's service repository. Various solutions have been proposed to realize those two phases.Furthermore, tests are carried out to evaluate service discovery on the architecture.

  9. Internet Naming and Discovery Architecture and Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Joud S

    2013-01-01

    Naming is an integral building block within data networks and systems and is becoming ever more important as complex data-centric usage models emerge. Internet Naming and Discovery is timely in developing a unified model for studying the topic of naming and discovery. It details the architectural and economic tools needed for designing naming and discovery schemes within the broader context of internetwork architecture.   Readers will find in this book a historic overview of the Internet and a comprehensive survey of the literature, followed by and an in-depth examination of naming and discovery. Specific topics covered include: ·         formal definitions of name, address, identifier, locator, binding, routing, discovery, mapping, and resolution; ·         a discussion of the properties of names and bindings, along with illustrative case studies; ·         taxonomy that helps in organizing the solution space, and more importantly in identifying new avenues for contributing to the...

  10. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  11. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  12. A new era for GPCR research: structures, biology anddrug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H Eric XU; Rui-ping XIAO

    2012-01-01

    Cells in a living organism must communicate with each other through continuously sending and receiving messages.G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of communicating molecules at the cell surface.They transmit diverse extracellular signals,ranging from light and small chemical hormones to large peptide and protein hormones,and as such they play crucial roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes.More importantly,GPCRsare the most successful class of drug targets that are relevant to many major diseases,including cancer,heart failure,and inflammatory diseases.Over 50% of currently used drugs are targeted to GPCRs.However,these drugs target only 50-60 GPCRs,leaving the majority of human GPCRs,exceeding 800,unexplored for drug discovery.Given the prominent roles of GPCRs in biology and their successful track records as drug targets,GPCRs have become a hot frontier in basic research of life science and therapeutic discovery of translational medicines.

  13. Ribozymes: applications to functional analysis and gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Maki; Sano, Masayuki; Miyagishi, Makoto; Taira, Kazunari

    2004-08-01

    Ribozymes are catalytic RNA molecules that cleave RNAs with high specificity. Since the discovery of these non-protein enzymes, the rapidly developing field of ribozymes has been of particular interest because of the potential utility of ribozymes as tools for reversed genetics. However, despite extensive efforts, the activity of ribozymes in vivo has not usually been high enough to achieve the desirable biological effects. Now, by the use of RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoters, the ribozyme activity in cells has been successfully improved by developing efficient transport systems for the transcripts to the cytoplasm. In addition, it is possible to cleave a specific target RNA in cells by using an allosterically controllable ribozyme or an RNA-protein hybrid ribozyme. These ribozymes are potentially applicable to molecular gene therapy and efficient gene discovery systems. Furthermore, the developed pol III expression system is applicable to the expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The advantage of such ribozymes over siRNAs is the high specificity of the ribozyme that would not cause interferon responses.

  14. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya’ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein–pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism. PMID:27044079

  15. Discovery, Characterization, and Dynamics of Transiting Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Eylen, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Are we alone in the Universe? So far, the question remains unanswered, but a significant leap forward was achieved two decades ago, with the discovery of the first planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Almost 2000 exoplanets have now been detected. They are diverse in radius, mass and orbital......, in this thesis I make use of the transit method, which is based on the observed brightness drop of a star as a planet crosses in front of it. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the discovery of new planets and the understanding of exoplanet properties. I report the discovery...... results of this study, constraining the masses and bulk compositions of three planets. The second part of this thesis focuses on dynamics of exoplanets. All the solar system planets orbit in nearly the same plane, and that plane is also aligned with the equatorial plane of the Sun. That is not true...

  16. Enabling the Discovery of Gravitational Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational radiation was announced with the publication of the results of a physics experiment involving over a thousand participants. This was preceded by a century of theoretical work, involving a similarly large group of physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists. This huge effort was enabled by a substantial commitment of resources, both public and private, to develop the different strands of this complex research enterprise, and to build a community of scientists to carry it out. In the excitement following the discovery, the role of key enablers of this success has not always been adequately recognized in popular accounts. In this talk, I will try to call attention to a few of the key ingredients that proved crucial to enabling the successful discovery of gravitational waves, and the opening of a new field of science.

  17. Protein chemical synthesis in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa; Mayer, John P

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of novel therapeutics to combat human disease has traditionally been among the most important goals of research chemists. After a century of innovation, state-of-the-art chemical protein synthesis is now capable of efficiently assembling proteins of up to several hundred residues in length from individual amino acids. By virtue of its unique ability to incorporate non-native structural elements, chemical protein synthesis has been seminal in the recent development of several novel drug discovery technologies. In this chapter, we review the key advances in peptide and protein chemistry which have enabled our current synthetic capabilities. We also discuss the synthesis of D-proteins and their applications in mirror image phage-display and racemic protein crystallography, the synthesis of enzymes for structure-based drug discovery, and the direct synthesis of homogenous protein pharmaceuticals.

  18. Penicillin: its discovery and early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    In August 1928, Alexander Fleming returned from a vacation to his usually messy, disordered laboratory. In one of the Petri dishes that had not been touched by the Lysol, he noticed an unusual phenomenon: separate colonies of staphylococci and, near the dish's edge, a colony of mold approximately 20 mm in diameter. The finding proved to be a watershed in the history of medicine. This discovery lay dormant for some time before other researchers took up the challenge to investigate its clinical possibilities. Two investigators at Oxford, Sir Howard Walter Florey and Ernst Boris Chain, brought penicillin's potential for medical use to fruition and, along with Fleming, shared the 1945 Nobel Prize for Medicine. The discovery and development of penicillin represent one of the most important developments in the annals of medical history. This article presents a brief overview of the events that occurred in the progress from discovery to implementation as a therapeutic agent.

  19. Virtual drug discovery: beyond computational chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardoni, Francois; Arvanites, Anthony C

    2010-02-01

    This editorial looks at how a fully integrated structure that performs all aspects in the drug discovery process, under one company, is slowly disappearing. The steps in the drug discovery paradigm have been slowly increasing toward virtuality or outsourcing at various phases of product development in a company's candidate pipeline. Each step in the process, such as target identification and validation and medicinal chemistry, can be managed by scientific teams within a 'virtual' company. Pharmaceutical companies to biotechnology start-ups have been quick in adopting this new research and development business strategy in order to gain flexibility, access the best technologies and technical expertise, and decrease product developmental costs. In today's financial climate, the term virtual drug discovery has an organizational meaning. It represents the next evolutionary step in outsourcing drug development.

  20. Literature mining for the discovery of hidden connections between drugs, genes and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijters, Raoul; van Vugt, Marianne; Smeets, Ruben; van Schaik, René; de Vlieg, Jacob; Alkema, Wynand

    2010-09-23

    The scientific literature represents a rich source for retrieval of knowledge on associations between biomedical concepts such as genes, diseases and cellular processes. A commonly used method to establish relationships between biomedical concepts from literature is co-occurrence. Apart from its use in knowledge retrieval, the co-occurrence method is also well-suited to discover new, hidden relationships between biomedical concepts following a simple ABC-principle, in which A and C have no direct relationship, but are connected via shared B-intermediates. In this paper we describe CoPub Discovery, a tool that mines the literature for new relationships between biomedical concepts. Statistical analysis using ROC curves showed that CoPub Discovery performed well over a wide range of settings and keyword thesauri. We subsequently used CoPub Discovery to search for new relationships between genes, drugs, pathways and diseases. Several of the newly found relationships were validated using independent literature sources. In addition, new predicted relationships between compounds and cell proliferation were validated and confirmed experimentally in an in vitro cell proliferation assay. The results show that CoPub Discovery is able to identify novel associations between genes, drugs, pathways and diseases that have a high probability of being biologically valid. This makes CoPub Discovery a useful tool to unravel the mechanisms behind disease, to find novel drug targets, or to find novel applications for existing drugs.

  1. The role of nanobiotechnology in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kewal K

    2009-01-01

    The potential applications of nanotechnology in life sciences, particularly nanobiotechnology, include those for drug discovery. This chapter shows how several of the nanotechnologies including nanoparticles and various nanodevices such as nanobiosensors and nanobiochips are being used to improve drug discovery. Nanoscale assays using nanoliter volumes contribute to cost saving. Some nanosubstances such as fullerenes are drug candidates. There are some safety concerns about the in vivo use of nanoparticles that are being investigated. However, future prospects for applications in healthcare of drugs discovered through nanotechnology and their role in the development of personalized medicine appear to be excellent.

  2. [The centenary of the discovery of radium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, J J; Gerbaulet, A

    1999-01-01

    Henri Becquerel presented the discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie at the Paris Académie des Sciences on 26th December 1898. One century later, radium has been abandoned, mainly for the reason of radiation safety concerns. It is, however, likely that modern techniques of brachytherapy are the successors of those designed for radium sources, and that radium has cured thousands and thousands patients all over the word for about 80 years. The history of discovery and medical use of radium is summarised.

  3. An environment for knowledge discovery in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Junior; Cesar, Roberto M; Ferreira, João E; Gubitoso, Marco D

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a data mining environment for knowledge discovery in bioinformatics applications. The system has a generic kernel that implements the mining functions to be applied to input primary databases, with a warehouse architecture, of biomedical information. Both supervised and unsupervised classification can be implemented within the kernel and applied to data extracted from the primary database, with the results being suitably stored in a complex object database for knowledge discovery. The kernel also includes a specific high-performance library that allows designing and applying the mining functions in parallel machines. The experimental results obtained by the application of the kernel functions are reported.

  4. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking work in genetics has identified thousands of small-effect genetic variants throughout the genome that are associated with almost all major diseases. These genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often proposed as a source of future medical breakthroughs. However......, with several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...... alongside existing drug discovery methods. Our aim is to evaluate human genetic confidence as a rationale for drug target selection....

  5. Stable Feature Selection for Biomarker Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zengyou

    2010-01-01

    Feature selection techniques have been used as the workhorse in biomarker discovery applications for a long time. Surprisingly, the stability of feature selection with respect to sampling variations has long been under-considered. It is only until recently that this issue has received more and more attention. In this article, we review existing stable feature selection methods for biomarker discovery using a generic hierarchal framework. We have two objectives: (1) providing an overview on this new yet fast growing topic for a convenient reference; (2) categorizing existing methods under an expandable framework for future research and development.

  6. Net present value approaches for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svennebring, Andreas M; Wikberg, Jarl Es

    2013-12-01

    Three dedicated approaches to the calculation of the risk-adjusted net present value (rNPV) in drug discovery projects under different assumptions are suggested. The probability of finding a candidate drug suitable for clinical development and the time to the initiation of the clinical development is assumed to be flexible in contrast to the previously used models. The rNPV of the post-discovery cash flows is calculated as the probability weighted average of the rNPV at each potential time of initiation of clinical development. Practical considerations how to set probability rates, in particular during the initiation and termination of a project is discussed.

  7. Discovery stories in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Diana Jaleh

    School science has been criticized for its lack of emphasis on the tentative, dynamic nature of science as a process of learning more about our world. This criticism is the guiding force for this present body of work, which focuses on the question: what are the educational benefits for middle school students of reading texts that highlight the process of science in the form of a discovery narrative? This dissertation traces my journey through a review of theoretical perspectives of narrative, an analysis of first-hand accounts of scientific discovery, the complex process of developing age-appropriate, cohesive and engaging science texts for middle school students, and a comparison study (N=209) that seeks to determine the unique benefits of the scientific discovery narrative for the interest in and retained understanding of conceptual information presented in middle school science texts. A total of 209 middle school participants in nine different classrooms from two different schools participated in the experimental study. Each subject read two science texts that differed in topic (the qualities of and uses for radioactive elements and the use of telescopic technology to see planets in space) and genre (the discovery narrative and the "conceptually known exposition" comparison text). The differences between the SDN and CKE versions for each topic were equivalent in all possible ways (initial introduction, overall conceptual accuracy, elements of human interest, coherence and readability level), save for the unique components of the discovery narrative (i.e., love for their work, acknowledgement of the known, identification of the unknown and the explorative or experimental process to discovery). Participants generally chose the discovery narrative version as the more interesting of the two texts. Additional findings from the experimental study suggest that science texts in the form of SDNs elicit greater long-term retention of key conceptual information, especially

  8. The discovery of elements 113 to 118

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utyonkov, Vladimir; Oganessian, Yuri; Dmitriev, Sergey; Itkis, Mikhail; Moody, Kenton; Stoyer, Mark; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Roberto, James; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Hamilton, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    Discovery and investigation of the "Island of stability" of superheavy nuclei at the separator DGFRS in the 238U-249Cf+ 48Ca reactions is reviewed. The results are compared with the data obtained in chemistry experiments and at the separators SHIP, BGS, TASCA, and GARIS. The synthesis of the heaviest nuclei, their decay properties, and methods of identification are discussed and compared with the criteria that must be satisfied for claiming the discovery of a new chemical element. The role of shell effects in the stability of superheavy nuclei is demonstrated by comparison of the experimental results with empirical systematics and theoretical data.

  9. 喉癌 Hep -2细胞来源的 exosomes 的发现和鉴定%Discovery and isolation of exosomes derived from laryngocarcinoma Hep - 2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉晓滨; 梁俊毅; 刘启才; 谢景华

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe whether laryngocarcinoma Hep - 2 cells can secrete exosomes,and to identify exosomes morphologically. Methods:A large number of laryngocarcinoma Hep - 2 cells were cultivated,the yield of exosomes increased by hot shock,cell culture supernatant was gathered. Firstly,the culture supernatant was pretreat-ment by clarification through a 3 / 0. 8μm small filter element for deep filter to remove particles and impurities with larger diameter. Secondly,exosome isolation kit was used to isolate and extract exosomes. Cells culture supernatant 4ml was gathered,the solutions of the kit were added into the supernatant in proper sequence,then filtered by the special column,the concentrated fluid was obtained. The exosomes were observed under transmission electron microscopy. Re-sults:Exosomes could be isolated and extracted from culture supernatant of laryngocarcinoma Hep - 2 cells,and it present circular or elliptical vesicle with bilayer membrane,high density,well - distribution,and with range from 20 to 100nm of diameter. Conclusion:Exosomes can be secreted from laryngocarcinoma Hep - 2 cells was first discovered, which provide a new research to laryngocarcinoma immunotherapy.%目的:观察喉癌 Hep -2细胞可否分泌 exosomes,并从形态学角度鉴定。方法:大量培养喉癌 Hep -2细胞,热休克处理,收集培养上清。先通过3/0.8μm 深层过滤小型滤芯对上清进行预处理,去除直径较大的颗粒和杂质。采用 Exosome Isolation Kit(商品化试剂盒)收集培养上清液4ml,依次加入 Exosome Isolation Kit内试剂,通过 exosomes 提取专用过滤柱,收集浓缩液。用高倍透射电子显微镜对 exosomes 做鉴定。结果:成功从喉癌 Hep -2细胞培养上清中分离提取出 exosomes,电镜观察见 exosomes 呈圆形或椭圆形双层膜的囊泡状结构,直径约20~100nm,密度较高,分散均匀。结论:首次发现喉癌细胞自身能分泌 exosomes,为喉

  10. Target-oriented discovery of a new esterase-producing strain Enterobacter sp. ECU1107 for whole cell-catalyzed production of (2S,3R)-3-phenylglycidate as a chiral synthon of Taxol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong-Jie; Pan, Jiang; Yu, Hui-Lei; Zheng, Gao-Wei; Xu, Jian-He

    2013-07-01

    A new strain, Enterobacter sp. ECU1107, was identified among over 200 soil isolates using a two-step screening strategy for the enantioselective synthesis of (2S,3R)-3-phenylglycidate methyl ester (PGM), a key intermediate for production of a potent anticancer drug Taxol®. An organic-aqueous biphasic system was employed to reduce spontaneous hydrolysis of the substrate PGM and isooctane was found to be the most suitable organic solvent. The temperature and pH optima of the whole cell-mediated bioreaction were 40 °C and 6.0, respectively. Under these reaction conditions, the enantiomeric excess (ee(s)) of (2S,3R)-PGM recovered was greater than 99 % at approximately 50 % conversion. The total substrate loading in batch reaction could reach 600 mM. By using whole cells of Enterobacter sp. ECU1107, (2S,3R)-PGM was successfully prepared in decagram scale in a 1.0-l mechanically stirred reactor, affording the chiral epoxy ester in >99 % ee s and 43.5 % molar yield based on the initial load of racemic substrate.

  11. Drug Discovery Goes Three-Dimensional: Goodbye to Flat High-Throughput Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglen, Richard M; Randle, David H

    2015-06-01

    Immortalized cells, generated from two-dimensional cell culture techniques, are widely used in compound screening, lead optimization, and drug candidate selection. However, such cells lack many characteristics of cells in vivo. This could account for the high failure rates of lead candidates in clinical evaluation. New approaches from cell biology, materials science, and bioengineering are increasing the utility of three-dimensional (3D) culture. These approaches have become more compatible with automation and, thus, provide more physiologically relevant cells for high-throughput/high-content screening, notably in oncology drug discovery. Techniques range from simple 3D spheroids, comprising one or more cell types, to complex multitissue organoids cultured in extracellular matrix gels or microfabricated chips. Furthermore, each approach can be applied to stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, thereby providing additional phenotypic relevance and the exciting potential to enable screening in disease-specific cell types.

  12. Discovery of convoys in trajectory databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeung, Hoyoung; Yiu, Man Lung; Zhou, Xiaofang

    2008-01-01

    of trucks and carpooling of vehicles. Although there has been extensive research on trajectories in the literature, none of this can be applied to retrieve correctly exact convoy result sets. Motivated by this, we develop three efficient algorithms for convoy discovery that adopt the well-known filter...

  13. 15 CFR 904.240 - Discovery generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Hearing preparation: Materials. A party may not obtain discovery of materials prepared in anticipation of... preparation of his or her case and is unable without undue hardship to obtain the substantial equivalent of the materials by other means. Mental impressions, conclusions, opinions, or legal theories of...

  14. 10 CFR 2.1018 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 2.1018 Section 2.1018 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... legal theories of an attorney or other representative of a party, potential party, or interested... section does not apply to requests for the testimony of the NRC regulatory staff under § 2.709. (g)...

  15. Data mining and knowledge discovery handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Maimon, Oded

    2010-01-01

    This book organizes key concepts, theories, standards, methodologies, trends, challenges and applications of data mining and knowledge discovery in databases. It first surveys, then provides comprehensive yet concise algorithmic descriptions of methods, including classic methods plus the extensions and novel methods developed recently. It also gives in-depth descriptions of data mining applications in various interdisciplinary industries.

  16. Data mining and knowledge discovery handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Maimon, Oded

    2006-01-01

    Organizes major concepts, theories, methodologies, trends, challenges and applications of data mining (DM) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD). This book provides algorithmic descriptions of classic methods, and also suitable for professionals in fields such as computing applications, information systems management, and more.

  17. Neutrino discoveries lead to precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, M

    2002-01-01

    The science of neutrino physics has reached a watershed, with discovery giving way to precision measurements. The author reports from the XXth International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Topics covered are low-energy neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, long-baseline experiments, accelerator experiments, neutrino properties, neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology, dark matter and neutrino telescopes.

  18. Cognitive Training Using Self-Discovery Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joan W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Attempted cognitive training of Raven's Progressive Matrices using guided self-discovery, but without directly providing strategies. Thirty-six older and 36 younger adults were pretested, underwent training, and were posttested. Found no significant difference in improvement between younger and older adults. Failed to find evidence for successful…

  19. Knowledge Discovery from Communication Network Alarm Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Knowledge Discovery in Databases(KDD) to learn valuable knowledge hidden in network alarm databases is introduced. To get such knowledge, we propose an efficient method based on sliding windows (named as Slidwin) to discover different episode rules from time sequential alarm data. The experimental results show that given different thresholds parameters, large amount of different rules could be discovered quickly.

  20. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  1. 41 CFR 105-70.021 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discovery. 105-70.021 Section 105-70.021 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General Services Administration...

  2. (Self-) Discovery Service: Helping Students Help Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debonis, Rocco; O'Donnell, Edward; Thomes, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) has been heavily used by UMUC students since its implementation in fall 2011, but experience has shown that it is not always the most appropriate source for satisfying students' information needs and that they often need assistance in understanding how the tool works and how to use it effectively. UMUC librarians have…

  3. Resource Discovery within the Networked "Hybrid" Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Sally-Anne

    This paper focuses on the development, adoption, and integration of resource discovery, knowledge management, and/or knowledge sharing interfaces such as interactive portals, and the use of the library's World Wide Web presence to increase the availability and usability of information services. The introduction addresses changes in library…

  4. Data Mining and Discovery of Chemical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wencong, Lu

    In this chapter, the Data mining methods adopted are briefly introduced. The main focuses are on the successful applications of data mining methods in chemistry and chemical engineering. The discoveries of chemical knowledge cover the formation of ternary Intermetallic compounds, structure activity relationships of drugs, and industrial optimization based on chemical data mining methods, especially by using statistical pattern recognition and support vector machine.

  5. Behind the discovery of "Nissenbaum's fixative".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, G

    2001-01-01

    The author describes the serendipitous discovery, conception, development, and history of Nissenbaum's Fixative while an undergraduate biology major in the early 1950s. The subsequent uses, applications, and modifications over the past forty-seven years are also described. Some of the modifications omitted from his short original paper are mentioned. Highlights of his subsequent career in the field of medicine are noted.

  6. Computational approaches to natural product discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, M.H.; Fischbach, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the earliest Streptomyces genome sequences, the promise of natural product genome mining has been captivating: genomics and bioinformatics would transform compound discovery from an ad hoc pursuit to a high-throughput endeavor. Until recently, however, genome mining has advanced natura

  7. Toward discovery science of human brain function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biswal, B.B.; Mennes, M.; Zuo, X.N.; Gohel, S.; Kelly, C.; Smith, S.M.; Beckmann, C.F.; Adelstein, J.S.; Buckner, R.L.; Colcombe, S.; Dogonowski, A.M.; Ernst, M.; Fair, D.; Hampson, M.; Hoptman, M.J.; Hyde, J.S.; Kiviniemi, V.J.; Kotter, R.; Li, S.J.; Lin, C.P.; Lowe, M.J.; Mackay, C.; Madden, D.J.; Madsen, K.H.; Margulies, D.S.; Mayberg, H.S.; McMahon, K.; Monk, C.S.; Mostofsky, S.H.; Nagel, B.J.; Pekar, J.J.; Peltier, S.J.; Petersen, S.E.; Riedl, V.; Rombouts, S.A.; Rypma, B.; Schlaggar, B.L.; Schmidt, S.; Seidler, R.D.; Siegle, G.J.; Sorg, C.; Teng, G.J.; Veijola, J.; Villringer, A.; Walter, M.; Wang, L.; Weng, X.C.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S.; Williamson, P.; Windischberger, C.; Zang, Y.F.; Zhang, H.Y.; Castellanos, F.X.; Milham, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints of a pr

  8. Computer-Assisted Discovery and Proof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2007-12-10

    With the advent of powerful, widely-available mathematical software, combined with ever-faster computer hardware, we are approaching a day when both the discovery and proof of mathematical facts can be done in a computer-assisted manner. his article presents several specific examples of this new paradigm in action.

  9. Taking Discovery Systems for a Test Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Melissa; Schmidt, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at American University investigated user preferences for discovery layer features, interface design, and content. They tested local implementations of WorldCat Local and Aquabrowser by conducting a group test with eighteen students and individual tests with ten students. Students searched a given question and a topic of their choosing…

  10. OPTIMIZED GATEWAY DISCOVERY IN HYBRID MANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Triviño

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile users are expected to demand access to the Internet anywhere and anytime. In a MANET context,a device which is about to connect to external hosts needs the route to the element which communicatesthe MANET with the Internet. This element is the Internet Gateway. To inform about its presence as wellas about some configuration parameters, the Gateway sends MRA messages. In a similar way to ad hocrouting protocols, the Gateway can generate the messages on demand (reactively, periodically(proactively or combining both previous strategies in a hybrid gateway discovery. Specifically, in thehybrid gateway discovery, the Gateway periodically sends the MRA messages in a restricted area. Thenodes that are outside this area demand the Gateway information reactively. This gateway discoveryrequires the setting of the number of hops that define the proactive area, also called the TTL value.Network performance can be improved when the Gateway uses information such as the position of thesources to adjust the TTL value. In this paper, we transfer the decision about the dimensions of theproactive zone to the mobile nodes so more network conditions are taken into account. Simulation resultsshow that the proposed gateway discovery outperforms other hybrid gateway discovery schemes.

  11. 47 CFR 1.729 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Reports Involving Common Carriers Formal Complaints § 1.729 Discovery. (a) Subject to paragraph (i... other electronic format that provides: (1) Indexing by useful identifying information about the... witnesses shall be subject to deposition in Accelerated Docket proceedings under the same rules...

  12. 40 CFR 164.51 - Other discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other discovery. 164.51 Section 164.51... GOVERNING HEARINGS, UNDER THE FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT, ARISING FROM REFUSALS TO... OTHER HEARINGS CALLED PURSUANT TO SECTION 6 OF THE ACT General Rules of Practice Concerning...

  13. 17 CFR 10.42 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 10.42 Section 10.42 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE Prehearing... the location where the respondents or their counsel live or work. Otherwise, the documents shall...

  14. Rough – Granular Computing knowledge discovery models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Eissa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical domain has become one of the most important areas of research in order to richness huge amounts of medical information about the symptoms of diseases and how to distinguish between them to diagnose it correctly. Knowledge discovery models play vital role in refinement and mining of medical indicators to help medical experts to settle treatment decisions. This paper introduces four hybrid Rough – Granular Computing knowledge discovery models based on Rough Sets Theory, Artificial Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithm and Rough Mereology Theory. A comparative analysis of various knowledge discovery models that use different knowledge discovery techniques for data pre-processing, reduction, and data mining supports medical experts to extract the main medical indicators, to reduce the misdiagnosis rates and to improve decision-making for medical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed models utilized two medical datasets: Coronary Heart Disease dataset and Hepatitis C Virus dataset. The main purpose of this paper was to explore and evaluate the proposed models based on Granular Computing methodology for knowledge extraction according to different evaluation criteria for classification of medical datasets. Another purpose is to make enhancement in the frame of KDD processes for supervised learning using Granular Computing methodology.

  15. Scheele's Priority for the Discovery of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassebaum, H.; Schufle, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Concludes that Carl Scheele first observed oxygen and clearly understood what he was observing in June 1771, when he heated manganese dioxide with concentrated sulfuric acid. This was more than three years before Lavoisier or Priestley (who is usually credited with the discovery of oxygen) made similar observations. (Author/MLH)

  16. The Discovery and Progress of AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1 The Discovery It is a modern plague: the first great pandemic ofthe second half of the 20th century. The plat, clinic-sounding name given to the disease by epidemiolo-gists- acquired immune deficiency syndrome- hasbeen shortened to AIDS.

  17. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-07-29

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. This publication describes how the KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of bioenergy-related information.

  18. 24 CFR 26.42 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 26.42 Section 26.42 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HEARING..., custody, condition, and location of any books, documents, or other tangible things and the identity...

  19. 24 CFR 26.18 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 26.18 Section 26.18 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HEARING... location of any books, documents, or other tangible things and the identity and location of persons...

  20. From Mere Coincidences to Meaningful Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2007-01-01

    People's reactions to coincidences are often cited as an illustration of the irrationality of human reasoning about chance. We argue that coincidences may be better understood in terms of rational statistical inference, based on their functional role in processes of causal discovery and theory revision. We present a formal definition of…

  1. Drug development: portals of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Susan E; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A British humorist said, "There is much to be said for failure. It is much more interesting than success." This CCR Focus section is aimed at identifying lessons to be learned from difficulties encountered in recent years during development of anticancer agents. Clearly, we have not found a silver bullet tyrosine kinase inhibitor against solid tumors comparable with imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Although vemurafenib for B-Raf-mutated melanoma and crizotinib for non-small cell lung cancers with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements were developed rapidly and offer hope for individualized targeted therapies, the development of agents targeting a number of other pathways has been slower and less successful. These agents include drugs for blocking the insulin-like growth factor I/insulin receptor pathways, mitotic kinase inhibitors, and Hsp90 antagonists. Several potentially useful, if not groundbreaking, agents have had setbacks in clinical development, including trastuzumab emtansine, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and satraplatin. From experience, we have learned the following: (i) not every altered protein or pathway is a valid anticancer target; (ii) drugs must effectively engage the target; (iii) the biology of the systems we use must be very well understood; and (iv) clinical trials must be designed to assess whether the drug reached and impaired the target. It is also important that we improve the drug development enterprise to enhance enrollment, streamline clinical trials, reduce financial risk, and encourage the development of agents for niche indications. Such enormous challenges are offset by potentially tremendous gains in our understanding and treatment of cancer.

  2. Discovery in a World of Mashups

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T. A.; Ritschel, B.; Hourcle, J. A.; Moon, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    When the first digital information was stored electronically, discovery of what existed was through file names and the organization of the file system. With the advent of networks, digital information was shared on a wider scale, but discovery remained based on file and folder names. With a growing number of information sources, named based discovery quickly became ineffective. The keyword based search engine was one of the first types of a mashup in the world of Web 1.0. Embedded links from one document to another with prescribed relationships between files and the world of Web 2.0 was formed. Search engines like Google used the links to improve search results and a worldwide mashup was formed. While a vast improvement, the need for semantic (meaning rich) discovery was clear, especially for the discovery of scientific data. In response, every science discipline defined schemas to describe their type of data. Some core schemas where shared, but most schemas are custom tailored even though they share many common concepts. As with the networking of information sources, science increasingly relies on data from multiple disciplines. So there is a need to bring together multiple sources of semantically rich information. We explore how harvesting, conceptual mapping, facet based search engines, search term promotion, and style sheets can be combined to create the next generation of mashups in the emerging world of Web 3.0. We use NASA's Planetary Data System and NASA's Heliophysics Data Environment to illustrate how to create a multi-discipline mash-up.

  3. Inseparability of science history and discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Herndon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Science is very much a logical progression through time. Progressing along a logical path of discovery is rather like following a path through the wilderness. Occasionally the path splits, presenting a choice; the correct logical interpretation leads to further progress, the wrong choice leads to confusion. By considering deeply the relevant science history, one might begin to recognize past faltering in the logical progression of observations and ideas and, perhaps then, to discover new, more precise understanding. The following specific examples of science faltering are described from a historical perspective: (1 Composition of the Earth's inner core; (2 Giant planet internal energy production; (3 Physical impossibility of Earth-core convection and Earth-mantle convection, and; (4 Thermonuclear ignition of stars. For each example, a revised logical progression is described, leading, respectively, to: (1 Understanding the endo-Earth's composition; (2 The concept of nuclear georeactor origin of geo- and planetary magnetic fields; (3 The invalidation and replacement of plate tectonics; and, (4 Understanding the basis for the observed distribution of luminous stars in galaxies. These revised logical progressions clearly show the inseparability of science history and discovery. A different and more fundamental approach to making scientific discoveries than the frequently discussed variants of the scientific method is this: An individual ponders and through tedious efforts arranges seemingly unrelated observations into a logical sequence in the mind so that causal relationships become evident and new understanding emerges, showing the path for new observations, for new experiments, for new theoretical considerations, and for new discoveries. Science history is rich in "seemingly unrelated observations" just waiting to be logically and causally related to reveal new discoveries.

  4. Swedish Chemists and Discovery of the Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-10-01

    All of the elements not already known from antiquity were discovered in Europe and North America. So which country ranks number one on the discovery list? The question occurred to me while leafing through reference 1 in search of thermodynamic data on silicon. Never having seen such a tabulation, I wondered if it might prove useful in teaching. The question has a sports-related flavor that will appeal to many students. Personally, I picked England or Germany for #1. The actual result is surprising. The ranking considering only up to atomic number 103 is as follows: Note: Where two or more independent discoveries have been made, each country is credited. In the "others" category Austria and Denmark each has two discoveries. The remaining countries, with one each, are Finland, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Romania, Russia, and Spain. The high place for the USA is primarily due to the work done at Berkeley and Los Alamos on the transuranics. Without these discoveries, the US would have tied with Switzerland at three elements. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this tabulation is that Swedish chemists have discovered the most elements. Four chemists alone account for twelve of the 20 discoveries: Baron Jöns Jakob Berzelius (1779-1848) is credited with four elements. His pupil, friend, and assistant, Carl Gustav Mosander (1797-1858) discovered three. P. T. Cleve also found three elements and Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786) discovered two. Biographical research on the Swedish chemists is a suitable assignment at the introductory level. Reasons for the predominance of Swedish chemists presents a challenging student research topic in the history of chemistry. Another interesting question at the introductory level is, transuranics aside, who discovered the most elements? At the more advanced level the question becomes, why? Literature Cited: 1. Emsley, J. The Elements; Clarendon: Oxford, 1989.

  5. High Tc: The Discovery of RBCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C. W.

    2007-03-01

    It was said by Emerson that ``there is no history; there is only biography.'' This is especially true when the events are recounted by a person who, himself, has been heavily involved and the line between history and autobiography can become blurred. However, it is reasonable to say that discovery itself is not a series of accidents but an inevitable product of each development stage of scientific knowledge as was also pointed out by Holden et al. (1) The discovery of RBCO (2,3) with R = Y, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu is no exception. In this presentation, I will briefly recount several events that were crucial to the discovery of RBCO: those before 1986 (4) that sowed the seeds in our group important to our later high temperature superconductivity effort; those in 1986 (5) that were critical to our discovery of the 93 K RBCO soon after the discovery of the 35 K high temperature superconductor by M"uller and Bednorz (6); and those in 1987 when the barrier of the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature of 77 K was finally conquered. 1. G. J. Holton et al., American Scientist 84, 364 (1996). 2. M. K. Wu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 908 (1987). 3. P. H. Hor et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1891 (1987). 4. C. W. Chu et al., S. S. Comm. 18, 977 (1976); C. W. Chu and V. Diatchenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 572 (1978); T. H. Lin et al., Phys. Rev. B(RC) 29, 1493 (1984); J. H. Lin et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 58, 363 (1985). 5. C. W. Chu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 405 (1987); C. W. Chu et al., Science 235, 567 (1987). 6. J. G. Bednorz and K. A. M"uller, Z. Phys. B64, 189 (1986).

  6. Allosteric inhibitors of hepatitis C polymerase: discovery of potent and orally bioavailable carbon-linked dihydropyrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Linton, Angelica; Tatlock, John; Gonzalez, Javier; Borchardt, Allen; Abreo, Mel; Jewell, Tanya; Patel, Leena; Drowns, Matthew; Ludlum, Sarah; Goble, Mike; Yang, Michele; Blazel, Julie; Rahavendran, Ravi; Skor, Heather; Shi, Stephanie; Lewis, Cristina; Fuhrman, Shella

    2007-08-23

    The discovery and optimization of a novel class of carbon-linked dihydropyrones as allosteric HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors are presented. Replacement of the sulfur linker atom with carbon reduced compound acidity and greatly increased cell permeation. Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to the identification of compounds, exemplified by 23 and 24, with significantly improved antiviral activities in the cell-based replicon assay and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  7. Beyond discovery: A review of the critique of the discovery view of opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen T.

    This paper systematically reviews and synthesises the critique since 2000 of the discovery view's interpretation of entrepreneurial opportunities. The review shows that the framing of the debate as polarised between two oppositions, the discovery view versus the creation view, is oversimplified......, emphasising distributed agency, non-linear processes, opportunities as formed, and the role of creativity. However, the paper also points to unresolved issues in relation to all four propositions that require further empirical and conceptual work....

  8. Novel avenues of drug discovery and biomarkers for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Hou, Jinling

    2011-02-01

    Globally, developed nations spend a significant amount of their resources on health care initiatives that poorly translate into increased population life expectancy. As an example, the United States devotes 16% of its gross domestic product to health care, the highest level in the world, but falls behind other nations that enjoy greater individual life expectancy. These observations point to the need for pioneering avenues of drug discovery to increase life span with controlled costs. In particular, innovative drug development for metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus becomes increasingly critical given that the number of diabetic people will increase exponentially over the next 20 years. This article discusses the elucidation and targeting of novel cellular pathways that are intimately tied to oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus for new treatment strategies. Pathways that involve wingless, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) precursors, and cytokines govern complex biological pathways that determine both cell survival and longevity during diabetes mellitus and its complications. Furthermore, the role of these entities as biomarkers for disease can further enhance their utility irrespective of their treatment potential. Greater understanding of the intricacies of these unique cellular mechanisms will shape future drug discovery for diabetes mellitus to provide focused clinical care with limited or absent long-term complications.

  9. New Hepatitis C Virus Drug Discovery Strategies and Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Snawar; Barretto, Naina; Uprichard, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Current treatment options are expensive, not effective in all patients and are associated with serious side effects. While pre-clinical anti-HCV drug screening is still hampered by the lack of readily infectable small animal models, the development of cell culture HCV experimental model systems has driven a promising new wave of HCV antiviral drug discovery. Areas covered This review contains a concise overview of current HCV treatment options and limitations with a subsequent in-depth focus on the available experimental models and novel strategies that have and continue to enable important advances in HCV drug development. Expert opinion With a large cohort of chronically HCV infected patients progressively developing liver disease that puts them at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic decompensation, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics that are well-tolerated and effective in all patients and against all HCV genotypes. Significant advances in HCV experimental model development have expedited drug discovery; however, additional progress is needed. Importantly, the current trends and momentum in the field suggests that we will continue to overcome critical experimental challenges to reach this end goal. PMID:22861052

  10. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Jensen, Bo Skaaning; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Christophersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels. A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion channel targets accessible for drug screening. Specifically, genuine HTS parallel processing techniques based on arrays of planar silicon chips are being developed, but also lower throughput sequential techniques may be of value in compound screening, lead optimization, and safety screening. The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery.

  11. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis contributes to biology and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Di; Trynka, Gosia; Raj, Towfique; Terao, Chikashi; Ikari, Katsunori; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Akari; Yoshida, Shinji; Graham, Robert R.; Manoharan, Arun; Ortmann, Ward; Bhangale, Tushar; Denny, Joshua C.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Jian; Ye, Lingying; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Jian; Xie, Gang; Keystone, Ed; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Zhou, Xuezhong; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Stahl, Eli A.; Diogo, Dorothée; Cui, Jing; Liao, Katherine; Guo, Michael H.; Myouzen, Keiko; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Coenen, Marieke J.H.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Bridges, S. Louis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Toes, Rene E.M.; Tak, Paul P.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne; de Vries, Niek; Moreland, Larry W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Kubo, Michiaki; Liu, Jun S.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Franke, Lude; Visscher, Peter M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Xu, Huji; Behrens, Timothy W.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Momohara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological datasets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)1. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis in a total of >100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating ~10 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 1012–4. We devised an in-silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation5, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL)6, and pathway analyses7–9 – as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency (PID), hematological cancer somatic mutations and knock-out mouse phenotypes – to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery. PMID:24390342

  12. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  13. The Discovery of a Class of High-Temperature Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, K. Alex; Bednorz, J. Georg

    1987-01-01

    Describes the new class of oxide superconductors, the importance of these materials, and the concepts that led to its discovery. Summarizes the discovery itself and its early confirmation. Discusses the observation of a superconductive glass state in percolative samples. (TW)

  14. Ferruccio Ritossa's scientific legacy 50 years after his discovery of the heat shock response: a new view of biology, a new society, and a new journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Antonio; Santoro, M Gabriella; Tanguay, Robert M; Hightower, Lawrence E

    2012-03-01

    The pioneering discovery of the heat shock response by the Italian scientist Ferruccio Ritossa reached maturity this year, 2012. It was 50 years ago that Professor Ritossa, through an extraordinary combination of serendipity, curiosity, knowledge and inspiration, published the first observation that cells could mount very strong transcriptional activity when exposed to elevated temperatures, which was coined the heat shock response. This discovery led to the identification of heat shock proteins, which impact many areas of current biology and medicine, and has created a new avenue for more exciting discoveries. In recognition of the discovery of the heat shock response, Cell Stress Society International (CSSI) awarded Professor Ritossa with the CSSI medallion in October 2010 in Dozza, Italy. This article is based on a session of the Fifth CSSI Congress held in Québec commemorating Professor Ritossa and his discovery.

  15. Implementation of BacMam virus gene delivery technology in a drug discovery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Thomas A; Condreay, J Patrick; Ames, Robert S; Rees, Stephen; Romanos, Michael A

    2007-05-01

    Membrane protein targets constitute a key segment of drug discovery portfolios and significant effort has gone into increasing the speed and efficiency of pursuing these targets. However, issues still exist in routine gene expression and stable cell-based assay development for membrane proteins, which are often multimeric or toxic to host cells. To enhance cell-based assay capabilities, modified baculovirus (BacMam virus) gene delivery technology has been successfully applied to the transient expression of target proteins in mammalian cells. Here, we review the development, full implementation and benefits of this platform-based gene expression technology in support of SAR and HTS assays across GlaxoSmithKline.

  16. An extended dual search space model of scientific discovery learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joolingen, van Wouter R.; Jong, de Ton

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a theory of scientific discovery learning which is an extension of Klahr and Dunbar''s model of Scientific Discovery as Dual Search (SDDS) model. We present a model capable of describing and understanding scientific discovery learning in complex domains in terms of the SDDS fr

  17. Discovery and the QuarkNet Data Portfolio

    CERN Document Server

    Cecire, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Student and public understanding of new discoveries in particle physics are enhanced by preparatory activities. Such activities give the user experience and context to understand a representation of the data associated with the discovery and some familiarity with the topics associated with the discovery. The QuarkNet Data Portfolio is a developing model of high-quality activities that address this need.

  18. 5 CFR 1201.72 - Explanation and scope of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... location of persons with knowledge of relevant facts. Discovery requests that are directed to nonparties... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Explanation and scope of discovery. 1201... PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Procedures for Appellate Cases Discovery § 1201.72 Explanation and...

  19. Discovery learning and learner autonomy development in secondary vocational school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芩利

    2015-01-01

    It is imperative to cultivate learner autonomy in secondary vocational school and discovery learning is a good choice.The author reviews the definition and principle of discovery learning and learning autonomy,concludes the adaptation of discovery learning from characteristics of vocational students,and finally illustrates an example in teaching.

  20. Graph-Based Methods for Discovery Browsing with Semantic Predications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkowski, Bartlomiej; Fiszman, Marcelo; Miller, Christopher M;

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension to literature-based discovery that goes beyond making discoveries to a principled way of navigating through selected aspects of some biomedical domain. The method is a type of "discovery browsing" that guides the user through the research literature on a specified phenomen...

  1. Discovery learning and learner autonomy development in secondary vocational school

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芩利

    2015-01-01

    It is imperative to cultivate learner autonomy in secondary vocational school and discovery learning is a good choice.The author reviews the definition and principle of discovery learning and learning autonomy,concludes the adaptation of discovery learning from characteristics of vocational students,andfinally illustrates an example in teaching.

  2. Discovery of Potent, Selective and Reversible Caspase-3 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yongxin; John Tam; Paul Tawa; Donald W. Nicholson; Robert J. Zamboni; André Giroux; John Colucci; Christopher I. Bayly; Daniel J. Mckay; Sophie Roy; Steve Xanthoudakis; John Vaillancourt; Dita M. Rasper

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis have revealed the importance of a group of cysteinyl aspartate specific proteases, the caspases, in the programmed cell death process (Hengartner, M.O. Nature 2000, 407, 770). Caspase-3, in particular,has been characterized as the dominant effector caspase involved in the proteolytic cleavage of a variety of protein substrates including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases and DNA repair enzymes during apoptosis (Nicholson, D. W. Cell Death Differ. 1999, 6, 1028). The development of potent and selective caspase-3 inhibitors has thus emerged as an attractive therapeutic target. In the presentation,the identification of a series of potent, selective and reversible non-peptidyl caspase-3 inhibitors containing a pyrazinone core (1) will be presented. SAR optimization at R1, R2, R3 and R4 led to the discovery of inhibitors such as 2 with excellent in vitro activities (IC50 against rh-caspase-3: 5 nM; IC50 against camptothecin induced apoptotic cell death in NT2 cells: 20 nM). Compounds such as 2 also displayed excellent in vivo activities in a number of animal models of acute injuries (see: Methot, N. et al, J. Exp. Med. 2004, 119, 199; Toulmond, S. et al, British J. Pharm. 2004, 141,689; Holtzman,D.M. et al, JBC, 2002, 277, 30128), and selected examples will be discussed during the presentation.

  3. Discovery of Convoys in Trajectory Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Jeung, Hoyoung; Zhou, Xiaofang; Jensen, Christian S; Shen, Heng Tao

    2010-01-01

    As mobile devices with positioning capabilities continue to proliferate, data management for so-called trajectory databases that capture the historical movements of populations of moving objects becomes important. This paper considers the querying of such databases for convoys, a convoy being a group of objects that have traveled together for some time. More specifically, this paper formalizes the concept of a convoy query using density-based notions, in order to capture groups of arbitrary extents and shapes. Convoy discovery is relevant for real-life applications in throughput planning of trucks and carpooling of vehicles. Although there has been extensive research on trajectories in the literature, none of this can be applied to retrieve correctly exact convoy result sets. Motivated by this, we develop three efficient algorithms for convoy discovery that adopt the well-known filter-refinement framework. In the filter step, we apply line-simplification techniques on the trajectories and establish distance b...

  4. Resources publication and discovery in manufacturing grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Fei; HU Ye-fa; DING Yu-feng; SHENG Bu-yun; ZHOU Zu-de

    2006-01-01

    In the manufacturing grid's architecture, Resources Management System (RMS) is the central component responsible for disseminating resource information across the grid, accepting requests for resources, discovering and scheduling the suitable resources that match the requests for the global grid resource, and executing the requests on scheduled resources. In order to resolve the problem of resources publication and discovery in Manufacturing Grid (MGrid), the classification of manufacturing resources is first researched after which the resources encapsulation class modes are put forward. Then, a scalable two-level resource management architecture is constructed on the model, which includes root nodes, domain nodes and leaf nodes. And then an RMS is proposed, and the resources publication and discovery mechanism are detailedly described. At last, an application prototype is developed to show the validity and the practicability of the proved theory and method.

  5. Secure Neighbor Position Discovery in VANETs

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Marco; Chiasserini, Carla Fabiana; Papadimitratos, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    Many significant functionalities of vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) require that nodes have knowledge of the positions of other vehicles, and notably of those within communication range. However, adversarial nodes could provide false position information or disrupt the acquisition of such information. Thus, in VANETs, the discovery of neighbor positions should be performed in a secure manner. In spite of a multitude of security protocols in the literature, there is no secure discovery protocol for neighbors positions. We address this problem in our paper: we design a distributed protocol that relies solely on information exchange among one-hop neighbors, we analyze its security properties in presence of one or multiple (independent or colluding) adversaries, and we evaluate its performance in a VANET environment using realistic mobility traces. We show that our protocol can be highly effective in detecting falsified position information, while maintaining a low rate of false positive detections.

  6. Semantic-Discovery of Construction Project Files

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Jiayi; Chimay J. Anumba

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a construction project generates a huge amount of information for processing.Most project information is recorded in digital files and managed in a decentralized way. Current document management tools do not consider the semantic relationships between files and then cannot discover files based on their content or ensure information consistency across various information repositories. This paper presents a semantic-discovery method for accessing project information across repositories. By adopting semantic web technologies, including extensible markup language (XML), ontology, and logic rules, the se-mantic-discovery tool can access project files by their properties and relations. The method has been ap-plied to searching for files using documents from a real project. The results show that the semantic content of a file can be used to ensure that only related files are retrieved.

  7. Node discovery problem for a social network

    CERN Document Server

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a practical heuristic algorithm to address a node discovery problem. The node discovery problem is to discover a clue on the person, who does not appear in the observed records, but is relevant functionally in affecting decision-making and behavior of an organization. We define two topological relevance of a node in a social network (global and local relevance). Association between the topological relevance and the functional relevance is studied with a few example networks in criminal organizations. We propose a heuristic algorithm to infer an invisible, functionally relevant person. Its performance (precision, recall, and F value) is demonstrated with a simulation experiment using a network derived from the Watts-Strogatz (WS) model.

  8. Golden Jubilee photos: A gargantuan discovery

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In July 1973, a groundbreaking discovery was announced in CERN's Main Auditorium: the Gargamelle group had found proof of the weak neutral current. The discovery confirmed the electroweak theory, which had predicted that the weak force and the electromagnetic force were different facets of the same interaction. This paved the way for the Grand Unified Theory, which holds that just after the birth of the Universe all forces were actually the same... Gargamelle, whose "body" now reposes in the Microcosm garden, was a huge bubble chamber weighing around 1000 tonnes, filled with 18 tonnes of liquid freon. Its size, worthy of the giant Gargantua - the son of Gargamelle - was mighty enough to catch neutrinos, the elusive neutral particles which career through space without leaving any tracks. In the photograph, an unseen neutrino interacts with an electron and emerges as a neutrino instead of changing into a muon - what is seen (vertically) is the track of the electron. This lepton event offers p...

  9. VEGA Infrastructure for Resource Discovery in Grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG YiLi(龚奕利); DONG FangPeng(董方鹏); LI Wei(李伟); XU ZhiWei(徐志伟)

    2003-01-01

    Grids enable users to share and access large collections and various types of resources in wide areas, and how to locate resources in such dynamic, heterogeneous and autonomous distributed environments is a key and challenging issue. In this paper, a three-level decentralized and dynamic VEGA Infrastructure for Resource Discovery (VIRD) is proposed. In this architecture, every Border Grid Resource Name Server (BGRNS) or Grid Resource Name Server (GRNS)has its own local policies, governing information organization, management and searching. Changes in resource information are propagated dynamically among GRNS servers according to a link-statelike algorithm. A client can query its designated GRNS either recursively or iteratively. Optimizing techniques, such as shortcut, are adopted to make the dynamic framework more flexible and efficient. A simulator called SimVIRD is developed to verify the proposed architecture and algorithms.Experiment results indicate that this architecture could deliver good scalability and performance for grid resource discovery.

  10. Supernova discoveries 2010: statistics and trends

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2013-01-01

    We have inspected all supernova discoveries reported during 2010, a total of 538 events. This number includes a small number of "supernova impostors" (bright extragalactic eruptions) but not novae or events that turned out to be Galactic stars. We examine the statistics of all discovered objects, as well as those of the subset of spectroscopically-confirmed events. This year shows the rise of wide-field non-targeted supernova surveys to prominence, with the largest numbers of events contributed by the CRTS and PTF surveys (189 and 88 events respectively), followed by the integrated contribution of numerous amateurs (82 events). Among spectroscopically-confirmed events the PTF (88 events) leads, before amateur discoveries (69 events), closely followed by the CRTS and PS1 surveys (67 and 63 events, respectively). Traditional galaxy-targeted surveys such as LOSS and CHASE, maintain a strong contribution (50 and 36 events, respectively) with high spectroscopic completeness (96% for LOSS). It is interesting to not...

  11. Ontology Based Qos Driven Web Service Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Suganyakala

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In today's scenario web services have become a grand vision to implement the business process functionalities. With increase in number of similar web services, one of the essential challenges is to discover relevant web service with regard to user specification. Relevancy of web service discovery can be improved by augmenting semantics through expressive formats like OWL. QoS based service selection will play a significant role in meeting the non-functional user requirements. Hence QoS and semantics has been used as finer search constraints to discover the most relevant service. In this paper, we describe a QoS framework for ontology based web service discovery. The QoS factors taken into consideration are execution time, response time, throughput, scalability, reputation, accessibility and availability. The behavior of each web service at various instances is observed over a period of time and their QoS based performance is analyzed.

  12. Discovery of the intermediate W boson

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Press conference on 25 January 1983 when the announcement was made of the discovery of the intermediate W boson at CERN. From right to left: Carlo Rubbia, spokesman of the UA1 experiment; Simon van der Meer, responsible for developing the stochastic cooling technique; Herwig Schopper, Director- General of CERN; Erwin Gabathuler, Research Director at CERN, and Pierre Darriulat, spokesman of the UA2 experiment, whose results confirmed those from Carlo Rubbia's experiment.

  13. The Neutron's Discovery - 80 Years on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John D.

    A brief review is given of selected highlights in scientific developments from the birth of modern nuclear physics at the end of the 19th century to the discovery of the neutron in 1932. This is followed by some important milestones in neutron and reactor physics that have led to our current understanding and implementation of nuclear technologies. The beginnings can be traced back to the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen, the identification of natural radioactivity by Becquerel and the discovery of the electron by Thomson, towards the end of the 19th Century. Rutherford was a key figure in experimental physics who determined the structure of the atom and who inspired his students at McGill, Manchester and Cambridge Universities (many of whom would become Nobel laureates) in the pursuit of their physics research. One of Rutherford's students, James Chadwick, had studied the work carried out by Bothe and Becker on alpha particle-induced disintegration of light elements which had led to their observation of high energy penetrating radiation that neither they nor the Joliot-Curies could identify. Chadwick knew that the only possible explanation was the emission of a neutron in the nuclear reaction. He carried out tests in the Cavendish Laboratory and submitted his now classical paper identifying the neutron to the periodical Nature in 1932. The discovery of the neutron and of nuclear fission in 1939 opened up new areas for scientific investigation, in, for example, astrophysics, geology, neutron and nuclear physics. The prospects for nuclear power in particular appeared to be unlimited and both civil and military applications have been actively pursued. Many new experimental facilities have been designed and built to provide intense sources of neutrons for research purposes. Work carried out in such centres is included in the programme of the 7th International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography, an important forum for discussion of the latest research work of this

  14. From Discovery to Impact - Near Earth Asteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Tichý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Near-Earth Objects (NEOs are the most important of the small bodies of the solar system, having the capability of close approaches to the Earth and the chance to collide with the Earth.  We present here the current system of discovery of these dangerous objects, standards for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry, system of impact probabilities calculations, and also determination of impact site and evacuation area.

  15. Discovery Radiomics for Computed Tomography Cancer Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Devinder; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Chung, Audrey G.; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A.; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lung cancer is the leading cause for cancer related deaths. As such, there is an urgent need for a streamlined process that can allow radiologists to provide diagnosis with greater efficiency and accuracy. A powerful tool to do this is radiomics. Method: In this study, we take the idea of radiomics one step further by introducing the concept of discovery radiomics for lung cancer detection using CT imaging data. Rather than using pre-defined, hand-engineered feature models as with ...

  16. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  17. Discovery stories in the science classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, Diana Jaleh

    2010-01-01

    School science has been criticized for its lack of emphasis on the tentative, dynamic nature of science as a process of learning more about our world. This criticism is the guiding force for this present body of work, which focuses on the question: what are the educational benefits for middle school students of reading texts that highlight the process of science in the form of a discovery narrative? This dissertation traces my journey through a review of theoretical perspectives of narrative...

  18. Science, fiction and the age of discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Mark; Hook, Neil

    2007-05-01

    This article suggests that the age of discovery and enlightenment of the Scientific Revolution and the universe of Copernicus was responsible for a new way of imagining, which we now call science fiction. This history is important for an understanding of the evolution of the physics, and shows how scientists, such as Johannes Kepler and Galileo Galilei, and philosophers, such as the Bishop of Llandaff, Francis Godwin, and Cyrano de Bergerac, used the fictional imagination to help visualise the unknown.

  19. Discovery Monday - Behind the plug: communication networks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ever wondered what happens to your email when you click "send"? And when you make a phone call, how does your voice travel down the wire? Find out more about communication networks and their applications. Do not miss the next Discovery Monday in Microcosm on 1st March (see Bulletin 9/2004)! Monday 1st March from 7.30pm to 9.00pm, in Microcosm. Entrance Free.

  20. Services Discovery for Distributed Network Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    More and more distributed applications are deployed around interconnected network, which makes it necessary for network measurement services to address the scalability and robustness requirements. This paper discusses a service discovery for integrated network measurement architecture (INMA), including finding the location of measurement agent, the path of the measurement and the network attributes of the end-to-end path or host. It also describes the functions of the major building blocks used to construct the measurement architecture.

  1. Identifying and quantifying heterogeneity in high content analysis: application of heterogeneity indices to drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H Gough

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in biomedical research, drug discovery and diagnostics is understanding how seemingly identical cells can respond differently to perturbagens including drugs for disease treatment. Although heterogeneity has become an accepted characteristic of a population of cells, in drug discovery it is not routinely evaluated or reported. The standard practice for cell-based, high content assays has been to assume a normal distribution and to report a well-to-well average value with a standard deviation. To address this important issue we sought to define a method that could be readily implemented to identify, quantify and characterize heterogeneity in cellular and small organism assays to guide decisions during drug discovery and experimental cell/tissue profiling. Our study revealed that heterogeneity can be effectively identified and quantified with three indices that indicate diversity, non-normality and percent outliers. The indices were evaluated using the induction and inhibition of STAT3 activation in five cell lines where the systems response including sample preparation and instrument performance were well characterized and controlled. These heterogeneity indices provide a standardized method that can easily be integrated into small and large scale screening or profiling projects to guide interpretation of the biology, as well as the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Understanding the heterogeneity in the response to perturbagens will become a critical factor in designing strategies for the development of therapeutics including targeted polypharmacology.

  2. Material Discovery and Design with Dynamic Charge Reactive Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Atomic scale computational simulations of multi-phase systems is increasingly important as our ability to simulate nanometer-sized systems becomes routine. The recently developed charge optimized many body potential (COMB) potentials have significantly enhanced our ability to carry out atomic-scale simulations of heterogeneous material systems. The formalism of this potential combines variable charge electrostatic interactions with a classical analytical bond-order potential. It therefore has the capacity to adaptively model metallic, covalent, ionic, and van der Waals bonding within the same simulation cell and dynamically determine the charges on individual atoms according to the local environment. The utility of the COMB potentials is illustrated for materials design and discovery by exploring the structure, stability, mechanical properties, and thermal properties of intermetallic systems and oxide-metal interfaces. They are also used to address key questions associated with corrosion, thin film growth, and heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. RNA Editing and Drug Discovery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is vital to provide the RNA and protein complexity to regulate the gene expression. Correct RNA editing maintains the cell function and organism development. Imbalance of the RNA editing machinery may lead to diseases and cancers. Recently, RNA editing has been recognized as a target for drug discovery although few studies targeting RNA editing for disease and cancer therapy were reported in the field of natural products. Therefore, RNA editing may be a potential target for therapeutic natural products. In this review, we provide a literature overview of the biological functions of RNA editing on gene expression, diseases, cancers, and drugs. The bioinformatics resources of RNA editing were also summarized.

  4. Lambda-Display: A Powerful Tool for Antigen Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gargano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1985, phage display technology has been successfully used in projects aimed at deciphering biological processes and isolating molecules of practical value in several applications. Bacteriophage lambda, representing a classical molecular cloning and expression system has also been exploited for generating large combinatorial libraries of small peptides and protein domains exposed on its capsid. More recently, lambda display has been consistently and successfully employed for domain mapping, antigen discovery and protein interaction studies or, more generally, in functional genomics. We show here the results obtained by the use of large libraries of cDNA and genomic DNA for the molecular dissection of the human B-cell response against complex pathogens, including protozoan parasites, bacteria and viruses. Moreover, by reviewing the experimental work performed in recent investigations we illustrate the potential of lambda display in the diagnostics field and for identifying antigens useful as targets for vaccine development.

  5. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  6. In Silico Discovery of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxue Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNA. They play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and are essential for cell growth and survival. The aaRSs are one of the leading targets for development of antibiotic agents. In this review, we mainly focused on aaRS inhibitor discovery and development using in silico methods including virtual screening and structure-based drug design. These computational methods are relatively fast and cheap, and are proving to be of great benefit for the rational development of more potent aaRS inhibitors and other pharmaceutical agents that may usher in a much needed generation of new antibiotics.

  7. Exploiting plug-and-play electrochemistry for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lixia; Teng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemistry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique for chemical analysis of living cells, biologically active molecules and metabolites. Electrochemical biosensor, microfluidics and mass spectrometry are the most frequently used methods for electrochemical detection and monitory, which comprise a collection of extremely useful measurement tools for various fields of biology and medicine. Most recently, electrochemistry has been shown to be coupled with nanotechnology and genetic engineering to generate new enabling technologies, providing rapid, selective, and sensitive detection and diagnosis platforms. The primary focus of this review is to highlight the utility of electrochemical strategies and their conjunction with other approaches for drug metabolism and discovery. Current challenges and possible future developments and applications of electrochemistry in drug studies are also discussed.

  8. Two kinds of knowledge in scientific discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridewell, Will; Langley, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Research on computational models of scientific discovery investigates both the induction of descriptive laws and the construction of explanatory models. Although the work in law discovery centers on knowledge-lean approaches to searching a problem space, research on deeper modeling tasks emphasizes the pivotal role of domain knowledge. As an example, our own research on inductive process modeling uses information about candidate processes to explain why variables change over time. However, our experience with IPM, an artificial intelligence system that implements this approach, suggests that process knowledge is insufficient to avoid consideration of implausible models. To this end, the discovery system needs additional knowledge that constrains the model structures. We report on an extended system, SC-IPM, that uses such information to reduce its search through the space of candidates and to produce models that human scientists find more plausible. We also argue that although people carry out less extensive search than SC-IPM, they rely on the same forms of knowledge--processes and constraints--when constructing explanatory models.

  9. Novel Directions for Diabetes Mellitus Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Wang, Shaohui

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus impacts almost 200 million individuals worldwide and leads to debilitating complications. New avenues of drug discovery must target the underlying cellular processes of oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy, and inflammation that can mediate multi-system pathology during diabetes mellitus. Areas Covered We examine novel directions for drug discovery that involve the β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursor nicotinamide, the cytokine erythropoietin, the NAD+-dependent protein histone deacetylase SIRT1, the serine/threonine-protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and the wingless pathway. Implications for the targeting of these pathways that oversee gluconeogenic genes, insulin signaling and resistance, fatty acid beta-oxidation, inflammation, and cellular survival are presented. Expert Opinion Nicotinamide, erythropoietin, and the downstram pathways of SIRT1, mTOR, forkhead transcription factors, and wingless signaling offer exciting prospects for novel directions of drug discovery for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Future investigations must dissect the complex relationship and fine modulation of these pathways for the successful translation of robust reparative and regenerative strategies against diabetes mellitus and the complications of this disorder. PMID:23092114

  10. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  11. Pathways to new drug discovery in neuropsychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berk Michael

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently a crisis in drug discovery for neuropsychiatric disorders, with a profound, yet unexpected drought in new drug development across the spectrum. In this commentary, the sources of this dilemma and potential avenues to redress the issue are explored. These include a critical review of diagnostic issues and of selection of participants for clinical trials, and the mechanisms for identifying new drugs and new drug targets. Historically, the vast majority of agents have been discovered serendipitously or have been modifications of existing agents. Serendipitous discoveries, based on astute clinical observation or data mining, remain a valid option, as is illustrated by the suggestion in the paper by Wahlqvist and colleagues that treatment with sulfonylurea and metformin reduces the risk of affective disorder. However, the identification of agents targeting disorder-related biomarkers is currently proving particularly fruitful. There is considerable hope for genetics as a purist, pathophysiologically valid pathway to drug discovery; however, it is unclear whether the science is ready to meet this promise. Fruitful paradigms will require a break from the orthodoxy, and creativity and risk may well be the fingerprints of success. See related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/150

  12. Enhancing Service Discovery Performance Over Home Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intisar Al-Mejibli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Service discovery protocols are used to facilitate dynamic cooperation among devices / services with minimal user intervention. These protocols work by exchanging messages to identify and locate the relevant services. When new devices and services are added the flow of messages often appears as a burst. These bursts act as a critical factor that may cause the loss messages which dramatically influences the performance of the service discovery process. Thus, the loss of messages results in uncompleted discovery process which will directly affect the sharing of resources in home networks. This paper proposes an algorithm that computes the minimum period of time required between a consecutive burst of messages and determines the minimum required queue sizes for the routers to manage the traffic and avoid dropped messages. The algorithm has been applied to the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP protocol and considered the used of Active Queue Management (AQM. It was tested when the routers were connected in two configurations; decentralised and centralised. The message length and bandwidth of the links among the routers were taken into consideration. The result shows better improvement in number of dropped messages `among the routers.

  13. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G; Foster, Ian T; Evans, James A

    2015-11-24

    A scientist's choice of research problem affects his or her personal career trajectory. Scientists' combined choices affect the direction and efficiency of scientific discovery as a whole. In this paper, we infer preferences that shape problem selection from patterns of published findings and then quantify their efficiency. We represent research problems as links between scientific entities in a knowledge network. We then build a generative model of discovery informed by qualitative research on scientific problem selection. We map salient features from this literature to key network properties: an entity's importance corresponds to its degree centrality, and a problem's difficulty corresponds to the network distance it spans. Drawing on millions of papers and patents published over 30 years, we use this model to infer the typical research strategy used to explore chemical relationships in biomedicine. This strategy generates conservative research choices focused on building up knowledge around important molecules. These choices become more conservative over time. The observed strategy is efficient for initial exploration of the network and supports scientific careers that require steady output, but is inefficient for science as a whole. Through supercomputer experiments on a sample of the network, we study thousands of alternatives and identify strategies much more efficient at exploring mature knowledge networks. We find that increased risk-taking and the publication of experimental failures would substantially improve the speed of discovery. We consider institutional shifts in grant making, evaluation, and publication that would help realize these efficiencies.

  14. Pathways to new drug discovery in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michael

    2012-11-29

    There is currently a crisis in drug discovery for neuropsychiatric disorders, with a profound, yet unexpected drought in new drug development across the spectrum. In this commentary, the sources of this dilemma and potential avenues to redress the issue are explored. These include a critical review of diagnostic issues and of selection of participants for clinical trials, and the mechanisms for identifying new drugs and new drug targets. Historically, the vast majority of agents have been discovered serendipitously or have been modifications of existing agents. Serendipitous discoveries, based on astute clinical observation or data mining, remain a valid option, as is illustrated by the suggestion in the paper by Wahlqvist and colleagues that treatment with sulfonylurea and metformin reduces the risk of affective disorder. However, the identification of agents targeting disorder-related biomarkers is currently proving particularly fruitful. There is considerable hope for genetics as a purist, pathophysiologically valid pathway to drug discovery; however, it is unclear whether the science is ready to meet this promise. Fruitful paradigms will require a break from the orthodoxy, and creativity and risk may well be the fingerprints of success.See related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/150.

  15. A Technique Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available “Socratic Method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions which was used by antique period greek philosopher Socrates. Socrates was teaching knowledge to his followers by asking questions and the conversation between them was named “Socratic Dialogues”. In this meaning, no novel knowledge is taught to the individual but only what is formerly known is reminded and rediscovered. The form of socratic questioning which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as Guided Discovery. In this method it is aimed to make the client notice the piece of knowledge which he could notice but is not aware with a series of questions. Socratic method or guided discovery consists of several steps which are: Identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly found information and questioning the old distorted belief and reaching to a conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are, questions for gaining information, questions revealing the meanings, questions revealing the beliefs, questions about behaviours during the similar past experiences, analyse questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood it is important to be empathetic and summarising the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues after each step

  16. Performance Evaluation of Frequent Subgraph Discovery Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ur Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to rapid development of the Internet technology and new scientific advances, the number of applications that model the data as graphs increases, because graphs have highly expressive power to model a complicated structure. Graph mining is a well-explored area of research which is gaining popularity in the data mining community. A graph is a general model to represent data and has been used in many domains such as cheminformatics, web information management system, computer network, and bioinformatics, to name a few. In graph mining the frequent subgraph discovery is a challenging task. Frequent subgraph mining is concerned with discovery of those subgraphs from graph dataset which have frequent or multiple instances within the given graph dataset. In the literature a large number of frequent subgraph mining algorithms have been proposed; these included FSG, AGM, gSpan, CloseGraph, SPIN, Gaston, and Mofa. The objective of this research work is to perform quantitative comparison of the above listed techniques. The performances of these techniques have been evaluated through a number of experiments based on three different state-of-the-art graph datasets. This novel work will provide base for anyone who is working to design a new frequent subgraph discovery technique.

  17. The process of remembering: recovery and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fónagy, I

    1999-10-01

    Experiences of gradually recovering lost memories may shed some light on the cognitive mechanism underlying remembering. We (1) easily remember the external frame (the context) of the lost memory; (2) experience the emergence of its internal frame (category or genre); (3) recall its configuration, its rhythmic skeleton or its dynamic structure; (4) and even sketch it by a gesture; (5) recall our evaluation of the person or our impression of the event we cannot remember; (6) find the central object may emerge in a disguised (symbolic) form; (7) find the abortive first attempt to reconstruct the lost memory may contain an unconscious interpretation of the hidden event or the forgotten dream. Gradual remembering follows on the whole the path of verbal evolution. Trying to recapture lost memories we are compelled to make use of preverbal forms of mental elaboration and expression (visual thinking, gesture language, symbols). At the same time, recovery of lost memories has much in common with the procedure of scientific discovery. Discovery could be considered as a paradoxical form of remembering: recovering the unknown. Scientific metaphors uncover ('remember') preconscious and unconscious knowledge. In his studies on Farkas Bólyai, Imre Hermann made an attempt to interpret scientific theories much in the same way that Freud, Jones, Rank, Reik, Hanns Sachs, Róheim analysed myths, rituals, literary and artistic works. He traces back some essential features of Bólyai's discovery to repressed early memories and fantasies of the great mathematician.

  18. Discovery of anticoagulant drugs: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Calvo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    The history of the traditional anticoagulants is marked by both perseverance and serendipity. The anticoagulant effect of heparin was discovered by McLean in 1915, while he was searching for a procoagulant in dog liver. Link identified dicumarol from spoiled sweet clover hay in 1939 as the causal agent of the sweet clover disease, a hemorrhagic disorder in cattle. Hirudin extracts from the medicinal leech were first used for parenteral anticoagulation in the clinic in 1909, but their use was limited due to adverse effects and difficulties in achieving highly purified extracts. Heparins and coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, phenprocoumon, acenocoumarol) have been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for more than 60 years. Over the past decades, the drug discovery paradigm has shifted toward rational design following a target-based approach, in which specific proteins, or "targets", are chosen on current understandings of pathophysiology, small molecules that inhibit the target's activity may be identified by high-throughput screening and, in selected cases, these new molecules can be developed further as drugs. Despite the application of rational design, serendipity has still played a significant role in some of the new discoveries. This review will focus on the discovery of the main anticoagulant drugs in current clinical use, like unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon), parenteral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) (i.e.: argatroban, recombinant hirudins, bivalirudin), oral DTIs (i.e.: dabigatran) and oral direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e.: rivaroxaban, apixaban).

  19. Parallel Frequent Pattern Discovery: Challenges and Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Parallel frequent pattern discovery algorithms exploit parallel and distributed computing resources to relieve the sequential bottlenecks of current frequent pattern mining (FPM) algorithms. Thus, parallel FPM algorithms achieve better scalability and performance, so they are attracting much attention in the data mining research community. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art parallel and distributed frequent pattern mining algorithms with more emphasis on pattern discovery from complex data (e.g., sequences and graphs) on various platforms. A review of typical parallel FPM algorithms uncovers the major challenges, methodologies, and research problems in the field of parallel frequent pattern discovery,such as work-load balancing, finding good data layouts, and data decomposition. This survey also indicates a dramatic shift of the research interest in the field from the simple parallel frequent itemset mining on traditional parallel and distributed platforms to parallel pattern mining of more complex data on emerging architectures, such as multi-core systems and the increasingly mature grid infrastructure.

  20. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level. PMID:26901192

  1. Gene set-based module discovery in the breast cancer transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Michael Q

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although microarray-based studies have revealed global view of gene expression in cancer cells, we still have little knowledge about regulatory mechanisms underlying the transcriptome. Several computational methods applied to yeast data have recently succeeded in identifying expression modules, which is defined as co-expressed gene sets under common regulatory mechanisms. However, such module discovery methods are not applied cancer transcriptome data. Results In order to decode oncogenic regulatory programs in cancer cells, we developed a novel module discovery method termed EEM by extending a previously reported module discovery method, and applied it to breast cancer expression data. Starting from seed gene sets prepared based on cis-regulatory elements, ChIP-chip data, and gene locus information, EEM identified 10 principal expression modules in breast cancer based on their expression coherence. Moreover, EEM depicted their activity profiles, which predict regulatory programs in each subtypes of breast tumors. For example, our analysis revealed that the expression module regulated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 is downregulated in triple negative breast cancers, suggesting similarity of transcriptional programs between stem cells and aggressive breast cancer cells. We also found that the activity of the PRC2 expression module is negatively correlated to the expression of EZH2, a component of PRC2 which belongs to the E2F expression module. E2F-driven EZH2 overexpression may be responsible for the repression of the PRC2 expression modules in triple negative tumors. Furthermore, our network analysis predicts regulatory circuits in breast cancer cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the gene set-based module discovery approach is a powerful tool to decode regulatory programs in cancer cells.

  2. Histamine and the antiallergic antihistamines: a history of their discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, M B

    1999-07-01

    The paper provides a historical overview of the discovery of both histamine and the H1 antihistamines. The context of these discoveries is provided in relation to the development of medicinal chemistry during the 19th century. Background is provided on the history of discovery of mechanisms of anaphylaxis and allergy and the immunology of hypersensitivity at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. The discovery of histamine and the antihistamines is then discussed in relation to the development of pharmacological receptor theory culminating in the discovery of the first antihistamines in the 1930s and their widespread clinical introduction in the 1940s.

  3. Subgroup Discovery Algorithms:A Survey and Empirical Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumyea Helal

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup discovery is a data mining technique that discovers interesting associations among different variables with respect to a property of interest. Existing subgroup discovery methods employ different strategies for searching, pruning and ranking subgroups. It is very crucial to learn which features of a subgroup discovery algorithm should be considered for generating quality subgroups. In this regard, a number of reviews have been conducted on subgroup discovery. Although they provide a broad overview on some popular subgroup discovery methods, they employ few datasets and measures for subgroup evaluation. In the light of the existing measures, the subgroups cannot be appraised from all perspectives. Our work performs an extensive analysis on some popular subgroup discovery methods by using a wide range of datasets and by defining new measures for subgroup evaluation. The analysis result will help with understanding the major subgroup discovery methods, uncovering the gaps for further improvement and selecting the suitable category of algorithms for specific application domains.

  4. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to real

  5. Applications of Fiberoptics-Based Nanosensors to Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Gregas, Molly; Zhang, Yan; Seewaldt, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Background Fiber-optic nanosensors are fabricated by heating and pulling optical fibers to yield sub-micron diameter tips, and have been used for in vitro analysis of individual living mammalian cells. Immobilization of bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, peptides, DNA, etc) selective to target analyte molecules of interest provides molecular specificity. Excitation light can be launched into the fiber, and the resulting evanescent field at the tip of the nanofiber can be used to excite target molecules bound to the bioreceptor molecules. The fluorescence or surface-enhanced Raman scattering produced by the analyte molecules is detected using an ultra-sensitive photodetector. Objective This article provides an overview of the development and application of fiber-optic nanosensors for drug discovery. Conclusions The nanosensors provide minimally invasive tools to probe sub-cellular compartments inside single living cells for health effect studies (e.g., detection of benzopyrene adducts) and medical applications (e.g., monitoring of apoptosis in cells treated with anti-cancer drugs). PMID:23496274

  6. Light Higgs boson discovery from fermion mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar–Saavedra, Juan Antonio

    2006-12-01

    We evaluate the LHC discovery potential for a light Higgs boson in tbar tH (→ellνbbar bbbar bjj) production, within the Standard Model and if a new Q = 2/3 quark singlet T with a moderate mass exists. In the latter case, T pair production with decays Tbar T→W+b Hbar t/Ht W-bar b→W+bW-bar bH provides an important additional source of Higgs bosons giving the same experimental signature, and other decay modes Tbar T→Ht Hbar t→W+bW-bar bHH, Tbar T→Zt Hbar t/Ht Zbar t→W+bW-bar bHZ further enhance this signal. Both analyses are carried out with particle-level simulations of signals and backgrounds, including tbar t plus n = 0,...,5 jets which constitute the main background by far. Our estimate for SM Higgs discovery in tbar tH production, 0.4σ significance for MH = 115 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 30 fb-1, is similar to the most recent ones by CMS which also include the full tbar tnj background. We show that, if a quark singlet with a mass mT = 500 GeV exists, the luminosity required for Higgs discovery in this final state is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, and 5σ significance can be achieved already with 8 fb-1. This new Higgs signal will not be seen unless we look for it: with this aim, a new specific final state reconstruction method is presented. Finally, we consider the sensitivity to search for Q = 2/3 singlets. The combination of these three decay modes allows to discover a 500 GeV quark with 7 fb-1 of luminosity.

  7. A New Supernova Discovery/Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Sullivan, M.; Gal-Yam, A.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of the Type Ia supernova PTF10ygu at RA=09:37:30.30, Dec=+23:09:33.6 (J2000) in the host galaxy NGC 2929 at z=0.025. The supernova was discovered on Oct. 12.5 UT when it was at magnitude 19.2 in R-band (calibrated wrt the USNO catalog). There was nothing at this location on Oct 8.5 UT to a limiting magnitude of 20.3, and a marginal detection (S/N=5) at R=19.6 on Oct.

  8. 60 years of CERN experiments and discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The book contains a description of the most important experimental results achieved at CERN during the past 60 years, from the mid-1950s to the latest discovery of the Higgs particle. It covers the results from early accelerators at CERN to the most recent results at the LHC and thus provides an excellent review of the achievements of this outstanding laboratory. It reflects not only the impressive scientific progress achieved during the past six decades but demonstrates also the special way of successful international collaboration developed at CERN.

  9. Solar System Moons Discovery and Mythology

    CERN Document Server

    Blunck, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Mars outward this concise handbook provides thorough information on the satellites of the planets in the solar system. Each chapter begins with a section on the discovery and the naming of the planet's satellites or rings. This is followed by a section presenting the historic sources of those names. The book contains tables with the orbital and physical parameters of all satellites and is illustrated throughout with modern photos of the planets and their moons as well as historical and mythological drawings. The Cyrillic transcriptions of the satellite names are provided in a register. Readers interested in the history of astronomy and its mythological backgrounds will enjoy this beautiful volume.

  10. Advances in knowledge discovery in databases

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) with a focus on the areas of market basket database, time-stamped databases and multiple related databases. Various interesting and intelligent algorithms are reported on data mining tasks. A large number of association measures are presented, which play significant roles in decision support applications. This book presents, discusses and contrasts new developments in mining time-stamped data, time-based data analyses, the identification of temporal patterns, the mining of multiple related databases, as well as local patterns analysis.  

  11. Toward discovery science of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Bharat B; Mennes, Maarten; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Gohel, Suril; Kelly, Clare; Smith, Steve M; Beckmann, Christian F; Adelstein, Jonathan S; Buckner, Randy L; Colcombe, Stan; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Ernst, Monique; Fair, Damien; Hampson, Michelle; Hoptman, Matthew J; Hyde, James S; Kiviniemi, Vesa J; Kötter, Rolf; Li, Shi-Jiang; Lin, Ching-Po; Lowe, Mark J; Mackay, Clare; Madden, David J; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Margulies, Daniel S; Mayberg, Helen S; McMahon, Katie; Monk, Christopher S; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Nagel, Bonnie J; Pekar, James J; Peltier, Scott J; Petersen, Steven E; Riedl, Valentin; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Rypma, Bart; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Schmidt, Sein; Seidler, Rachael D; Siegle, Greg J; Sorg, Christian; Teng, Gao-Jun; Veijola, Juha; Villringer, Arno; Walter, Martin; Wang, Lihong; Weng, Xu-Chu; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Williamson, Peter; Windischberger, Christian; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Castellanos, F Xavier; Milham, Michael P

    2010-03-09

    Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints of a priori hypotheses. Resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) constitutes a candidate approach capable of addressing this challenge. Imaging the brain during rest reveals large-amplitude spontaneous low-frequency (science of brain function, the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project dataset is freely accessible at www.nitrc.org/projects/fcon_1000/.

  12. The discovery potential of laser polarization experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, Markus [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics; Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics and Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Currently, a number of experiments are searching for vacuum magnetic birefringence and dichroism, i.e. for dispersive and absorptive features in the propagation of polarized light along a transverse magnetic field in vacuum. In this note we calculate the Standard Model contributions to these signatures, thereby illuminating the discovery potential of such experiments in the search for new physics. We discuss the three main sources for a Standard Model contribution to a dichroism signal: photon splitting, neutrino pair production and production of gravitons. (orig.)

  13. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  14. Medicinal chemistry approaches to malaria drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sofia Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Farmácia (Química Farmacêutica e Terapêutica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Farmácia, 2016 Malaria remains a major burden to global public health, causing nearly 600,000 deaths annually. Efforts to control malaria are hampered by parasite drug resistance, insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, and the lack of an effective vaccine. However antimalarial drugs are a mainstay in efforts to control and eventually eradicate this disease, thus the discovery of new ant...

  15. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  16. Exploiting background knowledge in automated discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronis, J.M.; Buchanan, B.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Provost, F.J. [NYNEX Science and Technology, White Plains, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Prior work in automated scientific discovery has been successful in finding patterns in data, given that a reasonably small set of mostly relevant features is specified. The work described in this paper places data in the context of large bodies of background knowledge. Specifically, data items are connected to multiple databases of background knowledge represented as inheritance networks. The system has made a practical impact on botanical toxicology research, which required linking examples of cases of plant exposures to databases of botanical, geographical, and climate background knowledge.

  17. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts.

  18. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: from Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra David Mirvish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis (RDA. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Patrick S. Moore, Yuan Chang, and colleagues developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS, an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV from Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC. Here we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV.

  19. 3D in vitro technology for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro systems that can mimic organ and tissue structure and function in vivo, will be of great benefit for a variety of biological applications from basic biology to toxicity testing and drug discovery. There have been several attempts to generate 3D tissue models but most of these models require costly equipment, and the most serious disadvantage in them is that they are too far from the mature human organs in vivo. Because of these problems, research and development in drug discovery, toxicity testing and biotech industries are highly expensive, and involve sacrifice of countless animals and it takes several years to bring a single drug/product to the market or to find the toxicity or otherwise of chemical entities. Our group has been actively working on several alternative models by merging biomaterials science, nanotechnology and biological principles to generate 3D in vitro living organs, to be called "Human Organs-on-Chip", to mimic natural organ/tissues, in order to reduce animal testing and clinical trials. We have fabricated a novel type of mechanically and biologically bio-mimicking collagen-based hydrogel that would provide for interconnected mini-wells in which 3D cell/organ culture of human samples in a manner similar to human organs with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules would be possible. These products mimic the physical, chemical, and biological properties of natural organs and tissues at different scales. This paper will review the outcome of our several experiments so far in this direction and the future perspectives.

  20. Thresholds for Discovery: EAD Tag Analysis in ArchiveGrid, and Implications for Discovery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proffitt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The ArchiveGrid discovery system is made up in part of an aggregation of EAD (Encoded Archival Description encoded finding aids from hundreds of contributing institutions. In creating the ArchiveGrid discovery interface, the OCLC Research project team has long wrestled with what we can reasonably do with the large (120,000+ corpus of EAD documents. This paper presents an analysis of the EAD documents (the largest analysis of EAD documents to date. The analysis is paired with an evaluation of how well the documents support various aspects of online discovery. The paper also establishes a framework for thresholds of completeness and consistency to evaluate the results. We find that, while the EAD standard and encoding practices have not offered support for all aspects of online discovery, especially in a large and heterogeneous aggregation of EAD documents, current trends suggest that the evolution of the EAD standard and the shift from retrospective conversion to new shared tools for improved encoding hold real promise for the future.

  1. The discovery and development of belimumab: the anti-BLyS–lupus connection

    OpenAIRE

    Stohl, William; Hilbert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    For the first time in more than 50 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved a drug specifically for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This drug, belimumab (Benlysta), is a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the B-cell survival factor, B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). The approval of belimumab combined a pioneering approach to genomics-based gene discovery, an astute appreciation of translational medicine, a disciplined clinical strategy, a willingness ...

  2. Applications of genome editing tools in drug discovery and basic research

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the DNA double helix, major advances in biology have been; the development of recombinant DNA technology in the 1970s, methods to amplify DNA and gene targeting technology in the late 1980s. In organisms such as yeast and mice, the ability to accurately add or delete genetic information transformed biology, allowing an unmatched level of precision in studies of gene function. But, the ability to easily and specifically edit the genetic material of other cells and organi...

  3. The importance of chronobiology to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Stuart N; Solari, Roberto; Willson, Timothy M

    2012-07-01

    Drug discovery scientists, faced with the myriad challenges involved in developing novel therapeutics as medicines, have tended to overlook the question of the most beneficial time to administer the drug. Recent developments in our understanding of circadian biology and the availability of tools to characterise the molecular clock indicate that time and duration of dosing may have profound consequences for the efficacy and safety of new and existing therapeutic agents. Progress in the field also suggests that many key physiological mechanisms are remarkably dependent on the circadian clock. It has also become clear that a number of diseases with important unmet medical need display marked circadian variation in their symptoms and severity. These discoveries now reveal opportunities for new therapeutic strategies to be developed that act by modulation of biological rhythms. These novel therapeutic approaches are likely to be facilitated by the continuing development of chemical probes and synthetic ligands targeted to an increasing number of the key proteins that regulate the molecular clock.

  4. Discovery Mondays: crystals and particles for medicine

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Question: what are as heavy as lead, as clear as glass, and appear as tiny specks in a doctor's scanner but large as life in a physicist's detector? Answer: the crystals you will be able to observe in all their facets on 1 September at the start of a new season of Discovery Mondays at Microcosm. Come along and meet the CERN physicists who use crystals not only in their detectors but also in the latest generation of scanners. Four workshops will be organised, each devoted to a different medical imaging technique. The first workshop will be run by a physicist from the Crystal Clear collaboration, who will present her collaboration's special breed of crystals, which emit light when they are traversed by high-energy particles, and explain to you these crystals' role in Positron Emission Tomographs. The second workshop will focus on an imaging technique known as the Compton Camera, also based on scintillating crystals. Crystals worth looking at and admiring. Come to the next Discovery Monday to find out how they ...

  5. Strategies for the discovery of therapeutic Aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianbin; Li, Na; Gorenstein, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Therapeutic aptamers are synthetic, structured oligonucleotides that bind to a very broad range of targets with high affinity and specificity. They are an emerging class of targeting ligand that show great promise for treating a number of diseases. A series of aptamers currently in various stages of clinical development highlights the potential of aptamers for therapeutic applications. Area covered in this review This review will cover in vitro selection of oligonucleotide ligands, called aptamers, from a combinatorial library using the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) process as well as the other known strategies for finding aptamers against various targets. What the reader will gain Readers will gain an understanding of the highly useful strategies for successful aptamer discovery. They may also be able combine two or more of the presented strategies for their aptamer discovery projects. Take home message Although many processes are available for discovering aptamers, it is not trivial to discover an aptamer candidate that is ready to move toward pharmaceutical drug development. It is also apparent that there have been relatively few therapeutic advances and clinical trials undertaken due to the small number of companies that participate in aptamer development. PMID:21359096

  6. Optical design of the Discovery Channel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Malcolm J.; Dunham, Edward W.

    2004-10-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a joint venture between Discovery Communications and Lowell Observatory. The telescope will have a 4.2-meter clear aperture, active primary mirror working at F/1.9. Two observing stations are presently planned; a Ritchey-Chretien focus some two meters behind the vertex of the primary mirror and a prime focus featuring a wide-field optical corrector (WFOC) with a two-degree field of view. The Ritchey-Chretien focus will be used for a variety of optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation while the prime focus will be largely used as a survey tool to search for near-earth and Kuiper belt objects, for example. In order to take advantage of sub-arc second seeing at the DCT site, a stringent set of requirements has been placed on the two foci. The requirements are for the full-width, half-maximum (FWHM) image of a point source to be less than 0.20 arc second at the Ritchey-Chretien focus over a 21 arc minute field and less than 0.27 arc second at prime focus in each of six filter bands including a very broad band for survey purposes. This paper describes the optical design of the field correctors at the two foci. Particular attention is paid to the WFOC. This state of the art device poses a number of optical challenges which are discussed here, as well as mechanical challenges which are discussed elsewhere.

  7. Crowdsourcing knowledge discovery and innovations in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Ippolito, Andrea; Montgomery, Robert A; Moses, Christopher; Stone, David J

    2014-09-19

    Clinicians face difficult treatment decisions in contexts that are not well addressed by available evidence as formulated based on research. The digitization of medicine provides an opportunity for clinicians to collaborate with researchers and data scientists on solutions to previously ambiguous and seemingly insolvable questions. But these groups tend to work in isolated environments, and do not communicate or interact effectively. Clinicians are typically buried in the weeds and exigencies of daily practice such that they do not recognize or act on ways to improve knowledge discovery. Researchers may not be able to identify the gaps in clinical knowledge. For data scientists, the main challenge is discerning what is relevant in a domain that is both unfamiliar and complex. Each type of domain expert can contribute skills unavailable to the other groups. "Health hackathons" and "data marathons", in which diverse participants work together, can leverage the current ready availability of digital data to discover new knowledge. Utilizing the complementary skills and expertise of these talented, but functionally divided groups, innovations are formulated at the systems level. As a result, the knowledge discovery process is simultaneously democratized and improved, real problems are solved, cross-disciplinary collaboration is supported, and innovations are enabled.

  8. Discovery Monday - Behind the plug: communication networks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ever wondered what happens to your email when you click "send"? And when you make a phone call, how does your voice travel down the wire? Find out more about communication networks and their applications at the next Discovery Monday in Microcosm on 1 March. At CERN, networks are used for a multitude of reasons. Mobile phones, for example, are used in the laboratory's underground areas. Optical fibre cabling ensures that CERN's computers are connected to the rest of the world. But how do optical fibres work and what does the future have in store? CERN's experiments also need networks. Particle detectors are made of many layers, each relays complex information to a computer analysis centre which reconstitutes the passage of the particles resulting from collisions. Many billions of bytes are transmitted every second from a multitude of sources, to many computers.  No single computer can handle such a huge flow of information. The next Discovery Monday is your chance to find out how this works.  Participate i...

  9. Centenary of the discovery of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    To mark the centenary of the discovery of the phenomenon of superconductivity, MANEP and the University of Geneva are organising open days at the PhysiScope between 8 and 15 April 2011. On 13 April CERN will make a contribution to the series of events with a lecture on superconductivity followed by a demonstration of the phenomenon at the Globe   Historic graph showing the superconducting transition of mercury, measured in Leiden in 1911 by H. Kamerlingh Onnes. On 8 April 2011 it will be a hundred years since the discovery of superconductivity by the Dutch physicist Kamerlingh Onnes. To mark the occasion, the University of Geneva and MANEP are organising a week-long interactive workshop at the PhysiScope. “The purpose of this initiative is to introduce the general public to this spectacular phenomenon by giving them an opportunity to take part in entertaining experiments”, explains Adriana Aleman, Head of Communications of the University of Geneva. As its contribution to the e...

  10. Feedback-Driven Dynamic Invariant Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingming; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha S.; Person, Suzette; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2014-01-01

    Program invariants can help software developers identify program properties that must be preserved as the software evolves, however, formulating correct invariants can be challenging. In this work, we introduce iDiscovery, a technique which leverages symbolic execution to improve the quality of dynamically discovered invariants computed by Daikon. Candidate invariants generated by Daikon are synthesized into assertions and instrumented onto the program. The instrumented code is executed symbolically to generate new test cases that are fed back to Daikon to help further re ne the set of candidate invariants. This feedback loop is executed until a x-point is reached. To mitigate the cost of symbolic execution, we present optimizations to prune the symbolic state space and to reduce the complexity of the generated path conditions. We also leverage recent advances in constraint solution reuse techniques to avoid computing results for the same constraints across iterations. Experimental results show that iDiscovery converges to a set of higher quality invariants compared to the initial set of candidate invariants in a small number of iterations.

  11. Business Model Discovery by Technology Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Muegge

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Value creation and value capture are central to technology entrepreneurship. The ways in which a particular firm creates and captures value are the foundation of that firm's business model, which is an explanation of how the business delivers value to a set of customers at attractive profits. Despite the deep conceptual link between business models and technology entrepreneurship, little is known about the processes by which technology entrepreneurs produce successful business models. This article makes three contributions to partially address this knowledge gap. First, it argues that business model discovery by technology entrepreneurs can be, and often should be, disciplined by both intention and structure. Second, it provides a tool for disciplined business model discovery that includes an actionable process and a worksheet for describing a business model in a form that is both concise and explicit. Third, it shares preliminary results and lessons learned from six technology entrepreneurs applying a disciplined process to strengthen or reinvent the business models of their own nascent technology businesses.

  12. New genetic discoveries and primary immune deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2014-04-01

    The field of immunology has undergone recent discoveries of genetic causes for many primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD). The ever-expanding knowledge has led to increased understanding behind the pathophysiology of these diseases. Since these diseases are rare, the patients are frequently misdiagnosed early in the presentation of their illnesses. The identification of new genes has increased our opportunities for recognizing and making the diagnosis in patients with PIDD before they succumb to infections that may result secondary to their PIDD. Some mutations lead to a variety of presentations of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The myriad and ever-growing genetic mutations which lead to SCID phenotypes have been identified in recent years. Other mutations associated with some genetic syndromes have associated immunodeficiency and are important for making the diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency in patients with some syndromes, who may otherwise be missed within the larger context of their syndromes. A variety of mutations also lead to increased susceptibility to infections due to particular organisms. These patterns of infections due to specific organisms are important keys in properly identifying the part of the immune system which is affected in these patients. This review will discuss recent genetic discoveries that enhance our understanding of these complex diseases.

  13. Sublinear Time Motif Discovery from Multiple Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Fu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a natural probabilistic model for motif discovery has been used to experimentally test the quality of motif discovery programs. In this model, there are k background sequences, and each character in a background sequence is a random character from an alphabet, Σ. A motif G = g1g2 ... gm is a string of m characters. In each background sequence is implanted a probabilistically-generated approximate copy of G. For a probabilistically-generated approximate copy b1b2 ... bm of G, every character, bi, is probabilistically generated, such that the probability for bi ≠ gi is at most α. We develop two new randomized algorithms and one new deterministic algorithm. They make advancements in the following aspects: (1 The algorithms are much faster than those before. Our algorithms can even run in sublinear time. (2 They can handle any motif pattern. (3 The restriction for the alphabet size is a lower bound of four. This gives them potential applications in practical problems, since gene sequences have an alphabet size of four. (4 All algorithms have rigorous proofs about their performances. The methods developed in this paper have been used in the software implementation. We observed some encouraging results that show improved performance for motif detection compared with other software.

  14. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles at close to the speed of light, then generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies, giving birth to showers of new particles. What are these particles? In order to find out, physicists transform themselves into detectives with the help of the detectors. Located around the collision area, these exceptional machines are made up of various layers, each of which detects and measures specific properties of the particles that travel through them. Powerful computers then reconstruct their trajectory and record their charge, mass and energy in order to build up a kind of particle ID card. At the next Discovery Monday you will be able to find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will provide live images of the trac...

  15. Modeling Truth Existence in Truth Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Shi; Zhao, Bo; Tong, Wenzhu; Gao, Jing; Yu, Dian; Ji, Heng; Han, Jiawei

    2015-08-01

    When integrating information from multiple sources, it is common to encounter conflicting answers to the same question. Truth discovery is to infer the most accurate and complete integrated answers from conflicting sources. In some cases, there exist questions for which the true answers are excluded from the candidate answers provided by all sources. Without any prior knowledge, these questions, named no-truth questions, are difficult to be distinguished from the questions that have true answers, named has-truth questions. In particular, these no-truth questions degrade the precision of the answer integration system. We address such a challenge by introducing source quality, which is made up of three fine-grained measures: silent rate, false spoken rate and true spoken rate. By incorporating these three measures, we propose a probabilistic graphical model, which simultaneously infers truth as well as source quality without any a priori training involving ground truth answers. Moreover, since inferring this graphical model requires parameter tuning of the prior of truth, we propose an initialization scheme based upon a quantity named truth existence score, which synthesizes two indicators, namely, participation rate and consistency rate. Compared with existing methods, our method can effectively filter out no-truth questions, which results in more accurate source quality estimation. Consequently, our method provides more accurate and complete answers to both has-truth and no-truth questions. Experiments on three real-world datasets illustrate the notable advantage of our method over existing state-of-the-art truth discovery methods.

  16. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles and generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies. The collisions give birth to showers of new particles. What are they? In order to find out, physicists slip into the role of detectives thanks to the detectors. At the next Discovery Monday you will find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will allow you to see the tracks of cosmic particles live. You will also be given the chance to see real modules for the ATLAS and for the LHCb experiments. Strange materials will be on hand, such as crystals that are heavier than iron and yet as transparent as glass... Come to the Microcosm and become a top detective yourself! This event will take place in French. Join us at the Microcosm (Reception Building 33, M...

  17. Spacewatch discovery of near-Earth asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Tom

    1992-01-01

    Our overall scientific goal is to survey the solar system to completion - that is, to find the various populations and to study their statistics, interrelations, and origins. The practical benefit to SERC is that we are finding Earth-approaching asteroids that are accessible for mining. Our system can detect Earth-approachers in the 1-km size range even when they are far away, and can detect smaller objects when they are moving rapidly past Earth. Until Spacewatch, the size range of 6-300 meters in diameter for the near-Earth asteroids was unexplored. This important region represents the transition between the meteorites and the larger observed near-Earth asteroids. One of our Spacewatch discoveries, 1991 VG, may be representative of a new orbital class of object. If it is really a natural object, and not man-made, its orbital parameters are closer to those of the Earth than we have seen before; its delta V is the lowest of all objects known thus far. We may expect new discoveries as we continue our surveying, with fine-tuning of the techniques.

  18. Motif Discovery in Tissue-Specific Regulatory Sequences Using Directed Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    States David

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motif discovery for the identification of functional regulatory elements underlying gene expression is a challenging problem. Sequence inspection often leads to discovery of novel motifs (including transcription factor sites with previously uncharacterized function in gene expression. Coupled with the complexity underlying tissue-specific gene expression, there are several motifs that are putatively responsible for expression in a certain cell type. This has important implications in understanding fundamental biological processes such as development and disease progression. In this work, we present an approach to the identification of motifs (not necessarily transcription factor sites and examine its application to some questions in current bioinformatics research. These motifs are seen to discriminate tissue-specific gene promoter or regulatory regions from those that are not tissue-specific. There are two main contributions of this work. Firstly, we propose the use of directed information for such classification constrained motif discovery, and then use the selected features with a support vector machine (SVM classifier to find the tissue specificity of any sequence of interest. Such analysis yields several novel interesting motifs that merit further experimental characterization. Furthermore, this approach leads to a principled framework for the prospective examination of any chosen motif to be discriminatory motif for a group of coexpressed/coregulated genes, thereby integrating sequence and expression perspectives. We hypothesize that the discovery of these motifs would enable the large-scale investigation for the tissue-specific regulatory role of any conserved sequence element identified from genome-wide studies.

  19. Stem cells: A tale of two kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfey, P N

    1999-03-11

    Homologous genes have recently been shown to regulate stem cell maintenance in animals and plants. This discovery should facilitate elucidation of the poorly understood factors that control stem cell maintenance and differentiation.

  20. Chance, creativity, and the discovery of the nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Romo, Ana Cecilia Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    This essay analyzes the history of the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) discovery, relating some of the principles of the theory of scientific creativity to the cognitive and personal qualities of the scientists that participated in the discovery, particularly Rita Levi-Montalcini and Viktor Hamburger. The discovery of NGF is especially attractive for the history of science as it involves chance, luck, creativity, and some extraordinary scientists.