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Sample records for cell carcinoma treated

  1. [Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and premalignant skin lesions--how to treat?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Sari; Jeskanen, Leila; Ylitalo, Leea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing exposure to UV radiation is considered the most important etiologic factor of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Consequently, exposed areas such as the scalp and face, are the primary areas for developing non-melanoma skin cancers. Once a patient has presented with one tumor, additional lesions are common. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical picture and biopsy or excision for histopathological analysis. Various non-surgical treatment options have been established. Superficial basal cell carcinoma, superficial carcinoma in situ and all actinic keratoses are preferentially treated non-surgically. Most other basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas should be surgically removed.

  2. 980nm laser for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjabo, A. D.; Cema, I.; Lihacova, I.; Derjabo, L.

    2013-06-01

    Begin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is most common skin cancer over the world. There are around 20 modalities for BCC treatment. Laser surgery is uncommon option. We demonstrate our long term follow up results. Aim: To evaluate long term efficacy of a 980nm diode laser for the difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: 167 patients with 173 basal cell carcinoma on the nose were treated with a 980 nm diode laser from May 1999 till May 2005 at Latvian Oncology center. All tumors were morphologically confirmed. 156 patients were followed for more than 5 years. Results: The lowest recurrence rate was observed in cases of superficial BCC, diameterConclusions: 980 nm diode laser is useful tool in dermatology with high long term efficacy, good acceptance by the patients and good cosmetics results.

  3. Survival Patterns in Elderly Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommers, Linda W.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Bijl, Henk P.; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Halmos, Gyorgy B.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We sought to assess the effect of age on overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and non-cancer-related death (NCRD) in elderly (aged ≥70 years) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with definitive radiation therapy. The results were compared with

  4. [Effects of differentially expressed proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma cell treated by different telomerase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Min; Wang, Xia; Zheng, Weiwei

    2010-03-01

    To detect differentially expressed proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors including antisense oligodeoxynuclectide of human telomerase RNA (hTR-ASODN), sense oligodeoxynuclectide of hTR (hTR-SODN), ASODN of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-ASODN), SODN of hTERT (hTERT-SODN), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and adriamycin (ADM) using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrom (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology. SELDI-TOF-MS technology and weak cation exchanger (WCX-2) protein chip were used to detect differentially expressed secretory and cytoplasmic proteins of SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors. The control group was hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cell without any disposal. The results of WCX-2 protein chip showed that the secretory and cytoplasmic proteins were differentially expressed in SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors. But some proteins were down-regulated or up-regulated together in all experimental groups. The molecular weight of these differential proteins were all less than 10,000 Da. Differentially expressed and common changes of proteins in SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors would associate with telomerase activity.

  5. Risk stratification of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of cervix treated by radiotherapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.-H.; Tsai, C.-S.; Lai, C.-H.; Chang, T.-C.; Wang, C.-C.; Chou, H.-H.; Lee, Steve P.; Lee, C.-C.; Tang, Simon G.; Hsueh Swei

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors for local and distant relapse and perform risk stratification for patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 1031 patients with Stage IB-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with full-course RT but without any chemotherapy were included for analysis. Of these, 311 patients with nonbulky Stage IB-IIA disease were designated the reference group and the other 720 patients were the study group. The associations of stage, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) level, hemoglobin level, age, cell differentiation, and pelvic lymph node status with treatment failure were evaluated. The independent prognostic factors were identified by multivariate analysis. The study group was further stratified into subgroups using combinations of these risk factors. Results: In the study group, independent risk factors for local relapse were advanced stage and age 2, and positive pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year distant relapse-free survival rate was 83% for patients with bulky Stage IB-IIA and IIB disease, SCC-ag level 2, and positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: The risk of treatment failure in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients treated by RT alone can be more precisely predicted by risk stratification. A certain subgroup of patients had better control than the others. The benefit of treating these relatively low-risk patients with additional treatment such as concurrent chemotherapy should be further evaluated in prospective studies or meta-analyses

  6. Stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.; Coste, A.; Martin, M.; Levy, C.; Raynal, M.; Pavlovitch, J.M.; Peynegre, R.; Perquin, B.; Bourgeois, J.P. le

    1991-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 233 evaluable patients with stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by definitive brachytherapy. Minimum follow-up is 3 years. Treatment of the neck was chosen by a multidisciplinary team, according to age, medical status and availability for follow-up. One hundred and ten patients (47 percent) underwent elective neck dissection (END), 28 (25 percent) had positive nodes and received neck irradiation post-operatively. One hundred and twenty-three patients (53 percent) were regularly followed up only, with therapeutic neck dissection (TND) reserved for cases of node relapses. In the END group, there were 19 neck relapses (17 percent): 12/60 (20 percent) in patients with mobile tongue carcinoma and 7/50 (14 percent) in patients with floor of the mouth carcinoma. Salvage treatment was successful in 13-21 (62 percent) cases. Ten-year survival is 37 percent for the END-group and 31 percent for the TND group. Tumour stage and infiltration into underlying tissues increased the probability of neck relapse and death. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that patients treated in the TND group had a higher probability of death than patients treated in the END group (p<0.04). (author). 30 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  7. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Squamous cell carcinoma Overview Squamous cell carcinoma: This man's skin ... a squamous cell carcinoma on his face. Squamous cell carcinoma: Overview Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a ...

  8. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissouni, Soundouss; Raissouni, Ferdaous; Rais, Ghizlane; Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Latib, Rachida; Mohtaram, Amina; Rais, Fadoua; Mrabti, Hind; Kabbaj, Nawal; Amrani, Naima; Errihani, Hassan

    2012-08-09

    Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  9. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  10. Extracapsular extension is a poor predictor of disease recurrence in surgically treated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James S; Carpenter, Danielle H; Thorstad, Wade L; Zhang, Qin; Haughey, Bruce H

    2011-11-01

    Extracapsular extension in squamous cell carcinoma nodal metastases usually predicts worse outcome. However, there are no standard histologic grading criteria for extracapsular extension, and there have been few studies on oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma alone. We studied the extent of extracapsular extension utilizing a novel grading system and correlated grades with outcomes while controlling for p16 status. A cohort of surgically treated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases were reviewed and metastases graded as 0 (within substance of node), 1 (filling subcapsular sinus with thickened capsule/pseudocapsule, but no irregular peripheral extension), 2 (≤1 mm beyond capsule), 3 (>1 mm beyond capsule), or 4 (no residual nodal tissue or architecture; 'soft tissue metastasis'). There were 101 cases, for which p16 was positive in 90 (89%). Extracapsular extension grades did not correlate with nodal size (P=0.28) or p16 status (P=0.8). In follow up, 10 patients (10%) had disease recurrence with only 3 of 64 (5%) grade 0-3 cases and 7 of 37 (19%) with grade 4 recurring (P=0.04). Grade 4 extracapsular extension was associated with poorer survival (PP=0.02), and in multivariate analysis, was not significantly associated with poorer overall (P=0.14) disease-free (P=0.2), or disease-specific survival (P=0.09). The impact of extracapsular extension in nodal metastases is limited in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Only extracapsular extension grade 4 associates with poorer outcomes, but not independently of T-stage and other variables.

  11. Donor Kidney With Renal Cell Carcinoma Successfully Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S F; Hansen, Jesper Melchior

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of donor-transmitted cancer is evident. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who was transplanted with a kidney from a deceased donor. Four days after transplantation a routine ultrasound scan revealed a 3-cm tumor in the middle-upper pole of the allograft....... A biopsy showed the tumor to be papillary renal cell carcinoma. The patient was treated with radiofrequency ablation. This procedure was complicated by the development of a cutaneous fistula and open surgery was done with resection of an area of necrosis in the kidney and of the fistula. The maintenance...

  12. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  13. Treatment Beyond Progression in Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Nivolumab in CheckMate 025

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escudier, Bernard; Motzer, Robert J; Sharma, Padmanee

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Response patterns to nivolumab differ from those seen with other approved targeted therapies. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of nivolumab in previously treated patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who were treated beyond (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) RE...

  14. Gene expression and pathway analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells treated with cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartularo, Laura; Laulicht, Freda; Sun, Hong; Kluz, Thomas; Freedman, Jonathan H; Costa, Max

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal naturally occurring in the Earth's crust. A common route of human exposure is via diet and cadmium accumulates in the liver. The effects of Cd exposure on gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were examined in this study. HepG2 cells were acutely-treated with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 μM Cd for 24h; or chronically-treated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 μM Cd for three weeks and gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Acute and chronic exposures significantly altered the expression of 333 and 181 genes, respectively. The genes most upregulated by acute exposure included several metallothioneins. Downregulated genes included the monooxygenase CYP3A7, involved in drug and lipid metabolism. In contrast, CYP3A7 was upregulated by chronic Cd exposure, as was DNAJB9, an anti-apoptotic J protein. Genes downregulated following chronic exposure included the transcriptional regulator early growth response protein 1. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the top networks altered by acute exposure were lipid metabolism, small molecule biosynthesis, cell morphology, organization, and development; while top networks altered by chronic exposure were organ morphology, cell cycle, cell signaling, and renal and urological diseases/cancer. Many of the dysregulated genes play important roles in cellular growth, proliferation, and apoptosis, and may be involved in carcinogenesis. In addition to gene expression changes, HepG2 cells treated with cadmium for 24h indicated a reduction in global levels of histone methylation and acetylation that persisted 72 h post-treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma of the Basal Cell Subtype Should Be Treated as a High-Risk Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeault, Emilie; Alain, Jimmy; Gagné, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcoma is a rare primary tumor of the skin, characterized by biphasic epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation. Due to the limited number of cases reported, there is no consensus regarding treatment and prognosis. Some authors suggest that cutaneous carcinosarcomas should be viewed as aggressive tumors, with ancillary imaging used to evaluate potential metastatic disease. Other reports demonstrate an indolent disease course, especially with epidermal-type cutaneous carcinosarcomas. We report a case of cutaneous carcinosarcoma, which we treated with electrodessication and curettage following a shave biopsy. The tumor had an epithelial component resembling a basal cell carcinoma and a fibrosarcomatous stroma. At 1-year follow-up, our patient did not show evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Our case suggests that a cutaneous carcinosarcoma with an epithelial component composed of basal cell carcinoma can be regarded as a high-risk nonmelanoma skin cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Basal cell carcinoma Overview Basal cell carcinoma: This skin cancer ... that has received years of sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma: Overview Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the ...

  17. Prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Kitamura, Yoko; Tomori, Akihisa; Hotta, Kin-ichi; Takahashi, Akiko; Miyata, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and fifty eight patients who had esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) from Jan. 2,000 to Dec. 2006. The invasion depth was divided as epithelium (EP), Lamina propria mucosa (LPM), muscularis mucosa (MM) and submuosal layer. When the depth of submucosal invasion was 200 micrometers or less, the invasion depth was defined as SM1. In this study, out of 158 patients 28 patients had MM SCC, and 12 patients had SM1 SCC. The additional therapies such as Esophagectomy or Chemo Radio Therapy (CRT) were recommended to the patients, when lymphatic permeation was found. Among the patients who had MM SCC, 5 patients had lymphatic permeation. Among the patients who had SM1 SCC, 4 patients had lymphatic permeation. 2 MM and 2 SM1 patients were treated by CRT and the other 5 patients who had lymphatic permeation refused the additional therapy because of other diseases. All 4 patients who were treated by CRT are alive, but lymph node metastasis was found in 2 of the patients who refused CRT. One died of esophageal SCC, and one died of another disease. No lymph node metastasis was found in 23 patients who had MM without lymphatic permeation, and 8 patients who had SM1 without lymphatic permeation. According to our data, the indication of esophageal ESD could be expanded for MM or SM1 SCC without lymphatic permeation. (author)

  18. Photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging of hypericin-treated squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercarz Joel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cancer therapy including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy often are physically debilitating and largely ineffective in previously treated patients with recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. A natural photochemical, hypericin, could be a less invasive method for laser photodynamic therapy (PDT of these recurrent head and neck malignancies. Hypericin has powerful photo-oxidizing ability, tumor localization properties, and fluorescent imaging capabilities as well as minimal dark toxicity. The current study defined hypericin PDT in vitro with human SCC cells before the cells were grown as tumor transplants in nude mice and tested as a model for hypericin induced tumor fluorescence and PDT via laser fiberoptics. Methods SNU squamous carcinoma cells were grown in tissue culture, detached from monolayers with trypsin, and incubated with 0.1 μg to 10 μg/ml of hypericin before exposure to laser light at 514, 550, or 593 nm to define optimal dose, time, and wavelength for PDT of tumor cells. The SCC cells also were injected subcutaneously in nude mice and grown for 6–8 weeks to form tumors before hypericin injection and insertion of fiberoptics from a KTP532 surgical laser to assess the feasibility of this operating room instrument in stimulating fluorescence and PDT of tumors. Results In vitro testing revealed a hypericin dose of 0.2–0.5 μg/ml was needed for PDT of the SCC cells with an optimal tumoricidal response seen at the 593 nm light absorption maximum. In vivo tumor retention of injected hypericin was seen for 7 to10 days using KTP532 laser induced fluorescence and biweekly PDT via laser fiberoptics led to regression of SCC tumor transplants under 0.4 cm2 diameter, but resulted in progression of larger size tumors in the nude mice. Conclusion In this preclinical study, hypericin was tested for 514–593 nm dye laser PDT of human SCC cells in vitro and for KTP532 surgical laser targeting

  19. Photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging of hypericin-treated squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Christian S; Luu, Quang; Sercarz, Joel; Saxton, Romaine

    2006-12-05

    Conventional cancer therapy including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy often are physically debilitating and largely ineffective in previously treated patients with recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A natural photochemical, hypericin, could be a less invasive method for laser photodynamic therapy (PDT) of these recurrent head and neck malignancies. Hypericin has powerful photo-oxidizing ability, tumor localization properties, and fluorescent imaging capabilities as well as minimal dark toxicity. The current study defined hypericin PDT in vitro with human SCC cells before the cells were grown as tumor transplants in nude mice and tested as a model for hypericin induced tumor fluorescence and PDT via laser fiberoptics. SNU squamous carcinoma cells were grown in tissue culture, detached from monolayers with trypsin, and incubated with 0.1 microg to 10 microg/ml of hypericin before exposure to laser light at 514, 550, or 593 nm to define optimal dose, time, and wavelength for PDT of tumor cells. The SCC cells also were injected subcutaneously in nude mice and grown for 6-8 weeks to form tumors before hypericin injection and insertion of fiberoptics from a KTP532 surgical laser to assess the feasibility of this operating room instrument in stimulating fluorescence and PDT of tumors. In vitro testing revealed a hypericin dose of 0.2-0.5 microg/ml was needed for PDT of the SCC cells with an optimal tumoricidal response seen at the 593 nm light absorption maximum. In vivo tumor retention of injected hypericin was seen for 7 to 10 days using KTP532 laser induced fluorescence and biweekly PDT via laser fiberoptics led to regression of SCC tumor transplants under 0.4 cm2 diameter, but resulted in progression of larger size tumors in the nude mice. In this preclinical study, hypericin was tested for 514-593 nm dye laser PDT of human SCC cells in vitro and for KTP532 surgical laser targeting of SCC tumors in mice. The results suggest hypericin is a

  20. [A case of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma treated by partial nephrectomy associated with adrenal tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, H; Ishibashi, Y; Fujinami, K; Tsuchiya, F; Sakanishi, S

    1994-12-01

    A case of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma was reported. The patient was 69-year-old male who had been examined for postoperative study of gastric cancer by abdominal CT. The abdominal CT incidentally revealed right adrenal tumor which was non-functional and multilocular cysts in the lower pole of the right kidney. Selective renal arteriography showed a hypovascular mass with fine neovascularity. These two findings of CT and arteriography were though to represent a probable malignant tumor but renal function of the patient decreased moderately. Surgical exploration was done and right renal masses were thought to be seen benign multilocular cysts without capsule. Simple excision of the wall of cysts and right adrenalectomy were performed. Pathological examinations showed multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma and benign adrenal hyperplasia. Additionally partial nephrectomy was done. Surgical margin of the kidney was tumor free and postoperative course was uneventful. Prognosis of multiocular cystic renal cell carcinoma is good, therefore conservative surgery is recommended.

  1. Immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimani, A; Berntsen, A; Svane, I M

    2009-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have a limited life expectancy but still a subset of these patients develop immune and clinical responses after immunotherapy including dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. In a recently published phase I/II trials, fourteen HLA-A2 negative patients...... with progressive mRCC were vaccinated with autologous DC pulsed with allogeneic tumour lysate. Low-dose IL-2 administered subcutaneously was given concomitantly. In this study, we analysed lysate specific proliferation of PBMCs from these patients together with the TH1/TH2 balance of the responding T cells. Also......, serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-18 from these patients and additional thirteen HLA-A2 positive mRCC patients treated with autologous DC pulsed with survivin and telomerase peptides were analysed during vaccination to identify systemic immune responses and potential response...

  2. A Case of Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Cisplatin and Adriamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Akiko; Ansai, Shin-Ichi; Ueno, Takashi; Kawana, Seiji; Shimizu, Akira; Naito, Zenya; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of an ulcer that had been growing on his back for 10 years. Physical examination showed an ulcerated tumor from the neck to the back and swollen cervical lymph nodes. The tumor size was 12×9 cm. Histology of the biopsy showed a nodular and morpheic basal cell carcinoma (BCC). A chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed multiple lung tumors. CT-guided biopsy of the lung and the cervical lymph node revealed metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC). The primary skin tumor was resected and a total of 10 courses of cisplatin (25 mg/m 2 /day×75%) and adriamycin (50 mg/m 2 ×75%) were administered for metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC). The patient died 5 years and 3 months after his first visit. Autopsy revealed MBCC in the lung, kidney, pancreas, several lymph nodes, liver and bone. A portion of the tumor cells were composed of squamoid cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, large nuclei, lack of the characteristic peripheral palisading and retraction artifacts, and variable cytoplasmic keratinization. These pathological findings were compatible with basosquamous cell carcinoma. Chemotherapy was effective for MBCC in this patient.

  3. SU-F-P-58: Squamous Cell and Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin Treated with a Freiburg Flap Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, K; Li, B [MedStar Health RadAmerica, Mercy Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jacobs, M; Laser, B [Mercy Medical Center Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To treat squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma of the skin with the Freiburg flap applicator using a high dose rate modality of an Elekta Flexitron or MicroSelectron for radiation delivery by compensating the dose deviation resulting from the incomplete scatter environment. Methods: Patients were selected to have lesions greater than or equal to 2cm. A mask might be needed depending on special locations. The lesions on the eyelid and face presented in this research were, however, treated without a mask. Cutting the flap into a shape conformal to the target and attaching it to the mask were used in order to make the treatment reproducible. Patients were scanned with a Philips Big Bore Brilliant CT. A 1cm margin was added to the lesion. An Elekta Oncentra Brachy treatment planning system ver. 4.3 was used for treatment planning. 40 Gy in 10 or 8 fractions was prescribed to the 1cm depth. The Freiburg flap was aligned and verified by CT scanning prior to treatment. Results: Three patients with squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma of the skin were treated with the Freiburg flap applicator. Lesion sizes ranged from 2cm to 6 cm in a maximum dimension. With treatment planning, we made a dose correction for compensating the dose deviation resulting from the incomplete scatter environment of the flap applicators exposed to air. The flap was also covered by a 4cm bolus in order to obtain more back scattered radiation during treatment. Six month follow up showed a very good cosmetic result. Conclusion: The Freiburg flap brachytherapy offers a non-invasive skin cancer treatment with a high skin dose delivered to the tumor while a low dose sparing the surrounding health tissue. It is a promising alternative to skin cancer surgery or external beam radiation therapy.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and Fuhrman grade in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma treated surgically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Antoni; Nguyen, Daniel P; Vertosick, Emily A; Corradi, Renato B; Musquera, Mireia; Pérez, Meritxell; Fossati, Nicola; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac; Montserrat, Josep M; Benfante, Nicole E; Hakimi, A Ari; Skanderup, Anders J; Russo, Paul; Alcaraz, Antonio; Touijer, Karim A

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Fuhrman grade in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). As secondary endpoints, we studied its association with tumor size, metastasis-free survival (MFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). We reviewed the databases of two tertiary care centers, identifying 2579 patients who underwent partial or radical nephrectomy for ccRCC between 1991 and 2014. Descriptive statistics were used to compare pathologic variables between patients with and without OSA. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association of OSA with Fuhrman grade and tumor size. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine OSA association with MFS and CSS. A pathway analysis was performed on a cohort with available gene expression data. In total, 172 patients (7 %) had self-reported OSA at diagnosis. More patients with OSA had high Fuhrman grade compared to those without OSA [51 vs. 38 %; 13 % risk difference; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 5-20 %; p = 0.003]. On multivariable analysis, the association remained significant (OR 1.41; 95 % CI 1.00-1.99; p = 0.048). OSA was not associated with tumor size (p > 0.5), MFS (p = 0.5) or CSS (p = 0.4). A trend toward vascular endothelial growth factor pathway enrichment was seen in OSA patients (p = 0.08). OSA is associated with high Fuhrman grade in patients undergoing surgery for ccRCC. Pending validation of this novel finding in further prospective studies, it could help shape future research to better understand etiological mechanisms associated.

  5. A massive neglected giant basal cell carcinoma in a schizophrenic patient treated successfully with vismodegib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Lei, Ulrikke

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule vismodegib is a great treatment alternative to patients challenged, e.g. psychiatric disorders, suffering from severe basal cell carcinoma of the skin in which surgery or other treatment modalities is not possible because of patient's wish or condition. We present a case of a 73...

  6. Survival Patterns in Elderly Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Linda W; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; Bijl, Henk P; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Halmos, Gyorgy B; de Rooij, Sophia E; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2017-07-15

    We sought to assess the effect of age on overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and non-cancer-related death (NCRD) in elderly (aged ≥70 years) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with definitive radiation therapy. The results were compared with those of younger patients, and the most important prognostic factors for survival endpoints were determined. Treatments may be better justified based on identification of the main differences in survival between young and elderly patients. Data were analyzed from all consecutive HNSCC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (66-70 Gy) in our department between April 2007 and December 2014. A total of 674 patients, including 168 elderly patients (24.9%), were included in the study. Multivariate association models were constructed to assess the effect of age on survival endpoints. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential prognostic factors for survival in elderly patients. A total of 674 consecutive patients, including 168 elderly patients, were analyzed. The 5-year OS and NCRD rates were significantly worse for elderly patients than for young patients: 45.5% versus 58.2% (P=.007) and 39.0% versus 20.7% (Pelderly patient group. Of the elderly patients, 80 (47%) died during follow-up; 45% of these deaths were ascribed to the index tumor. For elderly patients, radiation therapy combined with systemic forms of treatment was significantly associated with adverse NCRD rate (hazard ratio, 8.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-27.2; P=.001) after we performed a multivariate association analysis. Elderly HNSCC patients have worse survival outcomes than young HNSCC patients. Age is an independent prognostic factor for OS, mainly due to an increase in non-cancer-related mortality and comorbid diseases. The differences in CSS between young and elderly patients are negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-institutional analysis of early squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx treated with radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Saito, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Naoki; Nakata, Kensei; Hareyama, Masato; Takada, Takahiro; Karasawa, Kumiko; Watanabe, Toshiichi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Toba, Takashi; Yamada, Shogo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of patients with early hypopharyngeal cancer treated with radical radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten institutions combined the data from 115 patients with Stage I-II hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive RT between 1990 and 2001. The median patient age was 67 years; 99 patients were men and 16 were women. Of the 115 patients, 39 had Stage I and 76 had Stage II disease. Conventional fractionation was used in 98 patients and twice-daily RT in 17 patients; chemotherapy was combined with RT in 57 patients. The median follow-up period was 47 months. Results: The overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rate for 95 patients without synchronous malignancies was 66.0% and 77.4%, respectively. The 5-year disease-specific survival rate by T stage was 95.8% for patients with T1 disease and 70.1% for patients with T2 disease (p = 0.02). Of the 115 patients, local control with laryngeal voice preservation was achieved in 34 of 39 patients with T1 lesions, including 7 patients successfully salvaged, and in 56 of 76 patients with T2 lesions. Sixty-five patients (56.5%) had synchronous or metachronous cancers. Of the 115 patients, 19 died of hypopharyngeal cancer, 10 died of second primary cancers, and 14 died of other causes during the study and follow-up periods. Conclusions: Patients with early hypopharyngeal cancer tended to have a good prognosis after RT. However, second malignancies had an adverse effect on the overall outcomes of patients with early hypopharyngeal cancer

  8. Programmed cell death in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with yttrium-90 and doxorubicin-loaded beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Robert; Galvan, Lorena; Lan, Jing Quan; Han, Esther; Bauer, Jason; Morris, Katherine T

    2013-10-01

    Molecular analysis of apoptosis and autophagy pathways was performed from a single hepatocellular carcinoma treated with yttrium-90 and doxorubicin-loaded beads before resection and compared with normal liver tissue from the margins. Both bead formulations activated apoptosis-associated mechanisms and increased autophagy pathway protein levels. Increased DNA fragmentation and autophagy markers were seen in tumor treated with drug-eluting beads compared with yttrium-90-treated tumor. These results suggest that both microembolic therapies activate cell death signaling, although differences in apoptosis and autophagy pathways were seen in this patient. Knowledge of mechanisms of action for each treatment may enhance future therapeutic strategies. © SIR, 2013.

  9. Absence of REV3L promotes p53-regulated cancer cell metabolism in cisplatin-treated lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghao; Murata, Michael M; Digman, Michelle A

    2018-01-29

    Lung cancer is one of the deadliest cancers in the world because of chemo-resistance to the commonly used cisplatin-based treatments. The use of low fidelity DNA polymerases in the translesional synthesis (TLS) DNA damage response pathway that repairs lesions caused by cisplatin also presents a mutational carcinogenic burden on cells that needs to be regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. However, there is much debate over the roles of the reversionless 3-like (REV3L) protein responsible for TLS and p53 in regulating cancer cell metabolism. In this study, the fluorescence lifetime of the metabolic coenzyme NADH reveals that the absence of REV3L can promote the p53-mediated upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation in cisplatin-treated H1299 lung carcinoma cells and increases cancer cell sensitivity to this platinum-based chemotherapy. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized relationship between p53 and REV3L in cancer cell metabolism and may lead to improvements in chemotherapy treatment plans that reduce cisplatin resistance in lung cancer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Pattern of Failure in Surgically Treated Patients with Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cai-Neng; Liu, Shao-Yan; Luo, Jing-Wei; Gao, Li; Xu, Guo-Zhen; Xu, Zhen-Gang; Tang, Ping-Zhang

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of failure in patients who have undergone surgical resection for cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Case series with chart review. University hospital. Sixty-two patients who had undergone surgical resection of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from January 2001 through April 2012. Sites of failure were documented. Twenty-nine patients had developed treatment failure. Of the 29 patients, 14, 13, and 14 had developed local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis, respectively. Of the 13 regional failures, the images of 2 patients were lost. The other 11 regional failures included left lateral nodal disease at level II (n = 2), level III (n = 4), and level IV (n = 7); right lateral nodal disease at level II (n = 2), level III (n = 3), and level IV (n = 3); and level VI (n = 4). The overall 2-year local failure-free survival rate and regional failure-free survival rates were 79.6% and 58.6% (P = .04) for patients with stage II disease and 79.6% and 59.6% (P = .054) for patients with stage III disease, respectively. The pattern of failure of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is characterized by early locoregional failure, especially in patients with stage III disease. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Association of Oncogenic Mutations in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Alexandra; Pedeutour, Florence; Peyrade, Frédéric; Saudes, Laurence; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Sudaka, Anne; Ettaiche, Marc; Benchetrit, Maxime; Poissonnet, Gilles; Weinbreck, Nicolas; Dadone, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Passeron, Thierry; Montaudié, Henri

    2017-04-01

    Cetuximab was recently proposed for advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC); however, its efficacy is inconsistent and identification of predictive biomarkers for response is necessary. To search for somatic mutations of the HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and EGFR genes in patients with advanced cSCC treated with cetuximab; and to investigate the efficacy and tolerance of cetuximab according to these mutations. A multicentric and retrospective study of 31 patients (22 men, 9 women) with histologically confirmed advanced cSCC carried out in 1 department of dermatology and 2 departments of medical oncology in France between January 2008 and December 2014. The median age of participants was 86 years (range, 48-96 years). Mutational status was determined by pyrosequencing method, allelic discrimination, or Sanger sequencing. Patients were treated by single-agent cetuximab. The primary end point was the incidence of somatic mutations of the RAS, BRAF, and EGFR genes and association of cetuximab efficacy with these mutations was investigated by using Fisher test. Secondary end points were the disease control rate (DCR) at week 6, the progression free-survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety profile of cetuximab. Thirty-one samples of cSCC from 31 patients were analyzed. Only 2 RAS mutated samples (6.5%) were identified. The first harbored a NRAS point mutation (c.35G>A) in codon 12, resulting in a p.G12D substitution. The second sample presented a HRAS point mutation (c.38G>T) in codon 13, resulting in a p.G13V substitution. No mutation of KRAS, BRAF, and EGFR genes at the investigated loci was found. Two patients with NRAS and HRAS mutations showed a partial and complete response to cetuximab, respectively. The mean duration of follow-up was 19 months. At week 6, the disease control rate was 67.8%. The median OS was 13 months and the median PFS was 9 months. All patients could continue cetuximab treatment without dose reduction. Even in elderly patients

  12. [A Case of Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Crossed Fused Ectopic Kidney Treated with Partial Nephrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Manabu; Maehana, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Masumori, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    A 76-year-old man came to the department of gastrointestinal medicine with lower left abdominal discomfort and constipation. A crossed fused ectopic kidney with a renal tumor in the left upper pole of the kidney was detected by computed tomography. We performed left partial nephrectomy safely in spite of the complicated shape and complexity of the blood vessels. The pathological diagnosis was clear cell renal cell carcinoma, pT3a, with a negative surgical margin. After surgery, renal function was well preserved.

  13. Evaluation of Quality Metrics for Surgically Treated Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Townsend, Melanie E; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Quality metrics for patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) exist, but whether compliance with these metrics correlates with improved survival is unknown. To examine whether compliance with proposed quality metrics is associated with improved survival in patients with laryngeal SCC treated with surgery with or without adjuvant therapy. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a tertiary care academic medical center who had previously untreated laryngeal SCC and underwent surgery with or without adjuvant therapy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from August 4, 2015, through December 13, 2015. Surgery with or without adjuvant therapy. Compliance with quality metrics from the American Head and Neck Society (AHNS), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, and institutional metrics with face validity covering pretreatment evaluation, treatment, and posttreatment surveillance was evaluated. The association between compliance with the group of metrics and overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) was explored using Cox proportional hazards analysis. The association between compliance with individual metrics and survival was similarly determined. A total of 243 patients (184 men and 59 women) were included in the study (median age, 62 years; age range, 23-87 years). No association was found between increasing levels of compliance with the AHNS or NCCN metrics and survival. The only AHNS or NCCN metric for which greater compliance correlated with improved survival on multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis controlling for pT stage, pN stage, extracapsular spread, margin status, and comorbidity was pretreatment multidisciplinary evaluation for patients with stage cT3-4 or cN1-3 disease (OS adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24-0.94; DFS aHR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). For the institutional metrics, multidisciplinary evaluation

  14. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  15. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and proliferation cell nuclear antigen in esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; He Shaoqin; Shi Xuehui; Li Xiaoqiu; Lu Hongfen; Shi Daren

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the correlation between the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the outcome of esophageal carcinoma patients treated by radiotherapy. Methods: In 59 esophageal cancer patients, expressions of VEGF and PCNA gene proteins in the biopsy samples obtained by endoscopic examination were assessed by immunohistochemical stain. Correlation between the expression of VEGF and PCNA gene and prognosis and clinical or pathological characters such as gender, stage and histological grade were analyzed. Results: Preliminary study demonstrated that the expression of VEGF and PCNA was not correlated with clinical or pathological characters such as gender, stage and histological grade, while VEGF was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival rate by multivariate analysis. Neither correlation between VEGF and local control nor that between PCNA and local control or overall survival rates was found significant. The correlation between VEGF and PCNA was significantly positive. Conclusions: Expression of VEGF, which can reflect the cell proliferation, may have significant impact on overall survival rate in esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy and is worthy of further study. Although no correlation between PCNA and local control or overall survival rate is found, further study is still needed because of the limited cases alloted

  16. Renal cell carcinoma in patients with a solitary kidney after nephrectomy treated with radiofrequency ablation: Mid term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Jakobs, Tobias F.; Kubisch, Constanze H.; Trumm, Christoph; Weber, Christof; Siebels, Michael; Helmberger, Thomas K.; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with solitary kidney for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Within 2 years 10 patients (seven males, three females; age 65 ± 8 years) were treated. All patients had a history of nephrectomy of the contralateral kidney. The indications for RFA were inoperability or high probability of complete renal failure after surgical enucleation of the tumor. 13 tumors with a size between 1.9 and 4.2 cm (average 2.7 cm) were treated. In patients with a tumor diameter larger than 2.5 cm a transarterial embolization was performed prior to RFA to reduce heat sink effect and risk of bleeding. Therapeutical success was defined as a lack of contrast enhancement in follow up examinations and shrinking of the treated area. Furthermore all patients' renal function was monitored. RFA of renal tumors under CT-fluoroscopy was feasible in all patients. Within the follow up (3 and 24 months) no tumor recurrence or major complication was detected. One patient developed another RCC and was successfully treated with a second RF-ablation. None of the patients developed renal failure with the need of hemodialysis. In one of the patients a hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue was noticed, which stopped spontaneously. RFA is a valuable and effective therapeutical option in patients with solitary kidney suffering from inoperable renal cell carcinoma. The complication rate is small and an excellent tumor control can be achieved without deterioration of the renal function.

  17. Cystatin C as a predictor factor in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated by everolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Lubomir; Stec, Rafał; Dzierżanowska, Małgorzata; Synowiec, Agnieszka; Cierniak, Szczepan; Kade, Grzegorz; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the influence of serum cystatin C (CysC) with respect to other glomerular filtration rate (GFR) markers on the treatment effect of everolimus in a phase II study in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Outcomes were from the study's primary analysis. GFR was calculated according to CKD-EPI-sCr equation, CKD-EPI-CysC equation and CKD-EPI-sCr-CysC equation, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equation, serum levels of creatinine (sCr) and CysC before the treatment. We observed in 56 patients analysed patients high correlation (R Spearman from ±0.69 to ±1.00; P cystatin C level before treatment [HR: 2.60 (1.03-2.60), P = 0.0428], increased corrected calcium level [HR: 2.78 (95 % CI 1.03-7.54), P = 0.0441] and increased LDH level before treatment [HR: 2.34 (95 % CI 1.11-4.97), P = 0.0262]. Increased serum CysC level in contrast to other studied GFR markers had predictive significance in patients with mRCC.

  18. Locally-regionally advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, Valentina; Stojkovski, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil managed by definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in order to analyze the patients’ outcome and to evaluate the acute and late toxic effects of this treatment modality. Material and methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, 36 patients with locally and/or regionally advanced tonsillar cancer underwent three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The dose prescription of the planning target volume for gross tumor and low-risk subclinical disease was 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. Conventional fractionation with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy, 5 times per week was used. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 30 mg/m2 given on a weekly basis. Acute and late radiotherapy-related toxicities were recorded using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) grading system. The 3-year locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 20.5 months (range, 5 to 90 months). The median followup of living patients was 59 months (range, 30 to 90 months). Complete response rates of the primary tumor and of the nodal disease were 72.2% and 64.0%, respectively. A complete composite response was present in 25 patients (69.4%). Treatment failure occurred in 15 out of 25 patients who achieved complete composite response following CCRT. The 3-year LRRFS, DFS, and OS rate was 38.8%, 27.8%, and 27.3%, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 58.3% of patients. Xerostomia grade 2 was revealed in 72.2% of patients. Conclusion: Taking into account the low 3-year survival rates observed in our study and the high percentage of grade 2 xerostomia, it can be concluded that in the future, instead of 3DCRT with concurrent

  19. Cisplatin, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-09

    CDKN2A-p16 Negative; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  20. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Zhen; Weinman, Steven A; Ren, Jinyu; O’Neil, Maura; Zhao, Jie; Bridges, Brian; Cox, Josiah; Abdulkarim, Bashar; Schmitt, Timothy M; Kumer, Sean C

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs), has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE) treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040). None of the other markers predicted recurrence. High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of tumor cells with a CSC phenotype may be a critical factor in the

  1. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs, has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Methods Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. Results TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040. None of the other markers predicted recurrence. Conclusion High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of

  2. Treatment results and prognostic analysis of 47 patients with urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ke; Hou Xiaorong; Shen Jie; Lian Xin; Sun Shuai; Zhang Fuquan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors of 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma treated with post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: From October 1998 to October 2008, 47 patients with primary urethral transitional cell carcinoma received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Thirty-one patients had stage T 3 /T 4 disease, 7 had lymph node metastasis. Thirty-nine patients had G3 tumor, 13 had stump-positive. The median radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (36-64 Gy). 81% patients (38/47) were treated with regional irradiation. Results: The median follow-up time was 21 months (6 -88 months). The follow-up rate was 92%. The median overall survival time was 35 months (5 -88 months). The 2-and 5-year overall survival rates were 57% and 49%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the median overall survival time was better in patients with stage T 1 or T 2 compared with stage T 3 or T 4 tumor (42 months vs. 19 months, χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), with age of ≤65 years compared with >65 years (28 mouths vs 18 months,χ 2 =8.23, P =0.004). There was no significant difference in the long term survival in patients with non-radical surgery compared with radical mastectomy (21 months vs. 20 months, χ 2 = 0.90, P = 0.344). In multivariate analysis, the stage T 3 or T 4 (χ 2 = 7.89, P =0.005), >65 years old (χ 2 = 4.85, P = 0.028), renal pelvis involvement (χ 2 = 5.65, P = 0.018), and tumor located in the mid or inferior segment (χ 2 =6.08,P =0.014) were factors associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions: Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve the efficacy of patients with locally advanced urethral transitional cell carcinoma. Advanced T stage and > 65 years age are associated with poorer prognosis. (authors)

  3. Bilateral renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma: A rare entity diagnosed synchronously and treated surgically in a staged fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiremit, Murat Can; Acar, Ömer; Sağlıcan, Yeşim; Esen, Tarık

    2017-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of adult malignancies and 90-95% of kidney neoplasms. Renal cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma (RCCLS) is an extremely rare histopathological entity based on available literature data. Herein, we report a 31-year-old male with incidentally detected synchronous bilateral renal masses who was eventually found to harbor RCCLS after being operated sequentially via nephron-sparing surgery.

  4. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    de Faria, J

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  5. Early-stage esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with californium-252 neutron brachytherapy: clinical report on 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiming; Wang, Qifeng; Jia, Xitang; Liu, Bo; Wang, C-K Chris

    2013-01-01

    Californium-252 (²⁵²Cf) neutron brachytherapy is a form of high linear energy transfer radiotherapy, which has proven effective when used in combination with external beam radiotherapy to treat intracavitary cancers of the cervix, colon/rectum and esophagus. No study has been reported for treatment of intracavitary cancers with neutron brachytherapy alone. The aim of the study was to observe and analyze the long-term curative effects and complications for early stage thoracic esophageal cancer patients treated with neutron brachytherapy alone. From December 2001 to August 2006, 16 patients of early stage squamous cell carcinoma underwent neutron brachytherapy. The total radiation dose to the reference point was 20-28 Gy-eq in 5 to 7 fractions with 4 Gy-eq/fraction. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up rates were 100%. The 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates were 100%, 87.5%, 87.5%, and 75%, respectively. The early complication rates for grades 1 and 2 radiation esophagitis were 75% and 25%, respectively. The late complication rates for grades 0 and 1 (according to the RTOG/EORTC standard) were 87.5% and 12.5%, respectively. Barium esophagography after treatments confirmed that the complete response rate was 100%. Fourteen patients were confirmed by endoscopy to have either normal mucosa or inflammation change. Neutron brachytherapy alone was an effective and safe treatment for early stage esophageal squamous cell cancer.

  6. Pattern of failure in 5001 patients treated for glottic squamous cell carcinoma with curative intent - A population based study from the DAHANCA group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Nina Munk; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the pattern of failure in a national consecutive cohort of patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated with primary radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent over a 41-year period. Materials and methods All patients undergoing curative treatment for a glottic SCC...

  7. Survival, Durable Response, and Long-Term Safety in Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, David F; Drake, Charles G; Sznol, Mario; Choueiri, Toni K; Powderly, John D; Smith, David C; Brahmer, Julie R; Carvajal, Richard D; Hammers, Hans J; Puzanov, Igor; Hodi, F Stephen; Kluger, Harriet M; Topalian, Suzanne L; Pardoll, Drew M; Wigginton, Jon M; Kollia, Georgia D; Gupta, Ashok; McDonald, Dan; Sankar, Vindira; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Atkins, Michael B

    2015-06-20

    Blockade of the programmed death-1 inhibitory cell-surface molecule on immune cells using the fully human immunoglobulin G4 antibody nivolumab mediates tumor regression in a portion of patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumors. We report clinical activity, survival, and long-term safety in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with nivolumab in a phase I study with expansion cohorts. A total of 34 patients with previously treated advanced RCC, enrolled between 2008 and 2012, received intravenous nivolumab (1 or 10 mg/kg) in an outpatient setting once every two weeks for up to 96 weeks and were observed for survival and duration of response after treatment discontinuation. Ten patients (29%) achieved objective responses (according to RECIST [version 1.0]), with median response duration of 12.9 months; nine additional patients (27%) demonstrated stable disease lasting > 24 weeks. Three of five patients who stopped treatment while in response continued to respond for ≥ 45 weeks. Median overall survival in all patients (71% with two to five prior systemic therapies) was 22.4 months; 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 71%, 48%, and 44%, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 18% of patients; all were reversible. Patients with advanced treatment-refractory RCC treated with nivolumab demonstrated durable responses that in some responders persisted after drug discontinuation. Overall survival is encouraging, and toxicities were generally manageable. Ongoing randomized clinical trials will further assess the impact of nivolumab on overall survival in patients with advanced RCC. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Combination of mTOR and MAPK Inhibitors—A Potential Way to Treat Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Chauhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common neoplasm that occurs in the kidney and is marked by a unique biology, with a long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. In the past few years, there have been significant advancements to understand the biology of RCC. This has led to the introduction of novel targeted therapies in the management of patients with metastatic disease. Patients treated with targeted therapies for RCC had shown positive impact on overall survival, however, no cure is possible and patients need to undergo treatment for long periods of time, which raises challenges to manage the associated adverse events. Moreover, many patients may not respond to it and even response may not last long enough in the responders. Many inhibitors of the Mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway are currently being used in treatment of advanced RCC. Studies showed that inhibitions of mTOR pathways induce Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK escape cell death and cells become resistant to mTOR inhibitors. Because of this, there is a need to inhibit both pathways with their inhibitors comparatively for a better outcome and treatment of patients with RCC.

  9. Assessment of laryngeal functions in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Takahide; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Nagao, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    The laryngeal functions in patients with laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) were evaluated. We reviewed the records of 32 patients with resectable stage II to IV squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx treated with CCRT as a initial treatment between October 1998 and September 2003. A questionnaire survey and measurements of maximum phonation time, GRBAS and range of voice/speaking fundamental frequency were performed, and the method of food intake in the swallowing ability scale and the presence of tracheostoma were assessed for evaluating laryngeal functions after CCRT. After CCRT for laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer, the phonatory functions appeared to be preserved in 75% of the patients in terms of sustainability; however, there were some cases presenting hoarseness and narrowed range of voice. Oral intake was possible in most cases (97%) without a history of aspiration pneumonia. In 2 cases, permanent tracheostoma had to be retained. It was concluded that laryngeal functions could be preserved in most cases after CCRT, though the tracheostoma might not be closed in some patients with laryngeal cancer. (author)

  10. MMP-9, uPA and uPAR proteins expression and its prognostic significance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shuchai; Wang Yafei; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang; Shen Wenbin; Li Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the the prognostic significance of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR protein expression and its relationship with clinical-pathologic factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy. Methods: MMP-9, uPA and uPAR protein expression was measured in 59 esophageal carcinomas and 41 peri-carcinoma tissues with immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the protein expression and the clinical-pathological parameters was analyzed, and the prognostic factors in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone was evaluated. Results: The rates of positive expression of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR were 85%, 76% and 78% in esophageal carcinoma and 39%, 49% and 44% in peri-carcinoma tissues (χ 2 =22.54, 8.04 and 12.18; P=0.000,0.005 and 0.000). The rates of positive expression of MMP-9 was 79% and 100% when the depth of tumor invasion was ≤2 cm and >2 cm(P= 0.048), respectively. The expression of uPA was significantly correlated with the status of fat interspace between the esophageal lesion and the vertebra in CT scanning image. When the fat interspace existed and disappeared, the rates of strong positive expression was 44% and 70%, respectively (χ 2 =4.21, P=0.040). The positive expression rate of uPA was significantly correlated with distant metastasis, which was 100% in patients with distant metastasis and 68.89% in those without distant metastasis(χ 2 =4.12, P=0.042). The positive expression rate of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR did not affect the prognosis and the short-term result of esophageal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy alone. Conclusions: The protein expression of MMP-9, uPA and uPAR may correlate with local infiltration and distant metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Protein expression may not influence the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma treated by radio therapy, though long time followed-up is still needed. (authors)

  11. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp treated with serial free flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikander, Peder; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of large full thickness scalp defects is always a challenge. Many different techniques can be used, but larger defects often call for a free tissue transfer. The purpose of this report is to present one successful way of treating multiple large scalp defects. A 61-year-old man was ...

  12. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund Andersen, Anja; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    , to examine possible risk factors of developing SPMs. METHODS: Data on all patients treated for HNSCC with curative intent in the Region of Southern Denmark in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were reviewed. A total of 1,172 patients were identified. The combined data from the DAHANCA...

  13. Paclitaxel with Cisplatin as Salvage Treatment for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urothelial Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Uhm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of paclitaxel with cisplatin as salvage therapy in patients previously treated with gemcitabine and cisplatin (G/C for advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urothelial tract. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with metastatic or locally advanced TCC who had received prior G/C chemotherapy were enrolled. All patients received paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for eight cycles or until disease progression. RESULTS: The median age was 61 years (range, 43–83 years, and the median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1 (range, 0–2. The overall response rate was 36% [95% confidence interval (95% CI = 18–54], with three complete responses and seven partial responses. The median time to progression was 6.2 months (95% CI = 3.9–8.5, and the median overall survival was 10.3 months (95% CI = 6.1–14.1. The most common Grade 3/4 nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were emesis (10 of 28 patients; 36% and neutropenia (5 of 110 cycles; 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Salvage chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin displayed promising results with tolerable toxicity profiles in patients with metastatic or locally advanced TCC who had been pretreated with G/C.

  14. Serum CEA as a prognostic factor in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasumi, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Takuro; Matsuzawa, Masumi; Takahashi, Michiko.

    1984-01-01

    Serum CEA levels were serially examined during radiation therapy in 38 patients with stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Eighteen patients showed abnormal serum CEA levels and 20 showed normal serum CEA levels before therapy. The recurrence rate was independent of whether the patients showed normal or abnormal levels before radiation therapy. When pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels remained unchanged at the termination of radiation therapy, the recurrence rate was high. Recurrence developed in many of the patients outside the irradiated field early after therapy, suggesting that distant metastasis had already existed at the termination of therapy. Even when pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels turned to normal until the termination of therapy, approximately one third of the patients developed recurrence. However, the recurrence rate was lower in those patients, as compared with that in the former type of patients (p < 0.04). In determining the prognosis of cancer patients treated by radiation therapy, it is of great value to know whether pretreatment abnormal serum CEA levels remains unchanged or becomes normal until the termination of radiation therapy. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Retrospective Investigation of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Lip Treated with Peplomycin Administered Through a Superficial Temporal Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Taku; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Kambayashi, Yumi; Furudate, Sadanori; Hidaka, Takanori; Kakizaki, Aya; Watabe, Akiko; Haga, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Aiba, Setsuya

    2017-04-01

    Continuous intra-arterial (IA) administration of peplomycin (PEP) through a tumor-feeding artery is one of the most effective treatments for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in cosmetic areas. In order to determine the effective and safe dose of PEP and the curative rate of IA-PEP, we retrospectively investigated a case series of 24 patients with cSCC on the lips who were treated with IA-PEP. IA-PEP reduced the tumor mass in all 24 cases (100%). A complete response occurred in 17 patients (70.8%), and a partial response occurred in seven (29.2%). Moreover, 17 patients (70.8%) were cured, three patients developed cervical lymph node metastasis (12.5%), and four developed local recurrence (16.7%). Three out of the 24 patients developed interstitial pneumonia (12.5%). Low-dose IA-PEP administered through a superficial temporal artery was a highly effective treatment that achieved a curative response for 70.8% of patients with cSCC on the lips. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Medical marijuana use in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David A; Nabavizadeh, Nima; Romer, Jeanna L; Chen, Yiyi; Holland, John M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to better understand why patients with history of head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy are using medical marijuana (MM). Established HNC quality of life questionnaires and our own MM quality of life questionnaire were sent to 15 HNC patients treated at our institution who reported using MM. Patients are clinically disease free and currently using MM to manage long-term side effects after curative HNC treatment. There was a 100 % response rate. Median time from treatment was 45 months (21-136 months). Most patients smoked marijuana (12 patients), while others reported ingestion (4 patients), vaporizing (3 patients), and use of homemade concentrated oil (1 patient). Six patients reported prior recreational marijuana use before diagnosis. MM provided benefit in altered sense, weight maintenance, depression, pain, appetite, dysphagia, xerostomia, muscle spasm, and sticky saliva. HNC patients report MM use to help with long-term side effects of radiotherapy.

  17. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... H, Shuda M, Chang Y, et al . “Clonal integration of a polyomavirus in human Merkel cell carcinoma.” ... look at it under the microscope. This process continues until the surgeon no longer sees cancer cells. ...

  18. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma with known human papillomavirus status treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy: patterns of failure and toxicity outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bledsoe, Trevor J; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Noble, Anisha R; Hunter, Grant K; Rybicki, Lisa A; Hoschar, Aaron; Chute, Deborah J; Saxton, Jerrold P; Greskovich, John F; Adelstein, David J

    2013-01-01

    Tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status has emerged as one of the most powerful prognostic factors for disease control and survival in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We reviewed our experience in patients with OPSCC and known tumor HPV status treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients with stage III-IVb OPSCC and known tumor HPV status treated with CRT between 2006 and 2011 were identified from an IRB approved registry for this retrospective review. Outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between HPV-positive and negative patients using the log-rank test. Of the 121 pts (89% male, 93% Caucasian) included in this study, median age was 57 (range: 40–73) and median follow-up was 21 months (range: 6–63). Ninety-seven (80%) patients were HPV-positive and 24 (20%) were HPV-negative. Primary site was base of tongue (55%), tonsil (44%), and oropharyngeal wall (2%). Two year rates of locoregional recurrence (3% vs. 26%; p = 0.002), disease free survival (93% vs. 64%; p = 0.001) and overall survival (94% vs 73%; p = 0.002) were superior in HPV-positive patients, while rates of distant recurrence were similar (3% vs. 5%; p = 0.98). While acute toxicities were similar between both groups, patients with HPV-positive disease were more likely to resume a normal diet (90% vs. 65%; p = 0.017) at last follow up. Also, no HPV-positive patient required a feeding tube beyond 6 months after treatment, compared with 24% of HPV-negative patients. Definitive CRT produces excellent rates of disease control with minimal late toxicity for patients with HPV-positive OPSCC. Studies of OPSCC should account for tumor HPV status when identifying factors prognostic for outcome

  19. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of external auditory canal lacking epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression, in an elderly Omani with oculocutaneous albinism treated with palliative radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Mufti, Taha; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Qureshi, Asim

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of external auditory canal in an Omani man with oculocutaneous albinism. The disease mimicked inflammatory process revealing positive cultures for various microorganisms during the course of his illness. He was eventually biopsied to rule out atypical infective process or presence of malignancy. He was staged as T4N0M0 and treated with radical doses of palliative radiation therapy which was very well tolerated and resulted in a complete resolution o...

  1. The prognostic factors for patients with stage IB cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated by radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ye; Zhang Rong; Wu Lingying; Bai Ping; Li Xiaoguang; Li Hongjun; Ma Shaokang; Li Shumin; Li Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the disease-free survival (DFS) and prognostic factors for stage I b cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated by radical hysterectomy. Methods: From January 1999 to December 2005, a total of 206 patients with uterus cervical squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were treated by type 3 hysterectomy and pelvic and/or para-aortic lymphadenectomy at Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. The diseases were stage I B1 and I B2 = in 103 patients each. Seventy-nine (76.7%) patients had preoperative radiotherapy and 111 (53.9%) had postoperative adjuvant treatment (PosAT). Prognostic factors were analyzed using univariate model and multivariate Cox model. Results: The follow-up rate was 92. 7%. 106 patients had following-up time of five years. The overall 5-year survival rate and the disease-free survival rate of stage I b , I B1 and I B2 were 96. 3% and 86. 8%, 100% and 94. 6%, 92. 2% and 77.9%, respectively. Univariate predictors of DFS included tumor size (FIGO stage, 77.9% : 94.6% ; χ 2 = 5. 58, P = 0.018), lympho-vascular space involvement (LVSI, 74.6% : 89. 8% ; χ 2 = 10. 44, P =0.001), vaginal involvement (purely fornix involvement was not included disease, 50% : 87.9% ; χ 2 = 7.01, P = 0.008), parametrial involvement (PI, χ 2 = 17.69, P = 0.000), and metastatic lymph nodes (LNM) > 2 (χ 2 = 21.47, P = 0.000) in stage I b disease, while LVSI (χ 2 =6.35, P =0.012), PI (χ 2 =90.00, P =0.000) and LNM >2(χ 2 =26. 27,P = 0. 000) in stage I B1 disease, LVSI (χ 2 =10.12, P =0.001), cervical canal involvement (χ 2 =4.60, P = 0.032), vaginal involvement (χ 2 =5.87, P=0.015), PI (χ 2 =4.78, P=0.029) and LNM >2(χ 2 = 6.72, P = 0.010) in stage I B2 disease. In multivariate analysis, FIGO stage (χ 2 = 4.73, P =0.030), LVSI (χ 2 = 9.81, P = 0.002), and LNM > 2 (χ 2 = 6.30, P = 0.012) were significantly associated with DFS in stage I b , while LVSI (χ 2 = 6. 38, P = 0.012) and LNM > 2 (χ 2 = 3

  2. T1N0 to T2N0 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Glottic Larynx Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment outcomes of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the glottic larynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 585 patients with T1N0 to T2N0 invasive SCCA of the glottic larynx treated between 1964 and 2006 with RT alone. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up, had histologic diagnosis of invasive SCCA, and received continuous-course RT. None of these patients received chemotherapy or had elective nodal RT. The probabilities of local control (LC), ultimate LC, ultimate LC with larynx preservation, neck control, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median follow-up for survivors was 12 years. Five-year LC rates were as follows: T1A, 94%; T1B, 93%; T2A, 80%; and T2B, 70%. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall treatment time greater than 41 days (p = 0.001) and poorly differentiated histology (p = 0.016) adversely affected LC. Five-year rates of ultimate LC with laryngeal preservation were: T1A, 95%; T1B, 94%, T2A, 81%; and T2B, 74%. Twenty-four (4%) of 585 patients failed in the neck; only 7 neck failures (1%) were isolated. Five-year CSS and OS rates were as follows: T1A, 97% and 82%; T1B, 99% and 83%; T2A, 94% and 76%; and T2B, 90% and 78%, respectively. Ten (1.7%) patients had severe and/or fatal complications. One patient died of a radiation-induced carotid artery angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Based on our study results, RT cures a high proportion of patients with T1N0 to T2N0 glottic SCCAs and has a low rate of severe complications.

  3. Body composition by computed tomography as a predictor of toxicity in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cushen, Samantha J

    2014-04-21

    Sunitinib is a standard first-line option for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Body composition is a prognostic factor in cancer patients and patients with loss of skeletal muscle mass and fat-free mass (FFM) are prone to dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during targeted drug therapy. We investigated whether body composition by computed tomography predicted DLT from sunitinib in mRCC.

  4. A Case Report for Stage ⅢB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma Patient Treated with Cultured Wild Ginseng Pharmacopuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Ky Park

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To derive further studies evaluating the effectiveness of Cultured Wild Ginseng Pharmacopuncture (CWGP Therapy on squamous cell carcinoma as a first line. Methods : Three cycles (4 weeks/cycle of CWGP were administered as a dosage of 10 ml per day. Patient was diagnosed with stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma and refused all therapy of conventional medicine because of old age and cardiac invasion of tumor. Intensive treatment of CWGP for 3 cycles was done on the patient. Computed Topography (CT was performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. Results : After the intravenous infusion of 2 cycles of CWGP, chest CT revealed the mass size and pleural invasion sustained stable disease. After the point injection of 1 cycle of CWGP, chest CT revealed progressive disease. The disease free survival rate was 1 month. Conclusion : This case may provide us the possibility that CWGP offers potential benefits for patients with squamous cell lung carcinoma. But this is a single case study and further case-series research should be compensated.

  5. Outcomes of Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma and Sarcomatoid Dedifferentiation Treated with Nephrectomy and Systemic Therapies: Comparison between the Cytokine and Targeted Therapy Eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Sarp K; Msaouel, Pavlos; Hess, Kenneth R; Yu, Kai-Jie; Matin, Surena F; Sircar, Kanishka; Tamboli, Pheroze; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A; Tannir, Nizar M

    2017-09-01

    We studied overall survival and prognostic factors in patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma treated with nephrectomy and systemic therapy in the cytokine and targeted therapy eras. This is a retrospective study of patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma who underwent nephrectomy and received systemic therapy at our center in the cytokine era (1987 to 2005) or the targeted therapy era (2006 to 2015). Multivariate regression models were used to determine the association of covariables with survival. Of the 199 patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma 167 (83.9%) died (median overall survival 16.5 months, 95% CI 15.2-20.9). Survival of patients with clear cell histology was significantly longer vs those with nonclear cell histology (p = 0.034). Patients with synchronous metastatic disease had significantly shorter survival than patients with metachronous metastatic disease (median 12.1 vs 23.3 months, p = 0.0064). Biopsy of the primary tumor or a metastatic site could detect the presence of sarcomatoid features in only 7.5% of cases. Although a significant improvement in survival rate was observed in the first year in patients treated in the targeted therapy era (p = 0.011), this effect was attenuated at year 2, disappeared at years 3 to 5 after diagnosis and was not evident in patients with poor risk features. Patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma still have poor prognosis with no clear long-term benefit of targeted therapy. This underscores the need to develop more effective systemic therapies for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  7. Validation of housekeeping genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line treated by 5 kinds of chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W; Zhang, W H; Zhang, H; Li, Y; Zhang, Y; Yin, W; Yang, Q

    2016-11-30

    Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become a frequently used strategy in gene expression studies. The relative quantification method is an important and commonly used method for the evaluation of RT-qPCR data. The key of this method is to identify an applicable internal control gene because the usage of different internal control genes may lead to distinct conclusions. Herein, we report the validation of 12 common housekeeping genes for RT-qPCR for gene expression analysis in the Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line (KB and Tca-8113) treated by 5 kinds of Chemotherapy Drugs. The gene expression stability and applicability of the 12 housekeeping gene candidates were determined using the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software programs. Comprehensive analyzing the results of the three software, ALAS1/GAPDH, ALAS1 and GUSB were suggested to be the most stable candidate genes for the study of both KB and Tca-8113 cell line together, KB cell line, and Tca-8113 cell line, respectively. This study provides useful information to normalize gene expression accurately for the investigation of target gene profiling in cell lines of OSCC. Further clarification of tumor molecular expression markers with our recommended housekeeping genes may improve the accuracy of diagnosis and estimation of prognostic factors as well as provide novel personalized treatments for OSCC patients.

  8. Synchronous Supraglottic and Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated with a Monoisocentric Hybrid Intensity-Modulated Radiation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Barney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the head and neck (HN and esophagus are similar. As such, synchronous primary tumors in these areas are not entirely uncommon. Definitive chemoradiation (CRT is standard care for locally advanced HNSCC and is a preferred option for inoperable esophageal SCC. Simultaneous treatment of both primaries with CRT can present technical challenges. We report a case of synchronous supraglottic and esophageal SCC primary tumors, highlighting treatment with a monoisocentric hybrid radiation technique and normal tissue toxicity considerations.

  9. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  10. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  11. Co-Expression of Bmi-1 and Podoplanin Predicts Overall Survival in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Treated With Radio(chemo)therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vormittag, Laurenz; Thurnher, Dietmar; Geleff, Silvana; Pammer, Johannes; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Grasl, Matthaeus Ch.; Erovic, Boban M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to determine the expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin in healthy oral mucosa and in untreated tumor tissues samples of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. All patients were treated by primary radio(chemo)therapy. Methods and Materials: The expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin was immunohistochemically evaluated in 12 normal oral mucosa and 63 tumor specimens and correlated with patients' clinical data. Results: In healthy mucosa expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin was restricted to the basal cell layer. Expression of both proteins was found in 79% and 86% of our tumor samples, respectively. In 17 and 8 samples, Bmi-1 and podoplanin were co-expressed at the invasive border or diffuse in the bulk of the tumor, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin correlated to decreased overall survival (p = 0.044). Moreover, multivariate testing identified high expression of podoplanin (p = 0.044), co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin (p = 0.007) and lack of response to therapy (p < 0.0001) as predictors of shortened overall survival in patients treated with primary radio(chemo)therapy. Conclusions: Bmi-1 and podoplanin are expressed at the invasive front of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Co-expression of Bmi-1 and podoplanin predicts significantly overall survival of patients treated with primary radio(chemo)therapy

  12. Bilateral papillary renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossios, K.; Vazakas, P.; Argyropoulou, M.; Stefanaki, S.; Stavropoulos, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma is a subgroup of malignant renal epithelial neoplasms. We report the clinical and imaging findings of a case with multifocal and bilateral renal cell carcinoma which are nonspecific. (orig.)

  13. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Walvekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the most common epithelial malignancy affecting the oral cavity. The most common sites for the development are lateral surface of tongue and floor of mouth; the least common sites are soft palate, gingiva, and buccal mucosa. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can mimic a multitude of oral lesions and enlargements, especially those of inflammatory origin. In addition, predisposing and presenting factors are different from those of other OSCCs. Careful examination as well as routine biopsy are crucial for accurate diagnosis.

  14. Curability of esophageal carcinoma treated with irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1994-01-01

    The curability of 168 squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus treated with more than 60 Gy of irradiation between 1980 and 1987 were discussed. There were 49 autopsied cases. The curability rat was calculated after the conversion of 13 local free or 46 metastasis free patients who had not undergone autopsy into unknown cases in each analysis. Disease free, local free, and metastasis free rates were 11.2, 20.0, and 26.0%, respectively. The curability rate was higher in the superficial type cancer and stage I cases. The local control rate and the metastasis free rate were extremely poor in the infiltrative type cancer. The actuarial survival rate of overall patients was 31.5% at one year, 11.3% at three years, and 7.1% at five years. Reconstructed survival rates: disease free, local free, and metastasis free survival rates, indicated that the survival rates of overall patients might be improved by decreasing the number of intercurrent death in stage I and by elevating the ratio of the local control in stages II and III. The disease free survival rate of cases treated with low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost was better than that of the conventionally fractionated irradiation alone cases in stages II and III. (author)

  15. Analysis of prognostic factors in patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with radical cystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Alberto A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results of the treatment of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder with radical cystectomy and determine which prognostic factors can be utilized as disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival independent variables. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 113 patients submitted to radical cystectomy and bilateral iliac lymphadenectomy between 1993 and 2005 were reviewed. The risk factors analyzed were age, sex, pathological stage, tumor grade, presence of carcinoma in situ and the presence of lymph nodes involvement. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 31.7 ? 28.5 months, 46 patients (40.7% presented recurrence and 24 patients (21.2% died due to cancer. Only pathological stage and the lymph nodes involvement became independent variables for recurrence and survival. Patients with T4 stage presented 9.6 times the risk of recurrence of the disease when compared with stage T0 patients (p = 0.010 and the patients with lymph node involvement presented 2.5 times the risk of recurrence (p = 0.047 and 3.1 times the risk of death (p = 0.022 when compared to patients without lymph nodes involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Pathological stage and the involvement of lymph nodes represented more important prognostic variables, and in the presence of advanced stage tumors (T3/T4 and involvement of lymph nodes, the institution of adjuvant treatment should be considered.

  16. Intraosseous acinic cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... provisional diagnosis of benign odontogenic tumor was given. Intraosseous acinic cell carcinoma. V Hiremath, N Mishra1, SG Patil2. Departments of Oral Pathology and 1Oral Medicine and Radiology, Mansarovar Dental College, Bhopal, 2 Department Of. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, H.K.E' S.N. Dental ...

  17. Laryngeal adenocystic carcinoma treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Tomonori; Araki, Mamika; Fukukita, Kouhei; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Adenocystic carcinoma most commonly develops in the major salivary glands, on the other hand it is rare for adenocystic carcinoma to develop in the larynx. We report a case of adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. A 54-year-old male was hospitalized with symptoms of hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. He presented a tumor that developed at the base of the right arytenoid, and covered over the glottis. It was confirmed to be adenocystic carcinoma (solid type) by biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT also revealed a left cervical lymph node metastasis and multiple pulmonary metastases (T1N2cM1). He was treated with proton therapy to the larynx to prevent airway obstruction by growth of the tumor and to preserve the larynx because he had uncontrollable pulmonary metastasis. Although the tumor vanished after the treatment, one month later he had halitosis, dyspnea and bilateral vocal cord palsy. Despite administration of an antibacterial drug and steroid, there was no improvement to the narrowness of the glottis. A tracheotomy was therefore performed three months after the proton therapy. PET-CT, which was performed after the tracheotomy, suggested growth of the residual tumor or laryngeal radionecrosis. This study confirmed that proton therapy is effective for adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. However, proton therapy also was found to cause laryngeal radionecrosis. These results indicate the importance of evaluating the side effects of radiation therapy and providing that information to the patient. (author)

  18. Undermining plastic surgery as a possible option for treating basal cell carcinoma of the forehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernev, Georgi; Pidakev, Ivan; Lozev, Ilia; Lotti, Torello; Cardoso, Jose Carlos; Patterson, James W

    2017-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cutaneous cancer. Although most cases can be cured with simple surgical procedures and are associated with a good prognosis, a minority of BCCs may pose significant therapeutic challenges. This occurs mostly in cases of so-called advanced BCC, which a loosely defined term that encompasses locally advanced lesions and tumors with metastatic spread. Treatment of these cases is often complex and sometimes may need combinations of therapeutic modalities, including surgery, radiotherapy and/or targeted therapy directed towards sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathways, such as vismodegib. We herein present the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with a large basal cell of the forehead evolving for more than 7 years. The patient underwent excision of the lesion with clear surgical margins. Reconstruction of the defect was performed after extensive undermining of the skin allowing subsequent direct closure with a simple suture, which resulted in an acceptable cosmetic outcome. We discuss the potential advantages, disadvantages, and applicability of this relatively simple surgical maneuver in the reconstruction of defects resulting from excision of considerably large cutaneous tumors.

  19. Metastatic spinal cord compression from basal cell carcinoma of the skin treated with surgical decompression and vismodegib: case report and review of Hedgehog signalling pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, J; Carswell, S; Talbot, T

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old man with locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) causing spinal cord compression, which was treated with spinal surgery and subsequent vismodegib. The patient presented with a large fungating chest wall lesion and a metastasis in T8 that was causing cord compression. He had neurosurgical decompression of the T8 lesion and fixation of the spine. Punch biopsy from the fungating chest wall lesion showed a BCC with some malignant squamous differentiation (basosquamous). Histopathological examination of the metastatic lesion in T8 at the time of surgical decompression identified features identical to the punch biopsy. The patient was referred to the oncology clinic for adjuvant treatment. In light of his metastatic disease and the large area over his chest wall that could not fully be covered by radiotherapy, he was treated with the novel oral Hedgehog signalling pathway (HHSP) inhibitor vismodegib, which led to marked improvement. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Incidence of Incomplete Excision in Surgically Treated Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Identification of the Related Risk Factors

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    Sara Sabouri Rad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the second most common type of skin cancer with potential risks for metastasis and recurrence if left untreated or incompletely excised. This case series study was designed to determine the frequency of incompletely excised SCCs and the related risk factors. A total of 273 SCCs (253 patients excised in Razi dermatology hospital of Tehran from 2006-2008, were evaluated and were analyzed by Chi-square or t-test. The incidence of incomplete excision was 17.58 % and deep margin involvement was observed in 73% of lesions. Risk factors associated with incomplete excision of SCCs were being female, location of the tumors (in particular the lesions on lateral canthus, upper lip, foot, forehead, cheek, neck, nose and ear, large lesions and grafting method of repair. There was no statistically significant difference for the age, degree of histological differentiation, childhood history of radiotherapy for tinea capitis and the type of anesthesia. More care should be taken for high risk SCCs as complete excision avoids potential risk of recurrence and metastasis.

  1. Treatment Outcomes of Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Ethmoid Sinus Treated with Anterior Craniofacial Resection or Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Ono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively analyzed 14 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of ethmoid sinus (LASCC-ES for the feasibility of anterior craniofacial resection (ACFR. Ethmoid cancer treatment comprised alternating chemoradiotherapy (ALCRT; n = 1, concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial cisplatin (RADPLAT; n = 4 and ACFR (n = 9. The 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS rates of patients were 47.6 and 39.6%, respectively. The 3-year local control (LC rates of chemoradiotherapy (CRT; ALCRT and RADPLAT (n = 5 and ACFR (n = 9 groups were 0 and 66.7% (p = 0.012, respectively. The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS rate of the CRT and ACFR groups were 0 and 55.6% (p = 0.018, respectively. The 3-year OS rate of the CRT and ACFR groups were 0 and 76.2% (p = 0.005, respectively. Postoperative pathological examinations confirmed positive margins in 3 (33% of 9 cases. The 3-year LC and PFS rates of cases (n = 3 with positive surgical margins were significantly poorer than those of cases (n = 6 with negative surgical margins. Although ACFR for LASCC-ES is a feasible treatment, cases with positive surgical margins were more prone to local relapse. Therefore, surgical safety margins should be thoroughly assessed.

  2. Management of adverse events in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa-Todo, Maki; Yoshizawa, Takahiko; Zennami, Kenji; Nishikawa, Genya; Kato, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Kajikawa, Keishi; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Saito, Hiroko; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kogenta; Sumitomo, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    Patients with progressive renal cell carcinoma who undergo sunitinib treatment, experience many adverse events (AEs), including thrombopenia and hypertension. Dose reduction or treatment discontinuation due to AEs makes it difficult to control the clinical condition. Therefore, patients' understanding regarding the basics of blood pressure (BP) measurement and how to deal with each AE are particularly important. Here we report whether or not pharmacist instructions help in order to increase patients' awareness of early AE management results in an improvement of treatment outcomes. The present study included 15 patients who were administered sunitinib. From the start of sunitinib treatment, pharmacists continuously provided drug administration guidance to the patients and confirmed their awareness and knowledge regarding AEs, symptom management, and drug adherence. The relative dose intensity (RDI) of 15 patients from week 1 to 24 after sunitinib treatment was calculated. Pharmaceutical interventions significantly improved patients' understanding of BP measurements and reference values, etc. Although the RDI was 67.3%-78.7%, there were no cases of discontinuation of administration or reduction of the dose caused by e.g. hypertension, hand and foot syndrome (HFS) and stomatitis. Pharmaceutical interventions improved patients' awareness of the management of AEs and adherence to sunitinib therapy. As a result, a high RDI was maintained, which may lead to prolonged survival. Therefore, our results suggest that early AE management provided by pharmacists is particularly important to assure the safety and efficacy of sunitinib therapy.

  3. Basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Seven cases of basal cell carcinoma are reported in this paper. The incidence of this disease is two percent of all malignancies seen at the Miraj Medical Centre, Miraj, Maharashtra. There were five male and two female patients in this series. The youngest patient was 40 years old and the oldest 70 years. The average age of the patients was 57.3 years. All the cases in the series had lesions confined to the head and neck region. Radiation therapy was given to all the seven cases which was the primary form of treatment in five cases. In two cases surgical excision had been done and the growth in both the cases had recurred. Radiation therapy is considered more ideal and suitable in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas. (auth.)

  4. Therapeutic vaccination strategies to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham S; Steven, Neil M

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects most people worldwide. EBV has oncogenic potential and is strongly associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), that together total 200,000 cases of cancer each year. All EBV-associated cancers express viral proteins that allow highly selective immunotherapeutic targeting of the malignant cells. A number of therapeutic EBV vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with evidence of immune boosting and clinical responses in NPC patients. Therapeutic vaccination could be used after adoptive T-cell transfer to increase and sustain the number of infused T-cells or combined with immunotherapies acting at different stages of the cancer immunity cycle to increase efficacy. The therapeutic EBV vaccines tested to date have been well tolerated with minimal off-target toxicity. A safe therapeutic vaccine that was also able to be mass produced could, in principle, be used to vaccinate large numbers of patients after first line therapy to reduce recurrence.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of external auditory canal lacking epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression, in an elderly Omani with oculocutaneous albinism treated with palliative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Mufti, Taha; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Qureshi, Asim

    2014-06-06

    We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of external auditory canal in an Omani man with oculocutaneous albinism. The disease mimicked inflammatory process revealing positive cultures for various microorganisms during the course of his illness. He was eventually biopsied to rule out atypical infective process or presence of malignancy. He was staged as T4N0M0 and treated with radical doses of palliative radiation therapy which was very well tolerated and resulted in a complete resolution of disease clinically and a major soft tissue response on radiological imaging. Another unique finding was the absence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein overexpression in the tumour specimen. More than 90% of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the head and neck region overexpress the EGFR protein in normal skin patients. SCC is the predominant cutaneous malignancy in albinos, and the presence of EGFR protein overexpression in cutaneous SCC is believed to be 56-58% in normal skin patients. The scientific literature is scarce on reporting incidence of EGFR overexpression in either cutaneous or mucosal SCC in albinos, and it remains to be defined whether being albino is the cause for its absence. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Proteomic Analysis Revealed the Important Role of Vimentin in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells Treated With Gambogic Acid*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qingxi; Feng, Lixing; Cao, Biyin; Liu, Miao; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Wanying; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is an anticancer agent in phase IIb clinical trial in China. In HeLa cells, GA inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis, as showed by results of MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Possible target-related proteins of GA were searched using comparative proteomic analysis (2-DE) and nine proteins at early (3 h) stage together with nine proteins at late (24 h) stage were found. Vimentin was the only target-related protein found at both early and late stage. Results of both 2-DE analysis and Western blotting assay suggested cleavage of vimentin induced by GA. MS/MS analysis of cleaved vimentin peptides indicated possible cleavage sites of vimentin at or near ser51 and glu425. Results of targeted proteomic analysis showed that GA induced change in phosphorylation state of the vimentin head domain (aa51–64). Caspase inhibitors could not abrogate GA-induced cleavage of vimentin. Over-expression of vimentin ameliorated cytotoxicity of GA in HeLa cells. The GA-activated signal transduction, from p38 MAPK, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), vimentin, dysfunction of cytoskeleton, to cell death, was predicted and then confirmed. Results of animal study showed that GA treatment inhibited tumor growth in HeLa tumor-bearing mice and cleavage of vimentin could be observed in tumor xenografts of GA-treated animals. Results of immunohistochemical staining also showed down-regulated vimentin level in tumor xenografts of GA-treated animals. Furthermore, compared with cytotoxicity of GA in HeLa cells, cytotoxicity of GA in MCF-7 cells with low level of vimentin was weaker whereas cytotoxicity of GA in MG-63 cells with high level of vimentin was stronger. These results indicated the important role of vimentin in the cytotoxicity of GA. The effects of GA on vimentin and other epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers provided suggestion for better usage of GA in clinic. PMID:26499837

  7. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  8. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma

  10. Sonic hedgehog signaling in basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Couvé-Privat, Sophie

    2005-07-28

    The development of basal cell carcinoma, the commonest human cancer in fair skinned populations, is clearly associated with constitutive activation of sonic hedgehog signaling. Insight into the genesis of BCC came from the identification of germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene, PATCHED, a key regulatory component of hedgehog signaling in the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Analysis of sporadic basal cell carcinomas and those from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients has revealed mutational inactivation of PATCHED and gain of function mutations of the proto-oncogenes, SMOOTHENED and SONIC HEDGEHOG associated with solar UV exposure. The molecular mechanisms involved in alterations of the hedgehog signaling pathway that lead to the formation of basal cell carcinomas are being unraveled and has already allowed the investigation of future therapeutic strategies for treating these skin cancers.

  11. The drug efficacy and adverse reactions in a mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with oxaliplatin at different time points during a day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang K

    2013-06-01

    . The cosine fitting curve showed that the survival time and adverse reactions exhibited circadian rhythm. Conclusion: The time factor should be considered when treating patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with L-OHP in order to achieve better efficacy, reduce the adverse reactions, and improve the patients’ survival time and quality of life. Keywords: oral cancer, chronochemotherapy, oxaliplatin, efficacy, adverse reactions, circadian rhythm

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seum Chung

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, predominantly affecting the head and neck, and can be diagnosed clinically in most cases. Metastasis of BCC is rare, but localised tissue invasion and destruction can lead to morbidity.Risk factors for BCC include tendency to freckle, degree of sun exposure, excessive sun-bed use, and smoking.Incidence of BCC increases markedly after the age of 40 years, but incidence in younger people is rising, possibly as a result of inc...

  13. Perianal Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Bulur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet light is an important risk factor for BCC development and the disorder therefore develops commonly on body areas that are more exposed to sunlight, such as the face and neck. It is uncommon in the closed area of the body and quite rare in the perianal and genital regions. Herein, we report a 34-year-old patient with perianal BCC who had no additional risk factors.

  14. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  15. Histologic and systemic prognosticators for local control and survival in margin negative transoral laser microsurgery-treated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parul; Mehrad, Mitra; Chernock, Rebecca D.; Lewis, James S.; El-Mofty, Samir K.; Wu, Ningying; Nussenbaum, Brian; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appreciable local recurrence rates observed in patients with margin-negative, transoral laser microsurgery (TLM)-treated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) necessitate identification of new prognosticators for local control and survival. A histopathologic index (Brandwein–Gensler score [BGS]) and intrinsic/iatrogenic/chronic conditions causing immune compromise are investigated. Methods From a prospectively assembled database of TLM-treated oral cavity SCC, specimens for 60 patients with a minimum of 2-years follow-up could undergo BGS assignment. Local control, disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were study endpoints. Results “Low-BGS” was recorded in 28 patients (47%) and “high-BGS” in 32 patients (53%), whereas immune compromise was observed in 18%. In multivariate analyses, immune compromise was the only predictor for local control. T classification and immune compromise were prognostic for DSS and OS. “High-BGS” was prognostic only for OS. Conclusion “High-BGS” was associated with recurrences but immune compromise was the most significant predictor of local control and survival in margin-negative, TLM-treated oral cavity SCC. Strategies that maintain/restore tumor-specific immune responses in immune compromised oral cavity SCC hosts need to be developed. PMID:24430914

  16. Histologic and systemic prognosticators for local control and survival in margin-negative transoral laser microsurgery treated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parul; Mehrad, Mitra; Chernock, Rebecca D; Lewis, James S; El-Mofty, Samir K; Wu, Ningying; Nussenbaum, Brian; Haughey, Bruce H

    2015-01-01

    Appreciable local recurrence rates observed in patients with margin-negative, transoral laser microsurgery (TLM)-treated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) necessitate identification of new prognosticators for local control and survival. A histopathologic index (Brandwein-Gensler score [BGS]) and intrinsic/iatrogenic/chronic conditions causing immune compromise are investigated. From a prospectively assembled database of TLM-treated oral cavity SCC, specimens for 60 patients with a minimum of 2-years follow-up could undergo BGS assignment. Local control, disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were study endpoints. "Low-BGS" was recorded in 28 patients (47%) and "high-BGS" in 32 patients (53%), whereas immune compromise was observed in 18%. In multivariate analyses, immune compromise was the only predictor for local control. T classification and immune compromise were prognostic for DSS and OS. "High-BGS" was prognostic only for OS. "High-BGS" was associated with recurrences but immune compromise was the most significant predictor of local control and survival in margin-negative, TLM-treated oral cavity SCC. Strategies that maintain/restore tumor-specific immune responses in immune compromised oral cavity SCC hosts need to be developed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Early response of C-reactive protein as a predictor of survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yosuke; Saito, Kazutaka; Yuasa, Takeshi; Uehara, Sho; Kawamura, Naoko; Yokoyama, Minato; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okuno, Tetsuo; Yonese, Junji; Kihara, Kazunori; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be an independent prognostic factor for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We further evaluated the early response of CRP after the initiation of TKIs. A total of 103 patients (80 men and 23 women) were treated with TKIs for mRCC from 2008-2013. Patients were divided into three groups according to their early CRP kinetics-patients whose baseline CRP levels were 20% at 4 weeks after the initiation of TKIs (early CRP responder), and the remaining patients (non-early CRP responder). The endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The median follow-up period was 21 (interquartile range 10-34) months. The numbers of patients classified as non-elevated, early CRP responder, and non-early CRP responder were 62, 19, and 22, respectively. The 1-year PFS rates of patients in the non-elevated, early CRP responder, and non-early CRP responder groups were 50, 23, and 9.7%, respectively (p < 0.001). The 1-year OS rates of patients in these three groups were 79, 62, and 36%, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the early CRP kinetics assessment was a significant independent factor for PFS and OS. Early CRP response at 4 weeks is predictive of survival for patients with mRCC treated with TKI.

  18. Incidence of bowel wall oedema on computed tomography exams and association with diarrhoea in renal cell carcinoma patients treated with sunitinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, Liesbeth; Claus, Filip; Keyzer, Frederik de [KU Leuven, Radiology, Department of Imaging and Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Wolter, Pascal; Dumez, Herlinde; Beuselinck, Benoit [KU Leuven, Department of Medical Oncology and Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven (Belgium); Lerut, Evelyne [KU Leuven, Pathology, Department of Imaging and Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poppel, Hendrik van [KU Leuven, Department of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-28

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the incidence of bowel wall oedema on computed tomography (CT) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with sunitinib, and to investigate its association with diarrhoea. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all RCC patients treated with sunitinib at our hospital between December 2005 and December 2011. The presence or absence of bowel wall oedema on these CT examinations was scored. The presence of diarrhoea preceding, during, or after sunitinib treatment was identified from the patient files and retrospectively graded. For 54 of 87 patients, bowel wall oedema was present on at least one CT examination. Of these 54 patients, the right-sided colonic segment was affected in 87 %. Diarrhoea was the most common reported adverse event during treatment, with 58 patients (67 %) having grade 1/2 diarrhoea and 9 patients (10 %) having grade 3. There was a statistically significant correlation between the incidence of CT-scored bowel oedema and diarrhoea during sunitinib treatment (P = 0.004). This study shows a very high incidence of bowel wall oedema and a strong correlation between the incidence of bowel wall oedema and diarrhoea in patients treated with sunitinib. (orig.)

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma arising from chronic osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, Mohammed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to present the results from a retrospective study of 7 cases of squamous cell carcinoma arising from chronic osteomyelitis. We treated seven cases of chronic osteomyelitis related squamous cell carcinoma between 1993 and 2005. The patients had an average age of 54.5 (range: 38-71) years, with a male predominance (6 men, 1 woman). We analyzed the time up to cancerization, the localization and histopathological type of the carcinoma, and the type and result of the treatment. The mean time between the occurrence of the skin lesions and the diagnosis of malignant degeneration was 24.5 (range: 9 to 40) years. The carcinoma resulted from tibia osteomyelitis in 4 cases, femur osteomyelitis in 2 cases and humerus osteomyelitis in one. The pathological examination showed five cases of a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with bone invasion, and two cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The treatment consisted of amputation in all but one patient, who refused the amputation. The six amputee patients did not show local recurrence or metastatic dissemination over a period of five years. Amputation appears to be an effective treatment method in squamous carcinoma secondary to chronic osteomyelitis.

  20. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma, a distinctive morphologic variant of basal cell carcinoma that presents as a small red macule (dot) or papule, is described on a woman’s thigh. A high index of suspicion is necessary to consider the diagnosis since the tumor mimics a telangiectasia or an angioma. PMID:28670359

  1. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF EYELID MASQUERADING AS BASAL CELL CARCINOMA

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    Nagaraju

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main malignant tumors affecting the eyelid are Basal cell carcinoma (BCC, Sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC, Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, and Malignant melanoma (MM in that order of frequency in Asia. SGC and BCC forms majority of tumors in India. SC C is rare in Indian population and generally occurs in predisposed individuals like in patients with Xeroderma pigmentosa. BCC may present as pigmented or non - pigmented, nodular or noduloulcerative lesion. Usually SGC and BCC are not confused because of va ried clinical appearance and morphology. However non pigmented noduloulcerative BCC can be confused with SCC. We report a case of histopathologically proven squamous cell carcinoma presenting as basal cell carcinoma in a 90 year old patient and its managem ent.

  2. A transcriptomic computational analysis of mastic oil-treated Lewis lung carcinomas reveals molecular mechanisms targeting tumor cell growth and survival

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    Roussos Charis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a blend of bioactive terpenes with recognized medicinal properties, has been recently shown to exert anti-tumor growth activity through inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and inflammatory response. However, no studies have addressed its mechanisms of action at genome-wide gene expression level. Methods To investigate molecular mechanisms triggered by mastic oil, Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells were treated with mastic oil or DMSO and RNA was collected at five distinct time points (3-48 h. Microarray expression profiling was performed using Illumina mouse-6 v1 beadchips, followed by computational analysis. For a number of selected genes, RT-PCR validation was performed in LLC cells as well as in three human cancer cell lines of different origin (A549, HCT116, K562. PTEN specific inhibition by a bisperovanadium compound was applied to validate its contribution to mastic oil-mediated anti-tumor growth effects. Results In this work we demonstrated that exposure of Lewis lung carcinomas to mastic oil caused a time-dependent alteration in the expression of 925 genes. GO analysis associated expression profiles with several biological processes and functions. Among them, modifications on cell cycle/proliferation, survival and NF-κB cascade in conjunction with concomitant regulation of genes encoding for PTEN, E2F7, HMOX1 (up-regulation and NOD1 (down-regulation indicated some important mechanistic links underlying the anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of mastic oil. The expression profiles of Hmox1, Pten and E2f7 genes were similarly altered by mastic oil in the majority of test cancer cell lines. Inhibition of PTEN partially reversed mastic oil effects on tumor cell growth, indicating a multi-target mechanism of action. Finally, k-means clustering, organized the significant gene list in eight clusters demonstrating a similar

  3. Treating cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma using 5-aminolevulinic acid polylactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaojie Wang,1,2,* Lei Shi,2,* Qingfeng Tu,2 Hongwei Wang,3 Haiyan Zhang,2 Peiru Wang,2 Linglin Zhang,2 Zheng Huang,4 Feng Zhao,5 Hansen Luan,5 Xiuli Wang2 1Shanghai Skin Diseases Clinical College of Anhui Medical University, 2Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, 3Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 4MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 5National Pharmaceutical Engineering Research Center, China State Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is a common skin cancer, and its treatment is still difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nanoparticle (NP-assisted 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA delivery for topical photodynamic therapy (PDT of cutaneous SCC.Materials and methods: Ultraviolet-induced cutaneous SCCs were established in hairless mice. ALA-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA NPs were prepared and characterized. The kinetics of ALA PLGA NP-induced protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in SCCs, therapeutic efficacy of ALA NP-mediated PDT, and immune responses were examined.Results: PLGA NPs enhanced protoporphyrin IX production in SCC. ALA PLGA NP-mediated topical PDT was more effective than free ALA of the same concentration in treating cutaneous SCC.Conclusion: PLGA NPs provide a promising strategy for delivering ALA in topical PDT of cutaneous SCC. Keywords: 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, nanoparticles (NPs, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, photodynamic therapy (PDT, microneedling

  4. Socioeconomic characteristics of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with radiotherapy in the 1992 to 1994 patterns of care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Angela; Eifel, Patricia J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean B.; Mahon, Irene; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the relationship between socioeconomic variables and the treatment of patients with radiotherapy for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two institutions were randomly selected from a list of all radiotherapy facilities in the United States. From these we randomly selected and reviewed 471 cases of squamous cell carcinoma treated during 1992 to 1994. To create an additional minority-rich sample, we randomly selected 215 additional cases from 17 randomly selected institutions that admitted > 40% minority patients. The median household income of each patient's neighborhood was determined by matching her zip code to data from the 1990 United States Census. Results: Patients who lived in low-income neighborhoods, who had only Medicaid coverage, or who were treated at large academic or minority-rich institutions tended to have a poorer initial performance status, higher-stage or bulky central disease, and a lower pretreatment hemoglobin level. Ability to complete treatment did not correlate with ethnicity or income. However, noncompliant patients tended to be treated at minority-rich institutions and were more often ≤ 40 or > 60 years old. Patients who completed definitive treatment were more likely to have had ≤ 1 low-dose-rate intracavitary implants if they were black, came from a low-income neighborhood, were covered by Medicaid or Medicare only, or were treated at a minority-rich institution. Patients who were treated in academic institutions received higher mean radiation doses to Point A (83.8 Gy) than those treated in research- or non-research-participating facilities (79.4 and 80.9 Gy, respectively; p = 0.002). Patients who received their radiation therapy in facilities that treated an average of ≤ 3 patients per year also received lower mean doses to Point A (79.1 vs. 83.0 Gy; p = 0.001). Conclusion: The treatment received by patients who belonged to minority groups, came from low-income neighborhoods, or were treated in large

  5. Use of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen for follow-up monitoring of cervical cancer patients who were treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Joo-Young; Seo, Sang Soo; Park, Sang-Yoon; Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the significance of monitoring the levels of the serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) for the detection of recurrent disease in patients with cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The records of 112 patients with cervical cancer were reviewed. Serum SCC-Ag levels were measured at regular follow-up visits. A SCC-Ag level of 2 ng/mL was considered the upper limit of normal. Biochemical failure was defined as two consecutively increasing SCC-Ag values above normal. Recurrent disease was confirmed by histologic and radiographic studies. Eighteen patients (16%) developed recurrent disease. Sixteen patients had initially elevated SCC-Ag, post-treatment normalization of SCC-Ag, and tumor recurrence. The SCC-Ag difference (ΔSCC-Ag), defined as the difference between the last value after two consecutively increases above normal and the value immediately before the elevation, had good clinical performance in predicting cancer recurrence. The cutoff value of ΔSCC-Ag was 0.95 ng/mL. SCC-Ag is a relatively good method for the detection of disease recurrence in patients with cervical cancer who were treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  6. Effect of ABO blood type on the outcomes of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Kenji; Fukuma, Shingo; Ikenoue, Tatsuyoshi; Kondo, Tsunenori; Takagi, Toshio; Ishihara, Hiroki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effect of blood type on survival outcomes and adverse events (AEs) in patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients who received TKIs as first-line therapy for mRCC between 2008 and 2015 at our hospital were included in the study (n = 136). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on their blood type as O and non-O. Survival outcomes and AEs were compared according to blood type. Cox regression models were used for univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Of the 136 patients, 34 (25%) and 102 (75%) had O and non-O blood types, respectively. Blood type O was associated with an increased number of disease sites. There were no differences between the 2 groups with respect to other baseline characteristics. The progression-free survival in patients with O and non-O blood types was 12.1 and 11.6 months, respectively; the overall survival was 34.4 and 24.8 months, respectively. On univariate and multivariate analyses, the ABO blood type was not a significant prognostic factor for progression-free survival or overall survival. Furthermore, the incidences of serious AEs were similar in the 2 blood groups. ABO blood type was not associated with survival outcomes or incidences of serious AEs in mRCC patients treated with TKIs. However, blood type O may be associated with an increased number of disease sites. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A systematic review and Number Needed to Treat analysis to guide the management of the neck in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Sankalap; Munir, Nazia; Roland, Nicholas J; Lancaster, Jeffrey; Jackson, Shaun R; Jones, Terry M

    2011-12-01

    To systematically review the literature to identify studies from which it is possible to perform a Number Needed to Treat (NNT) analysis to identify, in a more clinically intuitive manner, neck node levels for which treatment is essential in the N0 and N+ neck with respect to the primary site of tumour. Systematic literature review using a defined search strategy; data extraction from studies meeting the inclusion criteria; calculation of NNT for individual neck node levels with respect to primary site. A total of 6169 articles were identified from searches of Embase, Medline, The Cochrane library of randomised control trials, conference proceedings and the bibliographies of retrieved papers. Titles and abstracts were screened; from these, 219 studies were retrieved for detailed review. One hundred and ninety six papers were excluded and 23 studies were included in the final analysis. Following review of the data from these studies, and accepting a NNT cut-off of 5 we confirmed that the following lymph node levels should be treated: NNT is a clinically intuitive parameter to guide appropriate lymph node level treatment in patients presenting with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary Tumor Characteristics Are Important Prognostic Factors for Sorafenib-Treated Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

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    Sung Han Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify prognostic factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients treated with sorafenib. We investigated 177 patients, including 116 who received sorafenib as first-line therapy, using the Cox regression model. During a median follow-up period of 19.2 months, the PFS and OS were 6.4 and 32.6 months among all patients and 7.4 months and undetermined for first-line sorafenib-treated patients, respectively. Clinical T3-4 stage (hazard ratio [HR] 2.56 and a primary tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.34 were significant prognostic factors for PFS among all patients, as were tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.12, collecting system invasion (HR 5.67, and tumor necrosis (HR 4.11 for OS (p<0.05. In first-line sorafenib-treated patients, ≥4 metastatic lesions (HR 28.57, clinical T3-4 stage (HR 4.34, collecting system invasion (univariate analysis HR 2.11; multivariate analysis HR 0.07, lymphovascular invasion (HR 13.35, and tumor necrosis (HR 6.69 were significant prognosticators of PFS, as were bone metastasis (HR 5.49 and clinical T3-4 stages (HR 4.1 for OS (p<0.05. Our study thus identified a number of primary tumor-related characteristics as important prognostic factors in sorafenib-treated mRCC patients.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma: pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in humans, which typically appears over the sun-exposed skin as a slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Although the exact etiology of BCC is unknown, there exists a well-established relationship between BCC and the pilo-sebaceous unit, and it is currently thought to originate from pluri-potential cells in the basal layer of the epidermis or the follicle. The patched/hedgehog intracellular signaling pathway plays a central role in both sporadic BCCs and nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). This pathway is vital for the regulation of cell growth, and differentiation and loss of inhibition of this pathway is associated with development of BCC. The sonic hedgehog protein is the most relevant to BCC; nevertheless, the Patched (PTCH) protein is the ligand-binding component of the hedgehog receptor complex in the cell membrane. The other protein member of the receptor complex, smoothened (SMO), is responsible for transducing hedgehog signaling to downstream genes, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. The importance of this pathway is highlighted by the successful use in advanced forms of BCC of vismodegib, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, that selectively inhibits SMO. The UV-specific nucleotide changes in the tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and PTCH, have also been implicated in the development of BCC.

  10. Renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Jayaprakash; Chandrika; Laxman, Prabhu

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma has been steadily increasing. There are several morphological types of renal cell carcinoma. Recognizing histologic patterns of renal cell carcinoma is important for correct diagnosis and subsequent medical care for the patient. Melanotic tumors in the kidney are very rare. Here, we present an unusual case of renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment. PMID:20877613

  11. Outcomes following management of squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp: A retrospective series of 235 patients treated at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estall, Vanessa; Allen, Angela; Webb, Angela; Bressel, Mathias; McCormack, Chris; Spillane, John

    2017-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp is a common clinical problem in an aging population. Despite its high incidence, little has been documented regarding treatment or outcomes. We retrospectively analysed 235 cases treated with curative intent at Peter MaCallum Cancer Centre between 1998 and 2010. The cohort was analysed for its characteristics, management, survival and prognostic factors. The patients were primarily male (88%) with a median age of 79 years (range 53-98 years). There was a high proportion of immunosuppressed patients (29%) and stage T2 (48%) tumours. Management included surgery (45%), radiotherapy (28%) and surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (26%). Median follow up from treatment was 4.5 years. Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were 59, 94 and 51%, respectively. The 5-year cumulative incidence of local and regional relapse was 11 and 7%, respectively. There were four patients who developed distant metastases and died of their disease. Statistically significant prognostic factors identified for poor outcomes for OS and PFS were T2 stage (hazard ratio [1.7 and 2.1) and immunosuppression (HR 3.3 and 3.4). We conclude the presence of immunosuppression and T2 stage is prognostic for survival. Further research to establish treatment principles is warranted. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  12. Shrinkage of thyroid volume in sunitinib-treated patients with renal-cell carcinoma: a potential marker of irreversible thyroid dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogiers, Aljosja; Wolter, Pascal; Op de Beeck, Katya; Thijs, Marleen; Decallonne, Brigitte; Schöffski, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is known to induce thyroid dysfunction in a substantial proportion of patients treated for advanced renal-cell carcinoma or gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Although sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism seems to be reversible in the majority of patients, some patients develop irreversible thyroid damage resulting in long-lasting thyroid hormone replacement therapy. We report on two cancer patients with a preexisting nodular thyroid gland, who developed thyroid dysfunction and showed marked shrinkage of the thyroid during treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, necessitating permanent thyroid hormone replacement therapy even after discontinuation of the anticancer agent. Sunitinib treatment in patients with a nodular thyroid can induce a significant decrease in the volume of the enlarged endocrine gland, associated with abnormal thyroid function tests leading to clinical hypothyroidism. The exact pathophysiology remains unknown but we discuss several possible mechanisms of sunitinib-induced thyroid shrinkage. Morphological changes of the thyroid gland can be associated with the well-described adverse biochemical effects of treatment with sunitinib and can be a potential marker of the irreversible organ damage.

  13. Risk-group definition by recursive partitioning analysis of patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, JA; Slotman, BJ; van der Waal, [No Value; Doornaert, P; Berkof, J; Leemans, CR

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to define different prognostic groups with regard to locoregional control (LRC) derived from recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). METHODS. Eight hundred one patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma underwent with primary surgery and received

  14. Synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo [Chonnam National Univ. School of Dentistry, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Thyroid carcinoma occurring as a second primary associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is unusual. This report presents a synchronous thyroid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the anterior palate region of a 41-year-old man. The clinical, radiologic, and histologic features are described. At 10-month follow-up after operation, no evidence of recurrence ana metastasis was present.

  15. of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Sobjanek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Polymorphic variants of MCP-1 and RANTES genes and their protein serum levels have been implicated in the increased risk and severity of several malignancies. However, the subject has not been explored in basal cell carcinoma (BCC patients so far. Aim : To investigate the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 (–2518 A/G and RANTES (–403 G/A polymorphism and risk and clinical course of BCC. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 150 unrelated patients with BCC and 140 healthy, unrelated, age- and sex-matched volunteers. The polymorphisms were analysed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method (ARMS-PCR and single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR. Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA. Results : The presence of the MCP-1 –2518 GG genotype was statistically more frequent in BCC patients and it increased the risk of BCC (OR = 2.63, p = 0.003. Genotype –330 GG was statistically more common in patients with less advanced tumours (OR = 2.8, p = 0.017. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 serum level was statistically higher with GG genotype. In the BCC group MCP-1 serum levels were decreased. Neither polymorphic variants of RANTES nor the chemokine serum concentration differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusions : These findings suggest that –2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism may be involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  16. Stages of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  17. The prognostic value of endogenous hypoxia-related markers for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas treated with ARCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan, Ruth A.; Wijffels, Karien I.E.M.; Peeters, Wenny; Wilde, Peter C.M. de; Marres, Henri A.M.; Merkx, Matthias A.W.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Kogel, Albert van der J.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxic radioresistance is an important cause for treatment failure in a number of tumor types including head and neck cancers. Recent studies suggest that outcome can be improved by oxygenation modifying treatments such as ARCON. A robust endogenous marker of hypoxia might be a valuable aid to select patients for such treatments. The aim of this investigation was to study associations between the putative endogenous hypoxia markers CA-IX, Glut-1 and Glut-3 and clinical tumor and patient characteristics and to evaluate the prognostic value of these markers. Patients and methods: Tumor biopsies from 58 patients treated with ARCON in a phase II trial were included. Tumor sections were immunohistochemically stained for CA-IX, Glut-1 and Glut-3. Sections were scored for relative tumor area stained by the markers (CA-IX and Glut-3) and for intensity of staining (Glut-1 and Glut-3). Further, sections were stained for CD34, an endothelial marker to assess microvascular density. Results: Staining of CA-IX and Glut-3 was observed at some distance from vessels and adjacent to necrosis. Glut-1 staining was generally very diffuse. The distribution of clinical characteristics was equal between tumors with high and low marker expression. Significant differences were found for locoregional control (P=0.04) and for freedom of distant metastases (P=0.02) in favour of patients with high CA-IX positivity (>25% of tumor area). High Glut-3 expression was associated with a better locoregional control (P=0.04). Higher Glut-1 intensity was associated with an increased rate of distant metastases (P=0.0005) and a worse overall survival (P=0.001). Conclusions: The inconsistent associations with outcome of CA-IX and the glucose transporters indicate that different factors play a role in up-regulation of these markers. Compared to studies with conventional treatment, the correlation between CA-IX expression and Glut-3 expression and outcome was reversed after treatment

  18. Locoregional control for esophageal carcinoma treated with irradiation following surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarai, Jiro; Kato, Toshio; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Seino, Yasuo; Kitamura, Michihiko; Abo, Shichisaburo

    1992-01-01

    Locoregional failure was analyzed in a total of 34 esophageal carcinoma patients treated with postoperative prophylactic irradiation following curative surgery. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma and no prior treatment. Twelve patients had subsequent lymph node metastasis in the follow-up period. In the 12 patients with node metastasis, there were 5 instances of supraclavicular node metastasis, 7 instances of thoracic inlet node (uppermost part of mediastinum) metastasis, and 3 instances of mediastinal node metastasis. Three patients had 2 metastatic nodes and 9 patients had 1 metastatic node. Intervals between surgery and recurrence were a median of 12 months for mediastinal nodes, 19 months for thoracic inlet nodes, and 26 months for supraclavicular nodes. Ten (52.6%) of the 19 patients treated by using a 12-MeV electron beam had metastatic involvement at the supraclavicular and thoracic inlet nodes. On the other hand, 2 (13.3%) of the 15 patients had the above-described lymph node metastases when treated by using 15-MeV electron, 18-MeV electron, or 10-MV photon beams. The difference in the metastatic rate between these two groups was statistically significant at the level of p<0.05 (chi-square test); this seems to be attributable mainly to the dose level at deep region. Doses of over 50 Gy to the thoracic inlet and supraclavicular nodes at deep location were necessary to reduce metastasis. (author)

  19. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by 18F FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0±8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV peak) and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV peak, MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV peakw as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm 3( range, 0.1-131.0cm 3) . The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV peak6 .2 and MTV 20.7cm 3w ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

  20. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  1. Retrospective analysis of the impact of HPV status and smoking on mucositis in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatca, M; Lucas, J T; Laudadio, J; D'Agostino, R B; Waltonen, J D; Sullivan, C A; Rouchard-Plasser, R; Matsangou, M; Browne, J D; Greven, K M; Porosnicu, M

    2014-09-01

    The standard concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens for patients with oropharyngeal cancer are highly toxic. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has recently emerged as a distinct biological and clinical entity with improved response to treatment and prognosis. A tailored therapeutic approach is needed to optimize patient care. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of HPV and smoking status on early toxicities (primarily mucositis) associated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with OPSCC. We retrospectively evaluated 72 consecutive patients with OPSCC and known HPV status treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy at our institution. Treatment-related toxicities were stratified by smoking and HPV status and compared using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. HPV-positive patients had a 6.86-fold increase in the risk of having severe, grade 3-4 mucositis. This effect was preserved after adjusting for patient smoking status, nodal stage, radiotherapy technique and radiotherapy maximum dose. Additionally, HPV status had significant effect on the objective weight loss during treatment and at three months after treatment. Consistently, non-smokers had a significant 2.70-fold increase in the risk of developing severe mucositis. Risk factors for OPSCC modify the incidence of treatment-related early toxicities, with HPV-positive and non-smoking status correlating with increased risk of high grade mucositis and associated outcomes. Retrospective single-institution studies need to be interpreted cautiously. However, this finding is important to consider when designing therapeutic strategies for HPV-positive patients and merits further investigation in prospective clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lower lip squamous cell carcinoma in patients with photosensitive disorders: Analysis of cases treated at the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) from 1999 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, J-F-P; Lanaro, N-D; Bernardo, V-G; Albano, R-M; Dias, F; de Faria, P-A-S; Pinto, L-F-R; Lourenço, S-Q-C

    2018-01-01

    Lower lip squamous cell carcinoma (LLSCC) is a common malignancy of the head and neck, being mainly a consequence of a chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light solar radiation. Here, we evaluated the clinicopathological profile of patients with photosensitive disorders (xeroderma pigmentosum, lupus erythematosus and albinism) that developed LLSCC. Data from patients who had a diagnosed LLSCC with a prior xeroderma pigmentosum, lupus erythematosus or albinism diagnosis that were treated at INCA from 1999 to 2012 were collected from patients medical records (n=16). The control group was composed of 68 patients with LLSCC without a medical history of photosensitivity. The clinicopathological data of this study population were collected and the association between these variables was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. Survival curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by log-rank test. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS statistics package. The mean age of patients in the photosensitive and non-photosensitive groups was 42 years and 67 years, respectively (p<0.0001). A previous history of malignant diseases was more common in the photosensitive group (p=0.001). In both groups, most tumors showed a pathological stage I/II disease. Overall and cancer-specific survival were not statistically different. However, disease-free interval showed a significant difference (p=0.01) between the photosensitive and non-photosensitive patients. Photosensitive patients presented LLSCC at earlier age but it usually was not the primary tumor in these patients. Furthermore, a more aggressive pathological behavior was not seen when compared with tumors from non-photosensitive patients. The disease-free interval was lower in photosensitive patients, as expected.

  3. Risk factors of proteinuria in renal cell carcinoma patients treated with VEGF inhibitors: a secondary analysis of pooled clinical trial data

    OpenAIRE

    Sorich, Michael J; Rowland, Andrew; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Woodman, Richard J; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteinuria is a common adverse effect of vascular endothelial growth factor targeted agents, particularly in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, risk factors for proteinuria are poorly defined. Methods: Data on 1392 mRCC patients using pazopanib or sunitinib were pooled from two Phase-III clinical trials. Risk factors and prognostic effect of on-therapy proteinuria were evaluated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Any-grade (1?4) and grade 3/4 proteinur...

  4. Basal cell carcinoma metastatic to cervical lymph nodes and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, J Scott; Flam, Marshall S; Tashjian, David N; Tschang, Tai-Po

    2006-10-31

    Metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC) of the skin is rare in occurrence and may initially elude proper diagnosis and management. We describe a case of MBCC to cervical lymph nodes, originally evaluated and treated surgically as metastatic thyroid carcinoma. After definitive diagnosis of MBCC was made, chemotherapy and concomitant radiation treatment were initiated; however, despite these measures, the patient then developed MBCC to the lung. Risk factors and current therapeutic modalities for MBCC are also discussed. In addition to the more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma primary tumor should be considered when evaluating cervical lymph node metastases of an uncertain head and neck primary.

  5. Effect of smoking on oxygen delivery and outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma – A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molich Hoff, Camilla; Grau, Cai; Overgaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer patients with high hemoglobin respond better to irradiation compared to patients with low hemoglobin possibly due to hypoxia induced radioresistance. The hemoglobin level is, however, a crude indicator of the amount of oxygen available to the tissue and may be influenced by a number of factors, smoking being of potential importance. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of smoking on available oxygen to tumors and the effect on outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy in a prospective study. Materials and methods: A total of 232 consecutive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity completed questionnaires on smoking habits prior to treatment. Venous blood samples were collected before and/or during treatment to determine the hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin level. Patients were treated with primary curative radiotherapy 62–68 Gy, 2 Gy/fx, 5 fx/week. Results: All but 12 patients had a history of smoking, 35 were long term quitters, 23 recent quitters, 54 moderate smokers and 108 heavy smokers (>1 pack/day). There was no relationship between total hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin, but effective hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin were linearly correlated. The amount of carboxyhemoglobin increased with increasing smoking status. Actuarial 5-year univariate analysis showed that heavy smokers had a significantly reduced probability of loco-regional control (44% vs. 65%, p = 0.001), disease-specific (56% vs. 77%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (39% vs. 66%, p = 0.0004) compared to non-smoking patients. Multivariate analyses showed that patients characterized as non-smokers, with low T and N classifications and high hemoglobin level had the best outcome measurements. A rise in carboxyhemoglobin significantly decreased the probability of loco-regional control and each additional pack year increased the risk of death. Smokers and former smokers develop secondary

  6. Real-world costs and outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with targeted therapies: a cohort study from the French health insurance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun, Rana; Fleury, Laetitia; Nachbaur, Gaelle; Maunoury, Franck; Vanhille, Jean-Louis; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns, survival, healthcare use and costs in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in a real-world setting. We used the National Health Insurance (NHI) claims database for the Ile-de-France region to perform a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with mRCC treated by a first-line targeted therapy. Treatment naïve patients were identified combining the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes (C64 & C77-C79) and a first prescription of targeted therapies. Descriptive analyses were performed on treatment patterns and patients' characteristics. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were determined using Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival analysis. All healthcare resource use and costs were estimated on a per patient per month (PPPM) basis (€2016). A total of 327 treatment naïve patients with mRCC were included. Median follow-up was 13.4 months. Sunitinib accounted for 73% of first-line treatments. The most frequently observed treatment sequence for the first two lines was sunitinib-everolimus (16%; n = 137) and for the first three lines sunitinib-everolimus-axitinib (20%; n = 49). First-line PFS for sunitinib, everolimus, pazopanib, sorafenib and other was 8.7, 6.2, 10.7, 5.7 and 11.2 months, respectively. Median OS for patients treated by first-line sunitinib, everolimus, pazopanib, sorafenib and other was respectively 14.7, 8.1, 21.1, 8.9 and 14.0 months. From the NHI's perspective, the mean PPPM was €5546. The average PPPM in pre-progression was €5597 compared to €5541 beyond progression of the disease. Oral targeted therapies accounted for 53% of the total PPPM. This descriptive study showed that the economic burden of mRCC is substantial with oral targeted therapies accounting for 53% of the PPPM. OS and PFS in real life are poorer than observed in clinical trials.

  7. c-Met Expression Is a Marker of Poor Prognosis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baschnagel, Andrew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Williams, Lindsay [Department of Pathology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hanna, Alaa; Chen, Peter Y.; Krauss, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Pruetz, Barbara L. [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Akervall, Jan [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D., E-mail: George.Wilson@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic significance of c-Met expression in relation to p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Archival tissue from 107 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation was retrieved, and a tissue microarray was assembled. Immunohistochemical staining of c-Met, p16, and EGFR was performed. c-Met expression was correlated with p16, EGFR, clinical characteristics, and clinical endpoints including locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Fifty-one percent of patients were positive for p16, and 53% were positive for EGFR. Both p16-negative (P≤.001) and EGFR-positive (P=.019) status predicted for worse DFS. Ninety-three percent of patients stained positive for c-Met. Patients were divided into low (0, 1, or 2+ intensity) or high (3+ intensity) c-Met expression. On univariate analysis, high c-Met expression predicted for worse LRC (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77; P=.031), DM (HR 4.41; 95% CI, 1.56-12.45; P=.005), DFS (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.68-5.38; P<.001), and OS (HR 4.35; 95% CI, 2.13-8.88; P<.001). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for site, T stage, smoking history, and EGFR status, only high c-Met expression (P=.011) and negative p16 status (P=.003) predicted for worse DFS. High c-Met expression was predictive of worse DFS in both EGFR-positive (P=.032) and -negative (P=.008) patients. In the p16-negative patients, those with high c-Met expression had worse DFS (P=.036) than did those with low c-Met expression. c-Met expression was not associated with any outcome in the p16-positive patients. Conclusions: c-Met is expressed in the majority of locally advanced HNSCC cases, and high c-Met expression predicts for worse clinical outcomes. High c-Met expression predicted for worse DFS in p16

  8. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Roeder, Falk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Martínez-Monge, Rafael [Radiation Oncology Division, University of Navarre, Pamplona (Spain); Whitson, Jared [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Calvo, Felipe A. [Departamento de Oncología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Salzburg (Austria); Wong, William W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Ellis, Rodney J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seidman Cancer Center University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  9. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma: 10 Years of Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, E.; Tarallo, M.; Maruccia, M.; Sorvillo, V.; Pollastrini, A.; Scuderi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a locally invasive malignant epidermal tumour. Incidence is increasing by 10% per year; incidence of metastases is minimal, but relapses are frequent (40%-50%). The complete excision of the BCC allows reduction of relapse. Materials and Methods. The study cohort consists of 1123 patients underwent surgery for basal cell carcinoma between 1999 and 2009. Patient and tumor characteristics recorded are: age; gender; localization (head and neck, trunk, and upper and lower extremities), tumor size, excisional margins adopted, and relapses. Results. The study considered a group of 1123 patients affected by basal cell carcinoma. Relapses occurred in 30 cases (2,67%), 27 out of 30 relapses occurred in noble areas, where peripheral margin was <3mm. Incompletely excised basal cell carcinoma occurred in 21 patients (1,87%) and were treated with an additional excision. Discussion. Although guidelines indicate 3mm peripheral margin of excision in BCC <2cm, in our experience, a margin of less than 5mm results in a high risk of incomplete excisions

  11. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels for patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) levels have been reported to be useful as prognostic factors, indicators of clinical response, and predictors for recurrence in patients with lung cancer treated by surgery or chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were useful as independent prognostic factors in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy alone. The serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured in 158 and 47 patients, respectively, before radiation therapy. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured by sandwich radioimmunoassay using the CEA-RIA (radioimmunoassay) kit and the SCC-RIA kit. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were above reference values in 19% and 30% of the patients, respectively. The 5-year survival rates were significantly better for patients with a negative SCC Ag result than for those with positive SCC Ag levels (p=0.0001), though no significant difference in survival rates was seen by CEA positivity (p=0.25). SCC Ag positivity (p=0.0006) and stage (p=0.04) were the important prognostic factors, as determined by multivariate analyses. Pretreatment serum SCC Ag level may be useful as an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who are treated with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  12. Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Campos Arbulú

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis

  13. Cardiac Metastasis in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... following: pleural mesothelioma (48.4%), melanoma (27.8%), lung adenocarcinoma (21%), undifferentiated carcinomas (19.5%), lung squamous cell carcinoma (18.2%) and breast carcinoma (15.5%). High rates of heart metastatisation have also been observed in patients affected by ovarian carcinoma ...

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of Basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firnhaber, Jonathon M

    2012-07-15

    Family physicians are regularly faced with identifying, treating, and counseling patients with skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer, which encompasses basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, is the most common cancer in the United States. Ultraviolet B exposure is a significant factor in the development of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. The use of tanning beds is associated with a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of basal cell carcinoma and a 2.5-fold increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Routine screening for skin cancer is controversial. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force cites insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine whole-body skin examination to screen for skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a pearly white, dome-shaped papule with prominent telangiectatic surface vessels. Squamous cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a firm, smooth, or hyperkeratotic papule or plaque, often with central ulceration. Initial tissue sampling for diagnosis involves a shave technique if the lesion is raised, or a 2- to 4-mm punch biopsy of the most abnormal-appearing area of skin. Mohs micrographic surgery has the lowest recurrence rate among treatments, but is best considered for large, high-risk tumors. Smaller, lower-risk tumors may be treated with surgical excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, or cryotherapy. Topical imiquimod and fluorouracil are also potential, but less supported, treatments. Although there are no clear guidelines for follow-up after an index nonmelanoma skin cancer, monitoring for recurrence is prudent because the risk of subsequent skin cancer is 35 percent at three years and 50 percent at five years.

  15. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda Plovmand

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.......Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis....

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeloev, B.; Kirkegaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Copenhagen Univ. Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and four patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity were treated at the Finsen Institute in cooperation with the ENT-surgical departments between 1978 and 1982. The primary treatment consisted of radiotherapy alone in 74%, surgery alone in 4%, and a combination of radiotherapy and surgery in 15% of the patients. 2% received other treatment (cryotherapy), 5% did not complete the planned radiotherapy, and 1% were not treated at all. Of 203 patients with tumour remnant or first recurrence, 45% were operated, 2% received radiotherapy, and 2% combined treatment. This treatment strategy made 38% of the patients free of disease in the follow-up period (3 1/2 to 8 years) or until the patients died from other causes. Fifty-nine percent of the patients died from their oral carcinomas. Tumour size (T), lymph node status (N), and tumour stage were as expected important prognostic factors. (orig.)

  17. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  18. Monitoring Cell Death in Regorafenib-Treated Experimental Colon Carcinomas Using Annexin-Based Optical Fluorescence Imaging Validated by Perfusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp M Kazmierczak

    Full Text Available To investigate annexin-based optical fluorescence imaging (OI for monitoring regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas in rats, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.Subcutaneous human colon carcinomas (HT-29 in athymic rats (n = 16 were imaged before and after a one-week therapy with regorafenib (n = 8 or placebo (n = 8 using annexin-based OI and perfusion MRI at 3 Tesla. Optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and MRI tumor perfusion parameters (plasma flow PF, mL/100mL/min; plasma volume PV, % were assessed. On day 7, tumors underwent immunohistochemical analysis for tumor cell apoptosis (TUNEL, proliferation (Ki-67, and microvascular density (CD31.Apoptosis-targeted OI demonstrated a tumor-specific probe accumulation with a significant increase of tumor SNR under therapy (mean Δ +7.78±2.95, control: -0.80±2.48, p = 0.021. MRI detected a significant reduction of tumor perfusion in the therapy group (mean ΔPF -8.17±2.32 mL/100 mL/min, control -0.11±3.36 mL/100 mL/min, p = 0.036. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly more apoptosis (TUNEL; 11392±1486 vs. 2921±334, p = 0.001, significantly less proliferation (Ki-67; 1754±184 vs. 2883±323, p = 0.012, and significantly lower microvascular density (CD31; 107±10 vs. 182±22, p = 0.006 in the therapy group.Annexin-based OI allowed for the non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry.

  19. Clinical Significance of Lymph Node Dissection in Patients with Muscle-Invasive Upper Urinary Tract Transitional Cell Carcinoma Treated with Nephroureterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Kang Su; Choi, Hyun Min; Koo, Kyochul; Park, Sung Jin; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Cho, Nam Hoon; Yang, Seung Choul; Hong, Sung Joon

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the value of lymph node dissection in patients with cN0 muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract (UUT-TCC). Medical records of 152 patients with cN0 muscle-invasive UUT-TCC, who underwent nephroureterectomy between 1986 and 2005, were reviewed. Sixty-three patients (41.4%) underwent lymph node dissection. The median number of lymph nodes harvested was 6 (range, 1 to 35), and from these, lymph node involvement was confirmed in 9 patients (14.3%). L...

  20. Identification of MicroRNAs Involved in Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Hydrogen Peroxide-Treated Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although both oxidative stress and microRNAs (miRNAs play vital roles in physiological and pathological processes, little is known about the interactions between them. In this study, we first described the regulation of H2O2 in cell viability, proliferation, cycle, and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Then, miRNAs expression was profiled after H2O2 treatment. The results showed that high concentration of H2O2 (600 μM could decrease cell viability, inhibit cell proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest, and finally promote cell apoptosis. Conversely, no significant effects could be found under treatment with low concentration (30 μM. miRNAs array analysis identified 131 differentially expressed miRNAs (125 were upregulated and 6 were downregulated and predicted 13504 putative target genes of the deregulated miRNAs. Gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that the putative target genes were associated with H2O2-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. The subsequent bioinformatics analysis indicated that H2O2-response pathways, including MAPK signaling pathway, apoptosis, and pathways in cancer and cell cycle, were significantly affected. Overall, these results provided comprehensive information on the biological function of H2O2 treatment in HepG2 cells. The identification of miRNAs and their putative targets may offer new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for liver cancer.

  1. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  2. Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ Overlying Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Maria A; Helm, Matthew F; Tarbox, Michelle B

    2016-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous neoplasm that has exhibited an exponential increase in incidence in the past 3 decades. Combined MCC and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC/MCC) is an uncommon variant of MCC that exhibits worse prognosis than pure MCC. To describe the clinical presentation, dermoscopy, and histology of an unusual subtype of combined SCC/MCC. A 73-year-old white woman presented with an ulcerated and violaceous 10-mm plaque on her right jawline that had been present for 2 to 3 months. On dermoscopy, the lesion was predominantly milky pink to red with peripheral crusting and large-caliber polymorphous vessels. Histology revealed SCC in situ above and adjacent to MCC. The tumor was excised with clear margins, and sentinel lymph node scintography was negative for nodal involvement. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: an atypical histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Ballestero-Pérez

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is one of the differential diagnoses of rectal tumors. It represents a low incidence in the population. The etiopathogenesis and the biology of these tumors are unclear, for this reason the gold standard treatment is difficult to establish. We present a 47-years-old woman who had a squamous cell carcinoma in medium rectum. She was treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy and the treatment was followed by surgical excision.

  4. Pretreatment serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen : A newly identified prognostic factor in early-stage cervical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duk, JM; Groenier, KH; deBruijn, HWA; Hollema, H; tenHoor, KA; vanderZee, AGJ; Aalders, JG

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of pretreatment serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels in patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma in relation to well-established conventional risk factors. Patients and Methods: Sere from 653 women treated for squamous cervical

  5. Adnexal Carcinomas Treated With Mohs Micrographic Surgery: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkachjov, Stanislav N

    2017-10-01

    Adnexal carcinomas (ACs) are rare cutaneous malignancies of sweat gland or pilosebaceous origin. Optimal treatment and metastatic potential of AC are poorly defined. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has been increasingly used to treat AC. To review selected primary cutaneous AC and their treatment outcomes with MMS. Literature review using PubMed search for articles related to primary cutaneous ACs. Sebaceous carcinoma treated with MMS recurred and metastasized in 6.4% and 3.7%, respectively. Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma treated with MMS recurred and metastasized in 9.6% and 6.4%, respectively. After MMS, 4.7% of microcystic AC recurred with no reported metastases. After MMS, recurrences and metastases of trichilemmal carcinoma or hidradenocarcinoma have not been reported. Two (4.2%) regional lymph node metastases but no distant metastases or local recurrences have been reported in eccrine porocarcinoma. Squamoid eccrine duct tumor, pilomatrix carcinoma, and spiradenocarcinoma treated with MMS are also reviewed. The rarity of ACs and the lack of comparative data on treatment makes conclusive recommendations on treatment difficult. Recent large case series and reviews suggest MMS is a useful and possibly superior treatment for AC and should be considered if primary cutaneous disease is suspected.

  6. Impact of the prophylactic gastrostomy for unresectable squamous cell head and neck carcinomas treated with radio-chemotherapy on quality of life: Prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Sebastien; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Alfonsi, Marc; Digue, Laurence; Bagarry, Danielle; Feham, Nasreddine; Bensadoun, Rene Jean; Pignon, Thierry; Loundon, Anderson; Deville, Jean-Laurent; Zanaret, Michel; Favre, Roger; Duffaud, Florence; Auquier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Concomitant radio-chemotherapy is the gold standard treatment for unresectable head and neck carcinomas. Placement of prophylactic gastrostomy has been proposed to provide adequate nutrition during the therapeutic sequence. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of prophylactic gastrostomy on the 6-month quality of life, and to determine the factors related to this quality of life. Materials and methods: Design. randomized, controlled, open study ('systematic percutaneous gastrostomy' versus 'no systematic gastrostomy'). Patients. squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (stages III and IV, UICC 1997). Setting. oncological departments of French university teaching hospitals. Treatment. optimal concomitant radio-chemotherapy. Evaluations. T0 baseline evaluation, T1 during the treatment, T2 end of the treatment, and T3 6-month post-inclusion. Primary endpoint. 6-month quality of life (Qol) assessed using SF36, EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ H and N35 questionnaires. Results: The Qol changes from baseline included a decline (T1 and T2) followed by an improvement (T3). Qol at 6 months was significantly higher in the group receiving systematic prophylactic gastrostomy (p = 10 -3 ). Higher initial BMI and lower initial Karnofsky index were significant factors related to a higher 6-month Qol. Conclusions: The study results suggest that prophylactic gastrostomy improves post-treatment quality of life for unresectable head and neck cancer patients, after adjusting for other potential predictive quality of life factors.

  7. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K. Andersen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions’ experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27-60. All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9-173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation.

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Parotid Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the...

  9. Basal cell carcinoma does metastasize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgediz, Doruk; Smith, E B; Zheng, Jie; Otero, Jose; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Corvera, Carlos U

    2008-08-15

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) rarely metastasizes. However, this unfortunate outcome can occur, usually in neglected tumors. We report a 52-year-old man with a BCC on the left chest that enlarged and then ulcerated over a 6-year period. Metastasis of the tumor to lymph nodes in the left axilla resulted, but the patient remains free of disease 24 months after wide excision, lymph node dissection, and local radiation therapy to the axilla.

  10. Intradural squamous cell carcinoma in the sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujisawa Kozo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in patients with cancer at the rate of approximately 5%; it develops particularly in patients with breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, leukemia, or malignant lymphoma. We describe a rare case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in which spinal intradural squamous cell carcinoma with no lesions in the cerebral meninges and leptomeninx, was the primary lesion. Methods A 64-year-old man complained of sacral pain. Although the patient was treated with analgesics, epidural block and nerve root block, sacral pain persisted. Since acute urinary retention occurred, he was operated on. The patient was diagnosed as having an intradural squamous cell carcinoma of unknown origin. Results Since the patient presented with a slightly decreased level of consciousness 2 months after surgery, he was subjected to MRI scanning of the brain and spinal cord, which revealed disseminated lesions in the medulla oblongata. The patient died of pneumonia and sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 5 months after surgery. Conclusion We report the first case of a patient with intradural squamous cell carcinoma with unknown origin that developed independently in the sacrum.

  11. Energy and protein intake and nutritional status in non-surgically treated patients with small cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enig, B.; Winther, E.; Hessov, I.; Aarhus Univ.

    1986-01-01

    The spontaneous food intake and nutritional status was assessed in 23 patients with small cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung before and two times during a treatment period of 6 weeks. Radiation therapy was given for 2 weeks followed by a course of chemotherapy and another 2 weeks of radiation therapy. The energy intake decreased during the treatment from 146 to 130 per cent of basal metabolic rate (p>0.10). The protein intake remained unchanged (mean 0.9 g/kg body weight).There were insignificant and small losses of weight, body fat, free body mass and arm muscle circumference, and no changes were seen in serum albumin and serum transferrin. However, 6 patients suffered a weight loss of 5 per cent or more. No correlation existed between the nutritional parameters measured before treatment and the changes during treatment. Patients who suffered a loss of body weight could therefore not be singled out before the treatment. (orig.)

  12. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma with suspected cholesterol granuloma of the maxillary sinus in a patient treated with combined modality therapy: A case report and the review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, You; Lu, Yanwei; Zheng, Liduan; Liu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor with aggressive growth characteristics. A 41-year-old Chinese male visited our hospital in 2013, with a 4-month history of bloody purulent rhinorrhea with a peculiar smell in the right nasal cavity. The patient suffered from recurrent GCOC with suspected cholesterol granuloma of the maxillary sinus. The patient was incorrectly diagnosed with a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor at his first recurrence. Physical examination, radiological examination, and histopathology were used to identify GCOC. Considering the recurrence of GCOC and poor effects of single surgery, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were performed after radical surgical excision. So far, no significant evidence has suggested recurrence or metastasis after a long-term follow-up. We advocate wide surgery with clean margins at the first accurate diagnosis. Combined modality therapy could be taken for the recurrent GCOC. We expect to provide a new treatment strategy to prevent the growth of this neoplasm.

  13. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of Cases and Review of This Unique Presentation of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-03-22

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma is a unique variant of basal cell carcinoma. Including the three patients described in this report, red dot basal cell carcinoma has only been described in seven individuals. This paper describes the features of two males and one female with red dot basal cell carcinoma and reviews the characteristics of other patients with this clinical subtype of basal cell carcinoma. A 70-year-old male developed a pearly-colored papule with a red dot in the center on his nasal tip. A 71-year-old male developed a red dot surrounded by a flesh-colored papule on his left nostril. Lastly, a 74-year-old female developed a red dot within an area of erythema on her left mid back. Biopsy of the lesions all showed nodular and/or superficial basal cell carcinoma. Correlation of the clinical presentation and pathology established the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma. The tumors were treated by excision using the Mohs surgical technique. Pubmed was searched with the keyword: basal, cell, cancer, carcinoma, dot, red, and skin. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. Red dot basal cell carcinoma has been described in three females and two males; the gender was not reported in two patients. The tumor was located on the nose (five patients), back (one patient) and thigh (one patient). Cancer presented as a solitary small red macule or papule; often, the carcinoma was surrounded by erythema or a flesh-colored papule. Although basal cell carcinomas usually do not blanch after a glass microscope slide is pressed against them, the red dot basal cell carcinoma blanched after diascopy in two of the patients, resulting in a delay of diagnosis in one of these individuals. Dermoscopy may be a useful non-invasive modality for evaluating skin lesions when the diagnosis of red dot basal cell carcinoma is considered. Mohs surgery is the treatment of choice; in some of the patients, the ratio of the area of the postoperative wound to that

  14. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... Follow your provider's recommendations in the treatment of kidney disorders, especially those that may require dialysis.

  15. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  16. Small hepatocellular carcinoma treated with percutaneous ethanol injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sironi, S.; Livraghi, T.; Vanzulli, A.; Delmaschio, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the potential role of MR imaging in the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions treated with percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI). Fifty-seven MR imaging examinations were obtained in 19 patients with 23 HCC lesions less than 3.5 cm in diameter treated with PEI under US guidance. All patients underwent MR imaging at 0.5 T before and after treatment. Seventeen patients were also examined with MR imaging 6 months after the completion of the therapy. After PEI, fine-needle biopsy specimens were obtained in all cases. Before treatment, on SE 500/20 (T1-weighted) images, HCC lesions were hypointense in 13 cases, isointense in 6, and hyperintense in 4, and all 23 tumors were hyperintense on SE 2,000/120 (T2-weighted) images, in comparison with normal liver. After treatment and at 6-month follow-up, all lesions that were negative for malignant cells at fine-needle biopsy (n = 21) had high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and appeared hypointense on T2-weighted images

  17. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

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    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  18. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

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    Mary H. Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC remains the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT, will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  19. Fanconi anemia and vaginal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Paula Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chromosome instability, cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, and increased predisposition to malignancies. We describe here a 28 year-old female with FA and vaginal squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiation therapy alone. The patient developed arm phlebitis, pulmonary fungal infection, and severe rectal bleeding, followed by hypocalcaemia, hypokalemia, vaginal bacterial and fungal infection, with subsequent leg and arm phlebitis, perineal abscess, and sepsis. The patient died 12 weeks later.

  20. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, M. H.; Sondak, V. K.; Sondak, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common form of non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  2. Hürthle cell carcinoma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sara Ahmadi,1 Michael Stang,2 Xiaoyin “Sara” Jiang,3 Julie Ann Sosa2,4,5 1Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, 2Section of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 3Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, 4Duke Cancer Institute, 5Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCC can present either as a minimally invasive or as a widely invasive tumor. HCC generally has a more aggressive clinical behavior compared with the other differentiated thyroid cancers, and it is associated with a higher rate of distant metastases. Minimally invasive HCC demonstrates much less aggressive behavior; lesions <4 cm can be treated with thyroid lobectomy alone, and without radioactive iodine (RAI. HCC has been observed to be less iodine-avid compared with other differentiated thyroid cancers; however, recent data have demonstrated improved survival with RAI use in patients with HCC >2 cm and those with nodal and distant metastases. Patients with localized iodine-resistant disease who are not candidates for a wait-and-watch approach can be treated with localized therapies. Systemic therapy is reserved for patients with progressive, widely metastatic HCC. Keywords: thyroid cancer, thyroid nodule, follicular cell carcinoma, Hurthle cell lesion, minimally invasive HCC

  3. Immunotherapy of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Stenzl, Arnulf; Stevanović, Stefan; Rammensee, Hans-Georg

    2007-01-01

    Carcinomas of the kidney generally have a poor prognosis and respond minimally to classical radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Immunotherapy constitutes an interesting alternative to these established forms of treatment, and indeed, cytokine-based therapies have been used for many years, leading to favorable clinical responses in a small subset of patients. During the past few years, immunotherapeutical trials targeting renal cell tumor-associated antigens have also been reported, with diverse passive or active approaches using antibodies or aimed at activating tumor-directed T lymphocytes. The following review presents the results and the progress made in the field, including classical cytokine treatments, non-myeloablative stem cell transplantation and antigen specific-based trials, with special focus on T-cell studies. In consideration of the few specific molecular targets described so far for this tumor entity, current strategies which can lead to the identification of new relevant antigens will be discussed. Hopefully these will very soon contribute to an improvement in renal cell carcinoma specific immunotherapy and its evaluation.

  4. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Autopsy findings in surgical-radiotherapeutically treated bladder carcinoma - conclusions for optimization of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueller, J.; Kob, D.; Fritzsche, V.

    1989-01-01

    Autopsy findings in patients with bladder carcinoma, treated by combined operation and radiotherapy, revealed tendencies of tumor spread as well as complications and late effects of radiotherapy. In 24.5% of the cases tumor tissue was found within the bladder and in 30.5% within the minor pelvis. Metastases were found in 24.1% in iliac lymph nodes, in 21.3% in abdominal lymph nodes. Liver, lungs, bones, and kidneys are main organs for hematological metastasizing. Little or undifferentiated carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas showed a greater tendency to metastasize than highly and medium-differentiated ureteral carcinomas. The least radiotherapeutical complications and late effects were found in a fractionation with daily 1.5 Gy and a total dose of 60 Gy. (author)

  6. Percutaneous and laparoscopic assisted cryoablation of small renal cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Borre, Michael

    Aim: To evaluate the complication rate and short term oncological outcome of small renal cell carcinomas treated with cryoablation. Materials and methods: 91 biopsy verified renal cell carcinomas were cryoablated between 2006-11. Patients treated had primarily T1a tumors, but exceptions were made...... Medical® was used. Treatment was considered successful when tumors gradually shrunk and showed no sign of contrast enhancement, assessed by CT or MRI. Results: Mean patient age and tumor size was 65 yr [17 - 83] and 26 mm [10 - 62], respectively [min-max]. Treatment modalities consisted of percutaneous...

  7. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment.

  8. Expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Almeida, Maria Carolina Leal; Costa, Alessandra Scorse; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Serrano, Rodrigo Lorenzetti; Machado Filho, Carlos D'Apparecida Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background Heparanase is an enzyme that cleaves heparan sulfate chains. Oligosaccharides generated by heparanase induce tumor progression. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma comprise types of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Objectives Evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and expression of heparanase in two human cell lines established in culture, immortalized skin keratinocyte (HaCaT) and squamous cell carcinoma (A431) and also investigate the expression of heparanase in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and eyelid skin of individuals not affected by the disease (control). Methods Glycosaminoglycans were quantified by electrophoresis and indirect ELISA method. The heparanase expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRTPCR). Results The A431 strain showed significant increase in the sulfated glycosaminoglycans, increased heparanase expression and decreased hyaluronic acid, comparing to the HaCaT lineage. The mRNA expression of heparanase was significantly higher in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma compared with control skin samples. It was also observed increased heparanase expression in squamous cell carcinoma compared to the Basal cell carcinoma. Conclusion The glycosaminoglycans profile, as well as heparanase expression are different between HaCaT and A431 cell lines. The increased expression of heparanase in Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma suggests that this enzyme could be a marker for the diagnosis of such types of non-melanoma cancers, and may be useful as a target molecule for future alternative treatment. PMID:27828631

  9. Results of a Phase 1/2 Study in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with a Patient-specific Adjuvant Multi-peptide Vaccine after Resection of Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Steffen; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Laske, Karoline; Walter, Kerstin; Feyerabend, Susan; Chandran, Premachandran Anoop; Kruck, Stephan; Singh-Jasuja, Harpreet; Frick, Annemarie; Kröger, Nils; Stevanović, Stefan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Bedke, Jens

    2017-10-04

    Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma comprises metastasectomy±systemic medical treatment. Specific immunotherapy after metastasectomy could be a complementary option. In this phase 1/2 study, safety and tolerability of an adjuvant multi-peptide vaccine (UroRCC) after metastasectomy was evaluated together with immune response and efficacy, compared with a contemporary cohort of patients (n=44) treated with metastasectomy only. Nineteen metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients received UroRCC via intradermal or subcutaneous application randomized to immunoadjuvants (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or Montanide). Adverse events of UroRCC were mainly grade I and II; frequency of immune response was higher for major histocompatibility complex class II peptides (17/19, 89.5%) than for major histocompatibility complex class I peptides (8/19, 42.1%). Median overall survival was not reached in the UroRCC group (mean: 112.6 mo, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 92.1-133.1) and 58.0 mo (95% CI: 32.7-83.2) in the control cohort (p=0.015). UroRCC was an independent prognosticator of overall survival (hazard ratio=0.19, 95% CI: 0.05-0.69, p=0.012). Adjuvant UroRCC multi-peptide vaccine after metastasectomy was well tolerated, immunogenic, and indicates potential clinical benefit when compared with a contemporary control cohort (NCT02429440). The application of a patient-specific peptide vaccine after complete resection of metastases in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients resulted in favorable tolerability and outcome. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  11. Assessment of quality of life in patients with advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma treated with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Uanne Resende Avelino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage, palliative chemotherapy therefore being the only treatment option. This study was aimed at evaluating the health-related quality of life (HRQoL of advanced-stage NSCLC patients receiving palliative chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. METHODS: This was a multiple case study of advanced-stage NSCLC outpatients receiving chemotherapy at a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire was used in conjunction with its supplemental lung cancer-specific module in order to assess HRQoL. RESULTS: Physical and cognitive functioning scale scores differed significantly among chemotherapy cycles, indicating improved and worsened HRQoL, respectively. The differences regarding the scores for pain, loss of appetite, chest pain, and arm/shoulder pain indicated improved HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy was found to improve certain aspects of HRQoL in patients with advanced-stage NSCLC.

  12. Treatment of early glassy cell carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Tae Jin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with glassy cell carcinoma of cervix. We reviewed all cases of glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix confirmed and treated at the Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, between January 1993 and December 2005. There were 7 cases with histopathologically confirmed gassy cell carcinoma. A tumor was diagnosed as glassy cell carcinoma if over 50% of the tumor cell type displayed glassy cell features. Six patients with stage IB had radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic node dissection, and 2 of them received adjuvant external pelvic irradiation with concurrent chemotherapy. Remaining one patient with stage IIA had curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy with external pelvic irradiation and brachytherapy. There were 7 patients diagnosed as glassy cell carcinoma among the 3,745 (0.2%) patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix. The mean age of 7 patients was 44 years with range of 35 to 53 years of age. The most frequent symptom was vaginal bleeding (86%). By the punch biopsy undertaken before treatment of 7 cases, 2 only cases could diagnose as glassy cell carcinoma of uterine cervix, but remaining of them confirmed by surgical pathological examination. The mean follow up duration was 73 months with range of 13 to 150 months. All 7 patients were alive without disease after treatment. Glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that demonstrates an aggressive biologic behavior. However for early-stage disease, we may have more favorable clinical outcome with radical surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers

  14. Neglected basal cell carcinoma on scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very rare entity. Usually, they occur due to the negligence of the patient. Local or distant metastasis is present in most cases. Here, we present a case of giant BCC that clinically resembled squamous cell carcinoma and demonstrated no metastasis at presentation.

  15. Metástasis cervical contralateral en el carcinoma epidermoide de la cavidad oral: Estudio clínico analítico retrospectivo en 315 pacientes primariamente tratados con cirugía Contralateral neck metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: An analytical retrospective clinical study of 315 patients primarily treated with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González-García

    2008-06-01

    carcinoma epidermoide de lengua. El tiempo de supervivencia medio libre de enfermedad fue 147± 6 meses. Veintinueve (9,1% pacientes desarrollaron recurrencia cervical ipsilateral, mientras que 18 (5,69% mostraron recurrencia cervical contralateral. Para los pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua, y considerando los porcentajes en relación a los 203 pacientes con esta entidad, estas cifras fueron de 20 (9,8% y 9 (4,4%, respectivamente. El tiempo medio de aparición de las metástasis cervicales desde la cirugía fue de 12,52 meses (rango: 3-49, algo menor para el subgrupo de pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua (11,4 meses, rango: 3-27. Dieciocho de los 29 pacientes con recurrencia cervical ipsilateral murieron finalmente de la enfermedad. Siete de 18 pacientes con metástasis contralateral murieron igualmente de la enfermedad. En el subgrupo de pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua, estas cifras fueron: catorce de 20 pacientes con metástasis cervical ipsilateral y ocho de 9 pacientes con metástasis cervical contralateral. Varios factores clínicopatológicos mostraron asociación estadísticamente significativa (pObjectives. There are numerous studies in the literature on the prognostic factors involved in the appearance of ipsilateral neck metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. However, there are no extensive clinical studies on the association of clinicopathological factors and the appearance of contralateral neck metastasis after the surgical resection of the primary tumor. The object of this study is to analyze the factors implied in the appearance of contralateral neck metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated primarily with surgery. Patients and methods. A series of 315 consecutive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, who had not been treated previously, were analyzed. A complementary study of a subgroup of 203 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lateral

  16. Round cell anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Yang, Moon Ho [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    Ultrasonography of the upper abdomen disclosed an oval well defined mass in the pancreas. Round cell anaplastic carcinoma is one of sarcomatoid pancreatic carcinoma, microscopically characterized by monotonous sheaths of small round plump cells with rare giant cells and thus more or less reminiscent of malignant lymphoma. Whether this tumor is of ductal or acinar cell origin remains to be determined. Clinically, this tumor does not differ significantly from ordinary adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We report a cases of round cell anaplastic carcinoma and describe the CT and sonographic findings, and discuss the differential points from other solid pancreatic tumors.

  17. [Descriptive study on basal cell eyelid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, M J; Pfeiffer, N; Valor, C

    2015-09-01

    To describe a series of cases of basal cell carcinomas of the eyelid. A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted by reviewing the medical outcome, histopathological history, and photographic images of 200 patients with basal cell eyelid carcinomas. All were treated in the Herzog Carl Theodor Eye Hospital in Munich, Germany, between 2000 and 2013. In the present study, it was found that females are more affected than males. The mean age of presentation of the tumor occurred at the age of 70 years. In 50% of the cases the tumor was found on the lower lid, especially medially from the center of the lid. The lid margin was involved in 47% of all tumors. The mean diameter was 9.2mm. The recurrence rate after surgery with histologically clear resection margins was 5%. There was a significant relationship between tumor diameter and age. As tumors where located farther away from medial and closer to the lid margin, they became larger. There is a predominance of women affected by this tumor. This may be related to the fact that the sample was taken from those attending an oculoplastic surgery clinic, where there are generally more women than men attending. The formation of basal cell carcinomas increases with age. The infrequent involvement of the upper lid could be explained by the protection of the the eyebrow. The frequent involvement of the lower lid may be due to the light reflection (total reflection) by the cornea on the lower lid margin. Also chemical and physical effects of the tears may be more harmful on the lower lid. Patients tend to ask for medical help when they are females, younger, when the tumor is closer to the medial canthus or when the tumor is away from the lid margin. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. What determines patient preferences for treating low risk basal cell carcinoma when comparing surgery vs imiquimod? A discrete choice experiment survey from the SINS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinelli Michela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SINS trial (Controlled Clinical Trials ISRCTN48755084; Eudract No. 2004-004506-24 is a randomised controlled trial evaluating long term success of excisional surgery vs. imiquimod 5% cream for low risk nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC. The trial included a discrete choice experiment questionnaire to explore patient preferences of a cream versus surgery for the treatment of their skin cancer. Methods The self-completed questionnaire was administered at baseline to 183 participants, measuring patients’ strength of preferences when choosing either alternative ‘surgery’ or ‘imiquimod cream’ instead of a fixed ‘current situation’ option (of surgical excision as standard practice in UK. The treatments were described according to: cost, chance of complete clearance, side effects and appearance. Participants had to choose between various scenarios. Analysis was performed using a mixed logit model, which took into account the impact of previous BCC treatment and sample preference variability. Results The analysis showed that respondents preferred ‘imiquimod cream’ to their ‘current situation’ or ‘surgery’, regardless of previous experience of BCC symptoms and treatment. Respondents were more likely to be worried about their cosmetic outcomes and side effects they might experience over and above their chance of clearance and cost. Those with no experience of surgery (compared with experience valued more the choice of ‘imiquimod cream’ (£1013 vs £781. All treatment characteristics were significant determinants of treatment choice, and there was significant variability in the population preferences for all of them. Conclusions Patients with BCC valued more ‘imiquimod cream’ than alternative ‘surgery’ options, and all treatment characteristics were important for their choice of care. Understanding how people with a BCC value alternative interventions may better inform the

  19. What determines patient preferences for treating low risk basal cell carcinoma when comparing surgery vs imiquimod? A discrete choice experiment survey from the SINS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinelli, Michela; Ozolins, Mara; Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Williams, Hywel C

    2012-10-04

    The SINS trial (Controlled Clinical Trials ISRCTN48755084; Eudract No. 2004-004506-24) is a randomised controlled trial evaluating long term success of excisional surgery vs. imiquimod 5% cream for low risk nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The trial included a discrete choice experiment questionnaire to explore patient preferences of a cream versus surgery for the treatment of their skin cancer. The self-completed questionnaire was administered at baseline to 183 participants, measuring patients' strength of preferences when choosing either alternative 'surgery' or 'imiquimod cream' instead of a fixed 'current situation' option (of surgical excision as standard practice in UK). The treatments were described according to: cost, chance of complete clearance, side effects and appearance. Participants had to choose between various scenarios. Analysis was performed using a mixed logit model, which took into account the impact of previous BCC treatment and sample preference variability. The analysis showed that respondents preferred 'imiquimod cream' to their 'current situation' or 'surgery', regardless of previous experience of BCC symptoms and treatment. Respondents were more likely to be worried about their cosmetic outcomes and side effects they might experience over and above their chance of clearance and cost. Those with no experience of surgery (compared with experience) valued more the choice of 'imiquimod cream' (£1013 vs £781). All treatment characteristics were significant determinants of treatment choice, and there was significant variability in the population preferences for all of them. Patients with BCC valued more 'imiquimod cream' than alternative 'surgery' options, and all treatment characteristics were important for their choice of care. Understanding how people with a BCC value alternative interventions may better inform the development of health care interventions.

  20. Acinous cell carcinoma: a histogenetic hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsakis, J G; Wozniak, K J; Regezi, J A

    1977-11-01

    A proposed origin of acinous cell carcinoma of the parotid gland from serous cells of the acinar part of the salivary unit has been challenged. To date, the alternative histogenetic concept of origin from the reserve cell of the intercalated duct has been largely conjectural and based on light microscopic and only isolated electron microscopic evidence. Light and electron microscopic findings now support a terminal duct origin for at least some acinous cell carcinomas.

  1. A case of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma associated with small cell carcinoma of lung developing a skin metastasis on previously irradiated area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Mamoru; Takei, Yoji; Ueki, Hiroaki

    1983-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma which occurred in the penis of a 61-year-old male patient was treated surgically and by Linac (a total of 10,400 rad). However, it was not cured. Abnormal shadows in the lung and multiple liver tumor was noted one month before death. Autopsy revealed generalized metastases of pulmonary small-cell carcinoma, and persistent squamous cell carcinoma of the penis with no metastases. Skin metastasis of lung carcinoma occurred only in the area previously irradiated. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Occult carcinoma discovered after simple hysterectomy treated with postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, Christopher H.; Schneider, Bernard F.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of patients with occult carcinoma of the cervix discovered after simple hysterectomy is controversial. The purpose of this review is to examine our results with postoperative radiotherapy and to compare them to similar reports and to reports of treatment with radical parametrectomy. Methods and Materials: Between November 1979 and April:, 18 patients were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Virginia for invasive carcinoma of the cervix discovered after simple hysterectomy. Simple hysterectomy was performed in all 18 patients for a variety of indications. After surgery gross residual carcinoma remained in four patients; and microscopic disease was present at the surgical margins in two patients. The remaining patients had no evidence of residual disease. All 18 patients had postoperative radiotherapy with or without brachytherapy. The endpoints for this study were local control, survival, and treatment-related toxicity. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Life method. Results: Median follow-up for all 18 patients was 42 months (range 2-202 months). Both the 5 and the 10-year actuarial local control rates were 88%. Five and 10-year actuarial overall survival rates were both 93%. Two patients had both local and distant cancer recurrences. There were no recurrences among the six patients treated with external beam alone. The remaining patients are all alive without evidence of disease, including two patients who had gross residual disease after surgery, and one patient with both microscopic positive margin and a positive lymph node (the only patient to undergo lymph node sampling). There was no severe acute morbidity and only one patient had severe late morbidity. Conclusions: Invasive carcinoma found after simple hysterectomy may be treated safely and effectively with postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with known residual disease following surgery do poorly with either radiotherapy or reoperation, but treatment with radiotherapy

  3. Nivolumab versus Everolimus in Advanced Renal-Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motzer, Robert J; Escudier, Bernard; McDermott, David F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab, a programmed death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor, was associated with encouraging overall survival in uncontrolled studies involving previously treated patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma. This randomized, open-label, phase 3 study compared nivolumab with everolimus...

  4. Lobomycosis and squamous cell carcinoma Lobomicose e carcinoma espinocelular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Nogueira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurence of squamous cell carcinoma on long-lasting ulcers is classic. Malignant transformation may occur on burn scars and chronic ulcers of varying etiology, including infectious agents. Transformation of old lobomycosis lesion scars into squamous cell carcinoma has been rarely reported. Careful and long-term follow-up of such patients is important to avoid carcinomatous transformation.A ocorrência de carcinoma espinocelular sobre lesões cutâneas de longa evolução é clássica em cicatrizes de queimadura e úlceras crônicas de etiologia variada, inclusive infecciosa. Na literatura, são raros os casos de pacientes com lobomicose de longa evolução que desenvolveram CEC. O seguimento cuidadoso desses pacientes é importante, pois, nas áreas de traumas, ulcerações e cicatrizes crônicas pode ocorrer degeneração carcinomatosa.

  5. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma: a biological continuum of Basal cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karaninder S; Mahajan, Vikram K; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Sharma, Anju Lath; Sharma, Vikas; Abhinav, C; Khatri, Gayatri; Prabha, Neel; Sharma, Saurabh; Negi, Muninder

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 80% of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Its metastasis is extremely rare, ranging between 0.0028 and 0.55 of all BCC cases. The usual metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bones, or skin is from the primary tumor situated in the head and neck region in nearly 85% cases. A 69-year-old male developed progressively increasing multiple, fleshy, indurated, and at places pigmented noduloulcerative plaques over back, chest, and left axillary area 4 years after wide surgical excision of a pathologically diagnosed basal cell carcinoma. The recurrence was diagnosed as infiltrative BCC and found metastasizing to skin, soft tissue and muscles, and pretracheal and axillary lymph nodes. Three cycles of chemotherapy comprising intravenous cisplatin (50 mg) and 5-florouracil (5-FU, 750 mg) on 2 consecutive days and repeated at every 21 days were effective. As it remains unclear whether metastatic BCC is itself a separate subset of basal cell carcinoma, we feel that early BCC localized at any site perhaps constitutes a biological continuum that may ultimately manifest with metastasis in some individuals and should be evaluated as such. Long-standing BCC is itself potentially at risk of recurrence/dissemination; it is imperative to diagnose and appropriately treat all BCC lesions at the earliest.

  6. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Biological Continuum of Basal Cell Carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaninder S. Mehta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC accounts for 80% of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Its metastasis is extremely rare, ranging between 0.0028 and 0.55 of all BCC cases. The usual metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bones, or skin is from the primary tumor situated in the head and neck region in nearly 85% cases. A 69-year-old male developed progressively increasing multiple, fleshy, indurated, and at places pigmented noduloulcerative plaques over back, chest, and left axillary area 4 years after wide surgical excision of a pathologically diagnosed basal cell carcinoma. The recurrence was diagnosed as infiltrative BCC and found metastasizing to skin, soft tissue and muscles, and pretracheal and axillary lymph nodes. Three cycles of chemotherapy comprising intravenous cisplatin (50 mg and 5-florouracil (5-FU, 750 mg on 2 consecutive days and repeated at every 21 days were effective. As it remains unclear whether metastatic BCC is itself a separate subset of basal cell carcinoma, we feel that early BCC localized at any site perhaps constitutes a biological continuum that may ultimately manifest with metastasis in some individuals and should be evaluated as such. Long-standing BCC is itself potentially at risk of recurrence/dissemination; it is imperative to diagnose and appropriately treat all BCC lesions at the earliest.

  7. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  8. Analysis of toxicity of Milkier cell carcinoma of the skin treated with synchronous carboplatin/etoposide and radiation: a Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael; Rischin, Danny; Walpole, Evan; Harvey, Jennifer; Macintosh, John; Ainslie, Jill; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui B.; Tripcony, Lee B.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The acute and late toxicities of synchronous carboplatin, etoposide, and radiation therapy were prospectively assessed in a group of patients with high-risk Milkier cell carcinoma of the skin. Patients and Methods: Forty patients from six different centers throughout Australia were entered into a Phase II study under the auspices of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group. The trial was activated in 1996 and continues to accrue. Patients are eligible if they have disease localized to the primary site and nodes and are required to have at least one of the following high-risk features: recurrence after initial therapy, involved nodes, primary size greater than 1 cm, gross residual disease after surgery, or occult primary with nodes. Radiation was delivered to the primary site and nodes to a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, and synchronous carboplatin (area under curve [Auc] 4.5) and etoposide (80 mg/M 2 i.v.) were given on days 1-3 during weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10. The median age of the group was 67 years (43-78). Results: The median duration of follow-up was 22 months (2-45). There were no treatment-related deaths. Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicity occurred in 63% of patients (95% CI 48, 78). The most serious acute effect was on neutrophils with Grade 3 or 4 (neutrophils 9 /L), occurring in 60% (95% CI 45, 75) of cases. Complications from neutropenia (fever and sepsis) occurred in 16 patients (40% of cases). The median time for neutropenic complications was 27 days (9-35), and 10/16 (62%) cases of neutropenic fever occurred after the second cycle of chemotherapy. The probability of Grade 3 or 4 late effects on platelets ( 9 /L) and hemoglobin (<8 g/dl) was 10% (95% CI 1, 20) and 6% (95% CI 2, 15), respectively. Of the 40 patients, 35 were able to complete 4 cycles of chemotherapy. There were no factors predictive for neutropenic toxicity at a p value < 0.05. Conclusions: The protocol has acceptable toxicity, and the treatment has been deliverable in a

  9. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma of the head and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Kramer, B; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2016-02-05

    Ultraviolet light (UV) is an important risk factor for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin. These cancers most commonly affect persons with fair skin and blue eyes who sunburn rather than suntan. However, each of these cancers appears to be associated with a different pattern of UV exposure and to be mediated by different intracellular molecular pathways.Some melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants play a direct role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma apart from their role in determining a cancer-prone pigmentory phenotype (fair skin, red hair, blue eyes) through their interactions with other genes regulating immuno-inflammatory responses, DNA repair or apoptosis.In this short review we focus on the aetiological role of UV in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin, and on some associated biopathological events.

  10. The results of a series of 963 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder primarily treated by radical megavoltage X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Quilty, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The results are reported of a large series of patients with transitional cell cancer of the bladder, treated in Edinburgh between 1971 and 1982. Analysis of pre-treatment characteristics for patients with transitional cell bladder cancer showed that tumour category was significantly associated with grade and tumour size. Complete local tumour regression at follow-up cystoscopy was achieved in 45.9% of patients who completed radical megavoltage X-ray therapy. Patients with grade 2 or 3 cancer, a solid cancer or a tumour of less than 8 cm in size had significantly improved complete regression rates. Lasting local tumour control after initial complete regression was better in patients with grade 3 cancer. Complete regression was associated with improved survival for all but patients with T1 cancer. The poorest survival rates were seen in patients over 79 years of age, those with T4 cancer, an ulcerated cancer, a grade 3 cancer or a tumour of more than 7 cm in size. Metastases were more often seen in patients with grade 3 or T3/T4 cancer. Severe late radiation-related complications were seen in 14.8% of patients. (Auth.)

  11. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Yasukazu; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Mochimatsu, Izumi; Arai, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Satoshi; Enomoto, Hiroyuki

    2001-01-01

    Sixty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at our hospital from 1991 through 1999 were analyzed. In terms of curative treatments, definitive radiotherapy or curative surgery after neoajuvant chemotherapy had been mainly applied for advanced cases until 1997. Since 1998, advanced cases have been treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The cause-specific survival rate at 5 years for the 60 patients was 50% (stage I, II, 100%; III, 45%; IV A, 36%; IV B, 0%). In the 35 patients with operable advanced-stage disease, the 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 35% in cases treated with definitive radiotherapy, and 66% in those treated with curative surgery, respectively. All 12 operable patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy showed complete response, and 10 patients in this group are disease-free now. However, many problems in definitive treatment modalities, including concomitant chemoradiotherapy for advanced cases with oropharyngeal carcinoma, have not been clarified yet. (author)

  12. [Exenteration of the Orbit for Basal Cell Carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdová, A; Horkovičová, K; Krčová, I; Krásnik, V

    2015-08-01

    Primary treatment of basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid and the inner corner is essentially surgical, but advanced lesions require extensive surgical interventions. In some cases it is necessary to continue with the mutilating surgery--exenteration of the orbit. In this work we evaluate the indications of radical solutions in patients with basal cell carcinoma invading the orbit and the subsequent possibility for individually made prosthesis to cover the defect of the cavity. Indications to exenteration of the orbit in patients with basal cell carcinoma findings in 2008-2013. Case report of 2 patients. In period 2008-20013 at the Dept. of Ophthalmology, Comenius University in Bratislava totally 221 patients with histologically confirmed basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids and the inner corner were treated. In 5 cases (2.7 %) with infiltration of the orbit the radical surgical procedure, exenteration was necessary. In 3 patients exenteration was indicated as the first surgical procedure in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma, since they had never visited ophthalmologist before only at in the stage of infiltration of the orbit (stage T4). In one case was indicated exenteration after previous surgical interventions and relapses. After healing the cavity patients got individually prepared epithesis. Surgical treatment of basal cell carcinoma involves the radical removal of the neoplasm entire eyelid and stage T1 or T2 can effectively cure virtually all tumors with satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. In advanced stages (T4 stage) by infiltrating the orbit by basal cell carcinoma exenteration of the orbit is necessary. This surgery is a serious situation for the patient and also for his relatives. Individually made prosthesis helps the patient to be enrolled to the social environment.

  13. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  14. Focus on Merkel cell carcinoma: diagnosis and staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandhaye, Marion; Teixeira, Pedro Gondim; Blum, Alain [Imagerie Guilloz CHU de Nancy Hopital Central, Nancy (France); Henrot, Philippe [Service de Radiologie Institut de Cancerologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Morel, Olivier [Medecine Nucleaire CHU Nancy Hopital Brabois, Vancoeuvre les Nancy (France); Sirveaux, Francois [Service de Chirurgie Centre chirurgical Emile Galle, Nancy (France); Verhaeghe, Jean-Luc [Service de Chirurgie Institut de Cancerologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2015-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare lymphophilic skin tumor of neuroendocrine origin with the potential for rapid progression. Small, localized lesions are diagnosed and treated clinically, but advanced tumors often undergo imaging evaluation. Due to its rarity, radiologists are unaware of evocative imaging features and usually do not consider Merkel cell carcinoma in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors. Appropriate staging is important to determine appropriate treatment and has an impact on patient prognosis. Multimodality imaging is usually needed, and there is no consensus on the optimal imaging strategy. The purpose of this article is to review various aspects of Merkel cell carcinoma imaging and look in detail at how optimal multimodality staging should be carried out. (orig.)

  15. Targeting influenza virosomes to ovarian carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Schoen, P; Wilschut, J; Crommelin, DJA; Storm, G

    2001-01-01

    Reconstituted influenza virus envelopes (virosomes) containing the viral hemagglutinin (HA) have attracted attention as delivery vesicles for cytosolic drug delivery as they possess membrane fusion activity. Here, we show that influenza virosomes can be targeted towards ovarian carcinoma cells

  16. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors. PMID:28954101

  17. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Erik; Lopes, Otávio Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer, presenting low mortality but high morbidity, and it has as risk factor exposure to sunlight, especially UVB spectrum. The most important constitutional risk factors for basal cell carcinoma development are clear phototypes (I and II, Fitzpatrick classification), family history of basal cell carcinoma (30-60%), freckles in childhood, eyes and light hair. The environmental risk factor better established is exposure to ultraviolet radiation. However, different solar exposure scenarios probably are independent risk factors for certain clinical and histological types, topographies and prognosis of this tumor, and focus of controversy among researchers. Studies confirm that changes in cellular genes Hedgehog signaling pathway are associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma. The cellular Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in organogenesis, but is altered in various types of tumors.

  18. Eyelid Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-hyun Song1§, Sae-kwang Ku2§, Hwan-soo Jang3, Eun-young Kye, Sung-ho Yun, Kwang-ho Jang and Young-sam Kwon*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old, female, Yorkshire Terrier was presented with a left lower eyelid mass. No other abnormality was detected on affected eye in a general eye examination. The mass was surgically removed and histologically diagnosed as a squamous cell carcinoma. The advancement flap used in this case may be an appropriate therapeutic choice for eyelid squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma developed on hypertropic lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rahmat Ullah Siddique

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma occurring in the cutaneous lesions of Lichen Planus though rarely mentioned in literature does occw-and should be kept in mind while treating such lesions. We report a 30 year female who developed a squamous cell carcinoma in a long standing hypertropic lichen planus in the lower leg. This case is being presented to indicate the possibility of malignant transformation of cutaneous lichen planus to carcinoma, especially in the hypertrophic fonns and the need to have an early diagnosis so that it can be treated in the initial stages. A high degree of suspicion should be present when­ever we come across a non healing lesion in a patient with lichen planus. A few markers, which may give us a clue for increased chances of malignant transformation in these cases is presented.

  20. Isodeoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber (Didancao) induces cell cycle arrest and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in breast carcinoma T47D cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeer, Farha Arakkaveettil; Sreedevi, Geetha Balakrishnan; Nair, Mangalam Sivasankaran; Rajalekshmi, Dhanya Sethumadhavannair; Gopalakrishnan, Latha Panickaparambil; Prathapan, Remani

    2014-01-01

    Isodeoxyelephantopin (IDOE) isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. (Didancao) is used in Chinese medicine for the treatment of some types of cancer. The anti-cancer mechanism of IDOE remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative activity of IDOE on breast carcinoma T47D cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells. The growth inhibitory effects of IDOE on breast carcinoma T47D cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells, and normal lymphocytes were evaluated by the MTT assay. Morphological analysis of apoptosis induction was performed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual-staining and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining. The cell cycle profile, caspase-3 expression, and annexin V staining were evaluated by flow cytometry. IDOE inhibited the growth of A549 and T47D cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 values of 10.46 and 1.3 μg/mL, respectively. IDOE was not significantly toxic to normal lymphocytes. The cells became detached from the monolayer and rounded up, had fragmented nuclei and condensed chromatin, and the numbers of apoptotic cells increased (P = 0.0003). IDOE-induced cell death was associated with activated caspase-3 expression followed by cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. IDOE inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells and lung carcinoma cells and induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the treated cells.

  1. Familial Follicular-Cell Derived Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju eSon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Follicular cell-derived well-differentiated thyroid cancer, papillary (PTC and follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC compose 95% of all thyroid malignancies. Familial follicular cell-derived well-differentiated thyroid cancers contribute to 5% of those cases. These familial follicular cell derived carcinomas or non-medullary thyroid carcinomas (NMTC divide into two clinical-pathological groups. One group, syndromic-associated, composed by predominately non-thyroidal tumors, is comprised of Pendred syndrome, Warner syndrome, Carney complex type 1, PTEN-hamartoma tumor syndrome (Cowden disease; PHTS, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP/Gardner syndrome. Additionally other less established links correlated to the development of follicular cell-derived tumors have also included Ataxia-teleangiectasia syndrome, McCune Albright syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The subsequent group encompasses syndromes typified by non-medullary thyroid carcinomas or NMTC, as well as, pure familial (f PTC with or without oxyphilia, fPTC with multinodular goiter and fPTC with papillary renal cell carcinoma. This heterogeneous group of diseases has not a established genotype-phenotype correlation as the well-known genetic events identified in the familial C-cell-derived tumors or medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC. Clinicians should be have the knowledge to identify the likelihood of a patient presenting with thyroid cancer having an additional underlying familial syndrome stemming from characteristics through morphological findings that would alert the pathologist to have the patient undergo subsequent molecular genetics evaluations. This review will discuss the clinical and pathological findings of the patients with familial papillary thyroid carcinoma, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, Carney complex, Werner syndrome, and Pendred syndrome and the heterogeneous group of familial papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  2. Risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma after treatment of basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Tina; Abrouk, Michael; Sima, Camelia S; Sadetsky, Natalia; Hou, Jeannie; Caro, Ivor; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Arron, Sarah T

    2017-10-01

    Vismodegib is a first-in-class agent targeting the hedgehog signaling pathway for treatment of patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and metastatic BCC. There have been concerns about the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients treated with this drug. We sought to determine whether treatment with vismodegib is associated with an increase in the risk of cutaneous SCC. In this retrospective cohort study, patients treated with vismodegib as part of phase I and II clinical studies were compared with participants from the University of California, San Francisco, Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Cohort who received standard therapy for primary BCC. In total, 1675 patients were included in the analysis, and the development of SCC after vismodegib exposure was assessed. The use of vismodegib was not associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of SCC (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-1.16). Covariates including age, sex, history of previous nonmelanoma skin cancer, and number of visits per year were significantly associated with the development of SCC. A limitation of the study was that a historic control cohort was used as a comparator. Vismodegib was not associated with an increased risk of subsequent SCC when compared with standard surgical treatment of BCC. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeted therapy for orbital and periocular basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Vivian T; Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Esmaeli, Bita

    2013-01-01

    To review the literature on targeted therapy for orbital and periocular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and provide examples of patients recently treated with such therapy. The authors reviewed the literature on clinical results of targeted therapy and the molecular basis for targeted therapy in orbital and periocular BCC and cutaneous SCC. The authors also present representative cases from their practice. Mutation in the patched 1 gene (PTCH1) has been implicated in BCC, and overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown in SCC. Vismodegib, an inhibitor of smoothened, which is activated upon binding of hedgehog to Ptc, has been shown to significantly decrease BCC tumor size or even produce complete resolution, especially in cases of basal cell nevus syndrome. Similarly, EGFR inhibitors have been shown to significantly decrease SCC tumor size in cases of locally advanced and metastatic disease. The authors describe successful outcomes after vismodegib treatment in a patient with basal cell nevus syndrome with numerous bulky lesions of the eyelid and periocular region and erlotinib (EGFR inhibitor) treatment in a patient with SCC who was deemed not to be a good surgical candidate because of advanced SCC of the orbit with metastasis to the regional lymph nodes, advanced age, and multiple medical comorbidities. Targeted therapy using hedgehog pathway and EGFR inhibitors shows significant promise in treatment of orbital and periocular BCC and cutaneous SCC, respectively. Such targeted therapy may be appropriate for patients who are not good candidates for surgery.

  4. Carcinoma espinocelular da mama: relato de um caso Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast tissue: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens José Pereira

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma espinocelular do parênquima mamário é um tipo raro de neoplasia, representando menos de 1% de todos os carcinomas mamários. Esse trabalho relata a condução de um caso diagnosticado e tratado no Serviço de Ginecologia e Mama do Hospital Araújo Jorge/ACCG. São discutidos a apresentação clínica, o diagnóstico e o prognóstico destes tumores.Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary tissue is a very rare neoplasm, representing less than 1% of all breast carcinomas. The present study reports a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the breast, treated at the Hospital Araújo Jorge/ACCG. The tumor diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are also discussed.

  5. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  8. General Information about Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  9. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  10. Topical treatment of Basal cell carcinomas in nevoid Basal cell carcinoma syndrome with a smoothened inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvara, Hans; Kalthoff, Frank; Meingassner, Josef G.; Wolff-Winiski, Barbara; Aschauer, Heinrich; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Wu, Xu; Pan, Shifeng; Mickel, Lesanka; Schuster, Christopher; Stary, Georg; Jalili, Ahmad; David, Olivier J.; Emotte, Corinne; Antunes, Ana Monica Costa; Rose, Kristine; Decker, Jeremy; Carlson, Ilene; Gardner, Humphrey; Stuetz, Anton; Bertolino, Arthur P.; Stingl, Georg; de Rie, Menno A.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a distinctive manifestation in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients. Both inherited and acquired mutations of patched 1 (PTCH1), a tumor-suppressor gene controlling the activity of Smoothened (SMO), are the primary cause of the constitutive activation

  11. Basal cell carcinoma metastatic to parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Rinsey Rose; Di Palma, Silvana; Barrett, A W

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis from basal cell carcinoma of the skin is very rare with cases being documented in the lymph nodes, lung, bone and parotid gland. The main histopathological differential diagnosis is the locally arising basal cell adenocarcinoma from which it is difficult to distinguish by morphology and routine immunohistochemistry. Approximately 85 % of all reported metastatic basal cell carcinomas arise in the head and neck region. Here we present a case of basal cell carcinoma of the skin of the left lateral canthus of the eye which metastasized to the intraparotid lymph nodes with infiltration of the adjacent parotid parenchyma. More awareness and vigilance is required on the part of the reporting pathologist to consider metastasis in the presence of a parotid tumour. Features favouring metastasis include history of primary cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, histological similarity to the primary lesion and absence of any demonstrable direct extension from the skin lesion. We also review the literature on metastatic basal cell carcinoma and discuss the need for adequate follow up in high risk patients.

  12. [Basal cell carcinoma of unusual site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlika, Rym Benmously; Kerkeni, Nadia; Jebali, Amel; Zghal, Mohamed; Debbiche, Achraf; Ayed, Mohamed Ben; Mokhtar, Insaf; Fenniche, Samy

    2011-02-01

    Labial mucosa is an atypical site of basal cell carcinoma. The involvement of the vermilion lip, devoid of hair follicles and sweat glands, contrasts with the concept of its origin from pilar structures. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developed on the vermilion upper lip. A 49-year-old woman, presented with an asymptomatic, 1-cm-diameter, erythematous, telangiectatic and crusted nodule on the upper lip evolving for 9 months and having once interested the vermilion border. There were no cervical lymph nodes. Diagnosis of infiltrative basal cell carcinoma was made by histological study, which showed a tumoral proliferation of epithelial basal cells infiltrating the dermis with perineural and muscular infiltration. Our report illustrates a rare but not exceptional site of basal cell carcinoma. The nodule, initially confined to the vermilion border, has then developed onto the mucosal and the cutaneous areas. Histopathological study revealed, as previously reported, infiltarative features. Basal cell carcinoma of the lip should be rapidly managed since its invasion to deeper structures occurs early. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterizing the Impact of Lymph Node Metastases on the Survival Outcome for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Targeted Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroeger, Nils; Pantuck, Allan J; Wells, J Connor

    2015-01-01

    by its retrospective design and the lack of pathologic evaluation of LNM in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: The metastatic spread of RCC to SBD lymph nodes is associated with poor prognosis in mRCC patients treated with TT. PATIENT SUMMARY: The presence of lymph node metastases below the diaphragm is associated...

  14. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasal Vestibule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsmans, J D; Godballe, C; Jørgensen, K E

    1999-01-01

    From 1978 to 1992, 66 patients (32 women and 34 men) were treated for carcinoma of the nasal vestibule at Odense University Hospital. The treatment was radiotherapy (41 patients), surgery (13 patients) or a combination of the two modalities (12 patients). Twenty-one patients (32%) developed...... prognosticator of both disease specific and crude survival (p treatment and close follow up....

  15. Adhesion molecule expression in basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, M.; Beljaards, R.; Veraart, J.; Hoekzema, R.; Neumann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are frequently associated with a peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate. Until now, the function of this inflammatory infiltrate and its possible role in the control of tumor growth is unclear. Mechanisms controlling endothelial and target cell adhesiveness for leukocytes

  16. Apparatus for treating carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P.P.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for treating carcinoma of the uterine cervix by judiciously applying radioactive material immediately adjacent the uterine cervix for an extended period of time empirically determined by the radiologist. The novel apparatus comprises three radioactively chargeable components including a central tubular tandem vaginally insertable longitudinally into the uterine cervix and two non-lineal tubular ovoidal assemblies longitudinally locatable at the cervix and positioned laterally between the respective vaginal walls and the uterine cervix. The ovoidal assemblies are conveniently removably and pivotably connected to the central tandem component externally of the vaginal along the sagittal plane through a novel adapter member whereby the radioactively chargeable ovoidal assemblies tend to remain within a laterally extending plane located substantially midway the transversely separated vasicovaginal and rectovaginal septa, even though the patient periodically shifts her reclining posture during the extended treatment by said vaginally protruding apparatus

  17. Oral leukoplakia and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Arnaud F; Farwell, D Gregory

    Oral leukoplakia is defined as a white oral lesion not related to another disease process. These lesions are largely asymptomatic, and the clinical relevance of oral leukoplakia is primarily tied to its association with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Timely workup and effective management of these lesions can reduce the risk of malignant transformation and promote early diagnosis of invasive tumors. A biopsy should be performed promptly of any persistent or suspicious leukoplakia with subsequent management dictated by histologic findings. Benign lesions can be observed or treated with topical therapy, and dysplastic lesions should be excised. Some risk of malignant transformation remains even after treatment, and close follow-up is required. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that can result from malignant conversion of oral leukoplakia or occur de novo. These tumors are primarily treated with surgical resection and adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation as dictated by histopathologic findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  19. Ovarian Basaloid Carcinoma with Shadow Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Zamecnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available So-called shadow cell differentiation (SCD is typical for pilomatrixoma and other skin lesions with follicular differentiation, but it was rarely described also in some visceral carcinomas. We report a case of ovarian basaloid carcinoma with SCD. The tumor presented as a 14 cm ovarian mass in a 45-year-old woman, and therefore the adnexectomy and hysterectomy were performed. The tumor was of high stage. Multiple metastases were found in the liver, retroperitoneal and mediastinal lymph nodes, and the lung. Histologically, the tumor showed a pattern of high-grade basaloid carcinoma with numerous shadow cells. Extensive histologic examination did not reveal any glandular or preexisting teratoma component. Immunohistochemically, the tumor expressed markers of squamous cell differentiation, such as p63, cytokeratin 5/6, and high-molecular-weight keratin. Cytokeratin 7 and CA125 were positive in scattered cells of the lesion. Estrogen and progesterone receptor, vimentin, and p53 were negative. Beta-catenin showed nuclear and cytoplasmic positivity, indicating possible tumor proliferation/differentiation via Wnt signaling pathway. To our knowledge, SCD in basaloid carcinoma of the ovary was not described before. In addition to the description of the case, we review the literature on SCD in visceral carcinomas.

  20. Autopsy findings in carcinoma of the esophagus treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Tanaka, Shinichi; Miura, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    Forty autopsied patients with esophageal carcinoma (35 treated with radiotherapy and 5 with conservative treatment) were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Local recurrence significantly differed with the treatment method. The lowest rate of local recurrence was observed in the patients treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Mediastinal lymph node metastasis was significantly related to the extent of the primary tumor (T) and the lowest rate of metastasis was seen in the patients with T1. Abdominal lymph node metastasis was significantly related to both the disease stage and treatment method. The lowest rate of metastasis was noted in stage 1 patients, whereas, the rate was high in the patients with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Distant metastasis was significantly related to disease stage, with stage 1 patients showing the lowest rate of metastasis. Prognosis was significantly related to the treatment method. The average of survival was highest in the patients treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. (author)

  1. Identification of Prognostic Biomarkers for Progression of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Carcinoma, Squamous; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Lung Cancer; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms

  2. Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Eyelid and Periocular Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, Helen [Orbital Oncology and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 1488, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ruiz Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Sniegowski, Matthew C.; Esmaeli, Bita, E-mail: besmaeli@mdanderson.org [Orbital Oncology and Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 1488, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in the eyelid and periocular region can be treated surgically, in most cases, with preservation of the eye and reasonable visual function. Adjuvant radiation therapy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and chemotherapy should be considered for MCC of the eyelid and periocular region, especially for larger tumors that are T2b or more advanced and lesions that present with regional nodal or distant metastasis.

  3. Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Eyelid and Periocular Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, Helen; Sniegowski, Matthew C.; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in the eyelid and periocular region can be treated surgically, in most cases, with preservation of the eye and reasonable visual function. Adjuvant radiation therapy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and chemotherapy should be considered for MCC of the eyelid and periocular region, especially for larger tumors that are T2b or more advanced and lesions that present with regional nodal or distant metastasis

  4. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16?positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. Study Design This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. Methods We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16?positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5?fluorouracil. ...

  5. Ovarian small cell carcinoma complicated by carcinomatous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terukazu Ishii

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal metastasis is rare in the clinical course of ovarian carcinoma and its prognosis is extremely poor. We experienced a case of carcinomatous meningitis from metastatic ovarian small cell carcinoma. A 33-year-old woman with atypical genital bleeding, was diagnosed with a right ovarian tumor and referred to our department. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, and lymphadenectomy. It was an optimal debulking surgery. She was diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma classified as Stage IIIc according to the Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d’Obstétrique classification system. Histological findings showed small cell carcinoma of the pulmonary type. The tumor was bilateral with paraaortic lymph node involvement. The patient was treated with irinotecan and cisplatin (CPT-P therapy. After 4 courses of CPTP therapy, multiple liver metastases and Virchow’s lymph node metastases were found. She was treated with amrubicin as a secondline chemotherapy, but the treatment was ineffective. Five months after surgery, the patient complained of severe headache and nausea. Lumbar puncture was performed and cytology was positive. Magnetic resonance brain imaging indicated meningeal thickening. The patient was diagnosed with meningeal metastasis and received 19-Gy whole cranial irradiation. In spite of these treatments, her disease progressed rapidly and she was often drowsy. She died of aspiration pneumonia 6 months after surgery.

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of survival in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing [Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Yu-Chun [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Ko, Sheung-Fat [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung University, Biostatistics and Informatics Unit, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keelung (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Medical Imaging Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    We prospectively investigated the roles of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET)/CT for predicting survival of oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with histologically proven OHSCC and neck nodal metastases scheduled for chemoradiation were eligible. Clinical variables as well as DCE-MRI-, DWI- and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT-derived parameters of the primary tumours and metastatic neck nodes were analysed in relation to 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Eighty-six patients were available for analysis. Multivariate analysis identified the efflux rate constant (K{sub ep})-tumour < 3.79 min{sup -1} (P = 0.001), relative volume of extracellular extravascular space (V{sub e})-node < 0.23 (P = 0.004) and SUV{sub max}-tumour > 19.44 (P = 0.025) as independent risk factors for both PFS and OS. A scoring system based upon the sum of each of the three imaging parameters allowed stratification of our patients into three groups (patients with 0/1 factor, patients with 2 factors and patients with 3 factors, respectively) with distinct PFS (3-year rates = 72 %, 38 % and 0 %, P < 0.0001) and OS (3-year rates = 81 %, 46 % and 20 %, P < 0.0001). K{sub ep}-tumour, V{sub e}-node and SUV{sub max}-tumour were independent prognosticators for OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination helped survival stratification. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of survival in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung-Ming; Yang, Lan-Yan; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively investigated the roles of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET)/CT for predicting survival of oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with histologically proven OHSCC and neck nodal metastases scheduled for chemoradiation were eligible. Clinical variables as well as DCE-MRI-, DWI- and 18 F-FDG PET/CT-derived parameters of the primary tumours and metastatic neck nodes were analysed in relation to 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Eighty-six patients were available for analysis. Multivariate analysis identified the efflux rate constant (K ep )-tumour < 3.79 min -1 (P = 0.001), relative volume of extracellular extravascular space (V e )-node < 0.23 (P = 0.004) and SUV max -tumour > 19.44 (P = 0.025) as independent risk factors for both PFS and OS. A scoring system based upon the sum of each of the three imaging parameters allowed stratification of our patients into three groups (patients with 0/1 factor, patients with 2 factors and patients with 3 factors, respectively) with distinct PFS (3-year rates = 72 %, 38 % and 0 %, P < 0.0001) and OS (3-year rates = 81 %, 46 % and 20 %, P < 0.0001). K ep -tumour, V e -node and SUV max -tumour were independent prognosticators for OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination helped survival stratification. (orig.)

  8. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to investi......Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark...

  9. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Thyroid Gland, Presenting Like Anaplastic Carcinoma of Thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Riaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unpredictable and diverse behavior. The classic triad of hematuria, loin pain, and abdominal mass is uncommon. At time of diagnosis, 25%–30% of patients are found to have metastases. Bones, lungs, liver, and brain are the frequent sites of metastases. RCC with metastasis to the head and neck region and thyroid gland is the rarest manifestation and anaplastic carcinoma behaving metastatic thyroid mass is an extremely rare presentation of RCC. Case Presentation. A 56-year-old Saudi man with past history of right radical nephrectomy 5 years back presented with 3 months history of rapid increasing neck mass with dysphagia, presenting like anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Tru-cut biopsy turned out to be metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient was treated with radiation therapy 30 Gy in 10 fractions to mass. Patient died 4 months after the discovery of anaplastic thyroid looking metastasis. Conclusion. Rapidly progressing thyroid metastases secondary to RCC are rare and found often unresectable which are not amenable to surgery. Palliative radiotherapy can be considered for such patients.

  10. Primary candidiasis and squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyong Ho

    2013-02-01

    Primary candidiasis is rare and often confused with a pre-cancerous lesion, squamous cell carcinoma, or verrucous carcinoma. We report an extremely rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of the vocal cord following primary candidiasis. A 62-year-old man presented to our department reporting a 1-month history of hoarseness. He underwent laryngeal microscopic surgery for a presumptive diagnosis of glottic carcinoma. Histopathologic examination revealed candidiasis and scattered moderate dysplasia. He was treated with itraconazole for 4 weeks, and followed up without any recurrence of candidiasis. However, the 42-month follow-up examination revealed a focal whitish lesion on the right true vocal cord, and a repeat biopsy of this area revealed squamous cell carcinoma without evidence of candidiasis. The patient was treated with radiotherapy and remains well with no signs of tumor recurrence or candidiasis.

  11. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Distal Common Bile Duct

    OpenAIRE

    Jain A; Juneja M; Naik S; Sharma S; Kapoor S; Sewkani A; Varshney S

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Squamous cell carcinoma of the biliary tree is rare. Although few cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the intrahepatic bile-duct and gallbladder have been reported, until today, only four cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct have been reported in the literature. CASE REPORT: We present a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the distal common bile duct presenting with obstructive jaundice in a 60-year-old male which was successfully managed by a Whipple's pancr...

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-Min; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area. PMID:20523804

  13. TUMOR RECURRENCE FIVE YEARS AFTER TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS BASAL CELL CARCINOMA AND SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chren, Mary-Margaret; Linos, Eleni; Torres, Jeanette S.; Stuart, Sarah E.; Parvataneni, Rupa; Boscardin, W. John

    2012-01-01

    For most cutaneous basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas (nonmelanoma skin cancers [NMSC]) data are insufficient to permit evidence-based choices among treatments. To compare tumor recurrence after treatments, we conducted a prospective cohort study of consecutive patients with primary NMSC treated with the most common treatments in two practices in 1999–2000. Recurrence was determined from medical records by observers blinded to treatment type. 24.3% of tumors (N=361) were treated with destruction with electrodessication / curettage, 38.3% (N=571) with excision, and 37.4% (N=556) with histologically-guided serial excision (Mohs surgery). Follow-up was available for 1174 patients with 1488 tumors (93.8%) at median 7.4 years; overall 5-year tumor recurrence rate [95% Confidence Interval] was 3.3% [2.3, 4.4]. Unadjusted recurrence rates did not differ after treatments: 4.9% [2.3, 7.4] after destruction, 3.5% [1.8, 5.2] after excision, and 2.1% [0.6, 3.5] after Mohs surgery (P=0.26), and no difference was seen after adjustment for risk factors. In tumors treated only with excision or Mohs surgery, the hazard of recurrence was not significantly different, even after adjustment for propensity for treatment with Mohs surgery. These data indicate that common treatments for NMSC were at least 95% effective, and further studies are needed to guide therapeutic choices for different clinical subgroups. PMID:23190903

  14. Utilization and incorporation of tumor volume data in staging and prognostication of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen Ahlawat; Sheh Rawat; Anjali Kakria; Manoj Pal; Deepika Chauhan; Ruparna Khurana; Sarthak Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC) are a group of heterogeneous tumors, evident by their diverse behavior and natural history. The largest diameter of tumor measured for T classification may not necessarily reflect the true tumor dimension. There is a need to take into account certain other feature(s) of these tumors other than the maximum single dimension which can reflect the true tumor burden more accurately. Tumor volume has been shown to be a useful and accurate tool burden beca...

  15. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  16. Histologic Mimics of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanoszek, Lauren M; Wang, Grace Y; Harms, Paul W

    2017-11-01

    - Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human malignant neoplasm and is a frequently encountered diagnosis in dermatopathology. Although BCC may be locally destructive, it rarely metastasizes. Many diagnostic entities display morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with BCC, including nonneoplastic processes, such as follicular induction over dermatofibroma; benign follicular tumors, such as trichoblastoma, trichoepithelioma, or basaloid follicular hamartoma; and malignant tumors, such as sebaceous carcinoma or Merkel cell carcinoma. Thus, misdiagnosis has significant potential to result in overtreatment or undertreatment. - To review key features distinguishing BCC from histologic mimics, including current evidence regarding immunohistochemical markers useful for that distinction. - Review of pertinent literature on BCC immunohistochemistry and differential diagnosis. - In most cases, BCC can be reliably diagnosed by histopathologic features. Immunohistochemistry may provide useful ancillary data in certain cases. Awareness of potential mimics is critical to avoid misdiagnosis and resulting inappropriate management.

  17. State-of-the-art surgical management of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, David D; Winfield, Howard N

    2007-09-01

    There is a recognizable increase in the incidence of renal cell carcinoma and a parallel rise in the surgical management of renal cell carcinoma has occurred. However, recent literature shows that not all small, suspected renal cell carcinoma needs to be treated surgically, especially in elderly patients or those with multiple medical comorbidities. The surgical options for renal cell carcinoma have expanded from traditional open nephrectomy to partial nephrectomy and, at present, more recent outcomes data are available for the laparoscopic versions of these surgeries. Short-term results of thermal ablative technology (radiofrequency and cryoablation) show real promise as minimally invasive therapies. This review examines the most up-to-date outcomes and future directions of the surgical management of renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN. Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RPN. On the other hand, thermoablative therapy and cryoablation also play an important role in the renal preservation therapy to improve the patient procedural tolerance. Novel modalities, but limited to small number of patients, include high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU, radiosurgery, microwave therapy (MWT, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT, and pulsed cavitational ultrasound (PCU. Although initial results are encouraging, their real clinical roles are still under evaluation. On the other hand, active surveillance (AS has also been advocated by some for patients who are unfit for surgery. It is reasonable to choose the best therapeutic method among varieties of treatment modalities according to patients' age, physical status, and financial aid to maximize the treatment effect among cancer control, patient morbidity, and preservation of renal function.

  19. Effectiveness of brachytherapy in treating carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohar, Surjeet; Hoffstetter, Sylvette; Peiffert, Didier; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Pernot, Monique

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapeutic management of vulvar cancer often incorporates brachytherapy as a portion of the treatment regimen. However, few studies using this modality alone to manage vulvar cancer have been published. Methods and Materials: Thirty four patients were treated with iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) brachytherapy for vulvar cancer between 1975 and 1993 at Centre Alexis Vautrin. Twenty-one patients were treated at first presentation when surgery was contraindicated or declined. Of these patients, 12 had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Classification Stage III or IV disease, 8 were Stage II, 1 was Stage I, and 1 was Stage 0. Thirteen patients were treated for recurrent disease. Paris system rules for implantation and dose prescription were followed. The median reference dose was 60 Gy (range 53 to 88 Gy). At the time of analysis, 10 of 34 patients were alive. Median follow-up in these 10 patients was 31 months (range: 21 months to 107 months). Fourteen of the 24 deaths were from causes other than vulvar cancer. Results: Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year local control was 47% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23 to 73%) and 5-year actuarial loco-regional control was 45% (95% CI = 21 to 70%). Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival was 56% (95% CI = 33 to 76%) and actuarial 5-year survival was 29% (95% CI = 15 to 49%). Median time to death was 14 months. Subset analysis revealed a higher actuarial 5-year local control in patients treated at first presentation than those treated for recurrence (80 vs. 19%, log rank, p = 0.04). Similarly, actuarial 5-year loco-regional control was higher in patients treated at first presentation (80 vs. 16%, log rank, p 0.01). The two groups did not differ significantly in disease-specific or overall survival. The actuarial 5-year disease specific survival of 56% is somewhat less than the expected 5-year disease-specific survival after surgery in a group having a similar proportion of early stage

  20. Cathepsin B trafficking in thyroid carcinoma cells

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    Tedelind Sofia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in prohormone processing initiated in the follicle lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space in thyroid cancer tissue, and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through e.g. extracellular matrix degradation. Methods Transport of cathepsin B in normal thyroid epithelial and carcinoma cells was investigated through immunolocalization of endogenous cathepsin B in combination with probing protease activity. Transport analyses of cathepsin B-eGFP and its active-site mutant counterpart cathepsin B-C29A-eGFP were used to test whether intrinsic sequences of a protease influence its trafficking. Results Our approach employing activity based probes, which distinguish between active and inactive cysteine proteases, demonstrated that both eGFP-tagged normal and active-site mutated cathepsin B chimeras reached the endo-lysosomal compartments of thyroid epithelial cells, thereby ruling out alterations of sorting signals by mutagenesis of the active-site cysteine. Analysis of chimeric protein trafficking further showed that GFP-tagged cathepsin B was transported to the expected compartments, i.e. endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and endo-lysosomes of normal and thyroid carcinoma cell lines. However, the active-site mutated cathepsin B chimera was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi of KTC-1 and HTh7 cells. Hence the latter, as the least polarized of the three carcinoma cell lines analyzed, exhibited severe transport defects in that it retained chimeras in pre-endolysosomal compartments. Furthermore, secretion of endogenous cathepsin B and of other cysteine peptidases, which occurs at the apical pole of normal thyroid epithelial cells, was most prominent and occurred in a non-directed fashion in thyroid

  1. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA FOOT WITH ILIOINGUINAL LYMPHADENOPATHY : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the foot is rare. This carcinoma of the foot may arise from a precursor lesion or may be secondary. Squamous cell carcinoma of the foot may resemble verrucous carcinoma or there can be distinct verrucous carcinoma of the foot or epithelioma cuniculatum. We reporting a case of 45 years old male patient developed squamous cell carcinoma over marjolins ulcer and develop ilio - inguinal lymphadenopathy after 1 month of malignancy. We have done below knee amputation and ilioinguinal block dissection

  2. Treatment of localised renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, Hein; Becker, Frank; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Gill, Inderbir S.; Janetschek, Gunther; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Laguna, M. Pilar; Marberger, Michael; Montorsi, Francesco; Polascik, Thomas J.; Ukimura, Osamu; Zhu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence of localised renal cell carcinoma (RCC) over the last 3 decades and controversy over mortality rates have prompted reassessment of current treatment. To critically review the recent data on the management of localised RCC to arrive at a general consensus. A Medline search

  3. Granuloma Inguinale Simulating Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Z Mani

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of extensive granuloma inguinale simulating squamous cell carcinoma is described. There was past history of urethritis leading to a urethral fistula. The ulcer healed almost completely within 19 days of receiving streptomycin injections. The patient had associated scabies and presumably also had latent syphillis (His VDRL was reactive in 1:8 dilution. The patient belonged to Madhya Pradesh.

  4. Merkel cell carcinoma masquerading as a chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Nigel G; Brownstein, Seymour; Jordan, David R

    2007-06-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented with a large rapidly growing violaceous mass initially diagnosed as a chalazion. Histopathologic examination disclosed Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Radiotherapy was not tolerated. Despite chemotherapy, she succumbed to widespread metastases 13 months later. MCC must be included in the differential diagnosis of solitary eyelid nodules, requiring early and aggressive treatment.

  5. Optical coherence tomography of basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yücel, D.; Themstrup, L.; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignancy in Caucasians. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology using the principle of interferometry. OCT has shown a great potential in diagnosing, monitoring, and follow-up of BCC. So far most...

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma in bladder extrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral-Ribeiro, J; Silva, C; Sousa, L; Pérez García, D; Ribeiro dos Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    Bladder extrophy is a rare congenital malformation that nowadays is surgically corrected in neonatal period. We present a case report of a 71-year-old male with a verrucous squamous cell carcinoma arising in a classical uncorrected form of bladder extrophy.

  7. Novel treatment strategies in clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronsen, D.J. van; Weijer, K.J.M. de; Mulders, P.F.A.; Mulder, P.H.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) is highly resistant to cytotoxic agents or hormones and is currently mainly treated with cytokine-based therapy. Transient responses and moderate survival advantages have been achieved in a subset of patients with these aspecific biological response modifiers.

  8. Immune cells and prognosis in HPV-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Camelia Nami; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Dalianis, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Currently, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) are treated based on the traditional TNM-classification, although this scheme might be inadequate for the subgroup of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated OPSCCs. It remains debatable whether this subgroup of patients with favorable progn...

  9. Swallowing outcomes for patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary (chemo)radiation therapy receiving either prophylactic gastrostomy or reactive nasogastric tube: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, D; Coward, S; Fitzgerald, A; Paleri, V; Moor, J W; Patterson, J M

    2017-12-01

    There is currently no consensus on the optimal feeding route for an oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPSCC) patient without pre-existing dysphagia undergoing chemoradiotherapy. This study aimed to compare the swallowing outcomes for OPSCC patients fed via either prophylactic RIG (pRIG) or reactive nasogastric tube (rNGT). A prospective cohort study. Four head and neck cancer centres in the North of England Cancer Network. Fifty-three participants with OPSCC, on a normal diet pre-(chemo) radiotherapy. Swallowing outcomes for patients with rNGT and pRIG were compared using the following outcome measures administered prospectively at pre-treatment, three and 12 months post-treatment: MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), Performance Status Scales (Normalcy of Diet), timed water swallow test. Twenty-three patients received pRIG while 30 were planned for a rNGT. No differences in demographics were found between the groups. The rNGT group had a clinically significant higher score on MDADI at 12 months post-treatment. No significant difference was found on a timed water swallow test or diet texture scale. There is no statistical difference for swallowing outcomes in either group. However, patients' in the rNGT group reported a clinically meaningful difference at 1 year, with a trend for them to do better across all measures. Neither group returned to their baseline swallowing function. Further research with a larger sample size is indicated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Utilization and incorporation of tumor volume data in staging and prognostication of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Ahlawat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC are a group of heterogeneous tumors, evident by their diverse behavior and natural history. The largest diameter of tumor measured for T classification may not necessarily reflect the true tumor dimension. There is a need to take into account certain other feature(s of these tumors other than the maximum single dimension which can reflect the true tumor burden more accurately. Tumor volume has been shown to be a useful and accurate tool burden because it is a measurement of tumor burden in all three dimensions. This review article has compiled and reviewed the literature published in past on impact of tumor volumes (TVs on the prognosis of head and neck cancers. A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed for terms "clonogens," "TV" or "primary TV (PTV" or "nodal volume" or "total TV (TTV" or "volumetric analysis of TV in head and neck" or "predicting response in head and neck cancer" "prognostic factors head and neck cancers" and "outcome in head and neck cancer." We identified 33 studies which have commented on the impact of TV in HNSCC on treatment outcome, 9 of these had analyzed PTV, 11 studies had analyzed total nodal volume, and 14 studies have analyzed TTV. Besides these, we have dealt with laryngeal cancers separately with 9 studies. This review article is also aimed to enhance our knowledge further regarding how best a physician can incorporate TV data in staging and predicting response to radiotherapy.

  11. A case of small cell cancer of the breast in a male with synchronous stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Matt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC are extremely rare. Most reports indicate success with therapy directed at the tumor as if it was pulmonary small cell carcinoma Primary small cell carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon form of EPSCC. Differentiating between a primary small cell carcinoma of the breast from metastatic disease to the breast is very important. According to the literature, there have been approximately 70 cases reported worldwide. Of these cases, only two cases are documented in men. Prognosis is varied and depends on stage of disease at presentation. A combination of surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation is required to adequately treat patients with small cell carcinoma of the breast. We present a case of a male patient diagnosed with stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma first and then subsequently diagnosed with a concurrent small cell carcinoma of the breast responding to treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiation.

  12. Immunosuppressive Environment in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Silje Haukali; Nielsen, Patricia S; Gjerdrum, Lise M R

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between tumour survival tactics and anti-tumour immune response is a major determinant for cancer growth. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) contribute to tumour immune escape, but their role in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is not understood. The fraction of T-regs among T cells was analysed...... by immunohistochemistry followed by automated image analysis in facial BCC, peritumoural skin and normal, buttock skin. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed for FOXP3 and cytokines involved in T-reg attraction and T-cell activation. T-regs comprised 45% of CD4-cells surrounding BCC. FOXP3 was highly...

  13. CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A PANTHER CHAMELEON (FURCIFER PARDALIS) AND TREATMENT WITH CARBOPLATIN IMPLANTABLE BEADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James G; Naples, Lisa M; Chu, Caroline; Kinsel, Michael J; Flower, Jennifer E; Van Bonn, William G

    2016-09-01

    A 3-yr-old male panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) presented with bilateral raised crusted skin lesions along the lateral body wall that were found to be carcinoma in situ and squamous cell carcinoma. Similar lesions later developed on the caudal body wall and tail. A subcutaneous implantable carboplatin bead was placed in the first squamous cell carcinoma lesion identified. Additional new lesions sampled were also found to be squamous cell carcinomas, and viral polymerase chain reaction was negative for papillomaviruses and herpesviruses. Significant skin loss would have resulted from excision of all the lesions, so treatment with only carboplatin beads was used. No adverse effects were observed. Lesions not excised that were treated with beads decreased in size. This is the first description of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and treatment with carboplatin implantable beads in a panther chameleon.

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the larynx: results of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, J.; Juergens, A.; Musulen, E.; Lacasta, A.; Guedea, F.; Quer, M.; Leon, X.; Lopez Pousa, A.; Lerma, E.

    1994-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor of the larynx. Since this lesion was first described, only 58 cases have been reported in the literature. Between December 1985 and March 1992, five patients with small cell carcinoma of the larynx were treated at the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau in Barcelona, Spain. One patient was treated with radiation therapy alone, three patients with chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and one patient with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Local and distant control was achieved in only one patient who was observed for 12 months after radiation therapy. Four patients died, one of local disease without distant metastasis at 6 months following treatment, one of local and distant disease at 53 months after radiation therapy, and two of distant metastasis without local disease at 22 and 36 months following treatment. In spite of the fact that only one of the five patients presented in this series is alive and free of disease 12 months following treatment, recent published information suggests that chemotherapy and radiotherapy are currently the most effective form of therapy for small cell carcinoma of the larynx. 16 Refs

  15. Long-term results and prognostic factors in patients with stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy from a single institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudaka, Wataru; Nagai, Yutaka; Toita, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) incorporating high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a lower cumulative radiotherapy (RT) protocol and analyzed prognostic risk factors for survival among patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. Ninety-nine patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC of the cervix between 1997 and 2008 were treated with CCRT using cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 3 weeks or 40 mg/m 2 weekly. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Median age was 53.5 years. Median follow-up period was 58 months (range 6-170 months). Pathologically complete response was achieved in 93 patients (96.9%). The 5-year OS and DFS were 72.0 and 69.3%, respectively. The 5-year local and distant DFS were 83.0 and 75.1%, respectively. Thirty-one patients (31.3%) experienced recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and pretreatment hemoglobin level remained an independent risk factor for OS and DFS. Acute toxicity was moderate. In terms of late adverse effects, 2 patients (2.0%) suffered from grade 4 late intestinal toxicity because of radiation enterocolitis, with both requiring intestinal surgery. Our study demonstrates that the CCRT schedule in patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC is efficacious and safe. In addition, the assessment of tumor size and pretreatment anemia can provide valuable prognostic information. (author)

  16. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  17. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulos, Christos; Mantas, Dimitris; Philipidis, T; Kouskos, Efstatios; Antonopoulou, Zoi; Hatzinikolaou, Ml; Gogas, Helen

    2008-04-29

    Glycogen-rich carcinoma of the breast is a rare histological subtype of breast cancer, usually reported to have poor prognosis. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent a mastectomy for a 3.5 cm clinically palpable left breast carcinoma, originally diagnosed as fibroadenoma on a screening mammogram four years before presentation. Diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on certain histological characteristics of the tumour and immunohistochemical analysis (PAS staining, keratins AE1/AE3, EMA, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, melanosomes, vimentin, Chromogranin, Synaptophysin, S-100, SMA). No lymph node metastasis was found and as the tumour was ER positive and PgR negative, patient was treated only with an aromatase inhibitor upfront and remains free of disease 48 months now since operation. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor, its clinical behavior reported to be rather aggressive so far, might varies depending on special characteristics such as low grade and strongly positive ER expression.

  18. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzinikolaou ML

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen-rich carcinoma of the breast is a rare histological subtype of breast cancer, usually reported to have poor prognosis. Case presentation We present the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent a mastectomy for a 3.5 cm clinically palpable left breast carcinoma, originally diagnosed as fibroadenoma on a screening mammogram four years before presentation. Diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on certain histological characteristics of the tumour and immunohistochemical analysis (PAS staining, keratins AE1/AE3, EMA, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, melanosomes, vimentin, Chromogranin, Synaptophysin, S-100, SMA. No lymph node metastasis was found and as the tumour was ER positive and PgR negative, patient was treated only with an aromatase inhibitor upfront and remains free of disease 48 months now since operation. Conclusion Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor, its clinical behavior reported to be rather aggressive so far, might varies depending on special characteristics such as low grade and strongly positive ER expression

  19. MCPIP1 contributes to clear cell renal cell carcinomas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Janusz; Marona, Paulina; Gach, Natalia; Lipert, Barbara; Miekus, Katarzyna; Wilk, Waclaw; Jaszczynski, Janusz; Stelmach, Andrzej; Loboda, Agnieszka; Dulak, Jozef; Branicki, Wojciech; Rys, Janusz; Jura, Jolanta

    2017-08-01

    Monocyte Chemoattractant protein-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1), also known as Regnase-1, is encoded by the ZC3H12a gene, and it mediates inflammatory processes by regulating the stability of transcripts coding for proinflammatory cytokines and controlling activity of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP1. We found that MCPIP1 transcript and protein levels are strongly downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples, which were derived from patients surgically treated for renal cancer compared to surrounded normal tissues. Using Caki-1 cells as a model, we analyzed the role of MCPIP1 in cancer development. We showed that MCPIP1 expression depends on the proteasome activity; however, hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor 2 alfa (HIF2α) are key factors lowering MCPIP1 expression. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 negatively regulates HIF1α and HIF2α levels and in the case of the last one, the mechanism is based on the regulation of the half time of transcript coding for HIF2α. Enhanced expression of MCPIP1 in Caki-1 cells results in a downregulation of transcripts encoding VEGFA, GLUT1, and IL-6. Furthermore, MCPIP1 decreases the activity of mTOR and protein kinase B (Akt) in normoxic conditions. Taken together, MCPIP1 contributes to the ccRCC development.

  20. Implant-retained skull prosthesis to cover a large defect of the hairy skull resulting from treatment of a basal cell carcinoma : A clinical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jitske; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Visser, Anita

    Skin carcinoma, particularly basal cell carcinoma, and its treatment can result in large defects of the hairy skull. A 53-year-old man is described who was surgically treated for a large basal cell carcinoma invading the skin and underlying tissue at the top of the hairy skull. Treatment consisted

  1. Clinical analysis of ear carcinoma treated in the Department of Otolaryngology, Niigata University Hospital. Focus on correlation between treatment method and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Tomita, Masahiko; Takahashi, Sugata; Watanabe, Jun; Matsuyama, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-six patients of ear carcinoma treated in our department were clinically analyzed. Those ear carcinoma patients accounted for 3.5% of all head and neck carcinoma patients. The most common primary site was the external auditory canal (67%), followed by the middle ear (19%) and the auricle (14%). The mean age of the patients was 66 years old, and the male to female ratio was 3:2. The most common chief complaint of the external auditory canal and middle ear carcinoma was otorrhea followed by ear itching and ear ache. Of patients with external auditory canal carcinoma and middle ear carcinoma, 26% had a history of ear surgery, and 35% had a habit of ear-picking. Histopathologically, 94% of the patients were squamous cell carcinoma, and 6% were malignant melanoma. Sixty-two % of squamous cell carcinoma patients underwent surgery, and the remaining 38% had radiotherapy without surgery. Postoperative radiotherapy was added for 67% of the surgery group. Five-year survival rates of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma were 74% for external auditory canal carcinoma, 67% for auricular carcinoma, and 34% for middle ear carcinoma, respectively. The five-year survival rate of the surgery group was 82%, and that of the non-surgery group was 29%. There was a statistical significance between the two groups. No statistical significance was seen between with and without postoperative radiotherapy. In the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma in the ear, radical en bloc surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy was considered to be an appropriate treatment strategy. (author)

  2. Human glioblastoma and carcinoma xenograft tumors treated by combined radiation and imatinib (Gleevec {sup registered})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, S.; Krempien, R.; Lindel, K.; Zabel, A.; Milker-Zabel, S.; Bischof, M.; Lipson, K.E.; Peschke, P.; Debus, J.; Abdollahi, A.; Huber, P.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, and Univ. of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: imatinib (Gleevec {sup registered}, Glivec {sup registered}) is an inhibitor of {alpha}-and {beta}-platelet-derived growth factor receptors and other tyrosine kinases, that are also associated with the function of growth factors. Imatinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors and is under investigation for the therapy of several other malignant tumors. Since radiotherapy is an important treatment option in many tumors, combined effects of imatinib and radiation were analyzed here. Material and methods: in vitro, U87 cells (human glioblastoma), A431 cells (human epidermoid carcinoma), and HUVECs (human umbilical, venous endothelial cells) were treated with imatinib alone and in combination with radiation. Clonogenic survival and cell proliferation were determined with and without additional radiation (0-10 Gy). In vivo, U87 and A431 cells (5 x 10{sup 6}) were subcutaneously injected into hind limbs of balb c nu/u mice. Drug and radiation treatments started on day 0 when tumor volumes were approximately 400-500 mm{sup 3}. Tumors were treated with 5 x 5 Gy (U87) or 6 x 5 Gy (A431) on consecutive days from day 0. Imatinib was administered orally via the mouse diet starting on day 0 until the end of observation. Tumor growth and microvessel density (CD31 IHC) were analyzed. Results: in vitro, imatinib increased radiosensitivity of U87 and A431 tumor cells as well as HUVECs in both clonogenic and cell number/proliferation assays. The enhancement of radiosensitivity in HUVECs was comparable to that observed in the tumor cells. In vivo, the concurrent and continuous administration of imatinib increased tumor growth delay of fractionated radiotherapy in the carcinoma and the glioblastoma models at reduced microvessel densities. No apparent additional toxicity by the combination of radiation and imatinib versus monotherapies was observed in terms of weight, skin, or general behavior

  3. Anal carcinoma - Survival and recurrence in a large cohort of patients treated according to Nordic guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leon, Otilia; Guren, Marianne; Hagberg, Oskar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment outcome in a large population-based cohort of patients with anal cancer treated according to Nordic guidelines. MATERIAL: Clinical data were collected on 1266 patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed from 2000 to 2007 in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. 886......-inclusion into a protocol were all independent factors associated with worse outcome. Among patients treated according to any of the protocols, the 3-year recurrence-free survival ranged from 63% to 76%, with locoregional recurrences in 17% and distant metastases in 11% of patients. The highest rate of inguinal recurrence...... of the patients received radiotherapy 54-64Gy with or without chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin or mitomycin) according to different protocols, stratified by tumor stage. RESULTS: High age, male gender, large primary tumor, lymph node metastases, distant metastases, poor performance status, and non...

  4. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudás, József; Fullár, Alexandra; Romani, Angela; Pritz, Christian; Kovalszky, Ilona; Hans Schartinger, Volker; Mathias Sprinzl, Georg; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells

  5. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  6. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  7. RENAL MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS: RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Giachini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of malignant kidney tumors, to contribute to identifying factors which the diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas. Through this study, we understand that kidney disease over the years had higher incidence rates, especially in adults in the sixth decade of life. The renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the third most common malignancy of the genitourinary tract, affecting 2% to 3% of the population. There are numerous ways of diagnosis; however, the most important are ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In general most of the patients affected by the CCR, have a good prognosis when diagnosed early and subjected to an effective treatment. This study conducted a literature review about the CCR, through this it was possible to understand the development needs of the imaging methods used for precise diagnosis and classification of RCC through the TNM system.

  8. ELF5 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongchao; Qiu, Linglin; Xie, Xiaolei; Yang, He; Liu, Yongli; Lin, Xiaoman; Huang, Hongxiang

    2017-03-01

    The expression of E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and its effects on biological behavior in ovarian carcinoma cells were assessed in search for a new approach for gene treatment of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. RT-PCR technology was applied to detect the expression of ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (n=49), borderline ovarian epithelial tumor (n=19), benign ovarian epithelial tumor (n=31) and normal ovarian tissues (n=40). Then, we transfected recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1‑ELF5+EGFP into human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells (recombinant plasmid group) in vitro and screened out stably transfected cells to conduct multiplication culture. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of ELF5 protein in the different groups. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell apoptosis and cycles. ELF5 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma and borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues were significantly lower (Povarian epithelial tumor and normal ovarian tissues. ELF5 protein expression in the cells of recombinant plasmid group was significantly higher compared with empty plasmid and blank control groups. The capacity of cell reproductive recombinant plasmid group at each time point decreased (Povarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells and promoted apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells inhibiting their growth and invasive capacity; and thus providing a new approach to gene treatment of ovarian carcinoma.

  9. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ichinokawa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118–1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124–125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  10. Papillary renal cell carcinoma in allograft kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Catherine; El Ghali, Sofiane; Buy, Xavier; Gangi, Afshin; Lindner, Veronique

    2005-01-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma is a subgroup of malignant renal epithelial neoplasms. Its occurrence in allograft transplanted kidney has not been debated in the literature. We report two pathologically proven cases and discuss the clinical hypothesis for such neoplasms and the aspect on MR images. The paramagnetic effect of the iron associated with an absence of signal coming from calcifications is a plausible explanation for this unusual hypointense appearance on T2-weighted sequence. (orig.)

  11. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  12. Comprehensive Cytomorphologic Analysis of Pulmonary Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Comparison to Small Cell Carcinoma and Non-pulmonary Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokhwi Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytologic diagnosis of pulmonary adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC is frequently challenging and differential diagnosis with small cell carcinoma is often difficult. Methods: Eleven cytologically diagnosed cases of pulmonary AdCC were collected and reviewed according to fifteen cytomorphologic characteristics: small cell size, cellular uniformity, coarse chromatin, hyperchromasia, distinct nucleolus, frequent nuclear molding, granular cytoplasm, organoid cluster, sheet formation, irregular border of cluster, hyaline globule, hyaline basement membrane material, individual cell necrosis or apoptotic body, and necrotic background. Twenty cases of small cell carcinoma and fifteen cases of non-pulmonary AdCC were also reviewed for the comparison. Results: Statistically significant differences were identified between pulmonary AdCC and small cell carcinoma in fourteen of the fifteen cytomorphologic criteria (differences in sheet formation were not statistically significant. Cellular uniformity, distinct nucleolus, granular cytoplasm, distinct cell border, organoid cluster, hyaline globule, and hyaline basement membrane material were characteristic features of AdCC. Frequent nuclear molding, individual cell necrosis, and necrotic background were almost exclusively identified in small cell carcinoma. Although coarse chromatin and irregular cluster border were observed in both, they favored the diagnosis of small cell carcinoma. Hyaline globules were more frequently seen in non-pulmonary AdCC cases. Conclusions: Using the fifteen cytomorphologic criteria described by this study, pulmonary AdCC could be successfully distinguished from small cell carcinoma. Such a comprehensive approach to an individual case is recommended for the cytologic diagnosis of pulmonary AdCC.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Breast Augmentation Scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lisa R; Cresce, Nicole D; Russell, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with a persistent lesion on the inferior right breast. The lesion was located within the scar from a breast augmentation procedure 12 years ago. The lesion had been treated as several conditions with no improvement. Biopsy revealed a superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma, and the lesion was successfully removed with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a surgical scar is exceedingly rare with only 13 reported cases to date. This is the first reported case of basal cell carcinoma arising in a breast augmentation scar. We emphasize the importance of biopsy for suspicious lesions or those refractory to treatment, particularly those lesions that form within a scar. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  14. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  15. Merkel cell carcinoma: our experience in this rare pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Pablo; Junquera, Luis; Vivanco, Blanca; García-Consuegra, Luis; Gallego, Lorena

    2011-09-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) was first described in 1972 by Toker, who described five cases of the so-called "trabecular carcinoma of the skin ". MCC is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that affects mainly the elderly. Sun exposed areas are mainly affected, specially the head and neck. Immunohistochemical analysis is essential to reach a correct diagnosis. According to the origin of MCC, the tumor expresses both epithelial and neuroendocrine markers. MCC has a propensity for recurrence, regional and distant metastases. Several treatment options are available, such as surgical excision or Moh's surgery, accompanied by neck dissection or radio and chemotherapy in advanced cases. The present study aims to evaluate the clinical behaviour and the evolution of five cases of this disease that were treated at our institution (reference to 1100000 inhabitants) in the last five years. It is stressed on the bad prognosis of this pathology, which presents high rates of locoregional recurrence, even though the recent advances in radio and chemotherapy.

  16. Recurrent ovarian undifferentiated carcinoma resembling hepatoid morphology treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Kashima, Kastunori; Yachida, Nozomi; Motoyama, Teiichi; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    Hepatoid carcinomas are undifferentiated epithelial carcinomas that are pathologically similar to hepatocellular carcinoma, but occur in a variety of organs. Hepatoid carcinomas, as strictly defined, typically produce α-fetoprotein. In addition, a standard effective chemotherapy regimen for hepatoid carcinoma has yet to be established. We present a case of advanced primary ovarian cancer that was pathologically similar to hepatoid carcinoma without staining for α-fetoprotein or hepatocyte paraffin 1. The primary ovarian, metastatic, and recurrent tumors shared similar pathological characteristics. Fourth-line chemotherapy with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab was effective in treating the recurrent tumor, even though this disease had recurred three times. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Verrucous carcinoma of the cervix and vagina treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Twiggs, L.B.; Okagaki, T.; Adcock, L.L.; Prem, K.A.; Potish, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Seven cases of verrocous carcinoma of the uterine cervix (five) and vagina (two) were reviewed. Four of the five patients managed primarily with radiation therapy have survived a median of 10 years. Of the two patients managed primarily with surgery, one experienced recurrence and was then successfully treated with radiation therapy; the other died of metastatic carcinoma. No anaplastic transformation of lesions or distant metastases occurred in the patients treated with radiation therapy. Human papilloma virus was isolated in two patients

  18. The prognostic value of the hypoxia markers CA IX and GLUT 1 and the cytokines VEGF and IL 6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goethals Laurence

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis, play a critical role in tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. A major question remains if these markers can be used to stratify patients to certain treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship and the prognostic significance of several biological and clinicopathological parameters in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Methods We used two subgroups of a retrospective series for which CT-determined tumoral perfusion correlated with local control. In the first subgroup (n = 67, immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1 was performed on the pretreatment tumor biopsy. In the second subgroup (n = 34, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine pretreatment levels of the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in serum. Correlation was investigated between tumoral perfusion and each of these biological markers, as well as between the markers mutually. The prognostic value of these microenvironmental parameters was also evaluated. Results For CA IX and GLUT-1, the combined assessment of patients with both markers expressed above the median showed an independent correlation with local control (p = 0.02 and disease-free survival (p = 0.04 with a trend for regional control (p = 0.06. In the second subgroup, IL-6 pretreatment serum level above the median was the only independent predictor of local control (p = 0.009, disease-free survival (p = 0.02 and overall survival (p = 0.005. Conclusion To our knowledge, we are the first to report a link in HNSCC between IL-6 pretreatment serum levels and radioresistance in vivo. This link is supported by the strong prognostic association of pretreatment IL-6 with local control, known to be

  19. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Bae, Kyounghwa; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non–small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray’s proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control

  20. The prognostic value of the hypoxia markers CA IX and GLUT 1 and the cytokines VEGF and IL 6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Schutter, Harlinde; Landuyt, Willy; Verbeken, Erik; Goethals, Laurence; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis, play a critical role in tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. A major question remains if these markers can be used to stratify patients to certain treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship and the prognostic significance of several biological and clinicopathological parameters in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. We used two subgroups of a retrospective series for which CT-determined tumoral perfusion correlated with local control. In the first subgroup (n = 67), immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) was performed on the pretreatment tumor biopsy. In the second subgroup (n = 34), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine pretreatment levels of the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum. Correlation was investigated between tumoral perfusion and each of these biological markers, as well as between the markers mutually. The prognostic value of these microenvironmental parameters was also evaluated. For CA IX and GLUT-1, the combined assessment of patients with both markers expressed above the median showed an independent correlation with local control (p = 0.02) and disease-free survival (p = 0.04) with a trend for regional control (p = 0.06). In the second subgroup, IL-6 pretreatment serum level above the median was the only independent predictor of local control (p = 0.009), disease-free survival (p = 0.02) and overall survival (p = 0.005). To our knowledge, we are the first to report a link in HNSCC between IL-6 pretreatment serum levels and radioresistance in vivo. This link is supported by the strong prognostic association of pretreatment IL-6 with local control, known to be the most important parameter to judge radiotherapy

  1. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myskowski, P.L.; Gumpertz, E.; Safai, B.

    1985-03-01

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results.

  2. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myskowski, P.L.; Gumpertz, E.; Safai, B.

    1985-01-01

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, F T

    2012-01-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma ofthe anal canal represents 1.5% of all malignancies affectingthe gastrointestinal tract. Over the past 20 years dramatic changes have been seen in both the epidemiological distribution of the disease and in the therapeutic modalities utilised to manage it. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT: Historically abdominoperineal resection had been the treatment of choice with local resection reserved for early stage disease. Work by Nigro et al. has revolutionised how we currently manage carcinoma of the anal canal, demonstrating combined modality chemoradiotherapy as an appropriate alternative to surgical resection with the benefit of preserving sphincter function. Surgery is then reserved for recurrent disease with salvage abdominoperineal resection. This article reviews current literature and highlights the changing therapeutic modalities with selected clinical cases

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Dorsal Hand: An Update and Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Rubin, Ashley G; Brian Jiang, Shang I

    2016-04-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary predisposing factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, surprisingly, BCCs occur very rarely on the dorsal hand, which is subject to intense sun exposure, and their infrequent presentation in this location suggests that other factors besides UVR may play a role in BCC pathogenesis. Because dorsal hand BCCs are uncommon, knowledge of their characteristics is limited, and more data are needed to describe their clinical presentation and treatment. To perform an updated review of the literature on the management of dorsal hand BCCs. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review by searching the PubMed database with the key phrases "basal cell carcinoma dorsal hand," "basal cell carcinoma hand," and "basal cell carcinoma finger," and "basal cell carcinoma thumb." The authors identified 176 cases of dorsal hand BCCs in the literature, 120 of which had sufficient data for analysis. Only 4 cases were treated with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The authors present 14 additional cases of dorsal hand BCCs treated with MMS. Basal cell carcinomas on the dorsal hand occur infrequently, and potential risk factors include being a male of white descent and personal history of skin cancer. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be an effective treatment method.

  5. New treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Kevin; Fang, Chunhui; Wu, Shenhong

    2017-02-02

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Agents targeting angiogenesis have played a primary role in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy almost always occurs, and major progress has been made in understanding its underlying molecular mechanism. Axitinib and everolimus have been used extensively in patients whom have had disease progression after prior anti-angiogenesis therapy. Recently, several new agents have been shown to improve overall survival in comparison with everolimus. This review provides an in-depth summary of drugs employable in the clinical setting, the rationale to their use, and the studies conducted leading to their approval for use and provides perspective on the paradigm shift in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Highlighted are the newly approved agents cabozantinib, nivolumab, and lenvatinib for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  6. New treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Zarrabi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Angiogenesis is a critical process in the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Agents targeting angiogenesis have played a primary role in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy almost always occurs, and major progress has been made in understanding its underlying molecular mechanism. Axitinib and everolimus have been used extensively in patients whom have had disease progression after prior anti-angiogenesis therapy. Recently, several new agents have been shown to improve overall survival in comparison with everolimus. This review provides an in-depth summary of drugs employable in the clinical setting, the rationale to their use, and the studies conducted leading to their approval for use and provides perspective on the paradigm shift in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Highlighted are the newly approved agents cabozantinib, nivolumab, and lenvatinib for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  7. A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Geun; Yang, Youngro; Kim, Kwang Sik; Hyun, Chang Lim; Lee, Ji Shin; Koh, Gwanpyo; Lee, Daeho

    2011-08-01

    Metastasis to the thyroid gland from distant cancer is rare, and, in some cases, is a diagnostic challenge. Here, we report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. A 77-year-old man presented with a neck mass detected about 1 month previously. He had undergone a right nephrectomy owing to renal cell carcinoma 14 years previously. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a few atypical follicular cells with nuclear atypia. Under a tentative diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma, a total thyroidectomy was performed. The histologic and immunohistochemical studies of the surgical specimens indicated that the thyroid masses were metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the thyroid.

  8. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma mimicking a superficial spreading melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbún Acuña, Paula; Cullen Aravena, Roberto; Maturana Donaire, César; Ares Mora, Raúl; Porras Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-20

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, especially in elderly people. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a rare subtype and has been described in the literature as a nodular and hyperpigmented lesion; rarely, it can appear as an extensive pigmented plate, which may be clinically indistinguishable from superficial spreading melanoma and Bowen disease. Dermatoscopy has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. When Menzies criteria are used; however, the final diagnosis is made by histopathology. The objective of the present report is to analyze the case of a patient with pigmented basal cell carcinoma simulating a superficial spreading melanoma.

  9. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  10. Notch signaling is significantly suppressed in basal cell carcinomas and activation induces basal cell carcinoma cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng-Tao; Yu, Mei; Zloty, David; Bell, Robert H; Wang, Eddy; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Leung, Gigi; Haegert, Anne; Carr, Nicholas; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2017-04-01

    A subset of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are directly derived from hair follicles (HFs). In some respects, HFs can be defined as 'ordered' skin appendage growths, while BCCs can be regarded as 'disordered' skin appendage growths. The aim of the present study was to examine HFs and BCCs to define the expression of common and unique signaling pathways in each skin appendage. Human nodular BCCs, along with HFs and non‑follicular skin epithelium from normal individuals, were examined using microarrays, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, BCC cells and root sheath keratinocyte cells from HFs were cultured and treated with Notch signaling peptide Jagged1 (JAG1). Gene expression, protein levels, and cell apoptosis susceptibility were assessed using qPCR, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry, respectively. Specific molecular mechanisms were found to be involved in the process of cell self‑renewal in the HFs and BCCs, including Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways. However, several key Notch signaling factors showed significant differential expression in BCCs compared with HFs. Stimulating Notch signaling with JAG1 induced apoptosis of BCC cells by increasing Fas ligand expression and downstream caspase-8 activation. The present study showed that Notch signaling pathway activity is suppressed in BCCs, and is highly expressed in HFs. Elements of the Notch pathway could, therefore, represent targets for the treatment of BCCs and potentially in hair follicle engineering.

  11. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  12. Induction of trismus by sunitinib and pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhima Iyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors sunitinib and pazopanib are used as first-line agents in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Treatment-related toxicities have been described with both these drugs. This report describes a patient with metastatic renal carcinoma who developed trismus while being treated with these agents and is, to the best of our knowledge, the first such case to be reported.

  13. Effect of treatment dose reductions in the setting of hand-foot syndrome on survival outcomes in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Erin B; Merriman, Joseph; Maughan, Benjamin; Poole, Austin; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Agarwal, Archana M; Batten, Julia A; Patel, Shiven B; Pal, Sumanta K; Stenehjem, David D; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2018-04-01

    Purpose Hand-foot syndrome is a common dose limiting toxicity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors used for treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The effect of treatment dose reductions, in the context of hand-foot syndrome, on survival outcomes is reported. Methods This was a retrospective case series of patients receiving vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors from 1 January 2004 to 31 October 2013. The main outcomes were progression-free and overall survival in these patients experiencing hand-foot syndrome and undergoing treatment dose reductions. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted utilizing Kaplan-Meier method and COX Proportional Hazard model with landmark analyses at 2 months. Results Of the 120 patients evaluated, treatment dose reductions for any reason were required in 68 (56.7%) patients. The most common reasons for treatment dose reductions were mucositis, hand-foot syndrome, and fatigue. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were significantly longer in patients with hand-foot syndrome with or without treatment dose reductions as compared to those without hand-foot syndrome. Conclusions An improvement in survival outcomes was observed in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with treatment-associated hand-foot syndrome despite treatment dose reductions. These data need validation in a larger cohort to confirm the hypothesis that treatment dose reductions in the setting of hand-foot syndrome do not negatively impatient survival.

  14. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...... studies of vitamin D's effect on TCC cells in vitro are necessary before the efficacy of treatment with vitamin D analogues in TCC can be evaluated in patients....

  15. Focus on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venura Samarasinghe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs, which include basal and squamous cell cancers are the most common human cancers. BCCs have a relatively low metastatic rate and slow growth and are frequently underreported. Whilst there is a definite role of sunexposure in the pathogenesis of BCC, several additional complex genotypic, phenotypic and environmental factors are contributory. The high prevalence and the frequent occurrence of multiple primary BCC in affected individuals make them an important public health problem. This has led to a substantial increase in search for newer noninvasive treatments for BCC. Surgical excision with predetermined margins remains the mainstay treatment for most BCC. Of the newer non-invasive treatments only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established in the treatment of certain BCC subtypes, while the search for other more effective and tissue salvaging therapies continues. This paper focuses on the pathogenesis and management of BCC.

  16. [Expression of promyelocytic leukaemia protein in Bowen's disease, skin squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongyu; Ma, Huiqun; Wang, Shijie; Ma, Yunyun; Zou, Xingwei; Li, Ruilian

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the expression of promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein of PML protein in Bowen's disease (BD), skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and explore the role of PML in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PML protein in normal skin tissues and lesions of Bowen's disease, SCC and BCC were detected with immunohistochemistry. Normal skin tissues did not express PML protein. In BCC, PML showed rather low expressions in the skin lesions (8.69% in cell nuclei and 4.35% in cytoplasm). The lesions in BD and SCC (grade I and II) showed obvious overexpression of PML protein in the cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and its expression in the cell nuclei of these lesions was significantly higher than that in grade III-IV SCC. PML protein may play an important role in the early stage of SCC, and its overexpression may contribute to the carcinogenesis and metastasis of SCC.

  17. Chemotherapy for pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas : Does the regimen matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Jules L.; van Suylen, Robert Jan; Thunnissen, Erik; den Bakker, Michael A.; Groen, Harry J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Damhuis, Ronald A.; van den Broek, Esther C.; Speel, Ernst-Jan M.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.

    Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is rare. Chemotherapy for metastatic LCNEC ranges from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) regimens to nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) chemotherapy regimens. We analysed outcomes of chemotherapy treatments for LCNEC. The Netherlands Cancer

  18. The Inhibitory Effect of Ellagic Acid on Cell Growth of Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chiang Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellagic acid (EA is able to inhibit the growth of several cancer cells; however, its effect on human ovarian carcinoma cells has not yet been investigated. Ovarian carcinoma ES-2 and PA-1 cells were treated with EA (10~100 μM and assessed for viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, anoikis, autophagy, and chemosensitivity to doxorubicin and their molecular mechanisms. EA inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner by arresting both cell lines at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, which were from elevating p53 and Cip1/p21 and decreasing cyclin D1 and E levels. EA also induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis by increasing the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and restored anoikis in both cell lines. The enhancement of apoptosis and/or inhibition of autophagy in these cells by EA assisted the chemotherapy efficacy. The results indicated that EA is a potential novel chemoprevention and treatment assistant agent for human ovarian carcinoma.

  19. Effects of calcitriol, seocalcitol, and medium-chain triglyceride on a canine transitional cell carcinoma cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaewsakhorn, T.; Kisseberth, W.C.; Capen, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in dogs is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Calcitriol and its analog seocalcitol, combined with medium-chain triglyceride (MCT), have potential for the treatment of this disease. Materials and Methods: TCC cells were treated with calcitr...

  20. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Gillian; Cheng, Jed-Sian; Shapiro, Oleg; Nsouli, Imad

    2012-06-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with gross hematuria and irritative urinary symptoms. He underwent transurethral resection of his prostate. The prostate chips revealed 70% poorly differentiated carcinoma with neuroendocrine features, initially read as small cell carcinoma, later as basal cell carcinoma. PSA at this time was 0.3. He received 4 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin. After which, rebiopsy of the prostate showed tumor consistent with poorly differentiated basal cell carcinoma. Given progression on chemotherapy, decision was made to proceed with radical prostatectomy. Metastatic workup was negative. Gross extraprostatic invasion was noted but lymph nodes were free of metastatic disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  2. Overview of Hurthle cell carcinoma of thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Korzeniowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical behaviour of Hurthle cell carcinoma (HCC of the thyroid is variable and there are many controversies in the literature. Here, we summarize an up-to-date review of the literature on genetics, diagnosis (ultrasound scan, fine needle aspiration, frozen section, etc., and management. At presentation, treatment decision should be made by a multidisciplinary board. Recurrent HCCs are seldom curable despite salvage treatments, which include radioactive iodine ablation, radiofrequency ablation, ethanol ablation, external radiotherapy, and systemic therapy. Further research is needed to develop more efficacious systemic treatments. Currently, lenvatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib are available. The completed and ongoing clinical trials for HCC are summarized

  3. Soft tissue metastasis in basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Rajeev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common of the cutaneous malignancies, accounting for 65-75% of all skin cancers. The natural history of this disease is one of chronic local invasion. Metastatic BCC Is a rare clinical entity, with a reported incidence of only 0.0028-0.5%. Approximately 85% of all metastatic BCCs arise in the head and neck region. We present a case of BCC that spread to the muscles of the cheek and nodes (intraparotid and internal jugular, in a man who had a lesion near the inner canthus of his right eye and adjoining nasal bridge.

  4. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beggs, Rachel E

    2012-09-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater are rare and confer a very poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. There are few case reports of large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater in the literature and to date no studies have been done to establish optimal management. We describe a pooled case series from published reports of neuroendocrine carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater including a case which presented to our institution.

  5. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Acrokeratosis Paraneoplastica Associated with Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Squires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, or Bazex syndrome, is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by cutaneous psoriasiform lesions with associated acral erythema and scale, as well as nail changes, including onycholysis and ungual dystrophy. Its most advanced, severe form involves the trunk, elbows, and knees. It is typically associated with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies in males. Rare cases associated with gynecological cancers have been reported, including uterine adenocarcinoma, as well as ovarian and vulvar squamous cell carcinomas. Cutaneous manifestations often precede cancer diagnosis. In most reported cases, skin changes resolve when the underlying malignancy is adequately treated. Main Observations. We present the case of a 56-year-old female diagnosed with acrokeratosis paraneoplastica following the discovery of FIGO stage IIB cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Scaling, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, and fissuring were noted on the patient’s hands, feet, legs, arms, and lower back. Pitting was noted on her fingernails. Her cervical cancer was successfully treated with chemoradiotherapy, after which her cutaneous lesions persisted for two months before resolving. Conclusions. The presentation of acrokeratosis paraneoplastica in this context is atypical. Reports of associations with gynecological cancers, as in our patient’s case, are exceedingly rare.

  7. Papilloma viruses, warts, carcinoma and Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viac, J; Chardonnet, Y; Chignol, M C; Schmitt, D

    1993-01-01

    In human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, Langerhans cells (LC) are essential in the control of viral infection. The evolution of HPV-derived lesions in the normal population and in graft patients is drastically different, since a high proportion of papillomas progress towards malignancy in transplant recipients. We analyzed the distribution of markers of LC and T lymphocytes, the level of keratinocyte activation and the prevalence of HPV in a series of epithelial lesions obtained from the normal population and from graft patients. The local immune response of warts, condyloma acuminata, Bowen, basal and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) showed a moderate to intense inflammatory reaction of HLA-DR positive cells, the intensity of the immune reaction being correlated with the degree of malignancy. In the normal population, CD4-positive cells were mainly overexpressed in the dermal infiltrate of condyloma and malignant lesions, whereas in grafted patients such infiltrates were CD4- and CD8-positive without significant predominance of a single T cell subset. The epidermis of most lesions was characterized by a reduced number of CD1a-positive LC with an altered morphology. This was concomitant with the decrease or loss of beta 2-microglobulin by epithelial cells. HLA-DR antigen was sometimes expressed by keratinocytes in genital lesions and SCC from the normal population but has not been detected in immunosuppressed patients. Whereas in the normal population HPV infection was only detected in benign papillomas, both benign and oncogenic HPV DNA may be present in carcinomas from graft patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Factors influencing the treatment outcome for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Ichiro; Kanehira, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Aoki, Manabu; Takagi, Sayako; Shirahama, Jun; Honda, Chikara

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic factors affecting local outcomes for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy. A total of 48 patients with T2N0 squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1992 and 2005 were studied. Cumulative probability of overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control and larynx-preserving were calculated according the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic significance of patient's age, number of subsites involved, impaired cord mobility, anterior commisure involved, total dose and overall treatment time were analyzed using the log-rank test in univariate analysis and Cox regression in multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 13 to 141 months (median, 62 months). Five-year survivals were: overall, 95.3%; cause-specific, 97.9% and five years rates were local control, 61.4%; larynx-preserving, 76.4%. Multivariate analyses of the six parameters showed that overall treatment time significantly influenced the probability of local control, and impaired mobility and overall treatment time affected the probability of larynx-preserving. Our study showed that longer overall treatment time significantly worsened the percentage of local control and larynx-preserving for patients with T2N0 glottic carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy. Therefore, we suggest treating, the patients in a shorter treatment course. (author)

  9. Primary peritoneal clear cell carcinoma versus ovarian carcinoma versus malignant transformation of endometriosis: a vexing issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insabato, Luigi; Natella, Valentina; Somma, Anna; Persico, Marcello; Camera, Luigi; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Masone, Stefania

    2015-05-01

    Peritoneum is a site for both primary and secondary tumors. Primary peritoneal tumors are fairly rare. The most common primary tumors of the peritoneum are malignant mesothelioma and serous papillary adenocarcinoma. Clear cell carcinoma of the peritoneum is extremely rare and often misdiagnosed as mesothelioma, serous carcinoma, or metastatic adenocarcinoma, so it represents a diagnostic challenge for both clinicians and pathologists. Up to date, to the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases of primary peritoneal clear cell carcinoma have been reported in the English literature. Distinguishing this tumor of the peritoneum versus ovarian carcinoma can be problematic. Herein, we report a rare case of primary peritoneal clear cell carcinoma occurring in a 49-year-old woman, along with a review of the literature. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in Calabar | Asuquo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in Calabar. Maurice Asuquo, Gabriel Ugare, Bartholomew Odio, Godwin Ebughe. Abstract. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common malignancy of the skin. Risk factors advanced include ...

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva in Ilorin, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to determine the incidence of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma at UITH over an 11 – year period. Nineteen patients (11males and 8 females) had histological confirmation of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma out of 21 conjunctival specimens, representing 22.9% of all orbito-ocular tumours reviewed ...

  12. Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Cornea in a Child with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    exposed areas of the skin and eyes. Chronic sun exposure causes marked alterations in the skin leading to keratosis, telangiectasia, atrophy, and development of malignant tumors such as squamous cell carcinomas, (SCCs) basal cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibrosarcoma, etc.,. The pathogenesis in a majority of ...

  13. Suprahyoid approach to base-of-tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue has a poor prognosis.1,2 This is a result of late presentation and diagnostic difficulties. Apart from the fact that there are few early symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue, the symptoms are often nonspecific and physical examination of this area is ...

  14. induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular basis of arsenite (As +3 )-induced acute cytotoxicity in human cervical epithelial carcinoma cells. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... Methods: After performing cytotoxic assays on a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, expression analysis was done by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and ...

  15. Prognostic factors in invasive bladder carcinoma treated by combined modality protocol (organ-sparing approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Tadeja; Cufer, Tanja; Cervek, Jozica; Borstnar, Simona; Kragelj, Borut; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    2000-01-01

    from conservative treatment approach include those with good performance status, absence of hydronephrosis, and histologic low grade transitional cell carcinoma

  16. Intraventricular metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, I; Sava, Anca; Şapte, Elena; Mihailov, Claudia; Dumitrescu, Gabriela; Poeată, I; Sava, Florina; Haba, Danisia

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular tumors represent a diagnostic problem, due to a wide range of differential diagnosis, with an important variability of tumoral histological types in adult and pediatric population. Patient, Our case is represented by a patient, aged 48 years, without any history of significant personal pathology, accusing nausea, vomiting, and intensive headache. In the morning, he became confused, having hallucinations for a short period of time, and has accused drowsiness for several weeks. Imaging (CT and MRI) shows a neoformation in the third ventricle, accompanied by bilateral lateral ventricles dilatation, with predominantly annular enhancement. During surgery, through the middle third transcallosal interhemispheric approach, it was revealed a reddish, well-demarcated intraventricular mass, well vascularized and with a firm consistency. Final pathologic diagnosis was metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Initial postoperative evolution was good, and then neurological and respiratory condition worsened as a bronchopneumonia lead to patient's death in 12 days after surgery. Clear cell carcinoma metastasis located in the third ventricle should be taken into consideration for patients presenting a single intraventricular lesion even they have no documented primary malignancy.

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy for the infiltrative thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Shinji; Kitao, Takeshi (Kitagata National Sanatorium, Fukui (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    This report represents one case of infiltrative thymoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma of the lungs. A 69-year-old man suffered from infiltrative thymoma which reduced by the radiation therapy. Seven years later its replase and the onset of squamous cell carcinoma were found simultaneously. Infiltrative thymoma metastasized not only to the mediastinum but also to the liver and bronchus. Squamous cell carcinoma developed in the right upper lobe. In spite of chemotherapy against them, the patient died. There are many cases in which infiltrative thymoma is accompanied by squamous cell carcinoma of the lung simultaneously; however, secondary onset of squamous cell carcinoma after the radiation therapy of infiltrative thymoma is rare. Secondary carcinogenesis of this case was considered to be closely related with immunological abnormalities caused by thymoma, effects of radiation, smoking and so on. (author).

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy for the infiltrative thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Shinji; Kitao, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    This report represents one case of infiltrative thymoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma of the lungs. A 69-year-old man suffered from infiltrative thymoma which reduced by the radiation therapy. Seven years later its replase and the onset of squamous cell carcinoma were found simultaneously. Infiltrative thymoma metastasized not only to the mediastinum but also to the liver and bronchus. Squamous cell carcinoma developed in the right upper lobe. In spite of chemotherapy against them, the patient died. There are many cases in which infiltrative thymoma is accompanied by squamous cell carcinoma of the lung simultaneously; however, secondary onset of squamous cell carcinoma after the radiation therapy of infiltrative thymoma is rare. Secondary carcinogenesis of this case was considered to be closely related with immunological abnormalities caused by thymoma, effects of radiation, smoking and so on. (author)

  19. Primary Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Palate with Cushing’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24-year-old woman presenting with a relapsed soy-bean-size tender mass at the junction of the soft and hard palate and a history of palatine tumor of small cell carcinoma. Reexcision surgery was performed and histopathological features were consistent. The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy consisting of etoposide and cisplatin. After one year, the patient developed bone metastases and Cushing's syndrome, and successfully recovered with subsequent chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin plus radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis for more than three years. Small cell carcinoma originating in the head and neck region has been reported to be highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. This is the first case report of a patient with relapsed primary small cell carcinoma of the palate and successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.

  20. Synchronous presentation of nasopharyngeal and renal cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Boruban

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of synchronous presentation of nasopharyngeal and renal cell carcinomas in a-50-year old male patient with long standing smoking history. The patient was initially presented with a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. During staging process, the abdominal computed tomography detected a right renal solid mass, 6.5 cm in diameter, originating from posterior portion of the right renal cortex. Right radical nephrectomy was performed and pathological examination revealed renal cell carcinoma. Smoking was thought to be a risk factor for both cancers. Systemic evaluation of kidney should not be discarded in patients diagnosed with nasopharyngeal carcinoma living in western countries with a smoking history.

  1. Merkel cell carcinoma: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosanta Kumar Bhattacharjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man presented with a lump at the right side of chest wall of 4 months duration which started bleeding suddenly from an ulcer at its center. Examination revealed a globular ulcerated mass 2 cm in diameter, on the anterior axillary fold, with adherent clot at its center. No regional lymphadenopathy was noted. Wide local excision with 2 cm margin was done. Biopsy report revealed malignant small round-cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed it to be cytokeratin-20-positive and S100-negative, suggesting the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma. The patient did not receive any other adjuvant therapy. He is being followed-up for the last 4 years and has shown no features of recurrence so far.

  2. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  3. Gastric Collision Tumor Consisting of Mucinous Carcinoma and Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Su Min; Lee, Ye Ri; Han, Eun Mee; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Jong Mun; Sim, Ji Ye [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The concurrence of two different pathological tumors of the stomach is infrequent. Even rarer is a gastric collision tumor of both tumor types. Although there have been a few reported cases of gastric collision tumors that consisted of an adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma, to the best of our knowledge, there is no documented case report of a gastric collision tumor consisting of a mucinous carcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. We report a case of gastric collision tumor, consisting of a mucinous carcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma that presented as abdominal discomfort in a 64-year-old man. This finding draws attention to the related findings from previous studies on gastric collision tumors

  4. Molecular features of renal cell carcinoma: early diagnostics and perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma is one of the major problems of modern urological oncology. In Russia renal cell carcinoma accountsfor 4.3 % of all cancers. The global incidence of renal cell carcinoma has increased over the past two decades. Worldwide renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3.6 % of all cancers and is 10th frequent malignancy. For some malignancies, for instance tumours of prostate, there are markers known that allowed improved early diagnostics. Kidney cancer, however, remains to be hard to diagnose and to treat, since the symptoms can be detected on advanced stages of the disease. In Russia 75.4 % of renal cell carcinoma cases detected at the stage of local and locally advanced disease. Though there are various target drugs on the market aimed to treat this disease, the results of renal cell carcinoma treatment did not reach any substantial success. Most of existing target drugs for kidney cancer treatment include inhibitors of a single signalingpathway regulated by VHL1, which expression is lost in the vast majority of renal-cell carcinomas. Till now existing drugs did not reach sufficient efficacy. Therefore, it is highly important to search for new signaling pathways, regulating such cellular processes as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Further, prognostic markers and therapy targets identified so far are not sufficient and poorly specific. Therefore identification and validation of new markers, and especially new specific targets for the treatment of kindey oncopathologies is highly important and timely task.

  5. Snail heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldumbide, Laura; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Pulido, Rafael; Cortés, Jesús M; López, José I

    2016-03-08

    Intratumor heterogeneity may be responsible of the unpredictable aggressive clinical behavior that some clear cell renal cell carcinomas display. This clinical uncertainty may be caused by insufficient sampling, leaving out of histological analysis foci of high grade tumor areas. Although molecular approaches are providing important information on renal intratumor heterogeneity, a focus on this topic from the practicing pathologist' perspective is still pending. Four distant tumor areas of 40 organ-confined clear cell renal cell carcinomas were selected for histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Tumor size, cell type (clear/granular), Fuhrman's grade, Staging, as well as immunostaining with Snail, ZEB1, Twist, Vimentin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, PTEN, p-Akt, p110α, and SETD2, were analyzed for intratumor heterogeneity using a classification and regression tree algorithm. Cell type and Fuhrman's grade were heterogeneous in 12.5 and 60 % of the tumors, respectively. If cell type was homogeneous (clear cell) then the tumors were low-grade in 88.57 % of cases. Immunostaining heterogeneity was significant in the series and oscillated between 15 % for p110α and 80 % for Snail. When Snail immunostaining was homogeneous the tumor was histologically homogeneous in 100 % of cases. If Snail was heterogeneous, the tumor was heterogeneous in 75 % of the cases. Average tumor diameter was 4.3 cm. Tumors larger than 3.7 cm were heterogeneous for Vimentin immunostaining in 72.5 % of cases. Tumors displaying negative immunostaining for both ZEB1 and Twist were low grade in 100 % of the cases. Intratumor heterogeneity is a common event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which can be monitored by immunohistochemistry in routine practice. Snail seems to be particularly useful in the identification of intratumor heterogeneity. The suitability of current sampling protocols in renal cancer is discussed.

  6. Immunotherapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unverzagt, Susanne; Moldenhauer, Ines; Nothacker, Monika; Roßmeißl, Dorothea; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Peinemann, Frank; Greco, Francesco; Seliger, Barbara

    2017-05-15

    Since the mid-2000s, the field of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has experienced a paradigm shift from non-specific therapy with broad-acting cytokines to specific regimens, which directly target the cancer, the tumour microenvironment, or both.Current guidelines recommend targeted therapies with agents such as sunitinib, pazopanib or temsirolimus (for people with poor prognosis) as the standard of care for first-line treatment of people with mRCC and mention non-specific cytokines as an alternative option for selected patients.In November 2015, nivolumab, a checkpoint inhibitor directed against programmed death-1 (PD-1), was approved as the first specific immunotherapeutic agent as second-line therapy in previously treated mRCC patients. To assess the effects of immunotherapies either alone or in combination with standard targeted therapies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and their efficacy to maximize patient benefit. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), ISI Web of Science and registers of ongoing clinical trials in November 2016 without language restrictions. We scanned reference lists and contacted experts in the field to obtain further information. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs with or without blinding involving people with mRCC. We collected and analyzed studies according to the published protocol. Summary statistics for the primary endpoints were risk ratios (RRs) and mean differences (MD) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We rated the quality of evidence using GRADE methodology and summarized the quality and magnitude of relative and absolute effects for each primary outcome in our 'Summary of findings' tables. We identified eight studies with 4732 eligible participants and an additional 13 ongoing studies. We categorized studies into comparisons, all against standard therapy accordingly as first-line (five comparisons) or second-line therapy (one comparison

  7. Treatment selection for squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inakami, Ken-ichi; Sato, Takeo; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Fujii, Takashi; Nagahara, Masamitu; Momohara, Chikahiro [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Between 1979 and 1995, 153 patients were treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (except the posterior wall region). All patients had a minimum 2-year follow-up and no patient was lost to follow-up. The distribution according to primary site was as follows: base of tongue region, 41 lesions; tonsillar fossa region, 71 lesions; and anterior tonsillar pillar and soft palate region, 41 lesions. The T1 and T2 tumors treated with surgery or radiotherapy had control rates of 29/33 (88%) and 48/66 (73%), respectively. The base of the tongue and tonsillar fossa region had good local control rates in both surgery and radiotherapy. In the anterior tonsillar pillar and soft palate region, however, the initial control by radiotherapy and surgery was T1 and T2 of 8/ 21 (38%) and T1 and T2 of 8/9 (89%) respectively. The ultimate local control rate after surgical salvage was 25 (83%) of 30 patients. Surgical salvage was often successful for early lesions. Surgery is an effective form of treatment for carcinoma of the soft palate and tonsillar pillar. (author)

  8. Coronary circulation disturbances in patients with pulmonary carcinoma treated by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, K.; Szadkowska, M. (Szpital Specjalistyczny im. dr Anki, Krakow (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Cases of two patients with pulmonary carcinoma treated with radiotherapy are reported. During treatment with /sup 60/Co irradiations or several weeks after completion of a course of this radiotherapy signs of coronary circulatory failure developed. In the light of these observations and a review of the pertinent literature the authors stress the necessity of taking into account the possibility of this complication during treatment with ionizing radiation. It is supposed that frequently this complication is masked by clinically similar symptoms of pulmonary carcinoma. Cardiological examinations before, during and after radiotherapy may be helpful in establishing the true extent of this risk in patients with coronary arterial disease treated in this way.

  9. Apollon modulates chemosensitivity in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shuqiang; Liu, Xijun; Rao, Benqiang; Gu, Jianxin; Chen, She; Wang, Qun; Shen, Xizhong; Xue, Ruyi; Dong, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are often diagnosed with advanced diseases that respond poorly to chemotherapy. Here we reported that Apollon, a membrane-associated inhibitor of apoptosis protein, was overexpressed in ESCC cell lines and clinical ESCC tissues, and Apollon overexpression clinically correlated with poor response to chemotherapy (P = 0.001), and short overall survival (P = 0.021). Apollon knockdown increased cisplatin/docetaxel-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome c release in two ESCC cell lines. Apollon knockdown potentiated cisplatin/docetaxel-induced long-term cell growth inhibition, and enhanced chemosensitivity of ESCC cells to cisplatin/docetaxel in xenograft tumor models. Apollon knockdown also enhanced cisplatin/docetaxel-induced activation of caspase-8 (extrinsic pathway) and caspase-9 (intrinsic pathway) in ESCC cells and xenograft tumor models. Mechanism studies revealed that the effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity is mainly mediated by Smac. Apollon expression strongly and negatively correlated with Smac expression in clinical ESCC tissues (P = 0.001). Apollon targeted Smac for degradation in ESCC cells. The effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity was reversed by Smac knockdown in ESCC cells. Taken together, our data show association of Apollon expression with chemotherapeutic response in ESCC, and provide a strong rationale for combining Apollon antagonism with chemotherapy to treat ESCC. PMID:25216531

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Dorsal Foot: An Update and Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Rubin, Ashley G; Jiang, Shang I Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a well-known risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Therefore, the high incidence of BCCs in sun-exposed areas such as the head and neck is unsurprising. However, unexpectedly, BCCs on the sun-protected dorsal foot have also been reported, and tumor occurrence here suggests that other factors besides ultraviolet radiation may play a role in BCC pathogenesis. Because only few dorsal foot BCCs have been reported, data on their clinical features and management are limited. To perform an updated review of the literature on clinical characteristics and treatment of dorsal foot BCCs. We conducted a comprehensive literature review by searching the PubMed database with the key phrases "basal cell carcinoma dorsal foot," "basal cell carcinoma foot," and "basal cell carcinoma toe." We identified 20 cases of dorsal foot BCCs in the literature, 17 of which had sufficient data for analysis. Only 1 case was treated with Mohs micrographic surgery. We present 8 additional cases of dorsal foot BCCs treated with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinomas on the dorsal foot are rare, and potential risk factors include Caucasian descent and personal history of skin cancer. Mohs micrographic surgery seems to be an effective treatment option.

  11. Inflammatory Cell Distribution in Primary Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheat, Rachel [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Roberts, Claudia [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Waterboer, Tim [Infection and Cancer Program, DKFZ (German Cancer Research Centre), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Steele, Jane [Human Biomaterials Resource Centre, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Marsden, Jerry [University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Steven, Neil M., E-mail: n.m.steven@bham.ac.uk [School of Cancer Sciences and CR UK Centre for Cancer Research, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, New Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Blackbourn, David J., E-mail: n.m.steven@bham.ac.uk [Department of Microbial and Cellular Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-06

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cutaneous carcinoma associated with older age, immunodeficiency and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) integrated within malignant cells. The presence of intra-tumoural CD8+ lymphocytes reportedly predicts better MCC-specific survival. In this study, the distribution of inflammatory cells and properties of CD8+ T lymphocytes within 20 primary MCC specimens were characterised using immunohistochemistry and multicolour immunofluorescent staining coupled to confocal microscopy. CD8+ cells and CD68+ macrophages were identified in 19/20 primary MCC. CD20+ B cells were present in 5/10, CD4+ cells in 10/10 and FoxP3+ cells in 7/10 specimens. Only two specimens had almost no inflammatory cells. Within specimens, inflammatory cells followed the same patchy distribution, focused at the edge of sheets and nodules and, in some cases, more intense in trabecular areas. CD8+ cells were outside vessels on the edge of tumour. Those few within malignant sheets typically lined up in fine septa not contacting MCC cells expressing MCPyV large T antigen. The homeostatic chemokine CXCL12 was expressed outside malignant nodules whereas its receptor CXCR4 was identified within tumour but not on CD8+ cells. CD8+ cells lacked CXCR3 and granzyme B expression irrespective of location within stroma versus malignant nodules or of the intensity of the intra-tumoural infiltrate. In summary, diverse inflammatory cells were organised around the margin of malignant deposits suggesting response to aberrant signaling, but were unable to penetrate the tumour microenvironment itself to enable an immune response against malignant cells or their polyomavirus.

  12. Inflammatory Cell Distribution in Primary Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat, Rachel; Roberts, Claudia; Waterboer, Tim; Steele, Jane; Marsden, Jerry; Steven, Neil M.; Blackbourn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cutaneous carcinoma associated with older age, immunodeficiency and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) integrated within malignant cells. The presence of intra-tumoural CD8+ lymphocytes reportedly predicts better MCC-specific survival. In this study, the distribution of inflammatory cells and properties of CD8+ T lymphocytes within 20 primary MCC specimens were characterised using immunohistochemistry and multicolour immunofluorescent staining coupled to confocal microscopy. CD8+ cells and CD68+ macrophages were identified in 19/20 primary MCC. CD20+ B cells were present in 5/10, CD4+ cells in 10/10 and FoxP3+ cells in 7/10 specimens. Only two specimens had almost no inflammatory cells. Within specimens, inflammatory cells followed the same patchy distribution, focused at the edge of sheets and nodules and, in some cases, more intense in trabecular areas. CD8+ cells were outside vessels on the edge of tumour. Those few within malignant sheets typically lined up in fine septa not contacting MCC cells expressing MCPyV large T antigen. The homeostatic chemokine CXCL12 was expressed outside malignant nodules whereas its receptor CXCR4 was identified within tumour but not on CD8+ cells. CD8+ cells lacked CXCR3 and granzyme B expression irrespective of location within stroma versus malignant nodules or of the intensity of the intra-tumoural infiltrate. In summary, diverse inflammatory cells were organised around the margin of malignant deposits suggesting response to aberrant signaling, but were unable to penetrate the tumour microenvironment itself to enable an immune response against malignant cells or their polyomavirus

  13. T Cell Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Basso, M Zecca, P Merli, A Gurrado, S Secondino, G Quartuccio, I Guido, P Guerini, G Ottonello, N Zavras, R Maccario, P Pedrazzoli, P Comoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the novel biologic therapeutics that will increase our ability to cure human cancer in the years to come, T cell therapy is one of the most promising approaches. However, with the possible exception of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes therapy for melanoma, clinical trials of adoptive T-cell therapy for solid tumors have so far provided only clear proofs-of-principle to build on with further development. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated malignancies offer a unique model to develop T cell-based immune therapies, targeting viral antigens expressed on tumor cells. In the last two decades, EBV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL have been successfully employed for the prophylaxis and treatment of EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised hosts. More recently, this therapeutic approach has been applied to the setting of EBV-related solid tumors, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The results are encouraging, although further improvements to the clinical protocols are clearly necessary to increase anti-tumor activity. Promising implementations are underway, including harnessing the therapeutic potential of CTLs specific for subdominant EBV latent cycle epitopes, and delineating strategies aimed at targeting immune evasion mechanisms exerted by tumor cells.

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of penis in patient with incipient neurosyphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Zaslavsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SSCC is one of the most common malignant skin tumors. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum, with human beings as the only host. The combination of syphilis and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is not uncommon, particularly if the lesions are located on different parts of the body. However, simultaneous development of the chancre and squamous cell carcinoma of the glans penis seems exceptional. Considering rarity of the manifestation observed we feel the rare case of combined syphilis and squamous cell skin cancer is of interest.

  15. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Neal Murari; Horattas, Mark C

    2008-11-01

    To examine the presentation, diagnosis, and appropriate management of renal clear cell carcinoma metastasis to the thyroid gland. We describe a clinical case of solitary thyroid metastasis from renal clear cell carcinoma and present a comprehensive review of the related English-language literature. Common patterns of presentation and generalized overall management recommendations are evaluated and summarized. Eight years after nephrectomy for renal carcinoma at age 61 years, a man presented with a thyroid mass. Cytology and histopathologic surgical findings were consistent with a solitary metastasis most compatible with metastatic clear cell carcinoma from his previous renal carcinoma. After left thyroid lobectomy and isthmusectomy, the patient remains disease-free 5 years later. Although uncommon, nearly 150 cases of clinically recognized metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the thyroid have been reported in the English-language literature. Metastatic disease from the kidney to the thyroid gland can occur more than 20 years after nephrectomy with the average time interval being 7.5 years. Obtaining a full clinical history in any patient who presents with a thyroid nodule is essential to allow consideration of possible metastatic disease from previous primary tumor. Metastatic disease to the thyroid gland can be correctly diagnosed preoperatively. If metastatic renal cancer is limited to the thyroid gland only, prompt, appropriate surgical intervention can be curative. Metastatic renal carcinoma to the thyroid should be considered in any patient presenting with a thyroid mass and a medical history of renal cell carcinoma.

  16. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author)

  17. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S. (Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author).

  18. Skin reactions and quality of life after x-ray therapy of Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, Jette; Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjaer; Daugbjerg, Helle

    2012-01-01

    Background. Advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is often treated by surgery or X-ray therapy. The consequences of X-ray therapy on the patients' health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) have so far not been described. Objectives. To quantify quality of life in BCC patients before and after X...

  19. Everolimus-induced pneumonitis associates with favourable outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penttilä, P; Donskov, F; Rautiola, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors may induce pneumonitis. We analysed the association of pneumonitis with outcomes in everolimus treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-five mRCC patients received everolimus at Helsinki University...

  20. Targeted therapies for renal cell carcinoma: review of adverse event management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisen, T.; Sternberg, C.N.; Robert, C.; Mulders, P.F.; Pyle, L.; Zbinden, S.; Izzedine, H.; Escudier, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), overall survival has improved, and patients are being treated continuously for increasingly long periods of time. This has raised challenges in the management of adverse events (AEs) associated with the six targeted

  1. Analysis of effectiveness of a surgical treatment algorithm for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Flávio Barbosa; Ferron, Camila; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez

    2016-01-01

    Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for basal cell carcinoma and micrographic surgery considered the gold standard, however not yet used routinely worldwide available, as in Brazil. Considering this, a previously developed treatment guideline, which the majority of tumors were treated by conventional technique (not micrographic) was tested. To establish the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinomas treated according to this guideline. Between May 2001 and July 2012, 919 basal cell carcinoma lesions in 410 patients were treated according to the proposed guideline. Patients were followed-up and reviewed between September 2013 and February 2014 for clinical, dermatoscopic and histopathologic detection of possible recurrences. After application of exclusion criteria, 520 lesions were studied, with 88.3% primary and 11.7% recurrent tumors. Histological pattern was indolent in 85.5%, 48.6% were located in high risk areas and 70% small tumors. Only 7.3% were treated by Mohs micrographic surgery. The recurrence rate, in an average follow-up period of 4.37 years, was 1.3% for primary and 1.63% for recurrent tumors. Study limitations: unicenter study, with all patients operated on by the same surgeon. The treatment guideline utilized seems a helpful guide for surgical treatment of basal cell carcinoma, especially if micrographic surgery is not available.

  2. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankfurt, O.S. (Cedars Medical Center, Miami, FL (United States))

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  3. Intracardiac metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Aparecida Coelho Siqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer shows variable incidence in different countries with a higher prevalence in developing countries. Squamous cell carcinoma represents the most common histologic type. The seventh decade of life corresponds to the mean age at diagnosis, but it is not an unusual diagnosis among young adults. Most cases present as “in situ” neoplasia or loco regional disease; however, systemic disseminated disease occurs via lymphatic and/or hematogeneous routes. The lymph nodes, liver, and lungs are the most frequently involved sites whereas the heart constitutes an exceptional and atypical site for penile cancer metastases. We report a case of a 79-year-old patient who presented a metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the penis with intracardiac dissemination. The patient had a past history of cardiomyopathy, which required an artificial cardiac pacemaker implantation. He had been treated 1 year before with a partial penectomy but was admitted for emasculation due to the cancer relapse. During the postoperative period, he experienced sudden respiratory distress and died. The autopsy findings showed metastatic disease into the cardiac right chambers, pulmonary tumoral thrombi, and pulmonary hilar involvement. The authors call attention to the possibility of the presence of pacing leads, cardiomyopathy and the altered low blood flow in the right chambers, as predisposing factors for the tumoral seeding in this case.

  4. Therapy of murine squamous cell carcinomas with 2-difluoromethylornithine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Targeted overexpression of an ornithine decarboxylase (ODC transgene to mouse skin (the K6/ODC mouse significantly enhances susceptibility to carcinogenesis. While in most strain backgrounds the predominant tumor type resulting from initiation-promotion protocols is benign squamous papilloma, K6/ODC mice on a FVB/N background develop malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs rapidly and in high multiplicity after carcinogen treatment. We have investigated the utility of polyamine-based therapy against SCCs in this model using the ODC inhibitor 2-difluoromethylornithine delivered orally. At a 2% concentration in drinking water, DFMO caused rapid tumor regression, but in most cases, tumors eventually regrew rapidly even in the presence of DFMO. The tumors that regrew were spindle cell carcinomas, an aggressive undifferentiated variant of SCC. At 1% DFMO in the drinking water, tumors also responded rapidly, but tumor regrowth did not occur. The majority of DFMO-treated SCCs were classified as complete responses, and in some cases, apparent tumor cures were achieved. The enzymatic activity of ODC, the target of DFMO, was substantially reduced after treatment with 1% DFMO and the high SCC polyamine levels, especially putrescine, were also significantly lowered. Based on the results of BrdUrd labeling and TUNEL assays, the effect of DFMO on SCC growth was accompanied by a significant reduction in tumor proliferation with no increase in the apoptotic index. These results demonstrate that SCCs, at least in the mouse, are particularly sensitive to polyamine-based therapy.

  5. Transitional cell carcinoma involving the ductus deferens in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Vincent J; 't Hooft, Krista W Visser; L'Eplattenier, Henry F; Petite, Audrey F

    2012-02-15

    A 12-year-old neutered male Springer Spaniel was referred with a 1-year history of recurring urinary tract infections. Repeated treatment with appropriate antimicrobials selected on the basis of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility results would result in clinical improvement, but recurrence of clinical signs was observed within days after discontinuation of treatment. Ultrasound examination revealed a tubular, fluid-filled structure dorsal to the bladder that extended from the midlevel of the bladder to the cranial pole of the prostate. Mineralized foci within a heterogeneous prostatic parenchyma were also noted. Dilation of the right ductus deferens (DD) was observed during exploratory laparotomy. Both DD were surgically removed, and the prostate was biopsied. The histopathological diagnosis was transitional cell carcinoma involving the right DD and the prostate. The dog was treated with meloxicam (0.1 mg/kg [0.05 mg/lb], p.o., q 24 h) for 9 months after diagnosis before being euthanized. Because the normal DD is rarely visualized during abdominal ultrasonography in dogs, identification of a tubular, fluid-filled structure dorsal to the bladder may indicate an abnormal DD. Transitional cell carcinoma of the DD should be included in the differential diagnoses of affected patients examined for clinical signs involving the urinary tract.

  6. Traditional serrated adenomas and serrated carcinomas in carcinogen-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Carlos A

    2017-04-01

    A recent review of archived sections from early experiments in rats showed neoplasias exhibiting serrated configurations. The aim was to assess the frequency of serrated neoplasias in the colon and small intestine of carcinogen-treated rats. While reviewing archival sections from early experiments in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Fisher-344 (F-344) rats, we recently detected colonic and intestinal traditional serrated adenomas (displaying serrated or microtubular patterns) and serrated carcinomas. SD rats were injected 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) for 27 weeks whereas F-344 rats were fed with a pyrolysate (GLU-1) for 24 months. Filed sections from 358 colonic and small intestinal neoplasias were re-evaluated. DMH-treated SD rats had 215 colonic neoplasias (1.4% were serrated adenomas, 7.9% microtubular adenomas, 2.8% serrated carcinomas and 2.8% microtubular carcinomas). GLU1-treated F-344 rats had 53 colonic neoplasias (1.9% were serrated adenomas and 20.8% microtubular adenomas), and 89 small intestinal neoplasias (1.1% were serrated adenomas, 42.7% microtubular adenomas and 6.7%, microtubular carcinomas). DMH/SD-rats develop serrated and microtubular adenomas and carcinomas in the colon, whereas GLU1/F-344 rats develop microtubular adenomas in the colon and microtubular adenomas and carcinomas in the small intestine. The two rat-settings emerge as suitable models to study the molecular attributes of serrated and microtubular neoplasias under the standard conditions of the laboratory. This study is the first showing that a substantial number of serrated and particularly microtubular adenomas and carcinomas develop in the colon and small intestine of experimental rats. Importantly, serrated and microtubular neoplasias in rats recreate the histology of duodenal and colonic traditional serrated neoplasias in human beings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. The dermatoscopic universe of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina; Moscarella, Elvira; Specchio, Francesca; Raucci, Margaritha; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Following the first descriptions of the dermatoscopic pattern of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that go back to the very early years of dermatoscopy, the list of dermatoscopic criteria associated with BCC has been several times updated and renewed. Up to date, dermatoscopy has been shown to enhance BCC detection, by facilitating its discrimination from other skin tumors and inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, upcoming evidence suggests that the method is also useful for the management of the tumor, since it provides valuable information about the histopathologic subtype, the presence of clinically undetectable pigmentation, the expansion of the tumor beyond clinically visible margins and the response to non-ablative treatments. In the current article, we provide a summary of the traditional and latest knowledge on the value of dermatoscopy for the diagnosis and management of BCC. PMID:25126452

  8. Sequential scintigraphic staging of small cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitran, J.D.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients with small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung were sequentially staged following a history and physical exam with liver, bran, bone, and gallium-67 citrate scans. Scintigraphic evaluation disclosed 7 of 30 patients (23%) with advanced disease, stage IIIM1. When Gallium-67 scans were used as the sole criteria for staging, they proved to be accurate and identified six of the seven patients with occult metastatic disease. Gallium-67 scans proved to be accurate in detecting thoracic and extrathoracic metastases in the 30 patients with SCC, especially within the liver and lymph node-bearing area. The diagnostic accuracy of gallium-67 fell in regions such as bone or brain. Despite the limitations of gallium-67 scanning, the authors conclude that these scans are useful in staging patients with SCC and should be the initial scans used in staging such patients

  9. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark......, and to investigate the incidence. We suggest guidelines for treatment. First we reviewed the medical records of 51 patients diagnosed with MCC from 1995 until 2006 in eastern Denmark. The nation-wide incidence of MCC was extracted from the Danish Cancer Registry for the calculations for the period 1986-2003. We...... reviwed published papers about MCC based on a MEDLINE search. Fourteen of the 51 patients developed recurrence, and 37 (73%) died during the study period. Mean follow-up was 13 months (range 1-122). A total of 153 patients were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry, and showed that incidence rates had...

  11. Pseudovascular squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, E; Sánchez-Motilla, J M; Pérez-Vallés, A; Martínez-Lahuerta, C; Alegre, V; Aliaga, A

    2000-05-01

    The presence of acantholysis in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) may rarely be so extreme that, histologically, it mimics a vascular tumour. However, careful histological examination and immunohistochemical study usually lead to the correct diagnosis. We describe such a case to highlight the clinico-pathological features of this rare form of cutaneous malignancy and to emphasize the difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis. We also review similar cases reported in the literature. Pseudovascular SCC shows a higher degree of recurrence and metastasis than other variants of SCC. Acantholytic foci in these tumours may demonstrate changes in keratinocyte differentiation markers, and this may explain the more aggresive biological behaviour in the pseudovascular variant of SCC.

  12. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  13. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: An Update and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Uchi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare but aggressive skin cancer with frequent metastasis and death. MCC has a mortality rate of 30%, making it more lethal than malignant melanoma, and incidence of MCC has increased almost fourfold over the past 20 years in the USA. MCC has long been considered to be an immunogenic cancer because it occurs more frequently in immunosuppressed patients from organ transplant and HIV infection than in those with immunocompetent. Chronic UV light exposure and clonal integration of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV are two major causative factors of MCC. Approximately 80% of MCC are associated with MCPyV, and T cells specific for MCPyV oncoproteins are present in the blood and tumors of patients. Several studies have shown that a subset of MCCs express PD-1 on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and express PD-L1 on tumor cells, which suggests an endogenous tumor-reactive immune response that might be unleashed by anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 drugs.

  14. Watermelon stomach, hemorrhagic pericarditis, small cell carcinoma of the lung and synchronous squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Murinello

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a case of gastric antral vascular ectasia (watermelon stomach that was associated with hemorrhagic pericarditis, small cell lung carcinoma with mediastinal lymph node metastases and a synchronous squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue, the authors made a review of the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological aspects of this type of gastropathy, and its association with other diseases, and of the results of its endoscopic therapy. The causes of hemorrhagic pericarditis are considered, emphasizing the necessity to know if the effusion has a malignant etiology. To the best of our knowledge the association of watermelon stomach to small cell lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the base of the tongue has not yet been described. Extensive metastases to mediastal lymph nodes are common to small cell lung carcinoma. Resumo: Baseados num caso de gastropatia antral com ectasia vascular (estômago em melancia associado a pericardite hemorrágica e a um carcinoma de pequenas células do pulmão com metástases ganglionares ao longo do mediastino e a um carcinoma pavimentocelular síncrono da base da língua, os autores fazem uma revisão dos aspectos clínicos, endoscópicos e histopatológicos deste tipo de gastropatia, da sua associação a outras doenças e das possibilidades terapêuticas actuais por via endoscópica. Referem-se igualmente as causas mais frequentes de pericardite hemorrágica, salientando-se a necessidade de esclarecer se o derrame é ou não de origem neoplásica. Não está referida na literatura a associação deste tipo de gastropatia ao carcinoma de pequenas células do pulmão nem ao carcinoma pavimento-celular da base da língua. A invasão extensa dos gânglios mediastínicos pelo carcinoma de pequenas células do pulmão é ocorrência frequente. Key-words: Gastric antral vascular ectasia, watermelon stomach, small cell lung carcinoma, oat cell lung carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the base

  15. MicroRNA-144 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-20

    Jan 20, 2017 ... [Bao H, Li X, Li H, Xing H, Xu B, Zhang X and Liu Z 2017 MicroRNA-144 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation, invasion and migration by targeting ZFX. J. Biosci. 42 103–111]. 1. Introduction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide (Tang et al. 2013).

  16. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of stomach: A rare entity - case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very few case reports of pure squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of stomach are available in the world literature. The exact pathology of this uncommon carcinoma in stomach remains unknown. This is an additional case report of SCC in an elderly female arising in the gastric antrum. She underwent distal gastrectomy, ...

  17. Ultrastructural proof of polyomavirus in Merkel cell carcinoma tumour cells and its absence in small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte T A H Wetzels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new virus called the Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV has recently been found in Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC. MCC is a rare aggressive small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma primarily derived from the skin, morphologically indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. So far the actual presence of the virus in MCC tumour cells on a morphological level has not been demonstrated, and the presence of MCPyV in other small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas has not been studied yet. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated MCC tissue samples from five patients and SCLCs from ten patients for the presence of MCPyV-DNA by PCR and sequencing. Electron microscopy was used to search ultrastructurally for morphological presence of the virus in MCPyV-DNA positive samples. MCPyV was detected in two out of five primary MCCs. In one MCC patient MCPyV-DNA was detected in the primary tumour as well as in the metastasis, strongly suggesting integration of MCPyV in the cellular DNA of the tumour in this patient. In the primary MCC of another patient viral particles in tumour cell nuclei and cytoplasm were identified by electron microscopy, indicating active viral replication in the tumour cells. In none of the SCLCs MCPyV-DNA was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest that MCPyV is an oncogenic polyomavirus in humans, and is potentially causally related to the development of MCC but not to the morphological similar SCLC.

  18. Axitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Buraczewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Due to the emergence of new therapeutic opportunities in the second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the choice of the appropriate medication requires consideration. Making the selection one should take into account the likelihood of response, the probability of toxicity, properties of the drug and the clinical characteristics of the patient. Aim of the work was to confirm antitumor efficacy of axitinib in patients with metastatic clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma in the second line treatment remaining under the care of our institution. The primary objective was to determine antitumor activity, secondary – to evaluate progression free survival, safety of the treatment and to analyse clinical characteristics of treated population. Results: Treatment records of 27 patients (9 females, 18 males treated from October 2014 to the present (July 2016 were reviewed. The median duration of treatment which corresponds to the time to disease progression in observed population was 6 months (range: under 1 month – 16 months. 1 patient (3.7% had got objective response (PR, partial remission. Clinical benefit rate (PR + SD (stable disease was 66%. 9 patients (33.33% experienced treatment toxicity only in the first degree of CTCAE (common toxicity criteria for adverse events, 11 patients (40.74% presented the second degree toxicity and 5 patients (18.5% – third degree. The most commonly reported treatment related adverse events were diarrhea (47%, fatigue (26%, hand-foot syndrome (26%, deterioration of blood pressure control (22.2%, abnormal liver function tests (18.5%, mucositis (11.1%.We observed 3 cases of unacceptable toxicity. Conclusions : Axitinib confirms its effectiveness also in situ ation outside clinical trials, however, it is characterized by significant toxicity. Therefore, qualification for treatment should take into account the clinical patient characteristics. Effective diagnosis and treatment of side

  19. A Case of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to Thyroid Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae-Geun; Yang, Youngro; Kim, Kwang Sik; Hyun, Chang Lim; Lee, Ji Shin; Koh, Gwanpyo; Lee, Daeho

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis to the thyroid gland from distant cancer is rare, and, in some cases, is a diagnostic challenge. Here, we report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. A 77-year-old man presented with a neck mass detected about 1 month previously. He had undergone a right nephrectomy owing to renal cell carcinoma 14 years previously. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a few atypical follicular cells with nuclear atypia. Under a tentative diagnosis of papillary thyroid ...

  20. Radiotherapy as an immunological booster in patients with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma treated with high-dose Interleukin-2: evaluation of biomarkers of immunologic and therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; de Rosa, Francesco; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Gentili, Giorgia; Valmorri, Linda; Scarpi, Emanuela; Parisi, Elisabetta; Romeo, Antonino; Guidoboni, Massimo

    2014-09-23

    Tumor cells killed by radiation therapy (RT) are a potentially good source of antigens for dendritic cell (DC) uptake and presentation to T-cells. RT upregulates cell death receptors such as Fas/CD95 and MHC-I, induces the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on tumor cells, and promotes production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. High-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL-2) bolus has been shown to obtain objective response rates ranging from 15% to 17% in patients with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with 6% to 8% of cases experiencing a durable complete response. However, HD-IL-2 is also associated with severe side-effects; if it is to remain a component of the curative treatment strategy in patients with metastatic melanoma or RCC, its therapeutic efficacy must be improved and patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment must be identified a priori. We designed a clinical study combining immunomodulating RT and HD-IL-2 to evaluate their clinical and immunological efficacy and to explore the predictive and prognostic value of 1) tumor-specific immune response and 2) serum levels of proangiogenic cytokines. The primary endpoint of this proof-of-principle phase II study is immune response. Secondary endpoints are the identification of biomarkers potentially predictive of response, toxicity, response rate and overall survival. Three daily doses of booster radiotherapy (XRT) at 6-12 Gy will be administered to at least one metastatic field on days -3 to -1 before the first and third cycle. Treatment with IL-2 (dose 18 MIU/m2/day by continuous IV infusion for 72 hours) will start on day +1 and will be repeated every 3 weeks for up to 4 cycles and then every 4 weeks for a further 2 cycles. Immune response against tumor antigens expressed by melanoma and/or RCC will be evaluated during treatment. Circulating immune effectors and regulators, e.g. cytotoxic T lymphocytes and regulatory T cells, as well as serum levels of proangiogenic

  1. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...... that is higher than that previously reported. The basal cell carcinoma material was further studied regarding the amount of amyloid, mitotic rate, degree of apoptosis and the age of the patients. There was no correlation between the amount of amyloid and the mitotic rate, or the degree of apoptosis...

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma of temporal bone: four case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Ha; Sung, Ki Joon; Sim, Young; Shim, Sue Yoen; Yoon, Byoung Moon [Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    We report the CT findings of four cases of squamous cell carcinoma, paying special attention to the epicenter of the lesion and the pattern of bony destruction. All four patients had a past history of chronic otitis media. Squamous cell carcinoma affected mainly the hypotympanum and inferior wall of the external auditory canal. and in all cases revealed an irregular pattern of bony destruction. Irregular destruction of the tegmen tympani occurred in two cases. In cases of squamous cell carcinoma, CT findings suggesting involvement of the promontory are usually noted. (author)

  3. MANDIBULAR SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN A BOBCAT (LYNX RUFUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladakovic, Izidora; Burnum, Anne; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Kelly, Lisa S; Garner, Bridget C; Holmes, Shannon P; Divers, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    A 23-yr-old female spayed bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with a 1-wk history of hypersalivation. On examination, the right mandible was markedly thickened, the right mandibular dental arcade was missing, and the oral mucosa over the right mandible was ulcerated and thickened. Skull radiographs and fine needle aspirate cytology were supportive of squamous cell carcinoma. The bobcat was euthanized as a result of its poor prognosis. Necropsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a bobcat.

  4. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Interdisciplinary Management of a Rare Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; Thurnher, D.; Erovic, B. M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to review contemporary multidisciplinary treatment with reference to Milkier cell carcinoma. Management of this rare but highly aggressive skin cancer is a complex undertaking that necessitates an understanding of its etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and the coordinated work of several clinical specializations. Recent Findings. The contemporary literature employs a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best patient's treatment. Conclusion. This paper presents an algorithm for contemporary management for the rare and aggressive Merkel cell carcinoma. Multidisciplinary approach in a tumor center provides high-quality care for patients with Merkel cell carcinoma.

  5. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Interdisciplinary Management of a Rare Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schneider

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goal of this paper is to review contemporary multidisciplinary treatment with reference to Merkel cell carcinoma. Management of this rare but highly aggressive skin cancer is a complex undertaking that necessitates an understanding of its etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and the coordinated work of several clinical specializations. Recent Findings. The contemporary literature employs a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best patient's treatment. Conclusion. This paper presents an algorithm for contemporary management for the rare and aggressive Merkel cell carcinoma. Multidisciplinary approach in a tumor center provides high-quality care for patients with Merkel cell carcinoma.

  6. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Profile of genetic and environmental factors in oncogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinomas (NBCCs) are a prototype of a genetic form of basal cell carcinoma. These basal cell cancers, rather than being caused by genetic factors alone, are most likely the product of genetic and environmental factors. The NBCC syndrome provides a model for studying tumors induced by ionizing radiation and for viewing carcinogenesis as a multistage process explainable by a minimum of two steps. The interaction of genetic and environmental factors in producing tumors to which an individual is predisposed can be studied in patients with the NBCC syndrome and childhood medulloblastoma that was treated by radiation therapy. Individuals with the NBCC syndrome represent a special subgroup with a hereditary predisposition to basal cell carcinoma in whom ionizing radiation may supply the subsequent mutation necessary for tumor development. The genetically altered epidermis underlying the palm and sole pits found in patients with the syndrome represents basal cell carcinoma in situ from which basal cell carcinomas develop, albeit infrequently. The restrained biologic behavior of most of these tumors contrasts with the usual destructive behavior of the NBCCs of the head and neck in the same patient

  7. Efficacy of Vismodegib (Erivedge) for Basal Cell Carcinoma Involving the Orbit and Periocular Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Worden, Francis; Nelson, Christine C; Elner, Victor M; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of vismodegib in the management of basal cell carcinoma with orbital extension and/or extensive periocular involvement. Retrospective chart review of 6 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven orbital basal cell carcinoma and 2 additional patients with extensive periocular basal cell carcinoma who were treated with oral vismodegib (150 mg/day) was performed. Basal cell carcinoma extended in the orbit in 6 of 8 patients (involving orbital bones in 1 patient), and 2 of 8 patients had extensive periocular involvement (1 with basal cell nevus syndrome). Vismodegib therapy was the only treatment in 6 patients, off-label neoadjuvant in 1 patient, and adjuvant treatment in 1 patient. Orbital tumors in all 4 patients who received vismodegib as sole treatment showed partial response with a mean 83% shrinkage in tumor size after a median of 7 months of therapy. In the 2 patients receiving vismodegib as neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapies, there was complete response after a median of 7 months of therapy and no evidence of clinical recurrence after discontinuing therapy for a median of 15 months. The 2 patients with extensive periocular involvement experienced complete clinical response after a median 14 months of treatment. During treatment, the most common side effects were muscle spasm (75%) followed by alopecia (50%), dysgeusia (25%), dysosmia, and episodes of diarrhea and constipation (13%). Basal cell carcinoma with orbital extension and extensive periocular involvement responds to vismodegib therapy. The long-term prognosis remains unknown, and additional prospective studies are indicated.

  8. Papillary thyroid carcinoma treated with radiofrequency ablation in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian Yi; Liu, Xiao Sun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yan Yun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiao Dong; Yu, Ji Ren [The First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-07-15

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation.

  9. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin [Department of Gastrointestinal and Thyroid Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Teng, Xiaodong [Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yu, Jiren [Department of Gastrointestinal and Thyroid Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation.

  10. A proton therapy model using discrete difference equations with an example of treating hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, Erin N; Monia, K Lars

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy used to treat cancer. It provides more localized particle exposure than other types of radiotherapy (e.g., x-ray and electron) thus reducing damage to tissue surrounding a tumor and reducing unwanted side effects. We have developed a novel discrete difference equation model of the spatial and temporal dynamics of cancer and healthy cells before, during, and after the application of a proton therapy treatment course. Specifically, the model simulates the growth and diffusion of the cancer and healthy cells in and surrounding a tumor over one spatial dimension (tissue depth) and the treatment of the tumor with discrete bursts of proton radiation. We demonstrate how to use data from in vitro and clinical studies to parameterize the model. Specifically, we use data from studies of Hepatocellular carcinoma, a common form of liver cancer. Using the parameterized model we compare the ability of different clinically used treatment courses to control the tumor. Our results show that treatment courses which use conformal proton therapy (targeting the tumor from multiple angles) provides better control of the tumor while using lower treatment doses than a non-conformal treatment course, and thus should be recommend for use when feasible.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma: evolving approaches to advanced non-clear cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y.C. Heng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies including sunitinib, sorafenib, and temsirolimus. Because patients with conventional clear cell histology account for 75- 80% of all patients with RCC, there has been little accumulated evidence on the treatment of patients with non-clear cell histologies. Most clinical trials have excluded them from enrolment, except for randomized studies investigating temsirolimus. Many retrospective studies on the use of all three of these targeted therapies in patients with non-clear cell histology have demonstrated response rates ranging from 3.7%–16%. Although response rates may not be as high compared to patients with clear cell histologies, targeted therapy does provide a clinically meaningful response.

  12. Chewstick trauma-induced oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Nirola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral carcinoma is one of the most prevalent cancers and one of the 10th most common causes of death worldwide. Oral squamous cell carcinoma accounts for nearly 90% of all oral carcinomas. Squamous cell carcinoma is the malignant neoplasm of mucosal origin. The etiology of squamous cell carcinoma is multifactorial. The use of tobacco and betel quid, heavy alcohol drinking, intake of diet low in fresh fruits and vegetables, viruses, trauma, and genetics are considered as possible risk factors. Early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma plays an important role in improving prognosis and reducing morbidity and mortality associated with it. It can be managed by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or combination of all these, but regardless of its treatment modality, the 5-year survival rate is poor at about 50%. This case report demonstrates a case of oral squamous cell carcinoma induced by Chewstick trauma with a history of no deleterious habits and is confirmed by clinical and histopathological examination.

  13. Clinicopathological evaluation of radiation induced basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibodi Naser

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of skin neoplasms is one of the most important chronic complications of radiation therapy. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent carcinoma occurring at the region of the body to which radiotherapy was delivered. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and histological aspects of basal cell carcinoma in patients with a history of radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Medical records and microscopic slides of 80 patients with basal cell carcinoma who had received radiotherapy (1996-2006 were reviewed in pathology department of Imam Reza hospital of Mashhad, Iran. Collected data were analyzed statistically using descriptive test. Results: 60 men and 20 women were included, majority of them in their sixties. Plaque was the most common clinical pattern of basal cell carcinoma. Fifty one percent of the patients had pigmented and 42.5% had multiple lesions. Scalp was the most common site of involvement. Histologically, macronodular and pigmented carcinoma were the most predominant forms of basal cell carcinoma. Discussion: Majority of patients had scalp involvement and multiple lesions. Nodular and pigmented forms were the most common histological findings. We suggest the need for close supervision in patients with a history of radio therapy in the past.

  14. Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Wang, Jinwan; Wang, Luhua; He, Jie; Xiao, Zefen; Yin, Weibo

    2008-12-01

    Primary small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare and aggressive disease for which there is no recommended standard treatment at this time. A total of 126 patients with SCEC, diagnosed histologically between May 1985 and June 2005 at our institution, were analyzed retrospectively. All were staged according to the Veterans' Administration Lung Study Group staging system. The TNM system for esophageal carcinoma (6th edition, American Joint Committee on Cancer) was also used for those who underwent esophagectomies. SPSS (10.0) software was used for statistical analysis. Cox's hazard regression model was performed to identify prognostic factors. The Kaplan-Meier and log-rank methods were used to estimate and compare survival rates. The chi2 test was performed to examine frequencies between different groups. Through a median follow-up of 13 months, 108 patients died, 10 were alive, and 8 were lost to follow-up. Of the entire study population, the overall median survival time (MST) and 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 12.5 months and 52.2%, 15.9%, and 12.2%, respectively. For limited disease, the MST and 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 14.0 months and 62.1%, 30.8%, and 22.4%, respectively; for extensive disease, the respective values were 7.0 months and 29.3%, 13.6%, and 2.7% (p = 0.0001). The MST of 14.5 months for cases who received chemotherapy was superior to that of 5.2 months for cases who did not (p = 0.0001). Tumor stage, length of the primary lesion, and chemotherapy, but not surgery were independent prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis. SCEC is systemic disease. Tumor stage and chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Systemic therapy, based on chemotherapy with radiotherapy, is recommended.

  15. Nonsurgical Therapies for Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, S; Espinosa, S; Naranjo, M

    2017-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignant tumor in humans and the local destruction of tissue that can result from excision has a significant impact on well-being. Treating BCC is costly for health care systems given the high incidence of this tumor, especially in older patients. Standard treatment involves either resection with histologic assessment of margins or Mohs micrographic surgery. Surgery is sometimes contraindicated, however, due to the presence of significant comorbidity or high cosmetic expectations. For such patients, nonsurgical treatments have become available. These alternatives can offer good local control of disease, preserve function, and achieve excellent cosmetic results. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Basal cell carcinoma with progression to metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Adsay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC or primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma is a malignant tumor considered to demonstrate differentiation towards Merkel cells that are present at the base of the epidermis or around the apical end of some hair follicles and are thought to play an yet uncertain role in sensory transduction. Here we present the case of a 54-year-old female with a basal cell carcinoma (BCC of the skin with neuroendocrine features (positivity for chromogranin that has evolved during multiple recurrences and radiotherapy into a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with morphologic and immunohistochemical features of MCC (trabecular and nesting arrangement, positivity for chromogranin, cytokeratin 20, neuron specific enolase, and also neurosecretory granules on electron microscopy. The progression from a chromogranin positive basal cell carcinoma of the skin, to a high grade neuroendocrine carcinoma demonstrates the potential for cross differentiation among skin tumors.

  17. Maslinic acid inhibits proliferation of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and suppresses angiogenesis of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Thakor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of many novel therapeutics in clinical practice, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains a treatment-re-sistant cancer. As red and processed meat are considered risk factors for RCC, and a vegetable-rich diet is thought to reduce this risk, research into plant-based therapeutics may provide valuable complementary or alternative therapeutics for the management of RCC. Herein, we present the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects of maslinic acid, which occurs naturally in edible plants, particularly in olive fruits, and also in a variety of medicinal plants. Human RCC cell lines (ACHN, Caki-1, and SN12K1, endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cell line [HUVEC], and primary cultures of kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC were treated with maslinic acid. Maslinic acid was relatively less toxic to PTEC when compared with RCC under similar experimental conditions. In RCC cell lines, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and colony formation. In HUVEC, maslinic acid induced a significant reduction in capillary tube formation in vitro and vascular endothelial growth factor. This study provides a rationale for incorporating a maslinic acid–rich diet either to reduce the risk of developing kidney cancer or as an adjunct to existing antiangiogenic therapy to improve efficacy.

  18. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  19. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica B Ericson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marica B Ericson1,2, Ann-Marie Wennberg1, Olle Larkö11Department of Dermatology; 2Department of Physics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, SwedenAbstract: The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma

  20. A novel gammaherpesvirus found in oral squamous cell carcinomas in sun bears (Helarctos malayanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Lydia; Garner, Michael M; Miller, Christine L; Milne, Victoria E; Cook, Kimberly A; Riggs, Gary; Grillo, James F; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2013-01-01

    A novel herpesvirus was detected in sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Five captive sun bears from 4 institutions in the United States presented with oral lesions ranging from erythema and mild erosions to nodular, ulcerated masses. All 5 were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. The tumors were treated with surgical resection but recurrence, local extension, or appearance of new lesions was noted in all cases. Intralesional chemotherapy was administered in 2 cases, and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug piroxicam was administered in 3 cases. Virus was detected in 4 of the 5 bears' tissue samples using a consensus herpesvirus polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed that this herpesvirus is in the subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae and distinct from other known herpesviruses. The association between the herpesvirus and squamous cell carcinoma is unknown. The current study presents a novel gammaherpesvirus within the order Ursidae, with the name Ursid herpesvirus 1 proposed.

  1. Thyroid metastasis as initial presentation of clear cell renal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Plaza, César Pablo; Domínguez-López, Marta Elena; Blanco-Reina, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumors account for 1.4-2.5% of thyroid malignancies. About 25-30% of patients with clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) have distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, being the thyroid gland a rare localization [5%]. A 62-year woman who underwent a cervical ultrasonography and a PAAF biopsy reporting atypical follicular proliferation with a few intranuclear vacuoles "suggestive" of thyroid papillary cancer in the context of a multinodular goiter was reported. A total thyroidectomy was performed and the histology of a clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) was described in four nodules of the thyroid gland. A CT scan was performed and a renal giant right tumor was found. The patient underwent an eventful radical right nephrectomy and the diagnosis of CCRC was confirmed. Thyroid metastasis (TM) from CCRC are usually apparent in a metachronic context during the follow-up of a treated primary (even many years after) but may sometimes be present at the same time than the primary renal tumor. Our case is exceptional because the TM was the first evidence of the CCRC, which was subsequently diagnosed and treated. The possibility of finding of an incidental metastatic tumor in the thyroid gland from a previous unknown and non-diganosed primary (as CCRC in our case was) is rare and account only for less than 1% of malignancies. Nonetheless, the thyroid gland is a frequent site of metastasis and the presence of "de novo" thyroid nodules in oncologic patients must be always considered and studied. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Definitive radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, Steven J.; Jhingran, Anuja; Levenback, Charles; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and describe clinical treatment guidelines for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina treated with definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1970 and 2000, a total of 193 patients were treated with definitive radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The patients' medical records were reviewed to obtain information about patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics, as well as outcome and patterns of recurrence. Surviving patients were followed for a median of 137 months. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with differences assessed using log-rank tests. Results: Disease-specific survival (DSS) and pelvic disease control rates correlated with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and tumor size. At 5 years, DSS rates were 85% for the 50 patients with Stage I, 78% for the 97 patients with Stage II, and 58% for the 46 patients with Stage III-IVA disease (p = 0.0013). Five-year DSS rates were 82% and 60% for patients with tumors ≤4 cm or >4 cm, respectively (p = 0.0001). At 5 years, pelvic disease control rates were 86% for Stage I, 84% for Stage II, and 71% for Stage III-IVA (p = 0.027). The predominant mode of relapse after definitive radiation therapy was local-regional (68% and 83%, respectively, for patients with stages I-II or III-IVA disease). The incidence of major complications was correlated with FIGO stage; at 5 years, the rates of major complications were 4% for Stage I, 9% for Stage II, and 21% for Stage III-IVA (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes can be achieved with definitive radiation therapy for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina. However, to achieve these results, treatment must be individualized according to the site and size of the tumor at presentation and the response to initial external-beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy

  3. Role of novel anticancer drug Roscovitine on enhancing radiosensitivity in carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiosensitization effect of Roscovitine (cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor) in carcinoma cell lines. Three cell lines are used (HepG2 liver carcinoma cell line, U251 brain carcinoma cell line, H460 Lung carcinoma cell line) in this study .cells were treated with Roscovitine in different concentrations ranging from 0.1μM to 100 μM before exposure to radiation doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 20 Gy according to each experiment. The cell viability by MTT assay, The cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation repair mechanism by diphenylamine were measured after Roscovitine treatment with or without radiation to explore the sensitization effect of Roscovitine. The present study conclude that Roscovitine a good candidate as radiosensitizer for modifying the ionizing radiation (IR) response in cancer cells, beside its cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor function, roscovitine can generate DNA Double strand Breaks and cooperate to enhance IR induce DNA damages . Roscovitine is currently in clinical trials, although our findings suggest that the combination of Roscovitine with IR appears to be a very promising especially for liver, brain and lung cancer treatment, further investigation is needed to evaluate the therapeutic index before tested in clinical trial

  4. Role of novel anticancer drug Roscovitine on enhancing radiosensitivity in carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noaman, E.; Sayed, H.M.; Medhat, A.M.; Morcos, N.Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the radiosensitization effect of Roscovitine (cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor) in carcinoma cell lines. Three cell lines are used liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), brain carcinoma cell line (U251), Lung carcinoma cell line (H460) in this study cells were treated with Roscovitine in different concentrations ranging from 0.1 ?M to 100 ?M before exposure to radiation doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 20 Gy according to each experiment. The cell viability by MTT assay, the cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation repair mechanism by diphenylamine were measured after Roscovitine treatment with or without radiation exposure to explore the sensitization effect of Roscovitine. The present study conclude that Roscovitine a good candidate as radiosensitizer for modifying the ionizing radiation (IR) response in cancer cells, beside its cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor function, Roscovitine can generate DNA Double strand Breaks and cooperate to enhance IR induce DNA damages. Roscovitine is currently in clinical trials, although our findings suggest that the combination of Roscovitine with IR appears to be a very promising especially for liver, brain and lung cancer treatment, further investigation is needed to evaluate the therapeutic index before tested in clinical trials

  5. Ovarian Small Cell Carcinoma Hypercalcemic Type: A Case Report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rahma, M B.

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old female was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (OSCCHT) post left oophorectomy. This is a rare aggressive ovarian tumour of which less than 300 cases were reported.

  6. Facial skin follllicular hyperkeratosis of patients with basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zhuchkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a clinical observation of paraneoplastic syndrome of a patient with basal cell carcinoma of skin. Authors present clinical features of the described for the first time, paraneoplastic retentional follicular hyperkeratosis of facial area.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in mature cystic teratoma of ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranu Patni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the ovary is a rare condition and usually arises in mature cystic teratoma (MCT or dermoid cyst of the ovary. The reported incidence of malignant transformation in MCT is approximately 2%. A case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a dermoid cyst of the ovary presenting at an early stage is presented here. A 53-year-old postmenopausal lady, presented with the complaint of pain in right lower abdomen since one month and a large complex abdomino-pelvic mass on examination and investigations. Final histopathology was reported as squamous cell carcinoma of left ovary arising from dermoid cyst and a benign dermoid cyst in the right ovary. The patient was assigned to squamous cell carcinoma of the ovary arising in a mature cystic teratoma, surgical stage Ic2. In view of the poor prognosis, adjuvant chemotherapy was started.

  8. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: a unique disease on the rise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Monsjou, Hester S.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite successful efforts to control tobacco and alcohol consumption in the western world, several developed countries report rising oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence figures, specifically in young individuals. Similar to anogenital cancers, a significant proportion of OPSCC

  9. A case of renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We describe a case of renal cell carcinoma in the right kidney together with an angiomyolipoma in the left kidney, encountered in an adolescent girl at Potchefstroom Provincial Hospital, North West Province, South Africa.

  10. Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Immunosuppressed Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Janice E. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Brewer, Jerry D., E-mail: brewer.jerry@mayo.edu [Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy. The infectivity of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), an apparent agent in MCC development, may be exacerbated with impaired immune responses. This paper reviews relevant data regarding the role of immunosuppression in the development of MCC and describes modes of immunodeficient states. Because of the inherently low incidence rate of MCC, several case studies and series are also briefly mentioned to provide a more comprehensive summary of MCC in the setting of immunosuppression. We describe immunosuppressed patients who have experienced excessive UV radiation, organ transplantation, human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Iatrogenic forms of immunosuppression are also highlighted. Studies that quantify risks consistently report that individuals with a history of solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and/or lymphoproliferative diseases have a significantly elevated risk of developing MCC. Overall, immunocompromised patients also appear to have an early onset and more aggressive course of MCC, with poorer outcomes. Recommendations for multidisciplinary approaches are proposed to effectively prevent and manage MCC in these patients.

  11. Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Immunosuppressed Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Janice E.; Brewer, Jerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy. The infectivity of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), an apparent agent in MCC development, may be exacerbated with impaired immune responses. This paper reviews relevant data regarding the role of immunosuppression in the development of MCC and describes modes of immunodeficient states. Because of the inherently low incidence rate of MCC, several case studies and series are also briefly mentioned to provide a more comprehensive summary of MCC in the setting of immunosuppression. We describe immunosuppressed patients who have experienced excessive UV radiation, organ transplantation, human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Iatrogenic forms of immunosuppression are also highlighted. Studies that quantify risks consistently report that individuals with a history of solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and/or lymphoproliferative diseases have a significantly elevated risk of developing MCC. Overall, immunocompromised patients also appear to have an early onset and more aggressive course of MCC, with poorer outcomes. Recommendations for multidisciplinary approaches are proposed to effectively prevent and manage MCC in these patients

  12. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  13. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma without evidence of a renal primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Corey; Thomas, George V.; Ryan, Christopher; Coakley, Fergus V.; Troxell, Megan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), without an identified kidney primary, has been reported rarely. We report a patient with RCC metastatic to bilateral adrenal glands and liver, without an apparent renal primary. We detail the immunohistochemical and molecular studies employed to substantiate the diagnosis of RCC and direct therapy. Methods Histopathologic findings were correlated with imaging data and supplemented by a panel of immunohistochemical stains, as well as tumor sequence analysis. Results Despite the presence of bilateral adrenal masses and lack of tumor within kidney parenchyma, the diagnosis of RCC was substantiated by immunohistochemistry (RCC+/PAX2+/PAX8+/Melan-A−/SF-1− among others) and molecular genetic analysis, harboring mutations in VHL, TP53, KDM5C, and PBRM1. After debulking surgery, based on the diagnosis of RCC and the molecular profile, the patient was treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (sunitinib), resulting in stablilization of disease. Conclusions This case illustrates the role of mutational analysis in carcinomas with rare or unusual presentations, such as metastatic RCC without a renal primary. PMID:26527083

  14. Heparanase expression and glycosaminoglycans profile in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Lucas Teixeira E Aguiar; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Machado, Leopoldo Ruiz; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2012-11-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of renal cell carcinogenesis could contribute to a decrease in the mortality rate of this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycosaminoglycans profile and heparanase expression in renal cell carcinoma. The study included 24 patients submitted to nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The majority of the samples (87.5%) were classified in the initial stage of renal cell carcinoma (clinical stages I and II). Heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis of renal cell carcinoma samples or non-neoplastic tissues obtained from the same patients (control group). The sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid were analyzed in urine samples of the patients before and after surgery. The data showed a significant statistical increase in chondroitin sulfate, and a decrease in heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate present in neoplastic tissues compared with non-neoplastic tissues. Higher heparanase messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the neoplastic tissues was also shown, compared with the non-neoplastic tissues. The urine glycosaminoglycans profile showed no significant difference between renal cell carcinoma and control samples. Extracellular matrix changes observed in the present study clarify that heparanase is possibly involved with heparan sulfate turnover, and that heparanase and the glycosaminoglycans can modulate initial events of renal cell carcinoma development. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. [Impact of postoperative pathological features of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma on the prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Yin; Sun, Haibo; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Zongfei; Chen, Xiankai

    2017-12-25

    Esophageal cancer is located in the 8th position of the incidence of malignant tumors and the 6th most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the world, while China has the highest incidence and mortality of esophageal cancer. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the predominant histologic type of esophageal cancer in China, accounts for about 90%. Despite recent improvement of surgical techniques and philosophy, however, the prognosis of ESCC patients treated with surgery is still poor, and 5-year survival remains unsatisfactorily low. So far, the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is still unclear, and effective prevention is also out of the question. To find the main factors affecting the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and to improve the survival of patients, are the main directions of all scholars. Postoperative pathology of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is considered to be one of the most important predictors of prognosis. Currently, the evaluation of postoperative esophageal prognosis mainly depends on TNM staging, but some criteria of its specific content and staging remains controversial. In this paper recent domestic and foreign related researches and clinical trials reports are collected, and the postoperative pathological features affecting esophageal squamous cell carcinoma prognosis were reviewed.

  16. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, C.; Chen, Y.; DuBeshter, B.; Angel, C.; Dawson, A.; Casey, W.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  17. Breast carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Lauridsen, M C; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2001-01-01

    Primary carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a very rare tumour of the female breast. The clinical course, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 61 cases of invasive duct carcinoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (OMGCs) are reviewed and a new...... in the literature have shown that 86% of patients with these tumours are still alive after 5 years. Histologically, these tumours are invasive ductal carcinomas with OMGCs next to the neoplastic glands and within their lumen. Signs of recent and past haemorrhage are ubiquitously present in the highly vascularized...

  18. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  19. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal-Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W Marston; Spellman, Paul T; Ricketts, Christopher J; Creighton, Chad J; Fei, Suzanne S; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A; Murray, Bradley A; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N; Hoadley, Katherine A; Robertson, A Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D M; Raphael, Benjamin J; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K; Hakimi, A Ari; Ho, Thai H; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Reuter, Victor E; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl S; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D; Penny, Robert J; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C; Zhang, Jiashan; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, Harsha V; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gibbs, Richard A; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D Neil; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven J M; Jones, Corbin D; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E; Schumacher, Steven E; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M; Winemiller, Cynthia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-14

    Papillary renal-cell carcinoma, which accounts for 15 to 20% of renal-cell carcinomas, is a heterogeneous disease that consists of various types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal-cell carcinoma, and no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. We performed comprehensive molecular characterization of 161 primary papillary renal-cell carcinomas, using whole-exome sequencing, copy-number analysis, messenger RNA and microRNA sequencing, DNA-methylation analysis, and proteomic analysis. Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups on the basis of molecular differences associated with patient survival. Type 1 tumors were associated with MET alterations, whereas type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was observed in a distinct subgroup of type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas that was characterized by poor survival and mutation of the gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH). Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway were associated with type 1, and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway was associated with type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in type 2 conveyed a poor prognosis. Furthermore, type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinoma consisted of at least three subtypes based on molecular and phenotypic features. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  20. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Creighton, Chad J.; Fei, Suzanne S.; Davis, Caleb; Wheeler, David A.; Murray, Bradley A.; Schmidt, Laura; Vocke, Cathy D.; Peto, Myron; Al Mamun, Abu Amar M.; Shinbrot, Eve; Sethi, Anurag; Brooks, Samira; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Brooks, Angela N.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Brooks, Denise; Bowlby, Reanne; Sadeghi, Sara; Shen, Hui; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Saksena, Gordon; Haake, Scott; Li, Jun; Liang, Han; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Akbani, Rehan; Leiserson, Mark D.M.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Anur, Pavana; Bottaro, Donald; Albiges, Laurence; Barnabas, Nandita; Choueiri, Toni K.; Czerniak, Bogdan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ho, Thai; Hsieh, James; Ittmann, Michael; Kim, William Y.; Krishnan, Bhavani; Merino, Maria J.; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Reznik, Ed; Shelley, Carl Simon; Shuch, Brian; Signoretti, Sabina; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Tamboli, Pheroze; Thomas, George; Tickoo, Satish; Burnett, Kenneth; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph D.; Penny, Robert J.; Shelton, Candace; Shelton, W. Troy; Sherman, Mark; Thompson, Eric; Yena, Peggy; Avedon, Melissa T.; Bowen, Jay; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gerken, Mark; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Santos, Tracie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Demchok, John A.; Felau, Ina; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean C.; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Liu, Jia; Lolla, Laxmi; Naresh, Rashi; Pihl, Todd; Sun, Qiang; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buhay, Christian; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Chao, Hsu; Chuah, Eric; Clarke, Amanda; Covington, Kyle R.; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Dewal, Ninad; Dhalla, Noreen; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Drummond, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Guin, Ranabir; Hale, Walker; Hawes, Alicia; Hayes, D. Neil; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kalra, Divya; Kovar, Christie; Lewis, Lora; Li, Jie; Ma, Yussanne; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Moore, Richard A.; Morton, Donna; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Muzny, Donna; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Roach, Jeffrey; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Skelly, Tara; Soloway, Matthew G.; Sougnez, Carrie; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Thiessen, Nina; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Wang, Min; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Zhou, Jane; Bedford, Jason; Chen, Fengju; Fu, Yao; Gerstein, Mark; Haussler, David; Kasaian, Katayoon; Lai, Phillip; Ling, Shiyun; Radenbaugh, Amie; Van Den Berg, David; Weinstein, John N.; Zhu, Jingchun; Albert, Monique; Alexopoulou, Iakovina; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Auman, J. Todd; Bartlett, John; Bastacky, Sheldon; Bergsten, Julie; Blute, Michael L.; Boice, Lori; Bollag, Roni J.; Boyd, Jeff; Castle, Erik; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cheville, John C.; Curley, Erin; Davies, Benjamin; DeVolk, April; Dhir, Rajiv; Dike, Laura; Eckman, John; Engel, Jay; Harr, Jodi; Hrebinko, Ronald; Huang, Mei; Huelsenbeck-Dill, Lori; Iacocca, Mary; Jacobs, Bruce; Lobis, Michael; Maranchie, Jodi K.; McMeekin, Scott; Myers, Jerome; Nelson, Joel; Parfitt, Jeremy; Parwani, Anil; Petrelli, Nicholas; Rabeno, Brenda; Roy, Somak; Salner, Andrew L.; Slaton, Joel; Stanton, Melissa; Thompson, R. Houston; Thorne, Leigh; Tucker, Kelinda; Weinberger, Paul M.; Winemiller, Cythnia; Zach, Leigh Anne; Zuna, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma, accounting for 15% of renal cell carcinoma, is a heterogeneous disease consisting of different types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal cell carcinoma; no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist. Methods We performed comprehensive molecular characterization utilizing whole-exome sequencing, copy number, mRNA, microRNA, methylation and proteomic analyses of 161 primary papillary renal cell carcinomas. Results Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas were found to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with Type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups based on molecular differences that influenced patient survival. MET alterations were associated with Type 1 tumors, whereas Type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-ARE pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was found in a distinct subset of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma characterized by poor survival and mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Conclusions Type 1 and Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinomas are clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway are associated with Type 1 and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway with Type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in Type 2 convey a poor prognosis. Furthermore, Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma consists of at least 3 subtypes based upon molecular and phenotypic features. PMID:26536169

  1. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome and Hairy Skin Patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notay, Manisha; Kamangar, Faranak; Awasthi, Smita; Fazel, Nasim

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of an increasing number of discrete patches of darkly pigmented terminal hair in a patient with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This case adds to a small case series of three patients which have previously reported this observation. We report this case to highlight hairy patches as an important clinical feature associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Corneal squamous cell carcinoma in a Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Claudia; Sansom, Jane; Dubielzig, R R; Hayes, Alison

    2008-01-01

    A 6-year-old, female, spayed Border Collie was presented to the Unit of Comparative Ophthalmology at the Animal Health Trust with a 6-month history of a progressive nonpainful opacity of the left cornea. A keratectomy was performed and the tissue submitted for histopathology. The diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma. There has been no recurrence of the neoplasm to date (5 months). Canine corneal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been reported previously in the UK.

  3. Choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting with cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoaib, K.K.; Haq, I.; Zafar, N.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of rare involvement of the eye with choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting 08 years after the primary tumor was removed. The patient initially presented with cataract most probably induced by the tumor. After cataract extraction, tumor was detected when it induced vitreous involvement and retinal detachment. Enucleation was performed and an extraocular mass was also excised. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of metastasis from renal cell carcinoma in the ocular tumor, extraocular mass and the vitreous. (author)

  4. Staghorn calculi and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis associated with transitional cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Wei Tseng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Untreated staghorn calculi can cause xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP, diminished renal function, and renal malignancy. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the upper urinary tract is associated with kidney stones and chronic infection, but their association with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC has not been proven and has rarely been reported in literature. We present a rare case of staghorn calculi and XGP associated with TCC.

  5. [Basal cell carcinoma. Molecular genetics and unusual clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenberger, J

    2007-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common human cancer. Its incidence is steadily increasing. The development of basal cell carcinoma is linked to genetic factors, including the individual skin phototype, as well as the cumulative exposure to UVB. The vast majority of basal cell carcinomas are sporadic tumors, while familial cases associated with certain hereditary syndromes are less common. At the molecular level, basal cell carcinomas are characterized by aberrant activation of sonic hedgehog signaling, usually due to mutations either in the ptch or smoh genes. In addition, about half of the cases carry mutations in the tp53 tumor suppressor gene, which are often UVB-associated C-->T transition mutations. Clinically, basal cell carcinomas may show a high degree of phenotypical variability. In particular, tumors occurring in atypical locations, showing an unusual clinical appearance, or imitating other skin diseases may cause diagnostic problems. This review article summarizes the current state of the art concerning the etiology, predisposition and molecular genetics of basal cell carcinoma. In addition, examples of unusual clinical manifestations are illustrated.

  6. Carcinoma of the maxillary antrum treated by pre-operative radiotherapy or radical radiotherapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, A.J.; Habib, F.; Hope-Stone, H.F. (Royal London Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1992-12-01

    The results of pre-operative radical radiotherapy and subsequent maxillary resection are reported in 54 consecutive patients with carcinoma of the maxillary antrum treated at The Royal London Hospital from 1965 to 1989. The actuarial two and five year survivals were 50.3 per cent and 38.5 per cent respectively. Patients with adenocarcinomas fared better when compared with squamous and undifferentiated carcinomas (log rank p = <0.01). Undifferentiated carcinoma and involved regional lymph nodes were both very poor prognostic factors. In those patients who were either unfit for or refused maxillary resection, radical radiotherapy alone was still an effective treatment, with only a slight disadvantage in terms of local control and survival. (Author).

  7. Mast cells dysregulate apoptotic and cell cycle genes in mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a disease of high mortality and morbidity. Interactions between the squamous cell carcinoma and the host's local immunity, and how the latter contributes to the biological behavior of the tumor are unclear. In vivo studies have demonstrated sequential mast cell infiltration and degranulation during squamous cell carcinogenesis. The degree of mast cell activation correlates closely with distinct phases of hyperkeratosis, dysplasia, carcinoma in-situ and invasive carcinoma. However, the role of mast cells in carcinogenesis is unclear. Aim This study explores the effects of mast cells on the proliferation and gene expression profile of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma using human mast cell line (HMC-1 and human glossal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC25. Methods HMC-1 and SCC25 were co-cultured in a two-compartment chamber, separated by a polycarbonate membrane. HMC-1 was stimulated to degranulate with calcium ionophore A23187. The experiments were done in quadruplicate. Negative controls were established where SCC25 were cultured alone without HMC-1. At 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation and viability of SCC25 were assessed with MTT colorimetric assay. cDNA microarray was employed to study differential gene expression between co-cultured and control SCC25. Results HMC-1/SCC25 co-culture resulted in suppression of growth rate for SCC-25 (34% compared with 110% for the control by 72 hours, p Conclusion We show that mast cells have a direct inhibitory effect on the proliferation of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro by dysregulating key genes in apoptosis and cell cycle control.

  8. Autocrine Human Growth Hormone Stimulates Oncogenicity of Endometrial Carcinoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Vijay; Perry, Jo K.; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M.; Kong, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Shu-Min; Wu, Zheng-Sheng; Mitchell, Murray D.; Zhu, Tao; Lobie, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent published data have demonstrated elevated levels of human GH (hGH) in endometriosis and endometrial adenocarcinoma. Herein, we demonstrate that autocrine production of hGH can enhance the in vitro and in vivo oncogenic potential of endometrial carcinoma cells. Forced expression of hGH in endometrial carcinoma cell lines RL95-2 and AN3 resulted in an increased total cell number through enhanced cell cycle progression and decreased apoptotic cell death. In addition, autocrine hGH express...

  9. Multimodality management for 145 cases of Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Patricia; Yu, Edward; Assouline, Avi; Lian, Ji Dong; Joseph, Kurian; Miale, Thomas; Krzisch, Claude

    2010-12-01

    The results of the multimodality management of 145 cases of cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) are reported herein. Patient information was obtained from medical records of four Canadian institutions and one French institution. These data included ages, pathological stages, disease sites, histological and treatment details. Cause-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were analyzed by the log-rank and Kaplan-Meier methods. From 1988 to 2007, 145 cases were analyzed. There were 74 men and 71 women. Median age was 78 years (range 47-95.2). Median follow-up was 21.5 months (range 0.5-169.1). During the follow-up period, 37 local, 37 regional nodal and 15 distant recurrences were determined to be either solitary or multifocal sites of treatment failure. Relapsing patients were treated with multimodal treatments provided that their general state of health did not preclude this approach. Either initially and/or at relapse, 30 patients were treated with either multiagent (mostly etoposide with cisplatin or carboplatin) or single-agent chemotherapy, including irinotecan, taxotere and topotecan. In conclusion, recurrence should be treated with multimodalities. Our experience of long-term survivors after treatment of recurrence is encouraging.

  10. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Biological Continuum of Basal Cell Carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Karaninder S. Mehta; Vikram K. Mahajan; Pushpinder S. Chauhan; Anju Lath Sharma; Vikas Sharma; C. Abhinav; Gayatri Khatri; Neel Prabha; Saurabh Sharma; Muninder Negi

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 80% of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Its metastasis is extremely rare, ranging between 0.0028 and 0.55 of all BCC cases. The usual metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bones, or skin is from the primary tumor situated in the head and neck region in nearly 85% cases. A 69-year-old male developed progressively increasing multiple, fleshy, indurated, and at places pigmented noduloulcerative plaques over back, chest, and left axillary area 4 years after wide s...

  11. Clinical analysis of oral carcinoma treated in the department of otolaryngology, Niigata University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Takahashi, Sugata; Tomita, Masahiko; Watanabe, Jun; Matsuyama, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-five sites of oral carcinoma (118 patients) treated in our department during 15 years (1991 to 2005) were clinically analyzed. Multiple carcinomas within the oral cavity arose in 17 sites. In our department, tongue and oral floor were common subsites, followed by buccal mucosa, gingiva, lip, and hard palate. The number of patients increased according to the elevation of clinical stage. Since the subsites and stage characteristics of our department might be due to patients' distribution among medical and dental clinics, correlation of information among medical and dental schools was considered important The significance of multiple malignancies in patients with oral carcinoma was confirmed since multiple malignancies within and outside of the oral cavity occurred at a high rate. The five-year survival rate was 73.8% in tongue carcinoma patients and 58.9% in oral floor carcinoma patients, and the prognosis of patients was fair with positive application of surgery. Since the prognosis of patients without surgery was poor, it is important to consider the treatment strategy for patients who reject surgery and to recommend that they visit a clinic before the tumor advances to an unresectable stage. (author)

  12. Epidemiology of basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in a Department of Dermatology: a 5 year review

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade,Pedro; Brites,Maria Manuel; Vieira,Ricardo; Mariano,Angelina; Reis,José Pedro; Tellechea,Oscar; Figueiredo,Américo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-melanoma skin cancer, a common designation for both basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, is the most frequent malignant skin neoplasm. OBJECTIVE: Epidemiologic characterization of the population with Non-melanoma skin cancer. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of all patients diagnosed with Non-melanoma skin cancer based on histopathologic analysis of all incisional or excisional skin biopsies performed between 2004 and 2008 in a Department of Dermatology. RESULTS:...

  13. Current MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sae Lin; Sung, Seuk Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of approximately 85-90% of renal masses, and its incidence is increasing due to widespread use of modern imaging modalities such as ultrasonography or computed tomography. Computed tomography has served an important role in the diagnosis and staging of RCC; however, recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have considerably improved our ability to predict tumor biology beyond the morphologic assessment. Multiparametric MRI protocols include standard sequences tailored for the morphologic evaluation and acquisitions that provide information about the tumor microenvironment such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The role of multiparametric MRI in the evaluation of RCC now extends to preoperative characterization of RCC subtypes, histologic grade, and quantitative assessment of tumor response to targeted therapies in patients with metastatic disease. Herein, the clinical applications and recent advances in MRI applied to RCC are reviewed along with its merits and demerits. We aimed to review MRI techniques and image analysis that can improve the management of patients with RCC. Familiarity with the advanced MRI techniques and various imaging findings of RCC would also facilitate optimal clinical recommendations for patients.

  14. Basal cell carcinoma in skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Jesleen; Hadjicharalambous, Elena; Mehregan, Darius

    2012-04-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer most commonly affects Caucasians, and only rarely affects darker-skinned individuals. However, skin cancer in these groups is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. Ultraviolet radiation is the major etiologic factor in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and likely plays a pivotal role in the development of other forms of skin cancer. Yet it is commonly thought among patients as well as physicians that darker pigmentation inherently affords complete protection from skin cancer development. This low index of suspicion results in delayed diagnoses and poorer outcomes. This review follows a detailed computer search that cross-matched the diagnosis of BCC with skin color type in a large commercial dermatopathology facility. The reported skin types, all Fitzpatrick skin types IV, V, and VI, and histories were confirmed. A predominance of pigmented BCCs was found in sun-exposed areas of these older individuals. Although less common in darker-skinned ethnic groups, BCC does occur and can pose significant morbidity. Thus, it is essential that dermatologists are familiar with the epidemiology and clinical presentation of all cutaneous malignancies in darker skin so that these patients are fully aware of risks as well as prevention of the disease.

  15. Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) of Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, K; Hamaloğlu, E

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, agressive, neurocutaneous malignancy with a high potential to metastasize. We present a 59 year-old woman referred to general surgery department with a complaint of epigastric pain. The abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed and revealed amass of 3 cm in the head of the pancreas. The significant debate in the patient's medical history was that she had a MCC in size of 5 cm removed from the left gluteal region 7 months ago. Following preoperative preparation a pancreatic oduodenectomy with Whipple procedure was performed fort hepancreatic head mass. As the tumor showed morphologically similar properties with the patient's primary neoplasm, it was accepted as a metastatic MCC. Following the operation the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and at a 30 months follow-up it was observed that the patient is disease free and has no complications related to the disease progression or recurrence. Although MCC is an aggresive and poor prognostic tumor, good results can be obtained with correct diagnosis and proper surgical treatment. Celsius.

  16. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  17. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  18. studies on ocular squamous cell carcinoma among horses in borno ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    medial canthus of the left eye, and at it was discoid in shape with an area of alopecia surrounding it. Microscopic examination of the masses revealed squamous cell carcinoma characterized by large numbers of squamous epithelial cells arranged in whorls with scanty keratin at the centre. Come of the cells appeared in ...

  19. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas: Mystery and Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Vaid, Arjun; Rego, Rayburn F

    2015-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is very rare as pancreas does not have any squamous cells. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We describe such a case where in the patient presented with painless jaundice. CT and EUS confirmed the pancreatic mass biopsy of which showed squamous cell cancer.

  20. Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Stomach: A Rare Entity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment for the same. Per abdominal examination revealed a swelling of the size 4 cm × 5 ... Very few case reports of pure squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of stomach are available in the world literature. The exact .... the presence of totipotential (stem) cells, an area of ectopic squamous cell nests, squamous metaplasia of.

  1. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellitteri, P.K.; Takes, R.P.; Lewis JS, J.r.; Devaney, K.O.; Harlor, E.J.; Strojan, P.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Suarez, C.; Rinaldo, A.; Medina, J.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Ferlito, A.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinomas are uncommon, but aggressive, cutaneous malignancies of neuroendocrine differentiation. To the pathologist, these lesions appear as sheets of undifferentiated tumor cells with little cytoplasm and dense nuclear chromatin. They are members of the group of "small round blue cell

  2. Ethnic variation of the histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.V. Ezenwa

    Malays with the papillary cell subtype, and also in the Chinese population the highest mortality rate was found in cases with the papillary cell subtype (16.9%). Conclusion: The commonest histological subtype of RCC in each of the studied ethnic groups in Singapore is clear cell carcinoma. However, most of the cancer ...

  3. Survival improvement in patients with disseminated medullary thyroid carcinoma treated with 131I-MIBG therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihaljevic, I.; Topuzovi, N.; Snajder, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction and aim: The aim of this paper is to present our experience of 131 I-MIBG therapy in the cases of aggressive form of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with local and distant metastases. MTC is an uncommon thyroid tumor, accounting from 3-5% of all thyroid malignancies, and arises from para-follicular C cells which produce calcitonin (CT). Prognosis of MTC is related to tumor extension at disease detection, but long-term survival in patients with disseminated MTC is still unsatisfactory. Methods: 4 female patients with metastatic MTC (63, 69 and 2 patients aged 73 years), which already underwent total thyroidectomy and selective neck dissection, received therapy with 100 mCi 131 I-MIBG in our Institute. Patients had widespread disease with neck recurrences (all 4 cases), liver and bone metastases (2 cases) and lung metastases (1 case). All those patients received the therapy twice, second one 3 months up to 1 year after the first cycle. After therapy, whole body scintigraphy was performed; tumor marker levels (CT, carcinoembryonic antigen - CEA, neuron specific enolase - NSE, chromogranin A - CgA and pro-gastrin releasing peptide - pro-GRP) were measured before and after therapy. Results: in one patient we observed a slight decrease in CT level after first MIBG therapy, in another one a slight decrease in CEA serum level, and no lung metastases were visible on whole body scan after second 131 I-MIBG therapy. In one of the two remaining cases there was a significant decrease in CT serum level only after neck dissection. In all cases the patients reported an improvement in subjective symptom reduction. Conclusion: 131 I-MIBG therapy could provide additional benefit to patients with MTC and could improve overall survival, but more patient should be treated in order to define the true potential of the therapy. The aim of this paper is to present our experience of 131 I-MIBG therapy in the cases of aggressive form of

  4. Vismodegib (ERIVEDGE°) In basal cell carcinoma: too many unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas are the most common skin cancers. They are usually localised and carry a good prognosis. There is no standard treatment for the rare patients with metastatic basal cell carcinoma or very extensive basal cell carcinoma for whom surgery or radiotherapy is inappropriate. Vismodegib, a cytotoxic drug, is claimed to prevent tumour growth by inhibiting a pathway involved in tissue repair and embryogenesis. It has been authorised in the European Union for patients with metastatic or locally advanced and extensive basal cell carcinoma. Clinical evaluation of vismodegib is based on a non-comparative clinical trial involving 104 patients, providing only weak evidence. Twenty-one months after the start of the trial, 7 patients with metastases (21%) and 6 patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma (10%) had died. Given the lack of a placebo group, there is no way of knowing whether vismodegib had any effect, positive or negative, on survival. There were no complete responses among patients with metastases, but about one-third of them had partial responses. Among the 63 patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma, there were 14 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The recurrence rate in patients with complete responses was not reported. Similar results were reported in two other uncontrolled trials available in mid-2014. Vismodegib has frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects, including muscle spasms, fatigue and severe hyponatraemia. Cases of severe weight loss, alopecia, ocular disorders, other cancers (including squamous cell carcinoma) and anaemia have also been reported. More data are needed on possible hepatic and cardiovascular adverse effects. A potent teratogenic effect was seen in experimental animals. As vismodegib enters semen, contraception is mandatory for both men (condoms) and women. In practice, vismodegib has frequent and varied adverse effects, some of which are serious, while its benefits are poorly documented

  5. [Cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma: role of 18FDG PET-CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, Guensi; Sara, Taleb; Ghofrane, Cherkaoui Salhi; Malika, Ait Idir; Majdouline, Houjami; Souha, Sahraoui; Abdelatif, Benider; Najoua, Touil; Ghita, Benmoussa; Zineb, Baroudi; Nabil, Chikhaoui

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with unpredictable evolution and high metastatic potential. This neoplasm usually occurs in the elderly on their sun-exposed areas. CCM constant greed for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) defines the role of positron emission tomography (PET) in this pathology. However, no consensus has yet been reached. This study reports the case of a 25 year old woman treated for metastatic MCC, in order to draw attention to this particular tumor and to illustrate the role of 18 FDG PET in the management of this rare entity.

  6. Estrogen receptor-positive primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby M. Pribish, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pure primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast (SCCB represents around 0.1% of breast carcinomas. Diagnosis requires independence from adjacent skin without metastatic disease. SCCB is often large at presentation with nonspecific mammographic and ultrasound findings. It is typically hormone receptor negative and aggressive. Mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy is the most common treatment, although treatment guidelines are not well established. We present a case of pure primary SCCB detected by high risk screening mammogram and treated with breast conserving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. We discuss clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings.

  7. Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Cycle Regulating Genes Targeted by Calycosin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Shufang; Zhu, Liguo; Tian, Yaping; Wang, Haibao; Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yu; Wang, Deqing

    2013-01-01

    We cocultured calycosin with human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (BEL-7402) to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. Calycosin can markedly block the cell growth in G1 phase (P < 0.01) on the IC50 concentration. There were seventeen genes involved in cell-cycle regulation showing differentially expressed in treated cells detected by gene chip. Eight genes were upregulated and nine genes were downregulated. Downregulated TFDP-1, CDKN2D, and SPK2 and upregulated CDC2 and CCNB1 migh...

  8. Expression of Cat Podoplanin in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor in cats; however, molecular-targeted therapies against this tumor, including antibody therapy, have not been developed. Sensitive and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against highly expressed membrane proteins are needed to develop antibody therapies. Podoplanin, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed in many human malignant tumors, including brain tumor, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and oral cancer. Podoplanin binds to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and activates platelet aggregation, which is involved in cancer metastasis. Until now, we have established several mAbs against podoplanin in humans, mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, cattle, and cats. We have reported podoplanin expression in canine melanoma and squamous cell carcinomas using an anti-dog podoplanin mAb PMab-38. In this study, we investigated podoplanin expression in 40 feline squamous cell carcinomas (14 cases of mouth floor, 13 of skin, 9 of ear, and 4 of tongue) by immunohistochemical analysis using an anti-cat podoplanin mAb PMab-52, which we recently developed by cell-based immunization and screening (CBIS) method. Of the total 40 cases, 38 (95%) showed positive staining for PMab-52. In particular, 12 cases (30%) showed a strong membrane-staining pattern of squamous cell carcinoma cells. PMab-52 can be useful for antibody therapy against feline podoplanin-expressing squamous cell carcinomas.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma vs basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: an immunohistochemical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David V; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Verduin, Lindsey; Brill, Louis B; Wick, Mark R

    2015-04-01

    Typical cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are morphologically dissimilar. It is well known, however, that poorly differentiated SCC may assume a basaloid phenotype, complicating the histologic distinction between these 2 neoplasms. Selected immunohistochemical stains have been used in the past to aid in that differential diagnosis. In the current study, additional markers were evaluated to determine whether they would be helpful in that regard. Twenty-nine cases of metatypical (squamoid) BCC (MBCC) and 25 examples of basaloid SCC (BSCC) were studied using the antibodies Ber-EP4 and MOC-31 as well as a plant lectin preparation from Ulex europaeus I (UEA-1). The resulting immunostains were interpreted independently by 3 pathologists, and the results showed that MBCCs demonstrated strong and diffuse staining for Ber-EP4 (25/29) and MOC-31 (29/29). In contrast, BSCCs tended to be only sporadically reactive for both markers (4/25 and 1/25 cases, respectively). Labeling for UEA-1 was observed in almost all BSCCs (24/25), but only 6 of 29 cases of MBCC showed limited, focal staining with that lectin. These data suggest that MOC-31 is a useful marker in the specified differential diagnosis, especially when used together with UEA-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preferential radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Brown, Stephen L.; Kim, Sang-Hie; Khil, Mark S.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Recent cell culture studies by us and others suggest that some human carcinoma cells are more sensitive to heat than are rodent cells following mild hyperthermia. In studying the cellular mechanism of enhanced thermosensitivity of human tumor cells to hyperthermia, prostatic carcinoma cells of human origin were found to be more sensitive to mild hyperthermia than other human cancer cells. The present study was designed to determine the magnitude of radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia and to examine whether the thermal radiosensitization is related to the intrinsic thermosensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Two human prostatic carcinoma cell lines (DU-145 and PC-3) and other carcinoma cells of human origin, in particular, colon (HT-29), breast (MCF-7), lung (A-549), and brain (U-251) were exposed to temperatures of 40-41 deg. C. Single acute dose rate radiation and fractionated radiation were combined with mild hyperthermia to determine thermal radiosensitization. The end point of the study was the colony-forming ability of single-plated cells. Results: DU-145 and PC-3 cells were found to be exceedingly thermosensitive to 41 deg. C for 24 h, relative to other cancer cell lines. Ninety percent of the prostatic cancer cells were killed by a 24 h heat exposure. Prostatic carcinoma cells exposed to a short duration of heating at 41 deg. C for 2 h resulted in a substantial enhancement of radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The thermal enhancement ratios (TERs) of single acute dose radiation following heat treatment 41 deg. C for 2 h were 2.0 in DU-145 cells and 1.4 in PC-3 cells. The TERs of fractionated irradiation combined with continuous heating at 40 deg. C were similarly in the range of 2.1 to 1.4 in prostate carcinoma cells. No significant radiosensitization was observed in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells under the same conditions. Conclusion: The present data suggest that a significant radiosensitization of

  11. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisumoto, Koji; Okami, Kenji; Sakai, Akihiro; Atsumi, Taku; Maki, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Iida, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate therapeutic strategies for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma based on an examination of clinical outcomes in our department. The patients were 99 cases with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated in our hospital from March 2000 to March 2009. Five-year overall survival (OS) and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) were examined by the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Subsite, stage, treatment (surgery group or radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group) and prognosis were reviewed retrospectively. Five-year OS and 5-year CSS were 50% and 59%. Compared with the Stage I and II groups, the prognosis of Stage III and IV groups was significantly worse. As for the treatment, 5-year CSS of the surgery group was 76%, while that of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group was 52%. Regarding the subsite, 5-year CSS of the lateral wall type Stage I and II groups was 90% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 83%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 63% (surgery group: 87%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 55%). Five-year CSS of the superior wall type Stage I and II groups was 85% (surgery group: 100%, radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group: 66%), and that of the Stage III and IV groups was 50% (surgery group: 75%, 5-year CSS was not obtained in the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group). The good outcome of the surgery group suggests that the indications for the operation were appropriate, and expansion of transoral resection should be considered in the near future. The outcomes of the radiotherapy or/and chemotherapy group require improvement. (author)

  12. Combination cisplatin and sulforaphane treatment reduces proliferation, invasion, and tumor formation in epidermal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Candace; Adhikary, Gautam; Grun, Daniel; George, Nicholas; Eckert, Richard L

    2018-01-01

    Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is an extremely common type of cancer. Early tumors can be successfully treated by surgery, but recurrent disease is aggressive and resistant to therapy. Cisplatin is often used as a treatment, but the outcome is rarely satisfactory. For this reason new strategies are required. Sulforaphane is a diet-derived cancer prevention agent that is effective in suppressing tumor growth in animal models of skin cancer. We monitored the efficacy of sulforaphane and cisplatin as a combined therapy for squamous cell carcinoma. Both agents suppress cell proliferation, growth of cancer stem cell spheroids, matrigel invasion and migration of SCC-13 and HaCaT cells, and combination treatment is more efficient. In addition, SCC-13 cell derived cancer stem cells are more responsive to these agents than non-stem cancer cells. Both agents suppress tumor formation, but enhanced suppression is observed with combined treatment. Moreover, both agents reduce the number of tumor-resident cancer stem cells. SFN treatment of cultured cells or tumors increases apoptosis and p21 Cip1 level, and both agents increase tumor apoptosis. We suggest that combined therapy with sulforaphane and cisplatin is efficient in suppressing tumor formation and may be a treatment option for advanced epidermal squamous cell carcinoma. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ghrelin inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    The only orexigenic peptide, ghrelin, which is primarily produced by the gastrointestinal tract, has been implicated in malignant cell proliferation and invasion. Ghrelin is a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). However, the role of ghrelin in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown since the expression of GHSR1a in ovary is not confirmed. The aim of the present study was to assess expression of ghrelin and its receptor in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma and to examine the effect of ghrelin on carcinoma cell proliferation. Frozen sections of ovarian samples and the human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line, HO-8910, were used to characterize the expression of ghrelin/GHSR1a axis and the effect of ghrelin on proliferation. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1a are expressed in ovarian epithelial carcinoma in vivo and in vitro. Ghrelin inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, and this inhibition may be abolished by the ghrelin receptor antagonist D-Lys-3-GH-releasing peptide-6 and ghrelin neutralizing antibody. Ghrelin enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis and autophagy. The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway blocks the effects of ghrelin-induced autophagy and apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation induced by ghrelin. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that ghrelin inhibits the proliferation of human HO-8910 ovarian epithelial carcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis and autophagy via the mTOR signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of ghrelin-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy.

  14. Report of a Rare Case of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Associated with Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Borzouei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC is the most common well-differentiated cancer of the thyroid. Only in few cases of PTC entity of renal cell carcinoma has been observed in patients affected with PTC. Case Report: In this study we report a case of sporadic PTC and renal cell carcinoma in a 63 year-old woman. Conclusion: After surgery the patient was hospitalized for 1 month in ICU section. 3 months after being discharged from the hospital, she was still in a good condition and is under the follow-up treatment.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012; 19 (3:75-77

  15. Early carcinoma of the penis treated with radiation therapy: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, R.K.; Babaiah, M.; Sudarshan, G.; Shah, A.M.; Ranganathan, Vanieshree

    1994-01-01

    Four patients with stage 1 carcinoma of the penis were treated with radical external beam radiotherapy using individualized wax bolus. All patients are alive and doing well at the time of this report, 2 years after treatment. No patient had local recurrence and all had preservation of the organ and its function. Radiotherapy can be used as an alternative modality to surgery especially in the early stages of penile cancers. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab

  16. Dyadic Aspects of Sexual Well-Being in Men with Laser-Treated Penile Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Skeppner, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: A high level of within-couple agreement concerning sexuality and life satisfaction points to the necessity of including an adequate sexological case history, counseling, and treatment for this group of patients and their partners. Skeppner E and Fugl-Meyer K. Dyadic aspects of sexual well-being in men with laser-treated penile carcinoma. Sex Med 2015;3:67–75.

  17. Doxorubicin fails to eradicate cancer stem cells derived from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells: characterization of resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuqin; Cui, Dai; Xu, Shuhang; Brabant, Georg; Derwahl, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Current chemotherapy with doxorubicin fails to eradicate anaplastic thyroid cancer or even to stop tumor progress which may be due to the failure of these drugs to effectively target putative cancer stem cells. To test this hypothesis, anaplastic thyroid cell lines were characterized by FACS for their content of cancer stem cells, their in vitro sphere-forming capacity and their expression of multidrug resistance transporters of the ABC gene family which may confer drug resistance to the cells. Cells were treated with doxorubicin in short-term and long-term culture up to 6 months to establish a resistant cell line. The survival of cancer and cancer stem cells and the differential expression of transporters were analyzed. Anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines that consisted of 0.4-0.8% side population cells, expressed ABCG2 and multi-drug-resistant 1 (MDR1) transporters. Treatment with doxorubicin gradually killed the non-side population of cancer cells derived from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells. This conferred a growth advantage to cancer stem cells which in turn overgrew the culture. Resistant cell line consisted of a 70% side population fraction enriched with Oct4-positive cancer stem cells. Inhibition of ABCG2 and/or MDR1 revealed that resistance of cancer stem cells to doxorubicin may be mainly due to the expression of these ABC transporters that were highly up-regulated in the resistant subline. The poor outcome of chemotherapy with doxorubicin in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma may be partly explained by up-regulation of ABCG2 and MDR1 transporters that confers resistance to cancer stem cells. Thus an effective treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer has not only to destroy cancer cells that represent the bulk of tumor cell population but also cancer stem cells that may drive tumor progression.

  18. Isolated Meningeal Recurrence of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butchart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal carcinomatosis occurs in 1–18% of patients with solid tumours, most commonly carcinomas of the breast and lung or melanomas. There are relatively few reports of meningeal carcinomatosis in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Isolated meningeal recurrence is particularly uncommon, and we present an unusual case of this in a 58-year-old man. The case was further complicated by the somewhat atypical presentation with a confirmed ischaemic stroke. The patient died one month after presentation.

  19. Synchronous presentation of nasopharyngeal and renal cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Boruban,Cem; Yavas,Ozlem; Altundag,Kadri; Sencan,Orhan

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of synchronous presentation of nasopharyngeal and renal cell carcinomas in a-50-year old male patient with long standing smoking history. The patient was initially presented with a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. During staging process, the abdominal computed tomography detected a right renal solid mass, 6.5 cm in diameter, originating from posterior portion of the right renal cortex. Right radical nephrectomy was performed and pathological examination revealed re...

  20. Estramustine: A novel radiation enhancer in human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Gabel, M.; Khil, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Estramustine (EM), an antimicrotubule agent, binds microtubule-associated proteins, causes spindle disassembly, and arrests cells at the late G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle. Since cells in the G 2 /M phase are the most radiosensitive and some human cancer cells contain high level of EM-binding protein, experiments were carried out to determine whether radiation sensitization could be obtained in human carcinoma cells. Cells containing a high level of EM-binding protein such as prostate carcinoma (DU-145), breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and malignant glioma (U-251) were used to demonstrate radiosensitization. Cervical carcinoma (HeLa-S 3 ) and colon carcinoma (HT-29) cells which are not known to contain EM-binding protein were also employed. Cell survival was assayed by the colony forming ability of single plated cells in culture to obtain dose-survival curves. Pretreatment of DU-145, MCF-7, and U-251 cells to a nontoxic concentration (5 μM) of EM for more than one cell cycle time, substantially enhanced the radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The sensitizer enhancement ratio of these cells ranged from 1.35-1.52. The magnitude of the enhancement was dependent on the drug concentration and exposure time. The rate of cell accumulation in G 2 /M phase, as determined by flow cytometry, increased with longer treatment time in the cell lines which showed radiosensitization. Other antimicrotubule agents such as taxol and vinblastine caused minimal or no radiosensitization at nontoxic concentrations. The data provide a radiobiological basis for using EM as a novel radiation enhancer, with the property of tissue selectivity. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. [What is new in basal cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppt, M; von Braunmühl, T; Berking, C

    2016-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in fair-skinned individuals. Although lymph node or visceral metastases are observed in less than 0.5 % of all cases, BCC can have a fatal course due to its highly invasive growth pattern. To provide a comprehensive update on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of BCC. We review the current literature and recommendations of the German guidelines on treatment and prevention of skin cancer. The most pertinent developments are summarized in this review article. The use of optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy can significantly improve the diagnosis of BCC compared with clinical assessment and dermoscopy alone. Mohs micrographic surgery remains the therapeutic gold standard for tumors in the head and facial area and tumors with high-risk features. The application of imiquimod, 5‑fluorouracil, or photodynamic therapy should be restricted to low-risk superficial tumors. Topical inhibitors of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway are currently being evaluated in early clinical trials. In contrast, vismodegib and sonidegib have been approved for the systemic treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC with good response rates. The most common adverse events of both agents are muscle cramps, dysgeusia, diffuse alopecia, weight loss, and fatigue. In an Australian phase III trial, oral nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduced the occurrence of new BCC by 20 % in skin cancer patients. Targeted therapy with SHH inhibitors has improved the prognosis of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, albeit at the cost of a significant number of adverse events.

  2. Two case reports: Carcinoma of the cervix and carcinoma of the endometrium treated with radiotherapy after previous irradiation for benign uterine bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, low doses of radiotherapy were used to treat benign uterine bleeding. The cases of two women who received this form of therapy and later developed gynaecological malignancies and had high-dose pelvic radiotherapy are presented. A 76-year-old woman with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage-II B squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix received external beam radiotherapy and intra-uterine brachytherapy and a 77-year-old woman with a FIGO stage-I B endometrial adenocarcinoma received adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Both women had a significant past history of low-dose-rate intra-uterine irradiation for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Therefore the theoretical question of carcinogenesis was raised, and also the practical questions of what dose had previously been given and what further dose could be safely given with regard to normal tissue tolerance. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Pancreatic-type Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Stomach Included in Multiple Primary Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Kurosawa, Manabu; Mise, Masahiro; Yamagishi, Miki; Higashide, Shunichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) in the stomach is extraordinarily rare. We pathologically examined two cases with multiple primary carcinomas, including gastric tumors. Gastric cancer specimens were examined by immunostaining and electron microscopy. Both cases had cancer cells with acinar patterns, resembling pancreatic ACC. The cancer cells in the first case were positive for exocrine markers, including chymotrypsin, lipase and alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT), as well as neuroendocrine markers, including chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The cancer cells in the second case were positive for chymotrypsin and alpha-1 ACT, while being slightly positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, cancer cells contained zymogen granules in both cases. The final diagnosis was pancreatic mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma and pure pancreatic ACC, respectively. We confirmed two cases with gastric pancreatic-type ACC included in multiple primary carcinomas. This type of double cancer has not been reported previously. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  5. Definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the pyriform sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Tao, Yungan; Veresezan, Ovidiu; Lusinchi, Antoine; Le Ridant, Anne-Marie; Janot, François; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Bourhis, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the long-term results after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for pyriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Material and methods: The data concerning all patients treated for pyriform sinus SCC with RT with a curative intent between 1990 and 2006 were reviewed. Results: A total of 249 patients were included. The median follow-up is 6.5 years. Overall 123 patients had relapsed. For the entire population, the 5-year local control, regional control, freedom-from-distant metastasis, and overall survival rate were 68%, 69%, 78% and 38%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate for the 107 T1–T2 tumors was 85% (95% confidence interval (CI): 75–91). N stage was the main risk factor for the development of distant metastases, with a hazard ratio of 8.9 (95% CI: 2.1–39) and 15.6 (95% CI: 3.6–67.8) for N2 and N3 patients respectively. For patients with N2–N3 disease, pre-RT neck dissection improved regional control but not overall survival. Moderate to severe late complications occurred in 50 patients (28% of the patients without local relapse). Conclusion: A high local control rate can be achieved when treating T1–T2 hypopharynx cancers with definitive radiotherapy. The high rate of nodal and distant relapses among patients with N2–N3 disease warrants intensification of therapy.

  6. Cigarette Smoking and the Risks of Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusingize, Jean Claude; Olsen, Catherine M; Pandeya, Nirmala P; Subramaniam, Padmini; Thompson, Bridie S; Neale, Rachel E; Green, Adèle C; Whiteman, David C

    2017-08-01

    Sunlight is the principal environmental risk factor for keratinocyte cancers, but other carcinogens have also been implicated, including tobacco smoke. Findings have been conflicting, however. We investigated associations between cigarette smoking and incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in QSkin, a prospective study of skin cancer (N = 43,794). Smoking history was self-reported at baseline; newly diagnosed BCCs and SCCs were ascertained through data linkage and verified by histopathology reports. We restricted analyses to white participants who at baseline reported no past history of skin cancer excisions and no more than five destructively treated actinic skin lesions. We fitted Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for known confounders. Compared with never smokers, current smokers had significantly lower risks of BCC (hazard ratio = 0.6; 95% confidence interval = 0.4-0.9) but significantly higher risks of SCC (hazard ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.5-3.6). Former smokers had similar risks for BCC and SCC as never smokers. Among smokers, we observed no dose-response trends with duration of smoking, intensity, or time since quitting. On further analysis, current smokers had fewer skin examinations and procedures than never smokers, suggesting greater opportunities for detection among never smokers. Strengths include large sample size, prospective design, and virtually complete follow-up; however, histologic details were missing for a proportion of excised tumors. In conclusion, current smokers had a lower incidence of BCC (possibly because of detection bias) but higher rates of SCC. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CD40L induces multidrug resistance to apoptosis in breast carcinoma and lymphoma cells through caspase independent and dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorzanger-Rousselot, Nathalie; Alberti, Laurent; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    CD40L was found to reduce doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through caspase-3 dependent mechanism. Whether this represents a general mechanism for other tumor types is unknown. The resistance induced by CD40L against apoptosis induced by a panel of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs in non Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Doxorubicin, cisplatyl, etoposide, vinblastin and paclitaxel increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast carcinoma as well as in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Co-culture with irradiated L cells expressing CD40L significantly reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines treated with these drugs. In breast carcinoma cell lines, these 5 drugs induced an inconsistent increase of caspase-3/7 activity, while in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines all 5 drugs increased caspase-3/7 activity up to 28-fold above baseline. Co-culture with CD40L L cells reduced (-39% to -89%) the activation of caspase-3/7 induced by these agents in all 5 non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, but in none of the 2 breast carcinoma cell lines. Co culture with CD40L L cells also blocked the apoptosis induced by exogenous ceramides in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through a caspase-3-like, 8-like and 9-like dependent pathways. These results indicate that CD40L expressed on adjacent non tumoral cells induces multidrug resistance to cytotoxic agents and ceramides in both breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, albeit through a caspase independent and dependent pathway respectively

  8. Characterizing the outcomes of metastatic papillary renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor Wells, John; Donskov, Frede; Fraccon, Anna P

    2017-01-01

    Outcomes of metastatic papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) patients are poorly characterized in the era of targeted therapy. A total of 5474 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the International mRCC Database Consortium (IMDC) were retrospectively analyzed. Outcomes were...... compared between clear cell (ccRCC; n = 5008) and papillary patients (n = 466), and recorded type I and type II papillary patients (n = 30 and n = 165, respectively). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall response rate (ORR) favored ccRCC over pRCC. OS was 8 months longer...

  9. Proteomic Studies of Cholangiocarcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Secretomes

    OpenAIRE

    Srisomsap, Chantragan; Sawangareetrakul, Phannee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Bhudhisawasdi, Vaharabhongsa; Wongkham, Sopit; Svasti, Jisnuson

    2009-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occur with relatively high incidence in Thailand. The secretome, proteins secreted from cancer cells, are potentially useful as biomarkers of the diseases. Proteomic analysis was performed on the secreted proteins of cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA-1) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-S102, HepG2, SK-Hep-1, and Alexander) cell lines. The secretomes of the five cancer cell lines were analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with LC/MS/MS. Sixty-eight...

  10. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  11. Current diagnosis and treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Mareike; Hillen, Uwe; Leiter, Ulrike; Sachse, Michael; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell carcinoma represents is most common tumor in fair-skinned individuals. In Germany, age-standardized incidence rates are 63 (women) and 80 (men) per 100,000 population per year. Early lesions may be difficult to diagnose merely on clinical grounds. Here, noninvasive diagnostic tools such as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser scanning microscopy may be helpful. The clinical diagnosis is usually confirmed by histology. Standard therapy consists of complete excision with thorough histological examination, either by means of micrographic surgery or, depending on tumor size and location as well as infiltration, using surgical margins of 3-5 mm or more. In particular, multiple basal cell carcinomas (such as in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome) and locally advanced as well as rarely also metastatic basal cell carcinoma may pose a therapeutic challenge. In superficial basal cell carcinoma, nonsurgical therapies such as photodynamic therapy or topical agents may be considered. In case of locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma, an interdisciplinary tumor board should issue therapeutic recommendations. These include radiation therapy as well as systemic therapy with a hedgehog inhibitor. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate regulates proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via syndecan-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Xiaoheng; Yan, Zhiping; Xie, Linshen

    2017-11-24

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that S1P induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells via an MMP-7/Syndecan-1/TGF-β autocrine loop. In the present study, we investigated the regulative role of S1P in cell survival and progression of HCC cells, and tested whether syndecan-1 is required in the S1P action. After transfected with syndecan-1 shRNA, HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells were treated with S1P for 72 h, and then cell proliferation was detected by CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and cell apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. The levels of apoptosis markers including cleaved-Caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP in SMMC7721 cells were examined by western blotting. Results showed that S1P significantly enhanced cell proliferation in HCC cells, which was significantly inhibited by syndecan-1 shRNA. S1P induced the cell proportion in S phase in HCC cells, whereas S1P decreased the proportion of cells in both early and late apoptosis. Syndecan-1 shRNA induced the G2/M arrest in the presence of S1P. In the syndecan-1 shRNA transfected HCC cells, the proportions of late and early apoptotic cells, and levels of cleaved-Caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP were significantly increased in cells with or without S1P treatment. Thus, S1P augments the proportion of cells in S phase of the cell cycle that might translate to enhance HCC cell proliferation and inhibit the cell apoptosis via syndecan-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune responses to transgene and retroviral vector in patients treated with ex vivo-engineered T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, C.H.; Willemsen, R.; Elzakker, P. van; Steenbergen-Langeveld, S. van; Broertjes, M.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Oosterwijk, E.; Sleijfer, S.; Debets, R.; Gratama, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of immune effector cells that are gene modified by retroviral transduction to express tumor-specific receptors constitutes an attractive approach to treat cancer. In patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, we performed a study with autologous T cells genetically retargeted

  14. Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting with a Gingival Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Rusha A.E.; Mohamed, Kamal E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic deposits to the oral cavity are exceptionally rare. The commonest tumor types metastasizing to the oral cavity include lung and breast carcinoma. Renal cell carcinoma is believed to be the third most common infra clavicular tumor to metastasize to the head and neck. We report a case where an oral cavity deposit was the initial presentation for an occult clear cell renal carcinoma. Additional therapeutic options, including immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and participation...

  15. High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Veness

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas occur at an epidemic rate in many countries with the worldwide incidence increasing. The sun-exposed head and neck are the most frequent sites for these cancers to arise and in most patients diagnosed with a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, local treatment is usually curative. However, a subset is diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. High-risk factors include size (> 2 cm, thickness/depth of invasion (> 4 mm, recurrent lesions, the presence of perineural invasion, location near the parotid gland, and immunosuppression. These patients have a higher risk (> 10–20% of developing metastases to regional lymph nodes (often parotid nodes, and in some cases also of experiencing local morbidity (perineural invasion, based on unfavourable primary lesion and patient factors. Despite treatment, many patients developing metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma experience mortality and morbidity usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease. It is therefore important that clinicians treating nonmelanoma skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of these high-risk patients. The aim of this article is to discuss the factors that define a high-risk patient and to present some of the issues pertinent to their management.

  16. Single cell time-lapse analysis reveals that podoplanin enhances cell survival and colony formation capacity of squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Youichi; Kojima, Motohiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-01-06

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) are characterized by high clonal expansion capacity. We previously reported that podoplanin is a TIC-specific marker for the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. The aim of this study is to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the high clonal expansion potential of podoplanin-positive A431cells using Fucci imaging. Single podoplanin-positive cells created large colonies at a significantly higher frequency than single podoplanin-negative cells, whereas no difference was observed between the two types of cells with respect to cell cycle status. Conversely, the cell death ratio of progenies derived from podoplanin-positive single cell was significantly lower than that of cells derived from podoplanin-negative cells. Single A431 cells, whose podoplanin expression was suppressed by RNA interference, exhibited increased cell death ratios and decreased frequency of large colony forming. Moreover, the frequency of large colony forming decreased significantly when podoplanin-positive single cells was treated with a ROCK (Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase) inhibitor, whereas no difference was observed in single podoplanin-negative cells. Our current study cleared that high clonal expansion capacity of podoplanin-positive TICs populations was the result of reduced cell death by podoplanin-mediated signaling. Therefore, podoplanin activity may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas.

  17. Leukemoid reaction associated with transitional cell carcinoma: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Bladder cancer, immunohistochemistry, leukemoid reaction, lymphatic metastasis. Date of Acceptance: 28-Aug-2013. Address for correspondence: ..... bladder of a mouse in vivo tumor model and discovered that the morbidity of mice with bladder carcinoma treated with SA-GM-CSF decreased from 100% to ...

  18. Basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) in children and teenagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbari, H.; Mehregan, A.H.

    1982-01-15

    Among over 390,000 routine dermatopathologic specimens there were 85 cases diagnosed as basal cell epithelioma (carcinoma) (BCE) in persons 19 years old or younger. This number was refined to 40 cases de novo BCE in children and teenagers. Basal cell epithelioma unrelated to other conditions is rare in the young and it should be differentiated from similar fibroepithelial growths.

  19. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Testicular Teratoma and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khan and Bagchi: Testicular squamous cell carcinoma with umbilical nodule tumors is usually localized in retroperitoneal lymph nodes including aortic, common iliac and caval nodes.[8]. In metastatic sites, the somatic-type malignancies have a poor prognosis. They do not respond to germ cell tumor chemotherapy; surgical ...

  20. Unclassified renal cell carcinoma: an analysis of 85 cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakiewicz, P.I.; Hutterer, G.C.; Trinh, Q.D.; Pantuck, A.J.; Klatte, T.; Lam, J.S.; Guille, F.; Taille, A. De La; Novara, G.; Tostain, J.; Cindolo, L.; Ficarra, V.; Schips, L.; Zigeuner, R.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Chautard, D.; Lechevallier, E.; Valeri, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Lang, H.; Soulie, M.; Ferriere, J.M.; Pfister, C.; Mejean, A.; Belldegrun, A.S.; Patard, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cancer-specific mortality in patients with unclassified renal cell carcinoma (URCC) vs clear cell RCC (CRCC) after nephrectomy, as URCC is a rare but very aggressive histological subtype. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-five patients with URCC and 4322 with CRCC were identified

  1. Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig Castillejo, Anna; Membrive Conejo, Ismael; Foro Arnalot, Palmira; Rodríguez de Dios, Nuria; Algara López, Manuel

    2010-07-01

    Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (SCC) is a rare disease that mixes clinical and biological characteristics of both cervical neoplasms and neuroendocrine small cell cancer. The prognosis is poor and the optimal treatment has not yet been clarified. Multimodality treatment, with surgery and concurrent chemoradiation has recently been shown to improve local control and survival rates.

  2. Survivin is a therapeutic target in Merkel cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, Reety; Shuda, Masahiro; Guastafierro, Anna; Feng, Huichen; Toptan, Tuna; Tolstov, Yanis; Normolle, Daniel; Vollmer, Laura L; Vogt, Andreas; Dömling, Alexander; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes ~80% of primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). By comparing digital transcriptome subtraction deep-sequencing profiles, we found that transcripts of the cellular survivin oncoprotein [BIRC5a (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing

  3. RADIATION THERAPY OF A PRESUMPTIVE URETHRAL TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA IN AN EASTERN GRAY SQUIRREL (SCIURUS CAROLINENSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Sanford, Sara E; St-Vincent, Rachel; Hiss, Anne

    2015-12-01

    An adult female Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), with a previous history of primary renal transitional cell carcinoma treated by nephrectomy, was diagnosed with a metastatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) utilizing the veterinary bladder tumor antigen test in combination with other noninvasive diagnostic tests. The squirrel was treated with piroxicam and external beam radiation therapy given in 18 treatments over 30 days to achieve a total of 54 gray. Mild to moderate side effects from the pelvic irradiation were self-limiting and easily managed. Resolution of clinical signs was achieved for approximately 6 mo until recurrence of metastasis. This report represents the first published account of both TCC and external beam radiation therapy in an Eastern gray squirrel.

  4. Clinico-pathological study on non-squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijiwa, Hideki; Sakamoto, Kikuo; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi; Suzuki, Gen; Hayabuchi, Naohumi

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed 22 cases of non-squamous cell carcinoma (NSCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx that were treated at the Kurume University Hospital between 1976 and 2005. Two percent of the oral carcinomas and 5% of the oropharyngeal carcinomas were NSCCs. The 5-year and 10-year survival rates of NSCC in the oropharynx were 90%. There was no statistically significant difference in survival rate between squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and NSCC (p=0.06). The 5-year and 10-year survival rates of NSCC in the oral cavity were 75% and 37%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate between SCC and NSCC. Survival results well correlated with clinical stages. A significant difference between Stage I, II and III versus Stage IV was found (p=0.04). In contrast, no significant relationship was found between survival and histologic type, or between survival and treatment. Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of Grade III, peri-neural invasion or vessel invasion, are recommended to receive adjuvant therapy. (author)

  5. Basosquamous Cell Carcinoma Developing from a Renal Transplantation Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tsukada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of basosquamous cell carcinoma arising from a 52-year-old Japanese renal transplantation recipient (RTR. In the present case, we investigated the immunohistochemical profiles of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, focusing on cytotoxic granules, granulysin-bearing cells and immunosuppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our present study suggests some of the possible mechanisms for the carcinogenesis of cutaneous malignancy in RTRs.

  6. Outcome of Patients With Metastatic Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chittoria, Namita; Choueiri, Toni K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology......%-8%) or underlying clear cell histology (87%-88%). More than 93% of patients received VEGF inhibitors as first-line therapy; objective response was less common in sRCC whereas primary refractory disease was more common (21% vs. 26% and 43% vs. 21%; P

  7. An Unusual Location of Basal Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tepe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin tumour. Chronic sun exposure is considered as the main etiologic factor in its development. Although it mainly occurs on sun-exposed areas as the face and neck, it rarely develops on the forearms and/or arms. The etiologic factors which affect the anatomic distribution of basal cell carcinoma are not well-known. Here we report two patients who developed basal cell carcinoma on the forearm. None of the patients had a specific etiologic factor except for chronic sunlight exposure. The aim of our report is to show that this prevalant cutaneous malignancy can be encountered in rare/unusual areas. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 51-4

  8. Radiographic findings of oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. H.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Growth of oat cell carcinoma tends to be invasive and extends rapidly through the bronchial lymphatics to the hilus and mediastinum, where bulky mass of tumor develop. Authors have analysed roentgenologic manifestations of 22 cases of histologically proven oat cell carcinoma of the lung seen during the period of 3 years from Jan, 1980 to May. 1983. The results 18 males and 4 females. Incidence was the most common in 7th decade as 45%. 2. Chief complaints are cough, sputum and dyspnea. Metastatic symptoms are hoarseness, SVC syndrome and back pain. 3. The radiographic findings of oat cell carcinoma were as follows. 1) hilar and perihilar mass 73% 2) Mediastinal mass 64% 3) Bronchial obstruction sign 55% 4) Peripheral mass 18% 5) Pleural effusion 18%

  9. SPECT/CT in gingival squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, R.; Hadzhiyska, V.; Petrov, T.

    2015-01-01

    Gingival squamous cell carcinoma have a relatively poor prognosis and large differential diagnosis (periodontitis, osteomyelitis, etc.), therefore, it is usually diagnosed at a late stage. Hematogenous dissemination occurs in only about 10% of cases, including lung (66%), bone (22%), liver (10%), skin, bone marrow and mediastinum. Bone metastases are very rare compared to other malignancies, most commonly affect the axial skeleton (spine, pelvis, ribs and lumbar spine). In our case, we presented a patient with gingival squamous cell carcinoma and bone metastasis in the forearm detected with Whole Body Bone Scintigraphy (WBS), combined with Single Photon Emission Tomography /Computed Tomography (SPECT /CT). The obtained data suggest that the single use of WBS was not informative enough for making the final diagnosis, but the result of combined functional-morphological approach was the most pathognomonic. Thus, with single study can be obtained a complex information, which leads to a fast therapeutic decision. Key words: SPECT/CT. GINGiVAL. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

  10. A Novel Protein Is Lower Expressed in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Guan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Engrailed-2 (EN2 has been identified as a candidate oncogene in breast cancer and prostate cancer. It is usually recognized as a mainly nuclear staining in the cells. However, recent studies showed a cytoplasmic staining occurred in prostate cancer, bladder cancer and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The inconsistency makes us confused. To clarify the localization and expression of EN2 in renal cell carcinoma, anti-EN2 antibody (ab28731 and anti-EN2 antibody (MAB2600 were used for immunohistochemistry (IHC respectively. Interestingly, we found that EN2 detected by ab28731 was mainly presented in cytoplasm while EN2 detected by MAB2600 was mainly presented in nucleus. To further investigate the different patterns observed above, lysates from full-length EN2 over expression in HEK293T cells were used to identify which antibody the EN2 molecule bound by western blot. Results showed ab28731 did not react with the lysates. For this reason, the novel specific protein detected by ab28731 was not the EN2 molecule and was named nonEN2. Then using the renal carcinoma tissue microarray and renal tissues, we found that the protein expression levels of nonEN2 in kidney tumor tissues was significantly lower than that in kidney normal tissues (p < 0.05, so was in renal cell lines. Taken together, nonEN2 is lower expressed and may play an important role in renal cell carcinoma.

  11. A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Developing Within a Red-Ink Tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Sara; Blakeway, Elizabeth; Fenn, Chris; German, Alyn; Laws, Philip

    Cutaneous reactions to tattoos are well reported and include allergic reactions, infections, and foreign body granuloma or may be a presenting sign of sarcoidosis. There have been very few reported cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in tattoo-treated skin. We report a case of SCC arising within a red-ink tattoo and discuss the potential the role of chronic low-grade inflammation in pathogenesis. This should serve to raise awareness of potential tattoo-related serious adverse effects.

  12. 5-Aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy for superficial basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Want, David; Kennedy, James C.; Brundage, Michael; Rothwell, Deanna

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) offers an alternative to plastic surgery and radiotherapy with potential for good cosmetic outcome and local control of disease. We report our clinical experience with this technique. Patients were treated prospectively on a study protocol enrolling a total of 118 patients (63 male, 55 female) with an average age of 65 years. Consecutive patients meeting eligibility criteria were invited to participate over a four year period. Median followup was 27 months (range 1 to 76 months). In the study group, 62 patients had single lesions and 56 had multiple lesions. Of the 56 patients with multiple lesions, 33 had 2-4 lesions, 11 had 5-9, and 11 had 10 or more. All patients were treated with 20% ALA dissolved in Glaxal Base applied to the tumors for three to four hours. Following removal of the cream, fluorescence intensity and distribution were assessed using a UV-A lamp, and the lesions were exposed to photoactivating light of wavelength greater than 600 nm for a light dose ranging from 100-150 J/cm2. Lesions were reassessed in followup, and scored as complete or partial responses. At subsequent patient assessments, lesions were scored as continued complete responses or recurrences. In the patients with single lesions, there was an initial complete response rate of 90.3%. Of the 56 patients with multiple lesions, 44 had all of their lesions respond completely, and there was an overall average response rate of 95.5%. Sixty three percent of males and 44% of females had all of their lesions respond completely. (p=0.033, Chi-squared test). There was no difference in response rate with respect to age, or site of lesion. The recurrence rates were 35% for patients with single lesions, and 10.5% for patients with multiple lesions. ALA-PDT would appear to be a promising alternative to conventional treatment for superficial basal cell carcinoma. Based on these results

  13. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Analysis of Outcomes: A 30-Year Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Liang

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is an aggressive cutaneous malignancy with poor prognosis. Limited data exists to guide treatment decisions. Here we report on our institutional experience and outcomes treating patients with MCC.A database search (1984-2014 of patients treated at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics was used to identify patients with histologically confirmed MCC. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were examined via review of medical records. Statistical analyses were performed to assess outcomes and associated prognostic factors.A total of 87 patients with MCC were identified with a median follow-up of 17 months (mean: 38, range: 0-210 months. Two and five-year overall survival rates were 53.9% and 32.8%, respectively. Recurrence was documented in 31.0% of patients (85.2% locoregional, 48.1% distant and 33.3% both. Patients with a history of immunosuppression exhibited significantly worse survival (hazard ratio, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7 when compared to immune-competent individuals. The head and neck region was the most common location of primary lesion (N=49 followed by the extremities (N=31. Upper extremity primaries predicted significantly better overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.23-0.99 while lower extremity primaries did not have significantly better results (hazard ratio, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.21-1.2 in comparison to head and neck site of primary. Nodal involvement (hazard ratio, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.5-5.79 was also a negative prognostic factor associated with poor overall survival when compared with clinically node negative patients. Primary tumor size > 2 cm (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 0.91-3.4 was not associated with survival.This study highlights the role of various factors in determining prognosis of Merkel cell carcinoma; history of immunosuppression, nodal involvement, and head/neck primary predicted worse overall survival. These findings suggest that improvements in both distant and locoregionally

  14. PDT-induced apoptosis in bladder carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Kleinschmidt, Klaus; Repassy, Denes; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1999-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a highly efficient inducer of apoptosis in EY-28 bladder carcinoma cells, resulting in extensive DNA fragmentation. Bladder carcinoma cells EY-28 (Tumorbank Heidelberg, Germany) were incubated for 1 h with 1 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml or 2 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml. After incubation cells were refed with complete medium and irradiated with 0.75 J/cm2. To identify apoptotic cells, a in situ cell death detection kit POD (Boehringer Mannheim, Germany) was used. The chromatin condensation characteristic to apoptotic cells was detected by transmission electron microscopy. Using 1 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml and 2 (mu) g AamTPPn/ml (9-Acetamido-2,7,12,17- tetra-n-Porpylporphycene), respectively, and irradiation at 0.75 J/cm2, a percentage of 36.9% and 54.7%, respectively, of apoptotic cells was detected.

  15. The significance of VEGF expression in stage II carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won; Choi, Yoon La; Huh, Seung Jae; Yoon, Sang Min; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to determine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to the VEGF expression in stage II cervical carcinoma patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. We enrolled 31 patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancer from 1995 to 2003 at Samsumg Medical Center and their paraffin block tissue samples were available for study. The median age of the patients was 65 years. The mean tumor size was 4.1 cm (range: 1.2 ∼8.2 cm). Seven patients (22.6%) were suspected of having pelvic lymph node metastasis. An external beam irradiation dose of 45-56.4 Gy was administered to the whole pelvis with a 15 MV linear accelerator, and an additional 24 Gy was given to point A by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. VEGF staining was defined as positive when more than 10% of the tumor cells were stained. The median follow-up duration was 58 months. A positive VEGF expression was observed in 21 patients (67.7%). There was no significant correlation between the VEGF expression and pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor size and the response of radiotherapy. During follow-up, 7 patients had recurrence. The complete response rate was not significant between the VEGF (-) and VEGF(+) tumors. However, the VEGF(+) tumors showed a significantly higher recurrence rate in comparison with the VEGF(-) tumors (ρ = 0.040). The three year disease-free survival rates were 100% and 66.7%, respectively, for patients with VEGF(-) or VEGF(+) tumor (ρ = 0.047). The VEGF expression was a significant factor for recurrence and disease-free survival. However, the significance of the VEGF expression is still controversial because of the various definitions of VEGF expression and the mismatches of the clinical data in the previous studies

  16. Surgical management for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Shelley, Mike; Coles, Bernadette; Biyani, Chandra S; El-Mokadem, Ismail; Nabi, Ghulam

    2011-04-13

    Upper tract transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) are uncommon and aggressive tumours. There are a number of surgical approaches to manage this condition including open radical nephroureterectomy and laparoscopic procedures. To determine the best surgical management option for upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. A sensitive search strategy was developed to identify relevant studies for inclusion in this review. The following databases were searched for randomised trials evaluating surgical approaches to the management of upper tract TCC: Medline EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, British Nursing Index, AMED, LILACS, Web of Science®, Scopus, Biosis, TRIP, Biomed Central, Dissertation Abstracts, and ISI Proceedings. The following criteria that were considered for this review.Types of studies - All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the various surgical methods and approaches for the management of localised upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. Types of participants - All adult patients with localised transitional cell carcinoma. Localised disease was defined as limited to the kidney or ureter with no gross regional lymph nodal enlargement on imaging. Types of interventions - Any surgical method or approach for managing localised upper tract transitional cell carcinoma. Types of outcome measures - Overall and cancer-specific survival were primary outcomes. Surgery-related morbidity. Quality of life and health economics outcomes were secondary outcomes. Two review authors examined the search results independently to identify trials for inclusion. We identified one randomised controlled trial that met our inclusion criteria. The trial showed that the laparoscopic approach had superior peri-operative outcomes compared to open approach. Laparoscopic was superior and statistically significant for blood loss (104 mL (millilitres) versus 430 mL, P management of upper tract transitional cell carcinoma

  17. Local control and image diagnosis of cases of esophageal carcinoma treated by external and intracavitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Miura, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Discussions are made on local control of 31 cases of esophageal carcinoma which were treated by external and intracavitary irradiation between May 1980 and March 1983. X-ray and endoscopic findings have been used for the image diagnosis. Before the begining of radiotherapy, types of esophageal carcinoma were determined from X-ray findings according to Borrmann's classification. There were 10 cases of types 1 and 2, and 21 cases of types 3 and 4. After completion of external and intracvitary irradiation, all 10 cases of types 1 and 2 were locally controlled. Of the 21 cases of types 3 and 4, 8 cases which developed stenosis or deep ulcer after external irradiation all failed in local control. The remaining 13 cases of types 3 and 4 were locally controlled except 2 by radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Evaluation of radiotherapy as a method of treating inoperable cases of uterine corpus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarlowska, L.; Rustkowski, J.; Wronkowski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The results of treatment and factors influencing them were studied in the group of 590 patients with uterine corpus carcinoma who had not been qualified for surgical treatment and were treated by radical palliative radiotherapy. The 5-year survival rate in this group was 44.1%, that is 52.4% in the stage 1, 48.2% in the stage 2 and 34.6% in 3 deg. Complications connected with the treatment developed in 28.3% of patients, including 2.2% of lethal complications and 2.0% of fistula. It was found that the following factors had an adverse effect on the results of radiotherapy: anaemia, uterus enlargement, low grade of carcinoma maturation, incomplete treatment. The age of the patient, obesity, features of the so called ''typical endometrial cancer individual'', and coexistence of other diseases had no significant effect on the results of radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Anti-tumor effect of cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells (SK-MES-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Wu, D; Wei, B; Wang, S; Sun, Hx; Li, Xl; Zhang, F; Zhang, Cl; Xin, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cactus polysaccharides are the active components of Opuntia dillenii which have been used extensively in folk medicine. In this study, we investigate the anti-tumor effect of cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells SK-MES-1. The inhibitory effect of Cactus polysaccharides on lung squamous carcinoma cells were detected by MTT assay. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was determined by AnnexinV assay. Western-blotting was applied to detect P53 and PTEN protein expression in the cells treated with cactus polysaccharides. Results showed that different concentrations of wild cactus polysaccharides prevent SK-MES-1 cells growth and induces S phase arrest. The data also revealed that cactus polysaccharides cause apoptosis in SK-MES-1 cells determined by Annexin-V assay. Furthermore, cactus polysaccharides induced growth arrest and apoptosis may be due to the increase of P53 and phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) protein. Cactus polysaccharides have anti-tumor activity on lung squamous carcinoma cells.

  20. [Histologic risk factors of basal cell carcinoma of the face, about 184 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavreille, O; Martin De Lassalle, E; Wavreille, G; Mortier, L; Martinot Duquennoy, V

    2012-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer in humans. The aim of our study was to determine the histologic risk factors involved in recurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the face. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with primary basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the face treated between March 2003 and December 2005. We analyzed the size of lateral and deep margins of tumor, histologic subtype, perineural invasion, and ulcerations. Clinical follow-up was observed until June 2011. We note that 184 cases of BCC were included. Eleven recurrences occurred during the follow-up, i.e. 6%. The population was divided into two groups according to histologic safety margins (1 mm for all basal cell carcinomas, 0.8 mm for nodular and 2 mm for aggressive-growth (AG-BCC) subtypes). There was a significant difference between groups in regards to cancer recurrence. Tumor size above 2 cm and presence of perineural invasion increased the risk of recurrence. Low histological safety margins appear to be critical on tumor recurrence. Depending on the tumor characteristics, and the patient, we advocate a re-excision in cases of histological safety margins inferior to 0.8 mm for the nodular subtypes and 2 mm for aggressive subtypes. Tumor size, and perineural invasion should be taken into consideration so as to make a well-informed decision between re-excision and a watching strategy in critical cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang, E-mail: wenfang64@hotmail.com; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: syzi960@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  2. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients

  3. Case Report: Scleral Metastasis of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Abbasi, Ata; Seyed Mokhtari, Seyed Arman; Pourasghary, Sajjad

    2018-01-05

    In this report, a case of ocular scleral metastasis was reported in a patient with a past history of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The patient was a 58-year-old male who was admitted to Urmia Imam Khomeini Hospital, Urmia, Iran, 8 years ago with progressive dysphasia. Seven years after initial diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer, the patient had no signs or symptoms of the disease. But 2 months ago, he was referred to the hospital due to ocular swelling, redness and watering. Pathologic examination of the excised lesion at Farabi Hospital reported metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma to the connective tissue of the sclera.

  4. Synchronous sebaceous lymphadenoma with squamous cell carcinoma – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker Sathibai

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sebaceous lymphadenoma is a rare benign salivary gland tumour of uncertain histogenesis. So is synchronous occurrence of two benign or malignant neoplasms. Case-report 68-year-old female presented with right side parotid swelling associated with pain and gradual increase is size. Fine needle aspiration cytology of parotid swelling was suggestive of pleomorphic adenoma. Total conservative parotidectomy was performed and histopathology of the specimen revealed sebaceous lymphadenoma with squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions Sebaceous lymphadenoma and squamous cell carcinoma are two rare benign and malignant neoplasms arising in parotid gland. Synchronous occurrence of these two entities has not been reported.

  5. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the tibia radiologically mimicking osteosarcoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cunningham, Laurence Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old lady with transitional cell carcinoma and no evidence of metastatic disease presenting with gradual weight loss, pretibial swelling and painful weightbearing. Investigations revealed a lesion of the right tibial diaphysis. The radiological and clinical appearance was that of primary osteosarcoma. Biopsy results revealed metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the tibia. Intramedullary nailing was performed which relieved pain on weightbearing. The patient declined radiotherapy and was started on a palliative care regimen. This case illustrates the importance of histological diagnosis in the treatment of diaphyseal lesions.

  6. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  7. Basal cell carcinoma in two Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Ducatelle, Richard; Bosseler, Leslie; Van Caelenberg, Annemie; Versnaeyen, Han; Chiers, Koen; Martel, An

    2016-11-01

    Neoplastic disorders are frequently encountered in the practice of reptile medicine. Herein we report the clinical behavior, antemortem diagnosis, and histopathologic characteristics of a recurrent intraoral keratinizing basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and a metastatic BCC of the carapace in 2 Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni). Although squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in tortoises show similar predilection sites and gross pathologic features, the BCCs described in our report were characterized by a remarkably fast and highly infiltrative growth in comparison to SCCs. Accordingly, early diagnosis including reliable discrimination from SCC is essential toward the management of this neoplastic entity in tortoises. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Review and analysis of management guidelines of basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Nunez, Hernan

    2013-01-01

    International guidelines for management of basal cell carcinoma are reviewed and analyzed for decision-making in the appropriate therapeutic behavior for patients. The different therapies for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma are described. Different therapies are evaluated according to the risk (low or high) of recurrence to determine the appropriate treatment. According to the evidence, low-risk tumors have responded to topical therapy, curettage and electrodesiccation, cryotherapy or simple resection, and high-risk tumors are managed with surgery, radiotherapy or Mohs' micrographic surgery [es

  9. Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma With CAIX CAR-engineered T cells: Clinical Evaluation and Management of On-target Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, C.H.; Sleijfer, S.; Steenbergen, S. van; Elzakker, P. van; Krimpen, B. van; Groot, C. de; Vulto, A.; Bakker, M. den; Oosterwijk, E.; Debets, R.; Gratama, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antibody receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to 12 patients with CAIX-expressing metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 infusions of a total of

  10. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  11. CT and MRI Findings of a Transitional Cell Carcinoma Case Located at Sino-nasopharyngeal Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Gokce

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonkeratinizing carcinoma (transitional cell carcinoma accounts for 1 to 20% of carcinomas of the sinonasal tract. Most of transitional cell carcinomas develop de novo, but a few may arise from preexisting inverted papillomas. Although histopathological findings of transitional cell carcinomas are well documented in the literature, detailed information on imaging findings is scarce. In the present study, CT and MRI findings of a de novo developed transitional cell carcinoma located at sino-nasopharyngeal junction are presented. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 199-202

  12. An unusual combined thymic carcinoma composed of squamous cell carcinoma and type AB thymoma: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yufeng; Liu, Yang; Shi, Xiuying; Mao, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yang; Fan, Chuifeng

    2017-01-17

    Combined thymic carcinoma is a malignant neoplasm of the thymus recently added to the 4th edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart. It involves at least one type of thymic carcinoma and another thymic epithelial tumor. The previously used term "combined thymic epithelial tumor" has been abandoned. Here, we present an unusual case of combined thymic carcinoma of the thymus in a 44-year-old male who had suffered from fever, chest pain, chest tightness and shortness of breath. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a mass approximately 6.4 cm × 4.2 cm in the anterior mediastinum, and a nonencapsulated tumor approximately 5.0 cm × 3.5 cm × 2.5 cm with an irregular shape was resected. The morphological features and the immunostaining pattern of the tumor revealed it to be an unusual combined thymic carcinoma consisting of type AB thymoma and squamous cell carcinoma. There were cysts of various sizes, some of which had crack-like structures, in the type AB thymoma area. A gradual transition could be seen between these structures and the squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that the carcinoma portion may have originated from the composition of the thymoma. Combined thymic carcinoma composed of type AB thymoma and squamous cell carcinoma is rare, and the carcinoma portion may have originated from epithelial structures in the type AB thymoma.

  13. Thyroid Metastasis in Pyramidal Lobe from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyung Seok; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Sang Su [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Soo Jin [Dept. of Pathology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Thyroid metastasis is rare. The most common primary malignancy of thyroid metastasis worldwide is known to be renal cell carcinoma, but the most common primary malignancy in South Korea is breast cancer. Many studies have reported that primary renal cell carcinoma is almost unilateral and thyroid metastasis from renal cell carcinoma is a nearly ipsilateral, single lesion. We report a case of pyramidal lobe metastasis from renal cell carcinoma.

  14. The Diagnostic Value of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen in Lung Adenosquamous Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangyu; Xu, Xiaoling; Xu, Haimiao; Lv, Lei; Lu, Hongyang

    2017-04-01

    Lung adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) is a rare malignant tumor with an adenocarcinoma and a squamous cell carcinoma component and associated with a lower 5-year survival rate than lung squamous cell carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. Surgical specimen histology revealed the inadequacy of conventional transbronchial needle aspiration samples in the diagnosis of lung ASC. Most lung ASC patients are not suitable to receive surgery, and it is difficult to diagnose ASC. This study is to explore the possibility of using serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) as a supplementary diagnostic test for ASC. We retrospectively analyzed the preoperative serum CEA and SCC levels in 34 patients with lung ASC, 35 cases of lung adenocarcinoma patients, 35 cases of lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. 36 cases of lung benign disease patients and 35 cases of healthy people as a control group were also retrospectively collected and analyzed from January 2012 to December 2014 at the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, China. The differences of CEA and SCC among the groups were evaluated, and the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity were calculated. The levels of SCC and CEA in the lung ASC group were significantly higher than those in the healthy control group and benign disease group (p < 0.05). The SCC level in lung ASC group was significantly higher than that in lung adenocarcinoma group (p < 0.05). CEA and SCC had good diagnostic sensitivity and specificity compared with the healthy control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Our retrospective study suggested a role for serum CEA and SCC levels as reference markers in the diagnosis of lung ASC. Patients with elevated CEA and SCC levels and diagnosed as lung adenocarcinoma by limited biopsy materials should be offered further work-up to reach an accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Cellular response of ovarian carcinoma cells to antibody-photosensitizer-mediated injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Sherwood, M. E.; Anderson, T.; Bamberg, Mike; Flotte, Thomas J.; Zurawski, Vince R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    An anti-ovarian carcinoma antibody OC125 was conjugated to a derivative of the photosensitizer (PS) chiorin e6 yj polyglutamic acid. Target cells from a human ovarian cancer cell line were treated with this conjugate and laser irradiation at 656 rim (absorption maximum of PS) and fixed 24 h later for electron microscopy. Electron niicrographs showed a high degree of vacoulization, generalized cell necrosis, and extrusion of organelles. No specific damage to the plasma membrane was noted. Untreated control cells, or cells treated with conjugate or light alone exhibited no injury. These data suggest that even though the antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen, the conjugate is internalized under the conditions of the experiment.

  16. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rombo, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selectiveanti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  17. Efficacy of Vismodegib (Erivedge™) For Basal Cell Carcinoma Involving the Orbit and Periocular Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Worden, Francis; Nelson, Christine C.; Elner, Victor M.; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the effectiveness of vismodegib in the management of basal cell carcinoma with orbital extension and/or extensive periocular involvement. Methods Retrospective chart review of six consecutive patients with biopsy-proven orbital basal cell carcinoma and two additional patients with extensive periocular basal cell carcinoma who were treated with oral vismodegib (150 mg/day). Results Basal cell carcinoma extended into the orbit in 6 of 8 patients (involving orbital bones in 1 patient), and 2 of 8 patients had extensive periocular involvement (one with basal cell nevus syndrome). Vismodegib therapy was the only treatment in 6 patients, off-label neoadjuvant in 1 patient and adjuvant treatment in 1 patient. Orbital tumors in all 4 patients who received vismodegib as sole treatment showed partial response with a mean 83% shrinkage in tumor size after a median of 7 months of therapy. In the 2 patients receiving vismodegib as neo-adjuvant or adjuvant therapies there was complete response after a median of 7 months of therapy and no evidence of clinical recurrence after discontinuing therapy for a median of 15 months. The 2 patients with extensive periocular involvement experienced complete clinical response after a median 14 months of treatment. During treatment, the most common side effect was muscle spasm (75%) followed by alopecia (50%), dysgeusia (25%), dysosmia, and episodes of diarrhea and constipation (13%). Conclusions Basal cell carcinoma with orbital extension and extensive periocular involvement responds to vismodegib therapy. The long-term prognosis remains unknown, and additional prospective studies are indicated. PMID:25675162

  18. Treatment of a Patient with Merkel Cell Skin Carcinoma Using Radiation Therapy - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Petrov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare, very aggressive tumour. The pathogenesis remains unclear, but UV radiation, immunosuppression, and the presence of Merkel cell polyomavirus in the tumour genome appear to have a key role. Merkel cell carcinoma is a highly aggressive tumour that often has a lethal end. CAS REPORT: A patient at 93 years of age comes for an examination by a dermatologist due to a rapidly growing nodular tumour growth in the forehead area. A tumour was about 3 cm in size. It had no signs of basal-cell carcinoma, no arborising vascularisation, no pigmentations on dermoscopy. Clinically, an eventual Merkel cell carcinoma was considered for the patient, but other primary skin tumours had to be excluded, as well as the possibility that regarding the patient’s age, it may be a metastatic deposit. A skin biopsy was performed, as well as H-E examination and immunohistochemical analyses (positive CD56, positivity of neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin, chromogranin which were in favour of Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin. After setting the diagnosis, our patient was treated with therapy which led to a complete withdrawal of a tumour. However, after 3 months the patient had repeated relapse of a tumour at the same site on the forehead and metastases in the retroauricular lymph nodes bilaterally. It shows that the radiotherapy as monotherapy has a great effect on the removal of the tumour formation, but unfortunately, it has no impact on lesion recurrence. It is also compatible with the literature data. CONCLUSION: In many adult patients, as our case suggests, radiotherapy could be a good palliative treatment opportunity that should be considered, as well as a combination of radiation therapy with other oncologic therapeutic options.

  19. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell mm9 DNase-seq Blood Carcinoma, Squamous C...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell mm9 TFs and others Blood Carcinoma, Squam...ous Cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Squamous_Cell.bed ...