WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell carcinoma recurrence

  1. Treatment of recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous follow-up of 244 patients treated for primary invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva during a 20-year period (1960-1979) resulted in the detection of recurrent (or persistent) disease in 60 cases. Forty-one of these cases developed local or regional recurrence, or both, later than six months after treatment, and an analysis of the result of retreatment in this group is presented. Twenty-nine had local recurrences, nine regional metastases and three local recurrences and regional metastases. The treatment technique for local recurrences was surgery, in a few cases combined with irradiation and chemotherapy. In approximately one-third of the cases, this treatment resulted in long-term or permanent cure. In cases of regional metastases the prognosis was often extremely poor, but treatment normally gave good palliation although of short duration. (orig.)

  2. Treatment of recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Continuous follow-up of 244 patients treated for primary invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva during a 20-year period (1960-1979) resulted in the detection of recurrent (or persistent) disease in 60 cases. Forty-one of these cases developed local or regional recurrence, or both, later than six months after treatment, and an analysis of the result of retreatment in this group is presented. Twenty-nine had local recurrences, nine regional metastases and three local recurrences and regional metastases. The treatment technique for local recurrences was surgery, in a few cases combined with irradiation and chemotherapy. In approximately one-third of the cases, this treatment resulted in long-term or permanent cure. In cases of regional metastases the prognosis was often extremely poor, but treatment normally gave good palliation although of short duration.

  3. Recurrence patterns of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after radical cystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bohyun; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Cho, Kyung-Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); E-mail: choihj@amc.seoul.kr

    2012-10-15

    Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is widely accepted as an effective imaging modality in monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence after radical cystectomy. Elucidating the pattern of bladder cancer recurrence on CT can increase the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose To evaluate the recurrence patterns of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and the factors associated with cancer recurrence. Material and Methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 66.55 years; range, 32-86 years) who underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced CT and radical cystectomy were included in this study. The presence, site, and time of tumor recurrence were recorded retrospectively by two radiologists in a consensus fashion. The association of tumor recurrence and tumor factors (T stage, lymph node metastasis, nuclear grade, and tumor diameter) were also evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier statistics. Results Tumor recurrence occurred in 60 patients (40.3%) with a mean time of 14 months (range, 1-64 months). The sites of recurrence included the operation site (n = 20), lymph node (n = 20), bone (n = 11), liver (n = 6), lung (n = 5), upper urinary tract (n = 4), colon (n = 3), adrenal gland (n = 2), peritoneum (n = 1), abdominal wall (n = 1), psoas muscle (n = 1), and penile skin (n = 1). Tumor recurrence was found to be associated with advanced T stage (P = 0.002) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Conclusion Transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder recur more frequently at the operation site and lymph node, and T-stage and lymph node metastasis are closely associated with tumor recurrence.

  4. Recurrence patterns of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after radical cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is widely accepted as an effective imaging modality in monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence after radical cystectomy. Elucidating the pattern of bladder cancer recurrence on CT can increase the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose To evaluate the recurrence patterns of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and the factors associated with cancer recurrence. Material and Methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients (mean age, 66.55 years; range, 32-86 years) who underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced CT and radical cystectomy were included in this study. The presence, site, and time of tumor recurrence were recorded retrospectively by two radiologists in a consensus fashion. The association of tumor recurrence and tumor factors (T stage, lymph node metastasis, nuclear grade, and tumor diameter) were also evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier statistics. Results Tumor recurrence occurred in 60 patients (40.3%) with a mean time of 14 months (range, 1-64 months). The sites of recurrence included the operation site (n = 20), lymph node (n = 20), bone (n = 11), liver (n = 6), lung (n = 5), upper urinary tract (n = 4), colon (n = 3), adrenal gland (n = 2), peritoneum (n = 1), abdominal wall (n = 1), psoas muscle (n = 1), and penile skin (n = 1). Tumor recurrence was found to be associated with advanced T stage (P = 0.002) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Conclusion Transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder recur more frequently at the operation site and lymph node, and T-stage and lymph node metastasis are closely associated with tumor recurrence

  5. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: survival, recurrence and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Camilo Souza Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper was based in data survey from macro and microscopic oral lesions characteristics, personal data and medical history of patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Lab of Pathological Anatomy from the Federal University of Alfenas from January 2000 to December 2010, establishing comparative parameters among clinical data, type of treatment, recurrence, survival and anatomic pathological characteristics of the lesions. Were analyzed the histopathological reports, dental and hospital records. The highest incidence was in white men, age between 50 and 60 years, married, with low education and socioeconomic levels. The beginning of treatment occurred in average 67 days after the histopathological diagnosis. The estimated survival of patients at five years was 42%. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco and the occurrence of metastasis were statistically significant for the increase of recurrence and lethality.

  7. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondo M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors presenting with recurrent pancreatitis.

  8. Delayed recurrence of renal cell carcinoma presenting as a haemorrhoid

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, James R.L.; Smith, Gavin; Cornaby, Andrew J.; Thomas, Teresa; Lamparelli, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic non-colorectal cancer of the anal canal is a rare entity. To date, only four cases have been described in the literature. We present a 76-year-old man who was referred with an unusual perianal lesion. He had a history of renal cell carcinoma 7 years previously. Histologically, the lesion revealed clear cell carcinoma in keeping with metastasis. To our knowledge, this is only the second time a renal carcinoma metastasis to the anal canal has been identified.

  9. Outcome of recurrent and metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder small cell carcinoma is an uncommon tumour. Through a retrospective study we will present the evolution of recurrent and metastatic disease and outcome of patients treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre. Methods Only 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma were treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre between 1996 and 2007. The patients were divided in two groups: a mixed small cell carcinoma group (9 patients and a pure small cell carcinoma group (6 patients. All the records and informations related to treatment and outcome of the 15 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Various characteristics of small cell carcinoma were investigated. Results The median age of the 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma and treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre was 63 years and the disease was at stage IV for all cases. Nine patients were treated by chemotherapy. Four patients were treated by local radiotherapy (3 with radiotherapy without previous surgery and 1 with surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One patient was treated by whole brain radiotherapy. And one patient died before treatment. After 52.4 months median follow up, 12 patients died. Median overall survival was 7.6 months. Survival probability at 1 year was 33%. Median overall survival was 9.9 months in the mixed small cell carcinoma group, and was only 4.6 months in the pure small cell carcinoma group. Survival probability at 1 year in the mixed small cell carcinoma group was 44% as compared to 17% in the pure small cell carcinoma group (Log-rank test: p = 0.228. Conclusion Recurrent and metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma is associated with very poor prognosis. The pure bladder small cell carcinoma appears to have poorer outcome than the mixed bladder small cell carcinoma. Chemotherapy using platinum drugs is a mainstay treatment.

  10. Autofluorescence imaging in recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Martin; Fuss, Juliana; Derman, Mehmet Ali; Kreppel, Matthias; Neugebauer, Jörg; Rothamel, Daniel; Drebber, Uta; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2016-03-01

    The survival of patients with oral cancer is decreased by locoregional recurrence after an initial multimodal treatment. In order to identify lesions in the oral cavity for a possible recurrence, clinical evaluation as well as MRI or CT scanning is advised. The evaluation of mucosa lesions is hampered by changes related to radio- and chemotherapy as well as reconstruction with tissue flaps. Several techniques for easier identification of tissue abnormalities in the oral cavity have been advocated as adjuncts in order to facilitate identification. Especially methods using altered tissue fluorescence have gained much interest during the last decade. The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate fluorescence properties of undiagnosed mucosa lesions with the VELscope device in patients with multimodal treated oral cancer prior to histological confirmation. In total, 41 patients with a history of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) (19 females and 22 males) with undiagnosed mucosa lesions where included in the study. After clinical evaluation, examination and documentation using the VELscope® device were performed. Then, an incisional biopsy was performed. An autofluorescence loss indicating a malignant or dysplastic mucosa condition could be detected in six patients (14.6 %); however, only one OSCC and one SIN revealed a complete autofluorescence loss. In four patients, OSCC was present in lesions with retained autofluorescence. Sensitivity and specificity for the VELscope® examination to identify malignant oral lesions by autofluorescence were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 33.3 and 88.6 %, respectively. No statistical correlation between gender and lesion appearance versus autofluorescence loss could be detected. In contrast to mucosa lesions in patients with no prior treatment, the autofluorescence evaluation with the VELscope reveals no additional information in our analysis. Accordingly, invasive biopsies

  11. Cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuyo; Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tomita, Eri; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-03-01

    Although local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is sometimes reported, cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with hemodialysis who developed cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma accompanied by acquired cystic disease of the kidney in the retroperitoneal space after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. A cystic tumor of 5.1 cm in diameter occurred in the left retroperitoneal space 15 months after left laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and enlarged to 7.2 cm in diameter with enhanced mass along the wall of the cyst 36 months after surgery. The cystic tumor was removed and showed local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma on pathological examination. PMID:23909823

  12. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondo M; Krishna M; Nguyen J; Scolapio J; Aqel B

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors pre...

  13. Outcome of recurrent and metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaili Nabil; Heudel Pierre; Elkarak Fadi; Kaikani Wafaa; Bajard Agathe; Ismaili Mohammed; Errihani Hassan; Droz Jean; Flechon Aude

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bladder small cell carcinoma is an uncommon tumour. Through a retrospective study we will present the evolution of recurrent and metastatic disease and outcome of patients treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre. Methods Only 15 patients having recurrent or metastatic bladder small cell carcinoma were treated at Léon-Bérard Cancer Centre between 1996 and 2007. The patients were divided in two groups: a mixed small cell carcinoma group (9 patients) and a pure small cell carcin...

  14. Panoramic zonography in evaluation of recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with recurrent, facial basal cell carcinoma were followed up both clinically and radiographically using a panoramic technique. A cylindrical image track was used for panoramic radiography. Five patients had bony destruction due to tumour re-occurence, four patients had bony defects caused by surgery. The confirmation of the results by surgery and/or follow-up shows that the spread of basal cell carcinoma into bone can be diagnosed using a panoramic technique. (orig.)

  15. Recidivas e recorrências de carcinomas basocelulares da face Relapses and recurrences of basal cell face carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Polizel Ocanha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar fatores relacionados ao seguimento oncológico dos carcinomas basocelulares da face, foi realizada a análise de série de casos. Avaliaram-se 465 pacientes, com 834 carcinomas basocelulares de face; 3,1% apresentaram recidivas. Nos tumores incompletamente excisados, a recidiva foi 14,7% contra 2,3% dos tumores, com margens livres. Ocorreram mais na região nasal. As taxas de recorrência evidenciaram risco cumulativo. Estes achados reforçam a importância do seguimento oncológico após a cirurgia do carcinoma basocelular.To evaluate factors related to oncological follow-up of basal cell face carcinomas it was carried out the analysis of a series of cases. Four hundred sixty-five patients with 834 basal cell face carcinomas were evaluated; 3,1% presented recurrences. There was 14.7% of recurrence in incompletely excised tumors against 2.3% of the tumors with clear margins. Recurrences were more prevalent on the nose. Relapse rates showed a cumulative risk. These findings reinforce the importance of oncological follow-up after surgery of basal cell carcinoma.

  16. The recurrence and survival of oral squamous cell carcinoma: a report of 275 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yue

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a common malignant tumor of the head and neck, and recurrence is an important prognostic factor in patients with OSCC. We explored the factors associated with recurrence of OSCC and analyzed the survival of patients after recurrence. Clinicopathologic and follow-up data of 275 patients with OSCC treated by surgery in the Cancer Institute and Hospital of Tianjin Medical University between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed. Recurrence factors were analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and multivariate analysis. The prognosis of patients after recurrence was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The recurrence rate was 32.7%. The recurrence time ranged from 2 to 96 months, with a median of 14 months. Univariate analysis showed that T stage, degree of differentiation, pN stage, flap application, resection margin, and lymphovascular invasion were factors of recurrence (P 0.05. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests showed that the 2- and 5-year survival rates were significantly lower in the recurrence group than in non-recurrence group (67.6% vs. 88.0%, 31.8% vs. 79.9%, P < 0.001. Therefore, to improve prognosis, we recommend extended local excision, flap, radical neck dissection, and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients more likely to undergo recurrence.

  17. Middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy for recurrent metastasis of renal cell carcinoma after pancreatoduodenectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Aiyama; Mitsuhiro, Inagaki; Hiromitsu, Akabane; Naoyuki, Yanagida; Taiichiro, Shibaki; Hiroki, Shomura; Takeaki, Kudo; Tatsuya, Shonaka; Futoshi, Oikawa; Hiroharu, Sakurai; Shiro, Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Many cases of surgical resection of metastatic pancreatic tumors originating from renal cell carcinoma have been reported; however, cases of reresection of recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in the remnant pancreas are rare. We performed a second resection for recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma six years after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction. By performing middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy, we were able to successfully spare the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function compared to that observed after total pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence for two years after the surgery. PMID:25061531

  18. Middle Segment-Preserving Pancreatectomy for Recurrent Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma after Pancreatoduodenectomy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Aiyama; Mitsuhiro, Inagaki; Hiromitsu, Akabane; Naoyuki, Yanagida; Taiichiro, Shibaki; Hiroki, Shomura; Takeaki, Kudo; Tatsuya, Shonaka; Futoshi, Oikawa; Hiroharu, Sakurai; Shiro, Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Many cases of surgical resection of metastatic pancreatic tumors originating from renal cell carcinoma have been reported; however, cases of reresection of recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in the remnant pancreas are rare. We performed a second resection for recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma six years after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction. By performing middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy, we were able to successfully spare the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function compared to that observed after total pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence for two years after the surgery. PMID:25061531

  19. Intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze our experience with intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma. From 1992 to 2010, 17 patients with histologically proven, locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma (median tumor size 7 cm) were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 15 Gy. All patients met the premise of curative intent including 7 patients with oligometastases at the time of recurrent surgery, which were resected and/or irradiated. The median time interval from primary surgery to local recurrence was 26 months. Eleven patients received additional 3D-conformal EBRT with a median dose of 40 Gy. Surgery resulted in free but close margins in 6 patients (R0), while 9 patients suffered from microscopic (R1) and 2 patients from macroscopic (R2) residual disease. After a median follow-up of 18 months, two local recurrences were observed, resulting in an actuarial 2-year local control rate of 91%. Eight patients developed distant failures, predominantly to liver and bone, resulting in an actuarial 2-year progression free survival of 32%. An improved PFS rate was found in patients with a larger time interval between initial surgery and recurrence (> 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival rate was 73%. Lower histological grading (G1/2) was the only factor associated with improved overall survival. Perioperative complications were found in 4 patients. No IOERT specific late toxicities were observed. Combination of surgery, IOERT and EBRT resulted in high local control rates with low toxicity in patients with locally recurrent renal cell cancer despite an unfavorable surgical outcome in the majority of patients. However, progression-free and overall survival were still limited due to a high distant failure rate, indicating the need for intensified systemic treatment especially in patients with high tumor grading and short interval to recurrence

  20. Post-radiotherapy locoregional recurrence of hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma of palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell carcinoma of the salivary glands is a rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all salivary tumors and is a new disease that is only recognized in recent years. It is rare and the standard treatment is still under investigation. This tumor often follows an indolent course and treatment includes wide surgical excision with or without adjuvant radiotherapy. Recurrence of the hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC after complete surgical resection is uncommonly documented. We hereby report a case of post-radiotherapy locoregional recurrence of HCCC of the palate and recommend further clinicopathological study and long-term follow-up to document the biological behavior of this entity along with highlighting the role of special stains and immunohistochemistry in its diagnosis.

  1. 8-year survival in a patient with several recurrences of renal cell carcinoma after radical nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Shivam; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a large renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy utilizing liver mobilization techniques similar to those used in transplantation. Despite recurrent metastases, our patient continues to survive eight years later with several metastasectomies and adjuvant chemotherapy. We report the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic American man who presented with a 4-month history of an enlarging right upper quadrant abdominal mass and hematuria. C...

  2. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  3. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neoadjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment.

  4. Low grade papillary transitional cell carcinoma pelvic recurrence masquerading as high grade invasive carcinoma, ten years after radical cystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi Amir

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor recurrence following radical cystectomy for a low-grade superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is exceedingly uncommon and has not been reported previously. Case presentation We describe a case of a young male presenting with anorexia, weight loss and a large, painful locally destructive pelvic recurrence, ten years after radical cystoprostatectomy. The pathology was consistent with a low-grade urothelial carcinoma. After an unsuccessful treatment with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, the patient underwent a curative intent hemipelvectomy with complete excision of tumor and is disease free at one year follow-up. Conclusion A literature review related to this unusual presentation is reported and a surgical solutions over chemotherapy and radiotherapy is proposed.

  5. Twelve-year survival after multiple recurrences and repeated metastasectomies for renal cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jue

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC presents a therapeutic challenge for clinicians because of the unpredictable clinical course, resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy and the limited response to immunotherapy. Patients and Methods We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who underwent nephrectomy for T4N0 RCC, clear cell type, Fuhrman grade 3/4 in 1999. The patinet subsequently had multiple tumor recurrences. Results The patient underwent eight metastasectomies, including multiple partial left nephrectomies, right adrenalectomy, a complete left nephrectomy, and distal pancreatectomy. She remains well and tumor free 12 years after initial diagnosis. Conclusion Repeated resections after initial metastasectomy can be carried out safely and provide long-term survival in selected patients with recurrent metastasis from RCC. The findings from our case indicate that close follow-up for the early detection of recurrence and complete resection of metastases can improve the results after repeated resection.

  6. [Intravesical Recurrence of Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ureter: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Norichika; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Arai, Hiroki; Honda, Masahito; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2016-02-01

    A 63-year-old man who presented with asymptomatic gross hematuria was referred to our hospital. Left ureteral tumor (cT3N0M0) was diagnosed and left nephroureterectomy was performed. Pathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma and small cell carcinoma with local invasion (pT3). The patient was treated with three cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin. Three months after the chemotherapy, cystoscopy showed an intravesical recurrence of the tumor. Transurethral resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed small cell carcinoma (pT1). We recommended a cystectomy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin according to the standard care of small cell carcinoma of bladder. However, the patient refused to undergo cystectomy and desired to preserve his bladder. Therefore, after two cycles of chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin, transurethral resection was performed to examine the presence of the residual tumor instead of immediate cystectomy. Because of no residual tumor, another two cycles of chemotherapy were added instead of a cystectomy. There is no evidence of recurrence seven months after the chemotherapy. PMID:27018413

  7. Does incomplete excision of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid mean tumor recurrence? A excisão incompleta de carcinoma basocelular da pálpebra implica

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Jankovic; Predrag Kovacevic; Milan Visnjic; Dimitrije Jankovic; Ivana Binic; Aleksandar Jankovic

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common tumor of the eyelid. In this region, reconstruction is complex and damage to healthy tissue should be minimal. Objective: To define the relationship between margin clearance at excision and the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted with 111 patients submitted to surgery for basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid between 2001 and 2003 and followed up for a period of five years. The ...

  8. Computed tomographic appearance of the recurrent patterns of the oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parapharyngeal invasion were seen often in the case of the squamous cell carcinoma between oropharynx and oral cavity. The recurrent cases with preoperative parapharyngeal invasion have a tendency to invade skull base via parapharyngeal and retropharyngeal space. The recurrent cases without preoperative parapharyngeal invasion have no such a tendency. The fashion of invasion were down-ward, namely inferior parapharyngeal invasion. The recurrent cases of postoperative tongue cancer had one more fashion of deep muscular invasion, ie suprahyoid intramuscular invasion that showed extension from tongue base to suprahyoid region. CT scanning were useful not only for the pre-operative evaluation of parapharyngeal invasion but also for the assessmen of the post operative prognosis. (author)

  9. FOXP3 subcellular localization predicts recurrence in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald T Weed

    Full Text Available Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4(+FOXP3(+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3 is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3 is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4(+ T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence.

  10. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced or recurrent penile squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ye Liu; Yong-Hong Li; Zhuo-Wei Liu; Zhi-Ling Zhang; Yun-Lin Ye; Kai Yao; Hui Han; Zi-Ke Qin; Fang-Jian Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis after conventional treatment is dismal. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin on local y advanced or recurrent SCC of the penis. Between April 1999 and May 2011, we treated 5 patients with locally advanced penile SCC and 7 patients with recurrent disease with intraarterial chemotherapy. The response rate and toxicity data were analyzed, and survival rates were calculated. After 2 to 6 cycles of intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, 1 patients with locoregional y advanced disease achieved a complete response, and 4 achieved partial response. Of the 7 patients with recurrent disease, 2 achieved complete response, 3 achieved partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 developed progressive disease. An objective tumor response was therefore achieved in 10 of the 12 patients. The median overal survival for the patients was 24 months (range, 10-50 months). Three out of 10 patients who responded were long-term survivors after intraarterial chemotherapy. Intraarterial chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin may be effective and potential y curative in locoregional y advanced or recurrent penile SCC. The contribution of this therapy in the primary management of advanced or recurrent penile SCC should be prospectively investigated.

  11. Radiation therapy of recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma in-situ: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noone Robert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also referred to as anal squamous carcinoma in-situ, or Bowen's disease of the anus, make up less than 1% of all digestive system cancers in the United States. The treatment of choice is surgical resection with anal mapping. However, this disease often recurs or persists, requiring additional surgery for these patients. This can compromise the anal sphincter leading to leakage. In this case report, we discuss the efficacy of radiation therapy as a modality to treat post-excisional recurrent Bowen's disease, which may prevent sphincter compromise, leading to improved quality of life. Case presentation An 84-year-old Caucasian woman presented with post-excisional persistent/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in-situ. The initial lesion measured 3 cm in diameter on the right lateral side of the anal margin. A standard surgery consisting of wide local excision with anal mapping was performed. The margins were clear and our patient was followed up. Our patient recurred with a 1.2 × 0.8 cm lesion on the left anal verge extending to the anal canal. A biopsy along with mapping was done, and 2 of the 17 mapping specimens were positive for carcinoma in-situ, one in the anal canal. Due to the location of the positive anal mapping, and in order to prevent sphincter compromise on re-excision, our patient was offered definitive radiation therapy. Two years after radiation therapy, our patient showed no signs of recurrent disease and had good sphincter control. Conclusion Although the main treatment modality for treating persistent/recurrent Bowen's disease is surgery, an alternative approach using external beam radiation for CIS may be enough to provide a cure for some patients with recurrent disease.

  12. Phase III study of gefitinib compared with intravenous methotrexate for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [corrected].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, J.S.; Cohen, E.E.; Licitra, L.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Khorprasert, C.; Soulieres, D.; Vodvarka, P.; Rischin, D.; Garin, A.M.; Hirsch, F.R.; Varella-Garcia, M.; Ghiorghiu, S.; Hargreaves, L.; Armour, A.; Speake, G.; Swaisland, A.; Vokes, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare survival in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated with gefitinib 250 or 500 mg/day or standard methotrexate. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four hundred eighty-six patients with recurrent SCCHN were randomly assigned to oral gef

  13. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma arising in a neglected pilonidal sinus: report of a case and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Eryılmaz, Ramazan; Bilecik, Tuna; OKAN, İsmail; Özkan, Orhan Veli; Çoşkun, Aytekin; Şahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare complication observed mainly in chronic, recurrent and untreated primary pilonidal disease. It is associated with poor prognosis, and its recurrence rate after surgery is high. Here we present a patient diagnosed with SCC arising from a neglected pilonidal sinus. A 44-year-old male, who is a heavy truck driver, applied to the hospital with chronic discharge from sacrococcygeal region. He had symptoms of the disease with multiple recurrent abscesses and ...

  14. Laparoscopic resection of tumor recurrence after radical nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lessandro Curcio; Antonio Claudio Cunha; Juan Renteria; Daniel Presto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Local recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy is a rare event. Some known risk factors are: clinical/pathological stage, locorregional disease and lyimph node positivity. Since up to 30-40% of patients can achieve a disease-free status, we show a case (video) in which we performed a laparoscopic excision of a local RCC, taking advantage of all the well-known benefits of laparoscopy.Case report A 56 years old female with a history of open radical nephrec...

  15. Bladder Tumor Recurrence after Primary Surgery for Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Urinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Oehlschläger, Sven; Baldauf, Anka; Wiessner, Diana; Gellrich, Jörg; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wirth, Manfred P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the upper urinary tract represents 6–8% of all TCC cases. Nephroureterectomy with removal of a bladder cuff is the treatment of choice. The rates of TCC recurrence in the bladder after primary upper urinary tract surgery described in the literature range between 12.5 and 37.5%. In a retrospective analysis we examined the occurrence of TCC after nephroureterectomy for upper tract TCC in patients without a previous history of bladder TCC a...

  16. Dramatic Response of a Case ofRecurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma toSystemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer among humans, and the standard treatment is surgery. Other modalities are reserved as a second line of treatment. Topical chemotherapy may be used in primary BCC. Systemic chemotherapy has no role in the primary treatment of BCC, although it may be efficacious in metastatic cases. We report the case of a patient with persistent recurrent BCC following multiple surgeries and radiotherapy, who achieved a dramatic response with a cisplatinand 5-flourouracil chemotherapy regimen.

  17. Recurrence of keratocyst in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: A major diagnostic dilemma for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocysts (OKC usually represent a particular entity that has been of interest primarily due to biological aggressiveness and to its frequent recurrence. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide-range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. There are several possible reasons why OKC recur so frequently and require meticulous surgical planning and execution. This article has attempted to show that there is a lack of published evidence regarding the cause of frequent recurrent of OKC that presented in NBCCS. However, the findings of the study revealed differences in opinion regarding the treatment modalities, which necessitates further long term clinical studies that could precisely document certain reliable guidelines in this point of view.

  18. Nomograms for Prediction of Disease Recurrence in Patients with Primary Ta, T1 Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Sung Joon; Cho, Kang Su; Han, Mooyoung; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ryu, Soo Bang; Sul, Chong Koo; Chung, Moon Kee; Park, Tong Choon; Kim, Hyung Jin; ,

    2008-01-01

    We developed nomograms to predict disease recurrence in patients with Ta, T1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Thirty-eight training hospitals participated in this retrospective multicenter study. Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 1,587 patients with newly diagnosed non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were enrolled in this study. Patients with prior histories of bladder cancer, non-transitional cell carcinoma, or a follow-up duration of less than 12 months were excluded. With univari...

  19. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  20. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Koya, E-mail: koyakn@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji, E-mail: 9709.ynakamo1@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo, E-mail: saga@nirs.go.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-Ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya, E-mail: higashi@shigamed.jp [Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, 5-4-30 Moriyama, Moriyama City, Shiga 524-8524 Japan (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  1. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  2. Factors related to recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate factors related to the recurrence of TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) in the urinary bladder after transurethal resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients in whom TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) after TUR-BT had been confirmed. Recurrence was evaluated by US, CT, cystoscopy and urine smear during the follow-up period of 6 months. The multiplicity, shape, size, and calcification of TCC, as revealed by radiologic studies, were evaluated retrospectively before TUR-BT. After TUR-BT, the histologic grade and pathologic stage of TCC were evaluated. Radiologically, multiple and/or sessile type TCC had a higher recurrence rate than the single and/or pedunculated type. Pathologically, when the grade and stage of bladder tumor were higher, recurrent rates were higher. (author). 17 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Gefitinib, Methotrexate and Methotrexate plus 5-Fluorouracil as palliative treatment in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kushwaha, Vandana Singh; Gupta, Seema; Husain, Nuzhat; Khan, Huma; Negi, MPS; Jamal, Naseem; Ghatak, Ashim

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy and toxicity of Gefitinib, Methotrexate and Methotrexate plus 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients of recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) treated with palliative intent. Patients with recurrent SCCHN not amenable to curative treatment were randomly assigned to Gefitinib, Methotrexate or Methotrexate plus 5-FU arm. The primary end point was overall survival. Secondary end points of interest were objective response rate, toxicity and quality ...

  4. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ja Yoon; Kwon, Kye Won; Kim, Sang Wook [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Youn, In Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy.

  5. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja yoon Jang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy.

  6. RECURRENCE RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF BLADDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xiang-hui; YANG Xiao-hong; ZHENG Fu-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study recurrence factors and set up a model to evaluate the prognosis of patients with bladder cancer.Methods: An analysis on recurrence-related factors was made by Cox's proportional hazards model analysis and logistic multiple linear regression model analysis in 212 patients with transitional cell carcinoma treated surgically from 1995~2001.These factors included clinical and pathologic figures. Results: The most important factor is metastasis to the regional lymph nodes, the Hazards ratio is 6.6 (P=0.0004), followed by multiple tumors (Hr=2.255, P<0.0001), tumor in trigone and bladder neck (Hr=2.053, P<0.0001), stage (Hr=2.057, P<0.0001), grade (Hr=1.569, P=0.0081), intravesical chemotherapeutic instillations (Hr-0.559, P=0.0011) and hematuria (Hr=0.762, P=0.0076). A predicting equation was established, and the predicting values were calculated according to the individual features of patients. The predicting and actual values were compared, and the sensitivity, specificity and overall concordance were 83.5%, 67.6% and 80.1% respectively. Conclusion:The evaluation of prognosis could be made quite accurately based on these factors.

  7. Laparoscopic resection of tumor recurrence after radical nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandro Curcio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Local recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC after radical nephrectomy is a rare event. Some known risk factors are: clinical/pathological stage, locorregional disease and lyimph node positivity. Since up to 30-40% of patients can achieve a disease-free status, we show a case (video in which we performed a laparoscopic excision of a local RCC, taking advantage of all the well-known benefits of laparoscopy.Case report A 56 years old female with a history of open radical nephrectomy two years before was diagnosed with a mass at the time of surveillance CT imaging during follow-up. The suspected local recurrence was 12cm, and vascularized predominantly by tributaries originating from the iliac vessels. There was no other site of disease (i.e. brain, lung, liver, bones and laboratory tests were normal. Laparoscopic approach was approached, by inserting 4 trocars (2 of 10 and 2 of 5mm with the patient in the lateral position.Result The procedure lasted 130 minutes, with 220mL of estimated bleeding; the larger vessels were ligated with polymer clips (Hem-o-lok and the smaller handled by ultrasonic clamp. The specimen was removed by a small incision below the umbilicus in an appropriate bag. The patient was feed in the first postoperative day and discharged on the third day. Histopathology revealed sarcoma, with a high degree of mitosis, and negative surgical margins. She was referred to medical oncology for adjuvant therapy consideration.Conclusion The laparoscopic resection of recurrent tumor should be encouraged in highly selected cases. The minimally invasive method, with its known advantages, especially for more debilitated patients, can be advantageous when applied to suitable cases.

  8. Isolated loco-regional recurrence after radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: A study of 22 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study aimed to assess prognosis of isolated local recurrence (ILR) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy (RN). Patients and Methods: This retrospective study involved 22 cases (16 men and 6 women) of ILR from two centers with a mean age of 60.1 ±8.5 years. All cases were managed surgically. Results: Primary tumors were mainly clear cell carcinoma (n= 17). Nine patients had T3 and T4 tumors. Local recurrence involved mainly the operative bed (n=17); 4 among them had nodal recurrence as well. The median interval to local recurrence was 13.5 months (7-25 months). Stages T3 and T4 were significantly associated with shorter interval. Complete excision was possible in 9 patients (41%); 8 tumors were irresectable. It was associated with significantly higher overall and median disease-free survival (DFS). Advanced disease stage (p= 0.002) and shorter interval to recurrence (p <0.001) were associated with higher proportion of incomplete excision. The median overall survival and DFS were 15 months (95% CI: 4.4-25.6) and 10 months (95% CI: 4.5-15.5), respectively. Overall and DF survival were significantly better in patients with nodal recurrence only, complete excision of the recurrence and interval from nephrectomy to recurrence >15 months. Conclusion: ILR after radical nephrectomy for RCC is more common with more advanced stages, where interval to recurrence tends to be shorter. The management should be surgical, which was possible in nearly 60% of cases. Complete excision was associated with better overall and disease free survival.

  9. Methods for estimating the site of origin of locoregional recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Due, A.K.; Vogelius, I.R.; Berthelsen, A.K.; Kristensen, C.A.; Specht, L. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Aznar, M.C. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Bentzen, S.M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Wisconsin Univ., MD (United States). Depts. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics; Korreman, S.S. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Roskilde Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Science, Systems, and Models

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Methods to estimate the likely origin of recurrences after radiation therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are compared. Methods and materials: A total of 25 patients meeting the following inclusion criteria were randomly selected: curatively intended intensity-modulated radiotherapy planned on a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan during the period 2005-2009; squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx; complete clinical response followed by locoregional recurrence; and a CT scan at recurrence before any salvage therapy. Exclusion criteria were previous cancer in the area, surgery prior to radiotherapy, or a synchronous cancer. Three methods of estimating focal points of recurrence origin and two volume overlap methods assigning the recurrences to the most central target volumes encompassing at least 50% or 95% of the recurrence volumes were tested. Treatment planning and recurrence scans were rigid and deformable co-registered in order to transfer focal points to the treatment planning scan. Double determinations of all volumes, points, and co-registrations were made. Results: The volume overlap methods assigned the recurrences to significantly more peripheral target volumes than focal methods (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons of 95% overlap vs. focal methods, p < 0.028 for all comparisons of 50% overlap vs. focal methods). Repeated registrations of the same point had higher reproducibility with deformable registration than with rigid registration (median distance 0.31 vs. 0.35 cm, p = 0.015). No significant differences were observed among the focal methods. Conclusion: Significant differences between methods were found which may affect strategies to improve radiotherapy based on pattern of failure analyses. (orig.)

  10. A case report of a xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis case mimicking the recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after partial nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakan M AlDarrab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old female presented to the urology clinic with flank pain and tenderness. After full assessment, the patient was booked for surgery for partial nephrectomy and the patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC chromophob type. Six months later, the patient came back for follow-up; a mass was detected on the same kidney. Radical nephrectomy was performed to excise what is thought to be a recurrence of RCC and the tissues were sent to pathology. The postoperative pathology report confirmed the presence of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis rather than RCC recurrence.

  11. Does incomplete excision of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid mean tumor recurrence? A excisão incompleta de carcinoma basocelular da pálpebra implica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jankovic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common tumor of the eyelid. In this region, reconstruction is complex and damage to healthy tissue should be minimal. Objective: To define the relationship between margin clearance at excision and the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted with 111 patients submitted to surgery for basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid between 2001 and 2003 and followed up for a period of five years. The patients were evaluated according to age, tumor site, recurrence rate and margin clearance at excision. RESULTS: No significant association was found between incomplete tumor excision and recurrence except in patients under 56 years of age, female patients and in the case of tumors of the medial canthus. CONCLUSION: A risk of recurrence in incompletely excised basal cell carcinomas of the eyelid was only confirmed in younger patients, females and for tumors of the medial canthus.INTRODUÇÃO: O carcinoma basocelular é o tumor mais comum entre os tumores das pálpebras. Nesta região, a reconstrução é complexa e recomenda-se que haja perda mínima de tecido saudável. OBJETIVO: Para definir a relação entre margem livre de tumor na excisão e taxa de recidiva do carcinoma basocelular das pálpebras. MÉTODOS: Este estudo prospectivo incluiu 111 pacientes operados para remoção de carcinoma basocelular das pálpebras no período de 2001 a 2003, com acompanhamento subsequente de 5 anos. Os pacientes foram avaliados de acordo com a idade, localização do tumor, taxa de recidiva, e margem livre de tumor na excisão. RESULTADOS: Não se encontrou associação significativa entre a excisão incompleta do tumor e casos de recidiva, exceto em pacientes com idade inferior a 56 anos, pacientes do sexo feminino e em tumores do canto medial. CONCLUSÃO: Um risco maior de recidiva de carcinoma basocelular das pálpebras com excisão incompleta foi confirmado

  12. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs, has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Methods Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. Results TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040. None of the other markers predicted recurrence. Conclusion High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of

  13. Impact of stem cell marker expression on recurrence of TACE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver transplantation is the most effective therapy for cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its utility is limited by post-transplant tumor recurrence. Use of the Milan, size-based criteria, has reduced recurrence rate to less than 10% but many patients remain ineligible. Reduction of tumor size with local therapies has been used to “downstage” patients to allow them to qualify for transplantation, but the optimal criteria to predict tumor recurrence in these latter patients has not been established. The existence of a progenitor cell population, sometimes called cancer stem cells (CSCs), has been proposed to be one mechanism accounting for the chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine if transcatheter arterial chemoemolization (TACE) treated tumors have increased CSC marker expression and whether these markers could be used to predict tumor recurrence. Formalin fixed specimens were obtained from 39 HCC liver explants (23 with no treatment and 16 after TACE). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for EpCAM, CD44, CD90, and CD133. Staining for each marker was scored 0–3 by evaluating the number and intensity of positive tumor cells in 5 hpf of tumor in each specimen. TACE treated tumors displayed greater necrosis and fibrosis than non-TACE treated samples but there were no differences in morphology between the viable tumor cells of both groups. In TACE treated specimens, the staining of both EpCAM and CD133 was greater than in non-TACE specimens but CD44 and CD90 were the same. In the TACE group, the presence of high EpCAM staining was associated with tumor recurrence. Four of ten EpCAM high patients recurred while 0 of 6 EpCAM low patients recurred (P = 0.040). None of the other markers predicted recurrence. High pre-transplant EpCAM staining predicted HCC recurrence. This suggests that the abundance of tumor cells with a CSC phenotype may be a critical factor in the

  14. Management of Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Shian Kao

    2004-01-01

    Management of recurrent endometrial carcinoma has traditionally focused on providingtargeted adjuvant therapy in select groups of patients based on their risk factors. Majorprogress has been made over the last two decades in identifying these clinical-pathologicalrisk factors, which has led to the classification of patients into different risk groups. Patientswith high-risk factors are generally treated with adjunctive radiation therapy immediatelyfollowing surgery to minimize the incidence o...

  15. PRIMARY SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF RENAL PELVIS ASSOCIATED WITH RENAL CALCULUS AND RECURRENT PYONEPHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoti Lal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the kidney is a rare malignant neoplasm associated with nephrolithiasis, typically monobacterial pyonephrosis and rarely Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. It is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis mostly due to lack of presenting clinical features like a palpable mass, gross haematuria and pain. We report a case presenting with renal calculus and pyonephrosis managed initially with percutaneous nephrostomy followed by nephrectomy due to complete loss of renal function. Histopathological evaluation revealed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma which is managed by chemotherapy, although initially beneficial, patients later develop disseminated metastatic disease which holds a poor prognosis.

  16. Analysis of 30 patients with persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix within one year after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the recurrence sites, risk factors, and prognosis of patients with persistent or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix within one year after undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Clinical data of 30 patients with persistent or recurrent SCC of the cervix within one year after CCRT between July 2006 and July 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. These data were compared with those of 35 SCC cases with no signs of recurrence after complete remission. These 35 patients were treated during the same period (between 2006 and 2011) and selected randomly. Among these 30 patients, 25 exhibited distant metastases of which 14 were observed within 6 months after CCRT. Univariate analysis showed higher incidence of pelvic or para-aortic lymphadenectasis and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL in the group with persistent or recurrent disease before treatment (P<0.01). Multivariate analysis by logistic regression revealed that the pre-therapeutic pelvic or para-aortic lymph node enlargement and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL were the independent risk factors. Palliative chemotherapy was the main treatment option for patients with persistent or recurrent disease. The 2-year survival rate was 21.7%, and the median survival time was 17 months. Patients with persistent or recurrent SCC of the cervix after CCRT exhibited a high rate of distant metastasis with poor prognosis. The pre-therapeutic pelvic or para-aortic lymph node enlargement and SCC-ag >10 ng/mL were identified as the independent risk factors for persistent or recurrent SCC within 1 year after CCRT

  17. Recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: A mixed nested variant case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    De Berardinis, Ettore; Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Antonini, Gabriele; Di Placido, Mariarosaria; Gentile, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Nested variant of urothelial cell carcinoma (NVUC) is a rare histological entity, with about 80 reported cases. It has a deceptively benign appearance with an aspect characterized by confluent small nest or urothelial’s cell tubules. This tumour often resembles inverted papilloma, von Brunn’s nests (VBNs), cystitis cystica, nephrogenic metaplasia and sometimes usual transitional cell cancer. It is very important to be able to distinguish between benign lesions and nested variant bladder cance...

  18. Marjolin ulcer: how much of safety margin needs resection along marjolin ulcer squamous cell carcinoma in recurrence cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate how much of the surrounding area need to be resected to reach tumor free margin in cases of recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) Marjolin ulcer. The other objective was to report the demographic characteristics, the site of development of SCC Marjolin ulcers. A total of 266 patients with ulcers created on burn scars were studied. Biopsy samples were taken from all ulcers and evaluated pathologically for chronic inflammation or SCC Marjolin ulcer. For primary SCC Marjolin ulcers a 2cm safety margin was removed, while for recurrent SCC Marjolin ulcers a 2cm safety margin was removed and assessed pathologically under frozen-section and a further 0.5cm safety margin was removed in cases of SCC involvement in any of the planes of the resected sections for reaching a SCC-clear margin. One hundred eighteen of the cases were due to chronic inflammation, and the remaining 148 cases were due to SCC Marjolin ulcers. Of this 31 cases were recurrent ones. At least one site of all the recurrent SCC Marjolin ulcer samples were found to be involved and required a second resection attempt for reaching a clear and a safe margin. Although classically 2cm safety margin is still widely used for resection of primary SCC Marjolin ulcers, we recommend that a 2.5cm safety margin is better for resection in recurrent cases. (author)

  19. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  20. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Zattoni, Fabio [University of Padua, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Urology Clinic, Padua (Italy); Spallino, Marianna [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Padua, Italy, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  1. Intraoperative Assessment of Surgical Margins of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Frozen Sections: A Practical Clinicopathological Management for Recurrences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Miyota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Local recurrence remains a challenging clinical issue for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. We analyzed retrospectively how effective the frozen section technique (FS was against recurrences of oral SCC. Methods. We screened 343 surgical samples from 236 patients who had oral SCC, carcinoma in situ (CIS, or epithelial dysplasia, and we followed up their clinical outcomes for at least 5 years. Histopathological states of surgical margins were compared between FS and surgical materials in relapse and relapse-free groups, respectively. Results. Among the 236 patients, 191 were classified into the relapse-free group, and 45 into the relapse group. FS was more frequently performed in the relapse-free group (128/191 than in the relapse group (83/152. Histopathologically, moderate dysplasia or CIS (borderline malignancies and SCC were recognized in 55 samples of the relapse-free group and in 57 of the relapse group. For those surgical margins with borderline malignancies, additional incisions were performed in 38 of the 55 relapse-free cases, which reduced to 20 from the 38 margins with borderline malignancies (47.4% reduction, and in 39 of the 57 relapse cases, which reduced to only 3 of 39 (7.7% reduction. Conclusions. The intraoperative assessment of surgical margins by FS is essential in preventing recurrences of oral mucosal malignancies.

  2. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Clinical Value of Serum HMGB1 Levels in Early Detection of Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Uterine Cervix: Comparison with Serum SCCA, CYFRA21-1, and CEA Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Xiugui; Du, Xuelian; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Dapeng; Lu, Chunhua; Li, Qinshui; Ma, Zhifang; Song, Quqing; Wang, Cong

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the clinical value of serum high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) levels in making the early diagnosis of recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) and compare it with the value of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), cytokeratin fragment (CYFRA) 21-1, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Methods Immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 64 patients with recurrent CSCCs, 72 patients with non-recurrent carcinoma,...

  4. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  5. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma arising in a neglected pilonidal sinus: report of a case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryılmaz, Ramazan; Bilecik, Tuna; Okan, Ismail; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Coşkun, Aytekin; Sahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare complication observed mainly in chronic, recurrent and untreated primary pilonidal disease. It is associated with poor prognosis, and its recurrence rate after surgery is high. Here we present a patient diagnosed with SCC arising from a neglected pilonidal sinus. A 44-year-old male, who is a heavy truck driver, applied to the hospital with chronic discharge from sacrococcygeal region. He had symptoms of the disease with multiple recurrent abscesses and spontaneous drainage for 10 years. The patient underwent cyst excision and the defect was left open for secondary healing. One year later, the patient was admitted to the hospital with a mass of 3 x 3 cm in the same area. Re-excision and a sigmoid colostomy were performed. The patient died after two years. This case study illustrates that since SCC is a fatal complication of recurrent and long-standing pilonidal sinus, the proper treatment of this disease should be carried out as soon as the diagnosis is established. To this end, we believe, that all pilonidal sinus lesions should be sent for pathologic examination. PMID:24600504

  6. PRIMARY SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF RENAL PELVIS ASSOCIATED WITH RENAL CALCULUS AND RECURRENT PYONEPHROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Hoti Lal; Shameer; Manish; Sadasukhi

    2015-01-01

    Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the kidney is a rare malignant neoplasm associated with nephrolithiasis, typically monobacterial pyonephrosis and rarely Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. It is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis mostly due to lack of presenting clinical features like a palpable mass, gross haematuria and pain. We report a case presenting with renal calculus and pyonephrosis managed initially with percutaneous nephrostomy followed by nephrectomy du...

  7. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    OpenAIRE

    Ja yoon Jang; Kye won Kwon; Sang wook Kim; Inyoung Youn

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested m...

  8. Examestane in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, Kristina; Malander, Susanne; Christensen, René dePont;

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor exemestane in patients with advanced, persistent or recurrent endometrial carcinoma.......We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor exemestane in patients with advanced, persistent or recurrent endometrial carcinoma....

  9. Recurrence in skeletal muscle from squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zannoni Gian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of skeletal muscle metastases is a very rare event. Only two cases of late skeletal muscle recurrence from cervical cancer have been documented until now. Case presentation A 38-year old patient, submitted to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for a squamous FIGO stage IB1 cervical carcinoma, presented after 76 months with a palpable, and painless swelling on the left hemithorax. MRI showed a nodule located in the context of the intercostal muscles. Pathology revealed the presence of metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of similar morphology as the primary. On the basis of FDG-PET findings, which excluded other sites of disease, surgical excision of the lesion was performed. The patient was triaged to chemotherapy plus external radiotherapy. Conclusion A case of skeletal muscle recurrence from cervical cancer after a very long interval from primary diagnosis is reported. Muscular pain or weakness, or just a palpable mass in a patient with a history of cancer has always to raise the suspicion of muscle metastasis.

  10. Recurrence in skeletal muscle from squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of skeletal muscle metastases is a very rare event. Only two cases of late skeletal muscle recurrence from cervical cancer have been documented until now. A 38-year old patient, submitted to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for a squamous FIGO stage IB1 cervical carcinoma, presented after 76 months with a palpable, and painless swelling on the left hemithorax. MRI showed a nodule located in the context of the intercostal muscles. Pathology revealed the presence of metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of similar morphology as the primary. On the basis of FDG-PET findings, which excluded other sites of disease, surgical excision of the lesion was performed. The patient was triaged to chemotherapy plus external radiotherapy. A case of skeletal muscle recurrence from cervical cancer after a very long interval from primary diagnosis is reported. Muscular pain or weakness, or just a palpable mass in a patient with a history of cancer has always to raise the suspicion of muscle metastasis

  11. Recurrent invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the ocular surface requiring penetrating therapeutic sclerokeratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Mannis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We review a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma invading the cornea to discuss optimal management. Methods:  Observational case report with histopathologic analysis. Results: Histopathology demonstrates corneal invasion by the tumor that appears to have been completely excised with a large therapeutic keratoplasty and adjuvant cryotherapy. Conclusions: Successful management of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN requires removal of identifiably abnormal tissue without disruption of normal protective architecture, careful histopathologic analysis, and the employment of adjuvant therapy at the time of or subsequent to surgical excision.

  12. Decreased expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 is involved in the proliferation and recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    PIAO, YONGRUI; LIU, XIANKUI; Lin, Zhenhua; Jin, Zhehu; JIN, XUANSHUN; Yuan, Kuichang; Wu, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) has been shown to be involved in the development of a number of types of carcinoma. However, the effect of PTPN12 on the proliferation and recurrence of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and function of PTPN12 in human TCC. Samples from 164 patients with TCC, in addition to 146 patients undergoing bladder surgery for indications other than TCC, were examin...

  13. The changes of histological malignancy in recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. Comparison between surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the difference of histological malignancy between primary lesion and recurrent lesion using malignancy grading system by Lund (Jakobsson) for oral squamous cell carcinomas. Patients were divided into radiation group (20 patients) and surgery group (10 patients). The incidence of patients whose malignancy was increased was 40% in surgery group and 75% in radiation group. The mean points of total malignancy score was increased from 18.8 to 22.0 points (p<0.05) in radiation group while from 18.4 to 18.9 points (ns) in surgery group. In eight factors of grading system, the points of ''appearance'', ''nuclear differentiation'' and ''cellular response'' were significantly increased in radiation group (p<0.05), although there was no significant increase in surgery group. The characteristic changes in recurrent tumor compared with primary tumor were that all four factors for tumor-host relationship became worth in both groups, especially radiation group. It was suggested that resistance of host tissue against tumors was reduced in recurrent tumor and adjacent tissue after initial therapy. (author)

  14. Recurrences after intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma more likely to originate from regions with high baseline [18F]-FDG uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne K.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.;

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the recurrence pattern in relation to target volumes and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Material and methods: 520 patients rece...

  15. Combined cetuximab and reirradiation for locoregional recurrent and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Dept. of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of external-beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: seven patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were treated between August and December 2008 with Re-RT (1.8 Gy/fraction to 50.4 Gy) and cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} initial dose in the 1st week, and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly). Recurrence had to be located at least {>=} 50% in the preirradiated field. Long term toxicity from previous treatment was recorded before Re-RT as a baseline value. Acute and late toxicity derived from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT, and then every 3 months. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after end of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter (Tables 1 and 2). Results: only mild localized mucositis occurred in all patients. Two patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. After treatment one patient developed a grade 2 trismus, another showed grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation with severe pain requiring opioid medication. Two patients achieved a complete response after 7 months, one remained stable, three progressed, and one died from pneumonia without having restaging magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: A second course of RT combined with cetuximab in patients with inoperable, recurrent HNSCC proved to be feasible with mild or moderate toxicity and encouraging response to treatment. (orig.)

  16. Patterns of tumor recurrence after definitive irradiation for inoperable non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary analysis was carried out on a prospective randomized cooperative group study involving 375 patients with histologically proven unresectable non-oat cell carcinoma of the lung who were treated with definitive radiotherapy. The patients were randomized to one of four treatment regimens: 4000 rad split course (2000 rad in five fractions one week, two weeks rest and an additional 2000 rad, five fractions in one week) or 4000, 5000 or 6000 rad continuous courses, five fractions per week. The patients who were treated with the split course had the lowest survival compared with the other groups. Complete and partial local tumor regression was 48% in patients who were treated with 4000 rad, 65% in the 5000 rad and 61% in the 6000 rad group. The rate of initial intrathoracic recurrence was 38% in patients who were treated with 6000 rad; 45% in those who received 5000 rad, 51% and 64% with 4000 rad split or continuous course, respectively. Distant metastases concurrent with or prior to intrathoracic failure were significantly higher in the patients with adenocarcinoma or large cell adenocarcinoma (63%) than in epidermoid carcinoma (33%). The present data strongly suggest that patients who were treated with 5000 or 6000 rad had a better response, tumor control and survival than those who were treated with lower doses

  17. Carcinoma basocelular da pálpebra: fatores relacionados com a recidiva tumoral Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid: factors related to recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Akemi Ishi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: O carcinoma basocelular (CBC palpebral é o tumor maligno mais freqüente das pálpebras, sendo possível observar casos em que existe recidiva após a exérese tumoral. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi procurar reconhecer fatores relacionados com a recidiva do CBC palpebral. MÉTODOS: No período de 1998 a 2001 foram detectados, na Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu/Unesp, 23 pacientes que apresentaram recidiva clínica de CBC palpebral. Foi realizada análise retrospectiva dos pacientes, analisando-se idade, sexo, história de exposição solar, localização do tumor na pálpebra, diagnóstico clínico, diagnóstico histológico, acometimento de bordas cirúrgicas e tempo de seguimento. RESULTADOS: Em meio aos 23 pacientes analisados, não houve predominância de sexo, e a média de idade foi de 72,9 anos. Dos tumores localizados exclusivamente na pálpebra inferior, sobretudo no canto interno (74,0%, 34,7% eram do tipo sólido ulcerado, e a maioria (66,6% apresentava margens cirúrgicas livres, quando da ressecção tumoral. CONCLUSÃO: A maioria das recidivas de CBC palpebral foi de tumores do tipo sólido e localizados no canto interno. Margens cirúrgicas livres não representam garantia de que a lesão não vá recidivar ou surgir "de novo".BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common malignant tumor located in the eyelid and there is a possibility of recurrent tumor after excision. OBJECTIVE: This study was done to evaluate the features related to recidive basal cell carcinoma. METHODS: A retrospective survey was done at Botucatu School of Medicine - UNESP, from 1998 to 2001. A total of 23 patients presented recidive basal cell carcinoma. The patients were studied according to sex, age, solar exposure, tumor localization, histological presentation, resection margins and follow up. RESULTS: Recidive BCC occurred in Caucasians, mostly in females (52.0%, all in the lower eyelid, mainly in the internal canthus

  18. Surgery for recurrent biliary carcinoma: results for 27 recurrent cases

    OpenAIRE

    Noji, Takehiro; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Mizota, Tomoko; Okamura, Keisuke; Nakamura, Toru; Tamoto, Eiji; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Various chemotherapies have been used as best practice to treat recurrent biliary malignancies. Conversely, relatively few surgeries have been described for recurrent extrahepatic biliary carcinoma (RExBC), so whether surgery for RExBC is feasible has remained unclear. This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of surgery for RExBC. Methods From February 2000 to January 2014, a total of 27 patients, comprising 18 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma...

  19. Recidivas e recorrências de carcinomas basocelulares da face Relapses and recurrences of basal cell face carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Polizel Ocanha; Juliana Tedesco Dias; Hélio Amante Miot; Hamilton Ometto Stolf; Mariângela Esther Alencar Marques; Luciana Patricia Fernandes Abbade

    2011-01-01

    Para avaliar fatores relacionados ao seguimento oncológico dos carcinomas basocelulares da face, foi realizada a análise de série de casos. Avaliaram-se 465 pacientes, com 834 carcinomas basocelulares de face; 3,1% apresentaram recidivas. Nos tumores incompletamente excisados, a recidiva foi 14,7% contra 2,3% dos tumores, com margens livres. Ocorreram mais na região nasal. As taxas de recorrência evidenciaram risco cumulativo. Estes achados reforçam a importância do seguimento oncológico após...

  20. Simultaneous removal of a tumour of the right atrium and inferior vena cava and coronary bypass-grafting in a patient with recurrent clear renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Edward; Głuszek, Stanisław; Michta, Kamil; Kot, Marta; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cardiac tumours are the most common malignant cardiac tumours. In the early stages they are usually asymptomatic, but their consequences can be very serious, and the prognosis is poor. We present a patient with recurrent renal cell carcinoma as a tumour of the right atrium and the vena cava inferior in whom cancerous masses were removed with simultaneously coronary artery bypass-grafting. PMID:26855653

  1. Recurrence of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed using contralateral adrenal biopsy with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    TANIMOTO, AZUSA; TAKEUCHI, SHINJI; YAEGASHI, HIROSHI; KOTANI, HIROSHI; KITAI, HIDENORI; NANJO, SHIGEKI; EBI, HIROMICHI; YAMASHITA, KANAME; MOURI, HISATSUGU; OHTSUBO, KOUSHIRO; IKEDA, HIROKO; YANO, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female in whom a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lesion was resected 19 years previously presented to our hospital with cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed nodules in the brain, lung, adrenal gland and a pelvic osteolytic lesion. To identify the primary cancer site, the present study performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the left adrenal lesion. Consequently, the pathological findings of the tissue obtained by EUS-FNA were similar to those of the previous nephrectomy specimen, revealing that the adrenal lesion was the recurrence of RCC. The majority of the metastatic lesions in the patient were reduced in size by the multiple kinase inhibitor, pazopanib. Contralateral adrenal metastasis of RCC is rare and the use of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remains to be elucidated. This is a rare case of adrenal lesion, diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Therefore, EUS-FNA is considered to be a useful diagnostic modality of adrenal metastases from unidentified primary tumor types. PMID:27073657

  2. Complete treatment of a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the lip and the commissure. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis-Irineos TSIROGIANNIS, Nadia THEOLOGIE-LYGIDAKIS, Stavros PELEKANOS,

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Carcinomas of the lip and the commisure show a milder biological behavior as well as higher differentiation and better prognosis in comparison with these of the oral cavity. Therapeutic management, as for malignant tumors, includes radical resection together with functional and aesthetic rehabilitation. Aim of the paper is to present the multidisciplinary treatment of a case of a lip commissure carcinoma. Case presentation: Α 68 years old patient with a recurrent squamous carcinoma of the lower lip and the commissure was referred for treatment. The treatment plan included an extensive surgical excision of the lesion, suprahomohyoid neck dissection, reconstruction of the defect with local flaps, additional radiotherapy and dental rehabilitation with implants in a later stage. Seven years post- operation the patient is free of disease.The functional and aesthetic results are satisfying, considering the large soft tissue defect.

  3. Lack of claudin-7 is a strong predictor of regional recurrence in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, L. J.; de Bruin, L. Bruine; Schnell, U.; Slagter-Menkema, L.; Mastik, M. F.; de Bock, G. H.; van Dijk, B. A. C.; Giepmans, B. N. G.; van der Laan, B. F. A. M.; van der Wal, J. E.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Schuuring, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Adequate treatment of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is dependent on correctly predicting the presence of lymph node metastases. Current methods to diagnose nodal metastases partly result in overtreatment with associated morbidity and undertreatment with decreased

  4. Selective arterial embolization for control of haematuria secondary to advanced or recurrent transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2014-05-02

    Haematuria is a common symptom in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. We report our experience of selective pelvic embolization using gelfoam as an embolic agent to treat intractable haematuria in these patients.

  5. The application of Levulan®-based photodynamic therapy with imiquimod in the treatment of recurrent basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Osiecka, Beata Joanna; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Common skin tumors like basal- and squamous-cell carcinoma present a serious problem in modern medicine. Exposure to ultraviolet solar radiation is the main cause of these lesions. Since application of Aldara® and PDT separately is well documented, we decided to use both methods together. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of local photodynamic therapy supplemented with topical application of Aldara® in basal-cell carcinoma. Material/Methods Thirty-four ...

  6. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz de Nova, Jose Luis; Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  7. Salvage surgery for local recurrence after concomitant radiotherapy and superselective arterial infusion of cisplatin in patients with squamous cell carcinoma cancer of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study aimed to assess the role of salvage surgery for local recurrence after concomitant radiotherapy and superselective arterial infusion of cisplatin (RADPLAT) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma cancer of the maxillary sinus as an initial treatment. Forty-one patients were treated by RADPLAT between 1999 and 2009. Local recurrence in the primary site was observed in 12 patients of whom 9 could undergo further salvage surgery. Primary disease control was achieved in 7 of these patients (successful salvage rate, 58.3%). Successful salvage rates for T3, T4a and T4b primary disease were 66.7% (2/3), 66.7% (4/6) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate was 73.6% in all patients. Severe postoperative complication was seen in one patient. Prognosis of patients with locally recurring maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma after RADPLAT is relatively good. This is because residual/recurrent tumor was located in anterior portion of the face in most cases. This result should be taken into consideration when the initial treatment plan is decided and the choice of salvage surgery for such recurrent cases should be carefully determined. (author)

  8. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  9. The Role of Embryologic Fusion Planes in the Invasiveness and Recurrence of Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Classic Mix-Up of Causation and Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Linus T. D.; Guppy, Michelle P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The facial embryologic fusion planes as regions of mesenchymal and ectodermal fusion of the primordial facial processes during embryological development have been suggested to influence the spread, invasiveness, pathogenesis, and recurrence of cutaneous carcinoma. This study sought to establish whether basal cell carcinoma (BCC) originating in embryologic fusion planes has a greater propensity for earlier depth of invasion, leading to an increased rate of lesion recurrence. Methods: Facial BCCs excised in a single surgeon practice over 2 years were allocated into 2 anatomic domains according to their correlation with embryologic fusion planes. Lesion depth of invasion, surface area, and margins of excision were analyzed in conjunction with recurrence data over the following 70–80 months. Results: Of the 331 lesions examined, 70 were located in embryologic fusion planes. No difference was found in the mean surface area and depth of invasion for lesions located in the 2 domains (P > 0.05). Ten lesion recurrences were identified, none of which were located in embryologic fusion planes. Recurrent lesions were excised with a significantly greater percentage of close and incomplete excision margins (P < 0.05). Conclusions: BCC arising in embryologic fusion planes are not more invasive or at greater risk of recurrence. Excision margins seem to have the greatest influence on lesion recurrence. Because of the paucity of superfluous tissue and the cosmetic and functionally sensitive nature of these areas of embryologic fusion, specialist treatment of these lesions is recommended to ensure that adequacy of excision is not neglected at the cost of ease of closure and cosmesis. PMID:26894007

  10. Pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level is a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node recurrence in addition to squamous cell carcinoma antigen following definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels as a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer. From March 1995 to January 2008, 188 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix were analyzed retrospectively. No patient received PALN irradiation as the initial treatment. CEA and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) were measured before and after radiotherapy. PALN recurrence was detected by computer tomography (CT) scans. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were carried out with Cox regression models. We stratified the risk groups based on the hazard ratios (HR). Both pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL and SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 8.838), SCC-Ag levels ≥ 40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 12.551), and SCC-Ag levels of 10-40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 4.2464) were significant factors for PALN recurrence. The corresponding 5-year PALN recurrence rates were 51.5%, 84.8%, and 27.5%, respectively. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate for patients with both low (< 10 ng/mL) SCC and CEA was only 9.6%. CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL or SCC-Ag levels ≥ 10 ng/mL at PALN recurrence were associated with overall survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL were also associated with survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA ≥ 10 ng/mL is an additional risk factor of PALN relapse following definitive CCRT for SCC of the uterine cervix in patients with pretreatment SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL. More comprehensive examinations before CCRT and intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in patients with SCC-Ag or CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL

  11. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene expression is a prognostic marker for tumor recurrence in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proto-oncogene pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG) has been shown to be abundantly overexpressed in a large variety of neoplasms likely promoting neo-vascularization and tumor invasiveness. In this study, we investigated a potential role for PTTG mRNA expression as a marker to evaluate the future clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with primary cancer of the head and neck. Tumor samples derived from primary tumors of 89 patients suffering from a squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed for PTTG mRNA-expression and compared to corresponding unaffected tissue. Expression levels were correlated to standard clinico-pathological parameters based on a five year observation period. In almost all 89 tumor samples PTTG was found to be overexpressed (median fold increase: 2.1) when compared to the unaffected tissue specimens derived from the same patient. The nodal stage correlated with PTTG transcript levels with significant differences between pN0 (median expression: 1.32) and pN+ (median expression: 2.12; P = 0.016). In patients who developed a tumor recurrence we detected a significantly higher PTTG expression in primary tumors (median expression: 2.63) when compared to patients who did not develop a tumor recurrence (median expression: 1.29; P = 0.009). Since the median expression of PTTG in patients with tumor stage T1/2N0M0 that received surgery alone without tumor recurrence was 0.94 versus 3.82 in patients suffering from a tumor recurrence (P = 0.006), PTTG expression might provide a feasible mean of predicting tumor recurrence. Elevated PTTG transcript levels might be used as a prognostic biomarker for future clinical outcome (i.e. recurrence) in primary squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, especially in early stages of tumor development

  12. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Donald T Weed; Gail Walker; Adriana C De La Fuente; Ronen Nazarian; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Paolo Serafini

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+)T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstr...

  13. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Donald T.; Walker, Gail; De la fuente, Adriana C.; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4+FOXP3+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in...

  14. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Furukawa; Hitomi Sakamoto; Shoko Takeuchi; Mitra Ameri; Yuko Kuboki; Toshiyuki Yamamoto; Takashi Hatori; Masakazu Yamamoto; Masanori Sugiyama; Nobuyuki Ohike; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Michio Shimizu; Noriyuki Shibata; Kyoko Shimizu; Keiko Shiratori

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we ide...

  15. Tumor vaccine against recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Gang Peng; Li-Jiang Liang; Qiang He; Ming Kuang; Jia-Ming Lia; Ming-De Lu; Jie-Fu Huang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of autologous tumor vaccine on recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: Sixty patients with HCC who had undergone curative resection, were randomly divided into HCC vaccine group and control group. Three vaccinations at 2-wk intervals were performed after curative hepatic resection. Delayedtype- hypersensitivity (DTH) test was performed before and after vaccination. Primary endpoints were the time of recurrence.RESULTS: Four patients in control group and 6 patients in HCC vaccine group were withdrawn from the study. The vaccine containing human autologous HCC fragments showed no essential adverse effect in a phase Ⅱ clinical trial and 17 of 24 patients developed a DTH response against the fragments. Three of 17 DTH-positive response patients and 5 of 7 DTH- negative response patients had recurrences after curative resection. After the operation,1-, 2- and 3-year recurrence rates of HCC vaccine groupwere 16.7%, 29.2% and 33.3%, respectively. But, 1-, 2- and3-year recurrence rates of the control group were 30.8%,53.8% and 61.5%, respectively. The time before the first recurrence in the vaccinated patients was significantly longer than that in the control patients (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Autologous tumor vaccine is of promise in decreasing recurrence of human HCC.

  16. Post liver transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder mimics recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Linlawan, Sittikorn; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Komolmit, Piyawat

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related postliver transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in a patient with post liver transplant which initially presented in a CT scan image mimicking recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Histopathology showed atypical plasma cell-like infiltration, and immunohistochemistry confirmed diagnosis of EBV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Typical imaging from dynamic phases contrast CT scan might not accurately diagnose recurren...

  17. Management of recurrent and metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbun, H J; Hughes, K S

    1993-02-01

    When metastatic or recurrent disease from colorectal carcinoma is detected, the surgeon must decide whether a patient is a candidate for resection. Although long-term survival after resection is not optimal, the relegation of patients to nonresective treatment means denying them the only chance for cure currently available. When isolated disease involving the liver, lung, or region of the primary carcinoma is documented, curative resection must be considered. Symptomatic patients may also obtain maximal palliation from resection, diversion, or a bypass procedure. Chemotherapy for the treatment of recurrent disease is palliative and probably should be considered only within clinical trials. Future alternative methods of treatment or new chemotherapeutic regimens need to be studied to improve survival and quality of life. PMID:8426994

  18. Re-irradiation with cetuximab or cisplatin-based chemotherapy for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornoff, Nicolas; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Franz [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Ghanaati, Shahram [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Atefeh, Nateghian; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site: Frankfurt, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Locoregional recurrence remains the main pattern of failure after primary combined modality treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We compared the efficacy and toxicity of either cisplatin or cetuximab in combination with re-irradiation (ReRT) for recurrent unresectable SCCHN. Various clinicopathological factors were investigated to establish a prognostic score. Between 2007 and 2014, 66 patients with recurrent SCCHN originating in a previously irradiated area received cetuximab (n = 33) or cisplatin-based chemotherapy (n = 33) concomitant with ReRT. Toxicity was evaluated weekly and at every follow-up visit. Physical examination, endoscopy, CT or MRI scans were used to evaluate response and disease control. With a mean follow-up of 18.3 months, the 1-year overall survival (OS) rates for Re-RT with cetuximab and cisplatin-based chemotherapy were 44.4 and 45.5 % (p = 0.352), respectively. At 1 year, local control rates (LCR) were 46.4 and 54.2 % (p = 0.625), freedom from metastases (FFM) rates 73.6 and 81 % (p = 0.842), respectively. Haematological toxicity ≥ grade 3 occurred more often in the cisplatin group (p < 0.001), pain ≥ grade 3 was increased in the cetuximab group (p = 0.034). A physiological haemoglobin level and a longer interval between primary RT and ReRT, proved to be significant prognostic factors for OS (multivariate: p = 0.003, p = 0.002, respectively). Site of the recurrence and gross target volume (GTV) did not show a significant impact on OS in multivariate analysis (p = 0.160, p = 0.167, respectively). A prognostic-score (1-4 points) based on these four variables identified significantly different subgroups: 1-year OS for 0/1/2/3/4 prognostic points: 10, 38, 76, 80 and 100 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Both cetuximab- and cisplatin-based ReRT of SCCHN recurrences are feasible and effective treatment options with comparable results in terms of tumour control and survival. Acute adverse events may differ slightly

  19. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-12

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  20. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Cheol [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Hyeok [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Young Joo [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee Jeong [Department of Pathology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Myung Woul [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Won [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-A [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Who, E-mail: swhokim@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon, E-mail: sykim3715@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation.

  1. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation

  2. Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma with Synchronous Tumor Growth in Azygoesophageal Recess and Duodenum: A Rare Cause of Anemia and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R.; Kashif, Muhammad; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has potential to present with distant metastasis several years after complete resection. The common sites of metastases include the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain. RCCs metastasize rarely to the duodenum, and duodenal metastasis presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleed is infrequently reported in literature. We present a case of synchronous presentation of duodenal and azygoesophageal metastasis manifesting as acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, four years after undergoing nephrectomy for RCC. The patient underwent further workup and was treated with radiation. The synchronous presentation is rare and stresses the importance of searching for recurrence of RCC in patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26640732

  3. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  4. Lin28B is an oncofetal circulating cancer stem cell-like marker associated with recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wen Cheng

    Full Text Available By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96 and non-HCC controls (n=60 and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2 and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5% of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3% of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046, large size (P=0.005, high AJCC stage (P=0.044 and BCLC stage (P=0.017. Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001. Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003. In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045 and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006. In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells staging system

  5. Lin28B is an oncofetal circulating cancer stem cell-like marker associated with recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  6. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  7. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  8. Recurrence of paraneoplastic membranous glomerulonephritis following chemoradiation in a man with non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Leonard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur as a rare paraneoplastic complication of human cancers. In this case report, we describe a patient who presented acutely with symptoms of the nephrotic syndrome including heavy proteinuria and anasarca. He was subsequently diagnosed with membranous glomerulonephritis, and soon afterwards was found to have stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Following chemoradiation therapy, both the patient’s cancer and membranous glomerulonephritis dramatically improved. However, approximately 14 months following his initial presentation, the patient was found to have a recurrence of his nephrotic-range proteinuria which corresponded temporally with recurrence of his cancer. We present details of the case and a review of the relevant scientific literature.

  9. Actinomycosis mimicking recurrent carcinoma after Whipple's operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Te Hsu; Hung-Chieh Lo; Yi-Yin Jan; Han-Ming Chen

    2005-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare, chronic, spreading, suppurative,granulomatous and fibrosing infection. Actinomyces are normal inhabitants of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. They rarely cause disease and are seldom reported as pathogens. Herein, we reported on a 69-year-old male patient who had undergone Whipple's operation due to ampulla Vater carcinoma, and became infected with actinomycosis at the pancreaticojejunostomy, which mimicked a recurrent malignancy. He was treated with radical resection of the mass at the pancreaticojejunostomy and had an uneventful postoperative course.

  10. Surgical Management of Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Hao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Current standard treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC is either radiotherapy alone or combined chemoradiotherapy.Surgery in the form of nasopharyngectomy is usuallyonly offered when there is evidence of local recurrence or persistentdisease. Recurrent NPC (rNPC can be detected earlierwith the utilization of Epstein-Barr virus molecular diagnosis.This may result in early management with salvage surgery andhence improved survival. The facial translocation approachenhanced our ability to access the nasopharynx. Through amultidisciplinary approach with the collaboration of neurosurgeons,the surgical indication of salvage surgery is extended.This allowed improved respectability in locally advanced diseaseand involved the skull base and intracranial extensionwith reasonable morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic nasopharyngectomyis a choice for recurrent NPC with central roof orfloor lesions with minimal lateral extension. Multivariate analysis indicated that gender,parapharyngeal space involvement, surgical margin, and the modality of adjuvant therapyimpact significantly on local control. The impact on survival is indicated by the dura orbrain involvement, local recurrence and modality of adjuvant therapy. It is apparent thatrecurrent NPC patients who underwent surgery had a significantly better survival rate thanthe re-radiation therapy group.

  11. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  12. Elevation of circulating big endothelin-1: an independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelin(ET) axis plays a key role in many tumor progression and metastasis via various mechanisms such as angiogenesis, mediating extracellular matrix degradation and inhibition of apoptosis. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of plasma big ET-1 levels in esophageal cancer patients. Circulating plasma big ET-1 levels were measured in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC) to evaluate the value of ET-1 as a biomarker for predicting tumor recurrence and patients survival. Preoperative plasma big ET-1 concentrations were measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) in 108 ESCC patients before surgery, and then again at 1,2,3,10 and 30 days after curative radical resection for ESCC. The association between preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels and clinicopathological features, tumor recurrence and patient survival, and their changes following surgery were evaluated. The preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels in ESCC patients were significantly higher than those in controls. And there was a significant association between plasma big ET-1 levels and disease stage, as well as invasion depth of the tumor and lymph node status. Furthermore, plasma big ET-1 levels decreased significantly after radical resection of the primary tumor and patients with postoperative recurrence had significantly higher plasma big ET-1 levels than that of patients without recurrence. Finally, the survival rate of patients with higher plasma big ET-1 concentrations (>4.3 pg/ml) was significantly lower than that of patients with lower level (≤ 4.3 pg/ml). Multivariate regression analysis showed that plasma big ET-1 level is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with ESCC. Plasma big ET-1 level in ESCC patients may reflect malignancy and predict tumor recurrence and patient survival. Therefore, the preoperative plasma big ET-1 levels may be a clinically useful biomarker for choice of multimodality therapy in ESCC

  13. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  14. Re-irradiation combined with capecitabine in locally recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormittag, L.; Kornek, G. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Div. of Clinical Oncology; Lemaire, C.; Radonjic, D.; Selzer, E. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology

    2012-03-15

    We performed a prospective phase II trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy combined with capecitabine in patients suffering from a recurrence of a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) within a previously irradiated field. A total of 31 evaluable patients with recurrent SCCHN received re-irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions over 5 weeks) up to a maximum of 60 Gy combined with 900 mg/m{sup 2}/day capecitabine given on the days of radiotherapy. The median time to relapse after the first course of radiotherapy was 15 months. The overall response rate in our study was 68% including 6 patients with a complete response. The median overall survival was 8.4 months. Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 4 patients and 1 patient, respectively. No grade 4 hematological toxicities were observed; 1 patient had grade 3 anemia. The cumulative median lifetime dose was 116 Gy. Capecitabine combined with re-irradiation is a well-tolerated treatment in patients with recurrent SCCHN. In light of its good tolerability, it appears to be a potential option for patients with a reduced performance status and may also serve as a basis for novel treatment concepts, such as in combination with targeted therapies.

  15. Estimation of groin recurrence risk in patients with squamous cell vulvar carcinoma by the assessment of marker gene expression in the lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional lymph node (LN) status is a well-known prognostic factor for vulvar carcinoma (VC) patients. Although the reliable LN assessment in VC is crucial, it presents significant diagnostic problems. We aimed to identify specific mRNA markers of VC dissemination in the LN and to address the feasibility of predicting the risk of nodal recurrence by the patterns of gene expression. Sentinel and inguinal LN samples from 20 patients who had undergone surgery for stage T1-3, N0-2, M0 primary vulvar squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed. Gene expression profiles were assessed in four metastatic [LN(+)] and four histologically negative [LN(−)] lymph node samples obtained from four VC patients, by the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 gene expression microarrays. Of the set of genes of the highest expression in the metastatic LNs compared to LN(−), seven candidate marker genes were selected: PERP, S100A8, FABP5, SFN, CA12, JUP and CSTA, and the expression levels of these genes were further analyzed by the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in 71 LN samples. All of the seven genes in question were significantly increased in LN(+) compared to LN(−) samples. In the initial validation of the seven putative markers of metastatic LN, the Cox proportional hazard model pointed to SFN, CA12 and JUP expression to significantly relate to the time to groin recurrence in VC patients. Our findings first provided evidence that SFN, CA12 and JUP have a potential of marker genes for the prediction of the groin recurrence LN in VC patients

  16. Management of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma afterliver transplant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause ofdeaths in patients with hepatitis B or C, and its incidencehas increased considerably over the past decade and is stillon the rise. Liver transplantation (LT) provides the bestchance of cure for patients with HCC and liver cirrhosis.With the implementation of the MELD exception systemfor patients with HCC waitlisted for LT, the number ofrecipients of LT is increasing, so is the number of patientswho have recurrence of HCC after LT. Treatments forintrahepatic recurrence after transplantation and afterother kinds of surgery are more or less the same, butlong-term cure of posttransplant recurrence is rarelyseen as it is a "systemic" disease. Nonetheless, surgicalresection has been shown to be effective in prolongingpatient survival despite the technical difficulty in resectinggraft livers. Besides surgical resection, different kindsof treatment are also in use, including transarterialchemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, highintensityfocused ultrasound ablation, and stereotacticbody radiation therapy. Targeted therapy and modulationof immunosuppressants are also adopted to treat thedeadly disease.

  17. Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna Vijaykumar Wader; Sujata S Kumbhar; Huddedar AD; Wasim GM Khatib

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the kidney comprised of different histological variants. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mainly diagnosed in the sixth decade of life. It is important to identify this entity because it has significantly better prognosis than the clear cell (conventional) and papillary renal cell carcinomas. The chromophobe renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from oncocytoma and clear cell ca...

  18. COX MULTIVARIATE REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF RECURRENCE FACTORS FOR COLONIC CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜寒松; 王国斌; 秦青平; 夏玉春; 司徒光伟

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the independent prognostic factors in the recurrence of colonic carcinoma after curative resection. Methods: Two hundred and one patients undergoing curative resections for colonic carcinoma were investigated by univariate and Cox multivariate regression analyses. Ten factors contributed to the rate were analyzed. Results: Dukes stages, obstruction, postoperative chemotherapy as well as the growth manner of the tumor were significantly associated with the recurrence rate of colonic carcinoma (P<0.05) by univariate analysis, while Dukes stages, obstruction, and postoperative chemotherapy were significant factors by the multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Dukes stages, obstruction, and postoperative chemotherapy are independent prognostic factors in the recurrence of colonic carcinoma.

  19. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Recurrent sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Baek; Park, Jun-Won; Oh, Won-Seok; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2010-07-01

    A 1.5-year-old intact male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was presented with a firm, non-movable subcutaneous mass on ventral chest area. Microscopically, the tumor was un-encapsulated, invasive up to the muscle layer, and composed of highly pleomorphic polygonal cells arranged in variably-sized lobules. The neoplastic cells had abundant cytoplasm with vacuolation and a large pleomorphic nucleus with prominent nucleoli. Mitotic figures were frequently observed with atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin, but negative for vimentin. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma was made. Three months after the surgery, a recurrent mass was found at the surgical site. On necropsy, the mass has penetrated the underlying intercostal musculature, without metastasis to distant organs. This is the first report of a sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:20215722

  1. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for postoperative recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: clinical efficacy and failure pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the therapeutic outcome and failure pattern of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after radical surgery. Treatment outcome and failure pattern were retrospectively evaluated in 83 patients with localized cervical and thoracic recurrences after radical surgery for thoracic esophageal SCC. All patients were treated with 3DCRT-based CCRT (median radiation dose 60 Gy), in which 39 received concurrent cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil (PF), and 44 received concurrent docetaxel plus cisplatin (TP). Treatment response was evaluated at 1–3 months after CCRT. With a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 2–116 months), the 3-year overall survival (OS) of all the patients was 51.8% and the median OS time was 43.0 months. The overall tumor response rate was 75.9% (63/83), with a complete remission (CR) rate of 44.6% (37/83). In univariate analysis, tumor response after CCRT (p = 0.000), recurrence site (p = 0.028) and concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.090) showed a trend favoring better OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor response after CCRT (p = 0.000) and concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.010) were independent predictors of OS. Forty-seven patients had progressive diseases after CCRT, 27 had local failure (27/47, 57.4%), 18 had distant metastasis (18/47, 38.3%) and 2 had both local and distant failures (2/47, 4.3%). 3DCRT-based CCRT is effective in postoperatively recurrent esophageal SCC. Patients that obtained complete remission after CCRT appeared to achieve long-term OS and might benefit from concurrent TP regimen. Local and distant failures remained high and prospective studies are needed to validate these factors

  2. Treatment Results of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Coexistence of Multiple Minor Risk Factors Results in Higher Recurrence Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). Materials and Methods: This study included 302 OSCC patients who were treated by radical surgery and PORT. Indications for PORT include Stage III or IV OSCC according to the 2002 criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer, the presence of perineural invasion or lymphatic invasion, the depth of tumor invasion, or a close surgical margin. Patients with major risk factors, such as multiple nodal metastases, a positive surgical margin, or extracapsular spreading, were excluded. The prescribed dose of PORT ranged from 59.4 to 66.6Gy (median, 63Gy). Results: The 3-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 73% and 70%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that differentiation, perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, bone invasion, location (hard palate and retromolar trigone), invasion depths ≥10mm, and margin distances ≤4mm were significant prognostic factors. The presence of multiple significant factors of univariate analysis correlated with disease recurrence. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 82%, 76%, and 45% for patients with no risk factors, one or two risk factors, and three or more risk factors, respectively. After multivariate analysis, the number of risk factors and lymphatic invasion were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: PORT may be an adequate adjuvant therapy for OSCC patients with one or two risk factors of recurrence. The presence of multiple risk factors and lymphatic invasion correlated with poor prognosis, and more aggressive treatment may need to be considered.

  3. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Choo, Richard, E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Leibovich, Bradley C. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  4. Decreased GATA5 mRNA expression associates with CpG island methylation and shortened recurrence-free survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GATA-5, a zinc-finger transcription factor and member of the GATA family proteins 1–6, is known to be involved in cellular differentiation. We recently found that tumor-specific hypermethylation of the GATA5 CpG island (CGI) occurs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome. In this study, we investigated whether epigenetic GATA5 alterations may result in changes in GATA5 mRNA expression levels and correlate with the observed prognostic impact of epigenetic changes in GATA5 in RCC. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction was applied to measure relative GATA5 mRNA expression levels in 135 kidney tissue samples, including 77 clear cell RCC (ccRCC) tissues and 58 paired adjacent normal renal tissue samples. Relative GATA5 expression levels were determined using the ΔΔCt method and detection of three endogenous control genes then compared to previously measured values of relative methylation. The mean relative GATA5 mRNA expression level exhibited an approximately 31-fold reduction in tumor specimens compared with corresponding normal tissues (p < 0.001, paired t-test). Decreased GATA5 mRNA expression was inversely correlated with increased GATA5 CGI methylation (p < 0.001) and was associated with shortened recurrence-free survival in ccRCC patients (p = 0.023, hazard ratio = 0.25). GATA5 mRNA expression is decreased in ccRCC, likely due to gene silencing by methylation of the GATA5 CGI. Moreover, reduced GATA5 mRNA levels were associated with a poor clinical outcome, indicating a possible role of GATA5 for the development of aggressive ccRCC phenotypes

  5. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Roeder, Falk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Martínez-Monge, Rafael [Radiation Oncology Division, University of Navarre, Pamplona (Spain); Whitson, Jared [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Calvo, Felipe A. [Departamento de Oncología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Salzburg (Austria); Wong, William W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Ellis, Rodney J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seidman Cancer Center University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  6. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  7. No-Needle Jet Intradermal Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy for Recurrent Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barolet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT with aminolevulinic acid (ALA to treat nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC has been shown to be beneficial. The success rate of ALA-PDT in the treatment of nodular BCC is dependent on optimal penetration of the photosensitizing agent and subsequent PpIX production. To enhance topical delivery of drugs intradermally, a needleless jet injection (NLJI, which employs a high-speed jet to puncture the skin without the side effects of needles, was used in one patient with recurrent BCC of the nose. Photoactivation was then performed using red light emitting diode [CW @ λ 630 nm, irradiance 50 mW/cm2, total fluence 51 J/cm2] for 17 minutes. Excellent cosmesis was obtained. Aside from mild crusting present for six days, no other adverse signs were noted. Clinically, there was no recurrent lesion up two years postintervention. Additional studies in larger samples of subjects are needed to further evaluate this promising technique.

  8. Postoperative distal ureteric and bladder cuff recurrence in a Grade I renal transitional cell carcinoma diagnosed and restaged by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 56-year-old male having Grade I transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of left kidney, postleft nephrectomy and upper 1/3rd ureterectomy presented with painless hematuria. Restaging fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) revealed abnormal linear FDG uptake in the lower 2/3rd of the left ureter and in the bladder adjacent to the left vesicoureteric junction, no locoregional adenopathy nor distant metastases (Figures 1 and 2- left column). Patient underwent left lower ureterectomy with partial cystectomy. Postoperative histopathology was TCC. Instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin injection in the bladder was done postoperatively. A follow-up FDG PET/CT scan performed 3 months postoperatively was revealed no abnormal focal FDG uptake in the whole body revealing disease free status. FDG PET was helpful in diagnosing tumor recurrence in the distal remnant ureter. This case attempts to highlight the role of FDG PET/CT in follow-up, residual and recurrence evaluation

  9. Strong CD8+ T-cell responses against tumor-associated antigens prolong the recurrence-free interval after tumor treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated whether tumor-specific CD8+T-cell responses affect tumor-free survival as well as the relationship between CD8+T-cell responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and the clinical course after tumor treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients with HCC that were treated by radiofrequency ablation or trans-catheter chemo-embolization (TACE) and in whom HCC was undetectable by ultrasonography, CT, and/or MRI 1 month after treatment were enrolled in the study. Before and after treatment for HCC, analyses of TAA (glypican-3, NY-ESO-1, and MAGE-1)-specific CD8+T-cell responses were evaluated with an interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay using peripheral CD8+T-cells, monocytes, and 104 types of 20-mer synthetic peptide overlapping by 10 residues and spanning the entirety of the 3 TAAs. Sixteen out of 20 patients (80%) showed a positive response (≥10 TAA-specific cells/105 CD8+T-cells) before or after treatment. When we performed univariate analysis of prognostic factors for the tumor-free period in the 20 patients, platelet count, prothrombin time, and the number of TAA-specific CD8+T-cells after treatment were significant factors (P=0.027, 0.030, and 0.004, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the magnitude of the TAA-specific CD8+T-cell response (≥40 TAA-specific cells/105 CD8+T-cells) was the only significant prognostic factor for a prolonged tumor-free interval (hazard ratio 0.342, P=0.022). Our results suggest that strong TAA-specific CD8+T-cell responses suppress the recurrence of HCC. Immunotherapy to induce TAA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by means such as the use of peptide vaccines should be considered for clinical application in patients with HCC after local therapy. (author)

  10. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Weiss, Christian, E-mail: christian.weiss@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  11. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  12. Recurrent copy number gains of ACVR1 and corresponding transcript overexpression are associated with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosio, Eliane P; Drigo, Sandra A; Bérgamo, Nádia A;

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: This study aimed to evaluate the copy number alteration on 2q24, its association with ACVR1 transcript expression and the prognostic value of these data in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-eight samples of squamous cell carcinoma were evaluated by fluoresc...

  13. Functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes in Hurthle cell thyroid neoplasm - an association of GPX1 polymorphism and recurrent Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krhin Blaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hurthle cells of the thyroid gland are very rich in mitochondria and oxidative enzymes. As a high level oxidative metabolism may lead to higher level of oxidative stress and can be associated with an increased risk for cancer, we investigated whether common functional polymorphisms in antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, GPX, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 are associated with the development or clinical course of Hurthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC.

  14. Galectin-1 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Local Recurrence and Survival After Definitive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Eng-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chung-Chi; Wang, Chong-Jong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Cheng, E-mail: huangcc@cgmh.org.tw [Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of galectin-1 in patients with cervical cancer after definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 154 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma. Patients underwent curative-intent radiation therapy. Paraffin-embedded tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining for galectin-1. The rates of cancer-specific survival (CSS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis were compared among patient tissue samples with no, weak, and strong galectin-1 expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Results: The areas under the curve for the intracellular expression scores of galectin-1 for both LR and CSS were significantly higher than those for stromal expression. There were no significant differences in the demographic data, such as stage and serum tumor markers, between patients with and without intracellular expression of galectin-1 in cancer tissue samples. Using multivariate analyses, the hazard ratios of LR and CSS were 2.60 (95% CI 1.50-4.52) (P=.001) and 1.94 (95% CI 1.18-3.19) (P=.010), respectively. Conclusion: Galectin-1 is an independent prognostic factor associated with LR and CSS in stage I-II cervical cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. Further studies targeting galectin-1 may improve the local control of cervical cancer.

  15. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  16. Retrospective analysis of chronomodulated chemotherapy versus conventional chemotherapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and 5-fluorouracil in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dan Chen, Jue Cheng, Kai Yang, Yue Ma, Fang Yang Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Background: Chronomodulated chemotherapy has emerged as a new therapy as a result of recent studies focusing on the biological clock. It has been demonstrated that combination chronomodulated chemotherapy of platinum-based drugs and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu can significantly improve efficacy and reduce the incidence of adverse events in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, as compared with conventional chemotherapy. However, the results may be different in different tumors. Recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is very difficult to treat, with an extremely unfavorable prognosis. So far, no report is available on chronomodulated chemotherapy for HNSCC. Methods: Retrospective analyses were made on 49 patients with local recurrent and/or metastatic HNSCC who underwent palliative treatments with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and 5-Fu. The patients were divided into a chronomodulated chemotherapy group (28 patients and a conventional chemotherapy group (21 patients according to their administration times. The two groups were compared for tumor objective response rate, overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, and the incidence of adverse events. Results: The tumor objective response rate and patients' OS were significantly higher and longer in the chronomodulated chemotherapy group than in the conventional chemotherapy group (71.43% versus 42.86%, respectively, P0.05. The global incidence of adverse events in the chronomodulated chemotherapy group was significantly lower than that in the conventional chemotherapy group (46.43% versus 76.19%, P<0.05, with significantly lower incidence of grade 3–4 adverse events (7.14% versus 33.33%, P<0.05. Conclusion: Chronomodulated chemotherapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and

  17. Objective and subjective image quality of primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma on head and neck low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Kaup, Moritz; Kraft, Johannes; Noeske, Eva-Maria; Schulz, Boris; Burck, Iris; Kerl, J.M.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Scheerer, Friedrich [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-03-26

    To investigate low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography (CT) of head and neck primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) regarding objective and subjective image quality. We retrospectively evaluated 65 patients (47 male, 18 female; mean age: 62.1 years) who underwent head and neck dual-energy CT (DECT) due to biopsy-proven primary (n = 50) or recurrent (n = 15) SCC. Eighty peak kilovoltage and standard blended 120-kVp images were compared. Attenuation and noise of malignancy and various soft tissue structures were measured. Tumor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective image quality was rated by three reviewers using 5-point grading scales regarding overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Radiation dose was assessed as CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}). Interobserver agreement was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Mean tumor attenuation (153.8 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 97.1 HU), SNR (10.7 vs. 8.3), CNR (8.1 vs. 4.8), and subjective tumor delineation (score, 4.46 vs. 4.13) were significantly increased (all P < 0.001) with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard blended 120-kVp images. Noise of all measured structures was increased in 80-kVp acquisition (P < 0.001). Overall interobserver agreement was good (ICC, 0.86; 95 % confidence intervals: 0.82-0.89). CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 48.7 % with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard DECT (4.85 ± 0.51 vs. 9.94 ± 0.81 mGy cm, P < 0.001). Head and neck CT with low-tube-voltage 80-kVp acquisition provides increased tumor delineation, SNR, and CNR for CT imaging of primary and recurrent SCC compared to standard 120-kVp acquisition with an accompanying significant reduction of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  18. Objective and subjective image quality of primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma on head and neck low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate low-tube-voltage 80-kVp computed tomography (CT) of head and neck primary and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) regarding objective and subjective image quality. We retrospectively evaluated 65 patients (47 male, 18 female; mean age: 62.1 years) who underwent head and neck dual-energy CT (DECT) due to biopsy-proven primary (n = 50) or recurrent (n = 15) SCC. Eighty peak kilovoltage and standard blended 120-kVp images were compared. Attenuation and noise of malignancy and various soft tissue structures were measured. Tumor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective image quality was rated by three reviewers using 5-point grading scales regarding overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Radiation dose was assessed as CT dose index volume (CTDIvol). Interobserver agreement was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Mean tumor attenuation (153.8 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 97.1 HU), SNR (10.7 vs. 8.3), CNR (8.1 vs. 4.8), and subjective tumor delineation (score, 4.46 vs. 4.13) were significantly increased (all P < 0.001) with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard blended 120-kVp images. Noise of all measured structures was increased in 80-kVp acquisition (P < 0.001). Overall interobserver agreement was good (ICC, 0.86; 95 % confidence intervals: 0.82-0.89). CTDIvol was reduced by 48.7 % with 80-kVp acquisition compared to standard DECT (4.85 ± 0.51 vs. 9.94 ± 0.81 mGy cm, P < 0.001). Head and neck CT with low-tube-voltage 80-kVp acquisition provides increased tumor delineation, SNR, and CNR for CT imaging of primary and recurrent SCC compared to standard 120-kVp acquisition with an accompanying significant reduction of radiation exposure. (orig.)

  19. CT diagnosis of recurrence following resection for gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, On Koo; Cho, Hye Young; Kim, Soon Yong [Hanyag University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    There is almost complete lack of specific reference to the findings of recurrent gastric carcinoma except a few data which have been based on autopsy findings. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of CT for defining the pattern of recurrence and to compare the results of convectional barium studies to identify the lesion. 1. There were 64 cases of postgastrectomy CT scan of gastric carcinoma during recent 3 years and recurrence evidence was identified in 53 cases. 2. Time lapse between operation and detection of recurrence was variable from 3 months to 6 years. Evidence of recurrence less than 1 year were stage III and IV patients and long survivors more than 5 years were stage I and III patients. 3. Local recurrence of gastric remnant or anastomosis area was identified in 10 cases. Regional recurrence was noted in 28 cases including 13 gastric bed and 26 lymph node enlargement. Most frequently enlarged nodes were peripancreatic and paraaortic nodes. 4. Peritoneal spread was the most frequent pattern of recurrence occurring in 34 cases. Mesenteric mass and ascites were most frequent findings. 5. Distant metastasis was noted in 12 cases and the liver was the most frequent site. 6. Local recurrence was detected in barium study in half of the cases. Peritoneal seeding was relatively well identified but regional recurrence was very poorly identified.

  20. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na'ara, Shorook; Amit, Moran; Fridman, Eran; Gil, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC. PMID:26886954

  1. Contemporary Management of Recurrent Nodal Disease in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shorook Na’ara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC comprises over 90% of thyroid tumors and includes papillary and follicular carcinomas. Patients with DTC have an excellent prognosis, with a 10-year survival rate of over 90%. However, the risk of recurrent tumor ranges between 5% and 30% within 10 years of the initial diagnosis. Cervical lymph node disease accounts for the majority of recurrences and in most cases is detected during follow-up by ultrasound or elevated levels of serum thyroglobulin. Recurrent disease is accompanied by increased morbidity. The mainstay of treatment of nodal recurrence is surgical management. We provide an overview of the literature addressing surgical management of recurrent or persistent lymph node disease in patients with DTC.

  2. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  3. Salvage irradiation of recurrent carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the impact of salvage irradiation on local control and survival and explore the role of brachytherapy and optimum dose. Ten patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva treated with salvage irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. Highly individualized external beam therapy was used alone in seven cases and combined with brachytherapy in three. Tumor clearance was achieved in 60%. Of those receiving less than 40 Gy, the mean survival was 3 months and 75% had persistent tumor at the completion of treatment. In those patients receiving 50-60 Gy, there was a means survival of 7.5 months and 50% had persistent tumor. In those who received over 60 Gy, there was a means survival of 27 months and 100% had tumor clearance

  4. Carcinoma basocelular da pálpebra: fatores relacionados com a recidiva tumoral Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid: factors related to recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Akemi Ishi; Ivana Cardoso Pereira; Silvana Artioli Schellini; Mariângela Esther Alencar Marques; Carlos Roberto Padovani

    2004-01-01

    FUNDAMENTOS: O carcinoma basocelular (CBC) palpebral é o tumor maligno mais freqüente das pálpebras, sendo possível observar casos em que existe recidiva após a exérese tumoral. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi procurar reconhecer fatores relacionados com a recidiva do CBC palpebral. MÉTODOS: No período de 1998 a 2001 foram detectados, na Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu/Unesp, 23 pacientes que apresentaram recidiva clínica de CBC palpebral. Foi realizada análise retrospectiva dos pacie...

  5. Continuous-Course Reirradiation With Concurrent Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent, Nonmetastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head-and-Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Choong, Nicholas [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wang, Dian; Firat, Selim; Schultz, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Sadasiwan, Chitra [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wong, Stuart, E-mail: Swong@mcw.edu [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy and toxicity of continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent, nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in a previously irradiated field. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with continuous course-reirradiation with concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki VA from 2001 through 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included in the analysis had prior radiation at the site of recurrence of at least 45 Gy. The analysis included patients who received either intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) or three-dimensional conformal RT techniques. All patients received weekly concurrent carboplatin (AUC2) and paclitaxel (30-50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Thirty-eight patients with nonmetastatic SCCHN met the entry criteria for analysis. The primary sites at initial diagnosis were oropharyngeal or laryngeal in most patients (66%). Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 54-70 Gy). Acute toxicity included Grade 2 neutropenia (5%), Grade 3 neutropenia (15%), and Grade 1/2 thrombocytopenia (8%). No deaths occurred from hematologic toxicity. Chemotherapy doses held (50%) was more prevalent than radiation treatment break (8%). Sixty-eight percent of patients required a gastrostomy tube in follow-up. Significant late toxicity was experienced in 6 patients (16%): 1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 pharyngocutaneous fistula, 3 with osteoradionecrosis, and 1 patient with a lingual artery bleed. Patients treated with three-dimensional conformal RT had more frequent significant late toxicites than patients treated with intensity-modulated RT (44% and 7% respectively, p < 0.05). The median time to progression was 7 months and progression-free rates at 1, 2, and 5 years was 44%, 34%, and 29% respectively. The median overall survival was 16 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 54

  6. Outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent or new primary squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck treated with curative intent reirradiation at Mayo Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed outcomes of patients with loco-regionally recurrent (LRR) or new primary (NP) squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated at our institution with reirradiation (RRT). Patients received definitive RRT (DRRT) or post-operative RRT following salvage surgery (PRRT) from 2003 to 2011. Measured survival outcomes included loco-regional relapse free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 81 patients (PRRT, 42; DRRT, 39), median PRRT and DRRT doses were 60 Gy (12–70 Gy) and 69.6 Gy (48–76.8 Gy). The majority of patients received IMRT-based RRT (n = 77, 95 %). With median follow-up of 78.1 months (95 % CI, 56–96.8 months), 2-year OS was 53 % with PRRT and 48 % with DRRT (p = 0.12); 23 % of patients were alive at last follow-up. LRFS at 2 years was 60 %, and did not differ significantly between PRRT and DRRT groups. A trend toward inferior LRFS was noted among patients receiving chemotherapy with RRT versus RRT alone (p = 0.06). Late serious toxicities were uncommon, including osteoradionecrosis (2 patients) and carotid artery bleeding (1 patient, non-fatal). OS of PRRT- and DRRT-treated patients in this series appears superior to the published literature. We used IMRT for the majority of patients, in contrast to several series and trials previously reported, which may account in part for this difference. Future studies should seek to improve outcomes among patients with LRR/NP SCCHN via alternative therapeutic modalities such as proton radiotherapy and by incorporating novel systemic agents

  7. Does 18FDG PET-CT improve the detection of posttreatment recurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in patients negative for disease on clinical follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: post-treatment follow-up of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (H.N.S.C.C.) recurrence is a diagnostic challenge. Tissue distortions from radiation and surgery can obscure early detection of recurrence by conventional follow-up approaches such as physical examination (P.E.), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A number of studies have shown that 18Fluoro-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F.D.G.) Positron emission tomography (PET) may be an effective technique for the detection of persistent, recurrent, and distant metastatic HNSCC after treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the benefits (sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy) of 18F.D.G. PET using hybrid PET 'Computed tomography system (PET/CT) in the detection of HNSCC subclinical locoregional recurrence and distant metastases, in patients 12 months after curative treatment with a negative conventional follow up. Materials and Method Ninety-one patients cured from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) without any clinical element for recurrence were included. Whole-body 18F.D.G. PET/CT examination was performed 11.6 ± 4.4 months after the end of the treatment. The gold standard was histopathology or 6 months imaging follow-up. Result The whole-body 18F.D.G. PET/CT of the 91 patients in this study consisted of 52 negative and 39 positive results. Nine of these patients who exhibited abnormal 18F.D.G. uptake in head and neck area did not have subsequently proven recurrent HNSCC (false positive). Thirty had proven recurrence (true positive). All 52 patients with negative readings of 18F.D.G. PET/CT remained free of disease at 6 months (true negative). The sensitivity and specificity of 18F.D.G. PET/CT in this study for the diagnosis of HNSCC recurrence were 100% (30/30) and 85% (52/61) respectively. The positive predictive value was 77% (30/39). The negative predictive value was 100% (52/52). The overall accuracy was 90% (82/91). Conclusion

  8. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  9. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  10. Radiotherapy for postoperative regional recurrence in esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the significance of radical radiotherapy for regional recurrence in esophageal carcinoma at different sites after radical surgery and its prognostic factors. Methods: 110 patients who developed regional recurrence in esophageal carcinoma after radical resection were analyzed retrospectively. The sites of recurrence were: supraclavicular lymph node 17, mediastinal lymph node 72, abdominal lymph node 5 and anastomotic stoma 16. Radiotherapy was given by 60Co unit or 6 MV X-ray with a median dose of 62 Gy (50-76 Gy). Results: The overall 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year survival rates were 55.4%, 30.4%, 21.8% and 14.5%, with a median of 14 months. Site of recurrence, T stage, total radiotherapy dose, symptom amelioration level and total treatment response were related with prognosis, but only TNM stage and symptom amelioration level after radiotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy may improve the survival in patients with postoperative recurrence in esophageal carcinoma. Patients with early lesion found at surgery and complete response of symptom after radiotherapy have better prognosis. (authors)

  11. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  12. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  13. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence post liver resection: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pictorial essay presents and discusses the imaging findings of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence post liver resection. A broad range of recurrence patterns is reviewed including intrahepatic and extrahepatic recurrences.

  14. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal cell carcinoma is a type of kidney cancer that starts in the lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx: Ki-67 and p53 can identify patients at high risk for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    .002) and the Ki-67 index (p = 0.01) remained the only significant factors for locoregional control. Conclusion: Ki-67 labeling index above 20% and a weak p53 nuclear intensity (0/+) are both able to identify patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx being at high risk for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative RT. Consequently, in this subgroup an intensification of treatment may be contemplated in prospective trials

  16. A recurrent germline BAP1 mutation and extension of the BAP1 tumor predisposition spectrum to include basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin Anna Wallentin; Aoude, L G; Johansson, P;

    2015-01-01

    mesothelioma, as previously reported for germline BAP1 mutations. However, mutation carriers from three new families, and one previously reported family, developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus suggesting inclusion of BCC in the phenotypic spectrum of the BAP1 tumor syndrome. This notion is supported by the...

  17. Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil Akhtar; Ahmad Shamshad; Zaheer Sufian; Mansoor Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC) is an aggressive tumor variant thought to arise predominantly from differentiation of clear cell carcinoma. A few reports of SRCC asso-ciated with non-clear cell tumors led to the presumption that SRCC may arise from any renal cell carcinoma, although direct evidence of this is lacking. We report a case of a 70-year-old male patient, who presented with acute left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have SRCC after pathological examination...

  18. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m2 on day −7 and then 250 mg/m2 on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time

  19. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K. [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  20. Chemoembolization for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the interventional chemoembolization in treating unresectable recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation. Methods: Twelve patients with unresectable recurrent HCC underwent one or more cycles (mean 2.25 cycles) of transarteria] chemoembolization (TACE) after liver transplantation. The results were evaluated by follow-up CT scans and were classified into four grades. The survival rate was calculated by using Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Results: No severe complications developed during follow-up period. Of the total twelve patients, targeted tumor showed a reduction in size by 30% in 7 (58.3%) after TACE. However, intrahepatic recurrence or extrahepatic metastasis occurred in 11 patients (91.3%). Conclusion: Our data obtained from this study indicates that TACE treatment seems to produce an effective tumor response for targeted recurrent HCC after liver transplantation. (authors)

  1. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  2. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Year Award Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Diversity Mentorship Program Eugene Van ... 300 PUVA treatments. What causes Merkel cell carcinoma? Scientists are still studying what causes this skin cancer. ...

  3. A retrospective study of salvage surgery for recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is sensitive to radiotherapy. When there is local relapse, re-irradiation treatment is inevitably associated with serious complications and decreased quality of life. Surgical resection offers an alternative treatment option with acceptable morbidity. Seventy-one consecutive patients with primary recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiation underwent nasopharyngectomy from January 1, 1990 to June 30, 2006. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 127 months. The actuarial 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 88.1, 62.1, 48.9, and 42.1%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year local control rates were 74.6, 61.9, 56.3, and 53.5%, respectively. There was no surgical mortality. The 3-year overall survival rates for recurrent T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease after surgery were 56, 61.1, 30.6, and 0%, respectively; the corresponding 5-year overall survival rates were 49.1, 24.7, 0, and 0%, respectively. Other prognostic factors with a negative effect on survival include lymph node metastasis, invasion of skull base and parapharyngeal space, and positive margin. Advances in skull base surgery make possible the effective control of primary recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma for patients with rT1 and rT2 stages, with acceptable mortality and morbidity. (author)

  4. Recent advances in the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li-Chun; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Poon, Ronnie T P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Early-stage HCC can be curatively treated, but the recurrence rate remains high. To date, adjuvant treatments have not proven effective in preventing HCC recurrence after curative treatment. Although early studies explored the potential of vitamin K2, retinoid, chemotherapy, and recently, sorafenib, none of the studies reported successful outcomes. Several new lines of evidence have emerged to support the use of novel antiviral agents for preventing the recurrence of virus-related HCC after curative treatment. In this review, the authors provide a thorough overview of the various adjuvant treatments that have been attempted or are being considered for trial. PMID:25369304

  5. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Randomized phase III trial (GORTEC 98-03) comparing re-irradiation plus chemotherapy versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent or a second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, treated with a palliative intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This randomized phase III trial investigated the potential benefit of concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea versus methotrexate for patients treated with palliative intent for recurrent or second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in previously irradiated area. Patients and methods: Patients with recurrent HNSCC or a second primary not amenable to curative-intent treatment were randomized to the R-RT arm (concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea) or to the Ch-T arm (methotrexate). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Due to a very slow accrual, the trial was closed after inclusion of 57 patients. Results: Fifty-seven patients were included. All patients died in the two arms with a maximal follow-up of 5 years. Although four complete responses were achieved in R-RT arm, (none in Ch-T arm) re-irradiation did not improve OS compared with methotrexate (23% versus 22% at 1 year, NS). Sixteen patients experienced clinical grade ≥3 late toxicities (>6 months), 11 in R-RT arm and five in Ch-T arm. Conclusions: Premature discontinuation of the trial did not allow us to draw firm conclusions. However, there was no suggestion that concurrent re-irradiation, fluorouracil and hydroxyurea improved OS compared to methotrexate alone in patients treated with palliative intent for a recurrent or second primary HNSCC.

  7. Antigen expression on recurrent meningioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningiomas are intracranial brain tumours that frequently recur. Recurrence rates up to 20% in 20 years for benign meningiomas, up to 80% for atypical meningiomas and up to 100% for malignant meningiomas, have been reported. The most important prognostic factors for meningioma recurrence are meningioma grade, meningioma invasiveness and radicality of neurosurgical resection. The aim of our study was to evaluate the differences in antigenic expression on the surface of meningioma cells between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. 19 recurrent meningiomas and 35 non-recurrent meningiomas were compared regarding the expression of MIB-1 antigen, progesterone receptors, cathepsin B and cathepsin L, using immunohistochemistry. MIB-1 antigen expression was higher in the recurrent meningioma group (p=0.001). No difference in progesterone receptor status between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas was confirmed. Immunohistochemical intensity scores for cathepsin B (p= 0.007) and cathepsin L (p<0.001) were both higher in the recurrent than in the non-recurrent meningioma group. MIB-1 antigen expression is higher in recurrent compared to non-recurrent meningiomas. There is no difference in expression of progesterone receptors between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. Cathepsins B and L are expressed more in recurrent meningiomas

  8. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  10. Oxaliplatin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent Solid Tumors That Have Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer

  11. Cisplatin With or Without WEE1 Inhibitor MK-1775 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  13. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  14. Clonal Origin of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Recurrence After Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenglu; Gong, Weihua; Shou, Dawei; Zhang, Luzhou; Gu, Xiangqian; Wang, Yuliang; Teng, Dahong; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to determine whether patterns of tumor clonal origin in pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (PNHC) could serve as an indicator of tumor recurrence following liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Tumor tissue samples from 60 PNHC patients who underwent liver transplantation were examined. The diagnosis of patients conformed to the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) standards for pluri-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma. We performed loss of heterozygosity tests at multiple microsatellite sites to determine the clonal origins of the tumors. Clinical information, pathological data, preoperative serum alpha-feto protein (AFP) and postoperative follow-ups were obtained and correlations between the clonal origin of the tumor, tumor-free survival, pathological characteristics, and AFP levels in serum were studied. RESULTS A total of 165 tumor nodules were collected. Tumor clonal origins were identified as intrahepatic metastasis (IM; 41.67%), multicentric occurrence (MO; 55%) or unidentified (3.33%). Three-year tumor-free survival for the IM group was 48% compared to 75.76% in the MO group (pAFP concentration for these groups was 226.80 μg/L (2.78-3000 μg/L) and 24.59 μg/L (1.16-531. 30 μg/L; pAFP levels, the risk of recurrence can be established in advance. PMID:27487734

  15. A gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins is predictive of oral carcinoma recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Dale

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, which is mainly due to recurrence leading to treatment failure and patient death. Histological status of surgical margins is a currently available assessment for recurrence risk in OSCC; however histological status does not predict recurrence, even in patients with histologically negative margins. Therefore, molecular analysis of histologically normal resection margins and the corresponding OSCC may aid in identifying a gene signature predictive of recurrence. Methods We used a meta-analysis of 199 samples (OSCCs and normal oral tissues from five public microarray datasets, in addition to our microarray analysis of 96 OSCCs and histologically normal margins from 24 patients, to train a gene signature for recurrence. Validation was performed by quantitative real-time PCR using 136 samples from an independent cohort of 30 patients. Results We identified 138 significantly over-expressed genes (> 2-fold, false discovery rate of 0.01 in OSCC. By penalized likelihood Cox regression, we identified a 4-gene signature with prognostic value for recurrence in our training set. This signature comprised the invasion-related genes MMP1, COL4A1, P4HA2, and THBS2. Over-expression of this 4-gene signature in histologically normal margins was associated with recurrence in our training cohort (p = 0.0003, logrank test and in our independent validation cohort (p = 0.04, HR = 6.8, logrank test. Conclusion Gene expression alterations occur in histologically normal margins in OSCC. Over-expression of the 4-gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins was validated and highly predictive of recurrence in an independent patient cohort. Our findings may be applied to develop a molecular test, which would be clinically useful to help predict which patients are at a higher risk of local recurrence.

  16. A gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins is predictive of oral carcinoma recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, which is mainly due to recurrence leading to treatment failure and patient death. Histological status of surgical margins is a currently available assessment for recurrence risk in OSCC; however histological status does not predict recurrence, even in patients with histologically negative margins. Therefore, molecular analysis of histologically normal resection margins and the corresponding OSCC may aid in identifying a gene signature predictive of recurrence. We used a meta-analysis of 199 samples (OSCCs and normal oral tissues) from five public microarray datasets, in addition to our microarray analysis of 96 OSCCs and histologically normal margins from 24 patients, to train a gene signature for recurrence. Validation was performed by quantitative real-time PCR using 136 samples from an independent cohort of 30 patients. We identified 138 significantly over-expressed genes (> 2-fold, false discovery rate of 0.01) in OSCC. By penalized likelihood Cox regression, we identified a 4-gene signature with prognostic value for recurrence in our training set. This signature comprised the invasion-related genes MMP1, COL4A1, P4HA2, and THBS2. Over-expression of this 4-gene signature in histologically normal margins was associated with recurrence in our training cohort (p = 0.0003, logrank test) and in our independent validation cohort (p = 0.04, HR = 6.8, logrank test). Gene expression alterations occur in histologically normal margins in OSCC. Over-expression of the 4-gene signature in histologically normal surgical margins was validated and highly predictive of recurrence in an independent patient cohort. Our findings may be applied to develop a molecular test, which would be clinically useful to help predict which patients are at a higher risk of local recurrence

  17. Surgical cytoreduction in recurrent ovarian carcinoma in patients with complete response to paclitaxel-platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronlund, Bo; Lundvall, L; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The objective was to analyse the impact of secondary cytoreductive surgery in patients with recurrent ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Retrospective review of 572 consecutive patients with primary ovarian carcinoma. Thirty-eight patients with intraabdominal/pelvic recurrence consisted the study g...

  18. Current strategies for preventing the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-Yi Wang; Lei Geng; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Liver transplantation is the optimal treat-ment for a selected group of patients with moderate to severe cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite the strict selection of candidates, post-transplant recurrence often occurs and markedly reduces the long-term survival of patients with HCC. The present review focuses on the current strategies on preventing the recurrence of HCC after liver transplantation. DATA SOURCES:Relevant articles were identiifed by exten-sive searching of PubMed using the keywords "hepatocellular carcinoma", "recurrence" and "liver transplantation" between January 1996 and January 2014. Additional papers were searched manually from the references in key articles. RESULTS:The current theories of HCC recurrence after liver transplantation are: (i) the growth of pre-transplant occult metastases; (ii) the engraftment of circulating tumor cells re-leased at the time of transplantation. Pre-transplant treatment aims to control local tumor by radiofrequency ablation, tran-sarterial embolization and transarterial chemoembolization. The main objective during the operation is to prevent tumor cell dissemination. Post-transplant treatment includes sys-temic anticancer therapy, antiviral therapy, and most recently, immunotherapy. These strategies concentrate on the control of the tumor when the patients are waiting for transplant, to reduce the release of HCC cells during surgical procedures and to clear the occult HCC cells after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS:Much can be done to prevent HCC recurrence after liver transplantation. In future, effort is likely to be di-rected towards combining multidisciplinary approaches and various treatment modalities.

  19. Pancreatic Carcinoma Recurrence in the Remnant Pancreas after a Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Dalla Valle

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Context :We report a rare case of a repeated pancreatic resection in the remnant distal pancreas 18 months after a Whipple R0 procedure. Case report: In September 2003, a 63-yearold man underwent a Whipple procedure with an extended lymphadenectomy, portal vein resection and direct reconstruction for pancreatic cancer. In September 2004, the tumor marker level increased and MR revealed a tumor in the remnant pancreas. There were no findings of invasion into the surrounding tissue or distant metastasis. After three months of systemic chemotherapy and a radiological reevaluation (PET and CT in March 2005, we removed the remnant pancreas. Histopathologically, the tumor was classified as a ductal adenocarcinoma like the tumor which had been removed during the first operation, with infiltration of peripancreatic adipose tissue and a segmentary tract of the transverse mesocolon, without lymph node metastasis. Conclusions :There are very few reports of pancreatic carcinoma recurrence in the remnant pancreas after a pancreaticoduodenectomy in the literature. In most of these cases, it is difficult to assess whether the remnant pancreatic cancer is a recurrence or a second primary cancer. In our patient, the first hypothesis seems to be more realistic due to the brief recurrence-free survival period. Otherwise the high rate of multicentricity in pancreatic cancer may also explain the development of a secondary cancer in the remnant pancreas, even though the interval was relatively brief.

  20. Predictors of recurrence in stage I invasive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The aim of the retrospective study was to determine whether 6 classical prognostic factors might predict a disease-free survival (DSF) in stage I breast carcinoma. Patients and methods. We analysed 181 patients who were operated on from 1991 through 1995. Measurements were made to find the association between the incidence of recurrence and prognostic features (size; histological subtype; lymphatic/vascular invasion (LVI); histological grade; hormone receptor status; age). Results. There were 4 cases with locoregional recurrences (2.2%), 6 with locoregional and distant metastases (3.3 %) and 13 women with distant metastases (7.2 %). In univariate analysis, the following prognostic factors were significantly related to DSF: tumour size, age and LVI. In the multivariate analysis age (p = 0.007) and LVI (p 0.00001) remained firmly associated with DSF, although the tumour size (p 0.067) lost its significance. Conclusions. Our experience indicates that the combined use of the tumour size, LVI and age may be a better predictor of recurrence in T1N0M0 breast cancer. (author)

  1. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma thyroid from functionally cured cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a very unusual occurrence of a metastatic squamous carcinoma to thyroid gland from a treated squamous cell carcinoma cervix 12 years before with no recurrence at the primary site. The case also has an additional complexity of rapid progression of the metastatic thyroid carcinoma to wide spread dissemination to lungs and bones while on concurrent chemo radio therapy confirming the aggressiveness of the entity

  2. Late local recurrence after radiotherapy for tongue and early glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1967 through 1982, 633 patients with tongue carcinoma and 330 patients with early (T1T2N0) glottic carcinomas were treated at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Of these 821 patients, 329 patients with tongue carcinoma and 221 patients with early glottic carcinoma survived at 5 years after radiotherapy without local recurrence. For tongue carcinoma, patients were divided by T category. For early glottic carcinoma, patients were divided by the tumor response at 40 Gy. Late local recurrence occurred in 23 of 329 patients (7%) with tongue carcinoma, and in 9 of 221 patients (4%) with early glottic carcinoma. For tongue carcinoma, late recurrence occurred in 19 of 249 patients (8%) in stage I and II, and 4 of 80 patients (5%) in stage III and IV. For glottic carcinoma, late recurrence occurred in 8 of 137 patients (6%) with tumor clearance at 40 Gy and 1 of 63 patients (2%) with tumor persistence at 40 Gy. The incidence of double cancer was also evaluated. Of 329 5-year survivors with tongue carcinoma, 39 patients (12%) had another malignancy, and 26 patients of 221 5-year survivors with early glottic carcinoma (12%) had also another malignancy. Of 39 double primaries of tongue carcinoma, 10 patients (26%) had head and neck malignancies, and none of 26 double primaries of early glottic carcinoma. Late local recurrence was not rare in tongue and early glottic cancer. Poor prognostic group showed lower incidence of late recurrence than good prognostic group. This result suggests that secondary tumor at the same site of primary tumor is late local recurrence. (orig./MG)

  3. Factors for early tumor recurrence of single small hepatocellular carcinoma after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsien-Chung Yu; Wei-Lun Tsai; Wen-Chi Chen; Jin-Shiung Cheng; Kwok-Hung Lai; Chi-Pin Lin; Gin-Ho Lo; Chiun-Ku Lin; Ping-I Hsu; Hoi-Hung Chan; Ching-Chu Lo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the factors affecting the early tumor recurrence within one year in cirrhotic patients having a single small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after complete tumor necrosis by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)therapy.METHODS: Thirty patients with a single small HCC received RFA therapy by a RFA 2000 generator with LeVeen needle. Tri-phase computerized tomogram was followed every 2 to3 mo after RFA. The clinical effects and tumor recurrence were recorded.RESULTS: The initial complete tumor necrosis rate was 86.7%. Twenty-two patients were followed for more than one year. The local and overall recurrence rates were 13.6% and 36.4%, 33.3% and 56.2%, 46.6% and 56.2%at 12, 24 and 30 mo, respectively. No major complication or procedure-related mortality was found. The risk factors for early local tumor recurrence within one year were larger tumor size, poor pathologic differentiation of tumor cells and advanced tumor staging. The age of patients with new tumor formation within one year was relatively younger (55.1±8.3 vs 66.7±10.8, P = 0.029).CONCLUSION: Large tumor size, poor pathologic differentiation of tumor cells and advanced tumor staging are the risk factors for early local tumor recurrence within one year, and young age is the positive predictor for new tumor formation within one year.

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  5. Papillary renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1976 and 1987, 395 patients with kidney tumors were studied with radiological techniques and sonography. In 37 cases (9.4%) histopathology diagnosed pure papillary renal cell carcinoma. Analyzing the radiographic patterns of these neoplasms, the authors observed constantly diminished vascularity (100%) frequent calcifications (35.1%) and necrotic areas (51.3%). Such X-ray features are not specific: nevertheless, their coexistence is strongly suggestive of papillary renal cell cancer. No consistent US pattern was found; however, necrotic areas were easily demonstrated in most cases. It must be stressed how patients with papillary carcinoma experienced a longer post-operative survival; it has not yet been established whether such favorable behavior is due to low biological aggressiveness or to earlier diagnosis

  6. Ipsilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, M. J.; Song, J H; Kim, J H; Kim, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) in the same kidney is unusual. We report a 53-year-old man with ipsilateral synchronous renal adenocarcinoma and renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma with severe hypercalcemia and a huge staghorn calculus in the opposite kidney. The patient was admitted to the hospital because of left flank pain and intermittent fever which he had had for 2 months. Computerized tomography revealed a huge stone in...

  7. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Hernández Piñero; José Luis Rodríguez López; María de Lourdes Menéndez Villa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagn...

  8. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  9. Management for Patients with De Novo or Recurrent Tumors in the Residual Kidney after Surgery for Nonfamilial Bilateral Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Hara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor de novo in the residual kidney after surgery for nonfamilial bilateral renal cell carcinoma (RCC is problematic. We reviewed 5 patients who experienced such a situation. Three patients had had metachronous bilateral RCC, treated with radical nephrectomy in one kidney and nephron-sparing surgery (NSS in the other. Two patients had had synchronous disease; one patient had received radical nephrectomy and NSS, and the other bilateral NSS. The 5 patients had another solid mass/de novo tumor in the residual kidney 16–88 (mean 46.8 months after surgery. For the tumor de novo in earlier years (1992–1999, one patient underwent surgery and hemodialysis, and the other selected a conservative observation. In recent years (2000–2007, one patient was conservatively observed; the remaining 2 received computerized-tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation, and the local tumors were well controlled postoperatively for 20 and 12 months with their renal function unimpaired. Ablative techniques can potentially strike a balance between oncological and nephrological outcomes in patients with sporadic multiple RCC, successful management of which was difficult previously.

  10. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  11. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Inferior vena cava tumor thrombus after partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Akatsuka, Jun; Suzuki, Yasutomo; Hamasaki, Tsutomu; Shindo, Takao; Yanagi, Masato; Kimura, Go; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Kondo, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial nephrectomy is now the gold standard treatment for small renal tumors. Local recurrence is a major problem after partial nephrectomy, and local recurrence in the remnant kidney after partial nephrectomy is common. Case presentation A 77-year-old man underwent right partial nephrectomy for a T1 right renal cell carcinoma. Microscopic examination revealed a clear cell renal carcinoma, grade 2, stage pT3a. Although the surgical margin was negative, the carcinoma invaded the pe...

  14. Transitional cell carcinoma forming a perirenal cyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffan, E; Kipar, A; Barber, P J; Freeman, A I

    2008-03-01

    An eight-year-old, neutered male Burmese cat presented with five days vomiting and anorexia. Physical examination, clinical pathology and diagnostic imaging findings suggested a perirenal pseudocyst. After partial resection of the perirenal capsule clinical signs temporarily resolved, but the cat was euthanased 34 days postoperatively as a result of seizures and recurrence of vomiting. Postoperative histopathology showed neoplastic transitional cells within and lining the resected perirenal capsule; a diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma was confirmed post-mortem. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this presentation of transitional cell carcinoma. Transitional cell carcinoma should be a differential diagnosis for the aetiology of perirenal pseudocyst. PMID:17784930

  15. Corneal squamous cell carcinoma in a Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Claudia; Sansom, Jane; Dubielzig, R R; Hayes, Alison

    2008-01-01

    A 6-year-old, female, spayed Border Collie was presented to the Unit of Comparative Ophthalmology at the Animal Health Trust with a 6-month history of a progressive nonpainful opacity of the left cornea. A keratectomy was performed and the tissue submitted for histopathology. The diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma. There has been no recurrence of the neoplasm to date (5 months). Canine corneal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been reported previously in the UK. PMID:18190354

  16. Laser surgery for the post-irradiation recurrence of laryngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Koji; Shido, Fumiaki; Tsubota, Hiroshi; Shintani, Tomoko; Ogasawara, Hideki; Kataura, Akikatsu; Hareyama, Masato; Morita, Kazuo [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    We performed endoscopic laser surgery for the treatment of post-irradiation recurrences of T1 and T2 laryngeal carcinomas. Two out of the 5 T1 glottic type carcinoma cases and 1 out of the 4 T2 cases were controlled after the laser surgery. Recurrences in the successfully treated cases were confined to the vocal cords. In 2 out of the 4 supraglottic type patients, the recurrences were confined to the false vocal cords and were controlled after the laser surgery. These findings suggest that small recurrences after irradiation can be controlled by endoscopic laser surgery. (author)

  17. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  18. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  19. Correlation of histological risk assessment/ scoring system with lymph node metastasis and recurrence/progression of disease in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To correlate the scoring system using histopathologic parameters; worst pattern of invasion (WPOI), lymphocytic host response (LHR) and peri-neural invasion (PNI), with disease recurrence, overall survival and cervical lymph node metastasis in OSCC patients. Study Design: Cross sectional. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology, Shaukat Khanam Memorial Cancer and Research Hospital, Lahore in collaboration with Department of Histopathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi. Study completed in 2 years. Material and Methods: A Risk Scoring system was applied to 50 cases of OSCC with 2 years follow-up data, based on histopathologic parameters WPOI, LHR and PNI. The cases were divided into High risk and Non-High risk categories according to the specified parameters and then correlated with disease recurrence, overall survival and cervical lymph node metastasis. Results: There were 7 low risk, 17 intermediate risk and 26 high risk cases. No correlation was seen between the risk groups and disease recurrence, overall survival or cervical lymph node metastasis. However, when assessing the individual parameters, significant correlation was observed between PNI with disease recurrence (p = 0.03), and between WPOI and overall survival (p = 0.02) and cervical lymph node metastasis (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The individual parameters, peri-neural invasion and worst pattern of invasion are observed to be significant prognostic indicators in OSCC patients. A study with a larger number of cases is required to truly assess the value of the scoring system in Pakistani patients. (author)

  20. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  1. Identification by FFPE RNA-Seq of a new recurrent inversion leading to RBM10-TFE3 fusion in renal cell carcinoma with subtle TFE3 break-apart FISH pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Letourneur, Franck; Pouliquen, Christelle; Dome, Florence; Audebourg, Anne; Biquet, Philippe; Vidaud, Michel; Terris, Benoit; Sibony, Mathilde; Pasmant, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Gene fusions involving TFE3 defines the "Xp11.2 translocations" subclass of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) belonging to the MiT family translocation RCC. Four recurrent TFE3 fusion partners were identified to date: PRCC, ASPSCR1, SFPQ, and NONO. Break-apart TFE3 fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections is currently the gold standard for identification of TFE3 rearrangements. Herein, we report a case of RCC with a morphological appearance of Xp11.2 translocation, and positive TFE3 immunostaining. By FISH, the spots constituting the split signal were barely spaced, suggestive of a chromosome X inversion rather than a translocation. We performed RNA-seq from FFPE material to test this hypothesis. RNA-seq suggested a fusion of RBM10 gene exon 17 (Xp11.23) with TFE3 gene exon 5 (Xp11.2). RBM10-TFE3 fusion transcript was confirmed using specific RT-PCR. Our work showed that RNA-Seq is a robust technique to detect fusion transcripts from FFPE material. A RBM10-TFE3 fusion was previously described in single case of Xp11.2 RCC. Although rare, RBM10-TFE3 fusion variant (from chromosome X paracentric inversion), therefore, appears to be a recurrent molecular event in Xp11.2 RCCs. RBM10-TFE3 fusion should be added in the list of screened fusion transcripts in targeted molecular diagnostic multiplex RT-PCR. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998913

  2. Recurrent TERT promoter mutations in urothelial carcinoma and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtis, Boaz; Zhuge, Jian; Ojaimi, Caroline; Ye, Fei; Cai, Dongming; Zhang, David; Fallon, John T; Zhong, Minghao

    2016-04-01

    Increased telomerase activity is associated with almost all types of advanced human cancers with unknown molecular mechanism(s). Two recurrent point mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-the key subunit of telomerase-have recently been identified in melanoma as well as a small sample of bladder cancer cell lines. However, the incidence and clinical-pathological significance of these mutations in urothelial carcinoma have not been well established yet. We collected 86 specimens of urothelial carcinoma including upper and lower urinary tract: high grade and low grade, invasive and noninvasive, and primary and metastatic. We also included some matched benign urothelium and common benign bladder lesions: cystitis, nephrogenic adenoma, and inverted papilloma. In addition, we collected urine samples for urothelial carcinoma workup; blood samples from patients underwent cystectomy with extensive lymphovascular invasion. All specimens were subject to polymerase chain reaction amplification and bidirectional Sanger sequencing for the TERT promoter mutations: C228T and C250T. We found that 64 (74%) of 86 carcinoma samples harbored 1 of the 2 TERT promoter mutations (C228T, n = 54; C250T, n = 10); the incidences were roughly equal regardless of site of origin, histologic grade, and invasive status. All matched benign and benign lesion samples showed wild-type sequence. These TERT promoter mutations are the most common genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma and are not associated with tumor locations, grade, or invasiveness. Importantly, the feasibility of detecting these mutations in urine samples may provide a novel method to detect urothelial carcinoma in urine. PMID:27040924

  3. Xp11 Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma: Unusual Variant Masquerading as Upper Tract Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Akhavein

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (TRCC is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma characterized by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 gene located at the Xp11.2 locus. Initial cases were more common in children, but cases in older adults have begun to accrue and suggest a relatively more aggressive course. We report a case of Xp11 TRCC in a 63-year-old female patient with initial presentation mimicking upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma, with biopsy proving TRCC. She underwent a radical nephrectomy and paracaval lymph node dissection and is followed up with the intent to initiate vascular endothelial growth factor–targeted therapy in case of recurrence.

  4. Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. Supportive therapies for prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence and preservation of liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Taro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Saeki, Issei; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Suehiro, Yutaka; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-08-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world and is associated with a high risk of recurrence. The development of a wide range of new therapies is therefore essential. In this study, from the perspective of supportive therapy for the prevention of HCC recurrence and preservation of liver function in HCC patients, we surveyed a variety of different therapeutic agents. We show that branched chain amino acids (BCAA) supplementation and late evening snack with BCAA, strategies that address issues of protein-energy malnutrition, are important for liver cirrhotic patients with HCC. For chemoprevention of HCC recurrence, we show that viral control after radical treatment is important. We also reviewed the therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs, sorafenib, peretinoin, iron chelators. Sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and a standard therapy in the treatment of advanced HCC. Peretinoin is a vitamin A-like molecule that targets the retinoid nuclear receptor to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in HCC cells. Iron chelators, such as deferoxamine and deferasirox, act to prevent cancer cell growth. These chelators may have potential as combination therapies in conjunction with peretinoin. Finally, we review the potential inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells on hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27621572

  6. Unusual Granular Cell Tumor of the Trachea Coexisting With Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Masquerading as Tracheal Invasion of Recurred Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This was an extremely rare case of unusual granular cell tumor of the trachea coexisting with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. We initially misdiagnosed this patient as having tracheal invasion from recurrent thyroid carcinoma even after a computed tomography scan and fine-needle aspiration cytology. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of granular cell tumor of the trachea occurring simultaneously with papillary thyroid carcinoma. PMID:27149467

  7. Transarterial chemoperfusion of inoperable pancreas carcinoma and local recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To evaluate the side effects and tumor response of a locoregional transarterial chemoperfusion with Mitomycin C and Gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods: Between October 2001 and August 2002, 16 patients were treated in 80 transarterial chemoperfusion sessions with a mean of 5 sessions per patient and a pause of 4 weeks between the sessions. The chemotherapy consisted of a combination of Mitomycin C (8.5 mg/m2) and Gemcitabine (500 mg/m2), administered within 1 hour. The tumor response was evaluated by MRT and CT and the quality of life by a patient questionnaire. Results: All patients tolerated the procedure well. The therapeutic outcomes were as follows: in 50% (n=8) of patients, minor response with a decrease in size of the primary tumor and metastases up to 20%; in 25% (n = 4) of patients, stable disease; and in 25% (n = 4) of patients, progressing metastases with stable primary tumor. Eleven patients (68.75%) reported a good quality of life without impaired performance of their daily activities. Side effects were moderate and reversible between the treatment cycles. After one year 25% of the patients were still alive. Conclusion: Transarterial chemoperfusion is a minimally invasive treatment for pancreatic carcinomas and local recurrences with little side-effects and can be delivered on an outpatient basis. It might be indicated as potential neoadjuvant treatment before surgery or as palliative treatment to provide clinical benefits and to improve the quality of life. (orig.)

  8. Relationship between survivin expression and recurrence, and prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and its correlation with clinicopathological factors, cell proliferation, recurrence and prognosis after hepatectomy.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of survivin and Ki-67 was performed by the standard streptavidinperoxidase technique on paraffin sections of 55 cases of HCC.RESULTS: The positive rate of survivin in HCC was 52.7% (29/55). Significant correlation was found between survivin expression with portal vein thrombi and intrahepatic matastasistic nodes (P < 0.05). The recurrent rate in survivin-positive HCC was significantly higher than that in survivin-negative HCC after hepatectomy, the 1- and 3-year survival rate in patients with survivin-positive tumors was significantly lower than that in patients with survivin-negative tumors (58.62 and 10.34% vs 76.92 and 30.77%, P < 0.05, log-rank test).The proliferation index (Ki-67) in survivin-positive HCC (33.83% ± 18.90%) was significantly higher than that in survivin-negative HCC (19.60% ± 19.35%) (P < 0.05).CONCLLSION: Survivin may play an important role in progression of HCC by promoting cell proliferation, and may be positively correlated with high risk of disease recurrence and poor prognosis in HCC. Its expression may serve as a prognostic factor for patients with HCC after hepatectomy.

  9. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  10. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Betekhtin M.; Ananiev J.; Tchernev G.; Zisova L.; Philipov S.; Hristova R.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset). The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. W...

  11. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  12. Renal cell carcinoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present five cases of renal cell carcinoma in children, describing its aspects on excretory urography, ultra-sonography and computerized tomography. The clinical, pathological and radiological features are compared with those of the literature. (author)

  13. Association between human papillomavirus infection and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Kamal

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using two methods: PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (PCR/DEIA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detection of HPV in specimens of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to correlate the presence of HPV with the epidemiological and clinicopathological features of recurrence and survival. HPV DNA was amplified from 93 paraffin-embedded laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissue specimens by the short PCR fragment (SPF 10) primer set using PCR/DNA method. HPV detection using monoclonal anti-human papilloma virus antibodies Clone K1H8 for IHC reaction was performed on 130 specimens. HPV was identified in 35.5% of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using PCR/DEIA and 27.7% using IHC. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and the epidemiological and clinicopathological features and recurrence. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and overall survival nor disease specific survival. Statistically significant correlation between HPV detection using PCR/DEIA technique and IHC technique was found. The presence of HPV infection in 27.7% and 38.9% of the patients suggests a possible role in the etiology of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The SPF(10) PCR/DEIA technique is the most accurate method for detection of HPV in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:20419817

  14. Remnant Pancreatectomy for Recurrent or Metachronous Pancreatic Carcinoma Detected by FDG-PET: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Koizumi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Although surgical resection is the only curative therapeutic option for recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas, most such cancers are beyond surgical curability. We herein report on two rare cases of remnant pancreatectomy used to treat recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas. Case reports Case#1 A 65-year-old male developed weight loss and diabetes mellitus 83 months after a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy followed by two years of adjuvant chemotherapy (5- fluorouracil plus leucovorin plus mitomycin C for a pancreatic carcinoma in the head of the pancreas (stage IA. An abdominal CT scan revealed a 3 cm tumor in the remnant pancreas which appeared as a ‘hot’ nodule on FDG-PET. A remnant distal pancreatectomy was performed and a pancreatic carcinoma similar in profile to the primary lesion (stage IIB was confirmed pathologically. Case#2 A 67-year-old male showed increased CA 19-9 levels 25 months after a distal pancreatectomy for a pancreatic carcinoma in the body of the pancreas (stage IA. An abdominal CT scan revealed a cystic lesion in the cut end of the pancreas which appeared as a ‘hot’ nodule on FDG-PET. A remnant proximal pancreatectomy with duodenectomy was performed and a metachronous pancreatic carcinoma (stage III was confirmed pathologically. Conclusion Remnant pancreatectomy can be considered a treatment option for recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas. FDG-PET can play a key role in detecting remnant pancreatic carcinomas.

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, F T

    2012-01-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma ofthe anal canal represents 1.5% of all malignancies affectingthe gastrointestinal tract. Over the past 20 years dramatic changes have been seen in both the epidemiological distribution of the disease and in the therapeutic modalities utilised to manage it. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT: Historically abdominoperineal resection had been the treatment of choice with local resection reserved for early stage disease. Work by Nigro et al. has revolutionised how we currently manage carcinoma of the anal canal, demonstrating combined modality chemoradiotherapy as an appropriate alternative to surgical resection with the benefit of preserving sphincter function. Surgery is then reserved for recurrent disease with salvage abdominoperineal resection. This article reviews current literature and highlights the changing therapeutic modalities with selected clinical cases

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hundred and four patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity were treated at the Finsen Institute in cooperation with the ENT-surgical departments between 1978 and 1982. The primary treatment consisted of radiotherapy alone in 74%, surgery alone in 4%, and a combination of radiotherapy and surgery in 15% of the patients. 2% received other treatment (cryotherapy), 5% did not complete the planned radiotherapy, and 1% were not treated at all. Of 203 patients with tumour remnant or first recurrence, 45% were operated, 2% received radiotherapy, and 2% combined treatment. This treatment strategy made 38% of the patients free of disease in the follow-up period (3 1/2 to 8 years) or until the patients died from other causes. Fifty-nine percent of the patients died from their oral carcinomas. Tumour size (T), lymph node status (N), and tumour stage were as expected important prognostic factors. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of 1p Losses in Primary Carcinomas, Local Recurrences and Peripheral Metastases from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Thorstensen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas have shown that loss of the distal part of chromosome arm 1p is common, particularly in tumors of the left colon. Because the importance of 1p loss in colorectal cancer metastases is unknown, we compared the frequency, exact site and extent of ip deletions in primary carcinomas (n=28, local recurrences (n=19 and metastases (n=33 from 67 colorectal cancer patients using 14 markers in an allelic imbalance study. Loss of 1p was found in 50% of the primary carcinomas, 33% of the local recurrences, and 64% of the metastases, revealing a significant difference between the local recurrences and the metastases (P=.04. The smallest region of 1p deletion overlap (SRO defined separately for each group of lesions had the region between markers Di S2647 and D1 S2644, at 1 p35-36, in common. The genes PLA2G2A (1p35.1-36 and TP73 (1p36.3 were shown to lie outside this consistently lost region, suggesting that neither of them are targets for the 1p loss. In the second part of the study, microdissected primary carcinomas and distant metastases from the same colorectal cancer patients (n=18 were analyzed, and the same 1p genotype was found in the majority of patients (12/18, 67%. The finding that primary carcinoma cells with metastatic ability usually contain 1p deletions, and that some cases lacking 1p alterations in the primary tumor acquire such changes during growth of a metastatic lesion, supports the notion that 1p loss may be important both early and late in colorectal carcinogenesis, with the apparent exception of local recurrences.

  18. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  19. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  20. 18FDG-PET在诊断头颈部鳞状细胞癌复发中的价值%Evaluation of Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma at Head and Neck with FDG PET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    目的:了解18FDG-PET在诊断头颈部鳞状细胞癌复发中的价值,确定标准吸收值(SUV)来鉴别放疗后的炎症与肿瘤复发.材料和方法:头颈部鳞状细胞癌患者43例,在放疗后至少4个月(平均11个月)进行18FDG-PET检查.计算感兴趣区的SUV值.肿瘤复发诊断依赖组织病理学检查或6个月以上的临床随访.结果:43例患者中,FDG-PET阳性23例,其中3例为假阳性;20例为阴性,其中假阴性2例.FDG-PET的诊断准确性是88%(38/43),而CT/MRI的诊断准确性则为66%(25/38).肿瘤复发病灶和炎症病灶的SUV有部分重叠,无统计学上差异(p=0.31).结论:18FDG-PET检测头颈部鳞状细胞癌复发中肉眼分析更有价值;18FDG-PET较CT/MRI更为准确.valuation of Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma at Head and Neck with FDG PET

  1. Role of 18FDG-PET imaging in management of recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Serial assays of CA-125 have been established as a tumor marker for monitoring recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma following initial surgery and chemotherapy. The anatomical imaging is performed to localize the tumor site for possible resection. This retrospective study analyzed the efficacy of 18FDG-PET to detect suspected recurrent ovarian carcinoma. Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive patients, age range 40-83 years, mean age 55.8 years with known Ovarian Carcinoma underwent 76 PET-FDG studies. All patients were status post total abdominal Hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo- oopherectomy and were treated with chemo and/or radiation therapy. The imaging was performed at approximately 60 minutes following intravenous injection of average dose of 5.7 mCi 18FDG. Fifty concomitant CA-125 serum assays and 58 anatomical imaging (CT/MRI) were available for comparison. Thirty-eight combined PET, CA-125 and CT/MRI studies were available for evaluation. In addition to ovarian carcinoma in fifteen patients secondary tumors including lung, breast and colon carcinoma and lymphoma were diagnosed. The final diagnoses were based on clinical follow up and other relevant findings. Results: The comparison of the three studies including CA-125, 18FDG-PET and anatomical imaging Revealed. There was no significant difference among all three studies with regard to the diagnosis of recurrent ovarian carcinoma (p=ns). The combined studies improved the sensitivity to 0.98. Among 18 patients with normal CA-125 level, 5 had negative PET and 13 had positive PET studies. Conclusion: 18FDG-PET studies play a major role in detection of recurrent ovarian carcinoma. The Combination of all three studies improves the sensitivity. We recommend routine use of 18FDG- PET in the management of recurrent ovarian carcinoma especially when anatomical imaging is inconclusive. (authors)

  2. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi Sato; Masao Kataoka; Junya Hata; Hidenori Akaihata; Soichiro Ogawa; Yoshiyuki Kojima

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis ...

  3. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma to the lungs: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Benson Nongrum; Debomaliya Bhuyan; Vanlalhuma Royte; Hughbert Dkhar

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer and it rarely metastasizes. The prevalence of metastatic basal cell carcinoma (MBCC) varies between 0.0028% and 0.55% of all cases. Over 250 MBCC have been reported in the literature. We present a case with large recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the face with radiological and histopathological findings indicating the presence of metastasis to the lungs.

  4. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Émilie L; Langlois, Isabelle; Santamaria-Bouvier, Ariane; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-12-01

    A cutaneous mass was surgically excised in a 4-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). A squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on histopathological examination and local recurrence following excision is strongly suspected. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first well-documented report of a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in this species. PMID:26663924

  5. The dreadful and the deadly erection—Malignant priapism from renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ling Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Penile metastasis of renal cell carcinoma is a rare occurrence. We report a case in a 44-year-old man who presented with malignant priapism as the first sign of recurrence of renal cell carcinoma. Although invasive procedures have a limited role in survival benefits, we performed a total penectomy to alleviate pain and provide a better quality of life.

  6. Evaluation of recurrent colorectal carcinoma after curative resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Keshvari

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study the rate of overall recurrence was 29.5%. Local recurrence rate was higher in colon cancer (16.44% vs. 15.05% but distant metastasis rate was higher in rectal cancer (12.9% vs. 10/96%.

  7. Radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer with postoperative intrathoracic recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed patients with intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer after surgery, with reference to the feasibility of radiotherapy. The series consisted of 46 patients (39 males and 7 females) treated by radiotherapy from 1982 to 1995. Histology included squamous cell carcinoma (28 patients), adenocarcinoma (17), and large cell carcinoma (1). Clinical stage by UICC classification (1987) was as follows: stage I (2 patients), stage II (1), stage IIIa (13), stage IIIb (23), and stage IV (7). Recurrences were noted in bronchial stump (18 patients) and surgical scar (4). Metastases occurred in hilar-mediastinal lymphnodes (15), lung fields (7), and pleuropericardium (2). The mean interval from surgery to recurrence was 27 months. Delivered dose ranged from 45 to 80 Gy, and 19 patients received combined chemotherapy. Therapeutic results were as follows: complete response in 16 patients, partial response in 27, no response in 12 and progressive disease in 1. Overall 2- and 5-year survival rates were 17% and 11%, respectively, and 10 months in MST. On univariate analysis, significant prognostic factors were sex, stage at recurrence, recurrence pattern, performance status and initial response to radiotherapy, while multivariate analysis showed sex and initial response. From these data, we are encouraged by effective radiotherapy for postoperative intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer, especially in patients with stump or lymphnode recurrence. (author)

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Pal, Sujoy [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, New Delhi (India); Julka, Pramod Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, New Delhi (India); Thulkar, Sanjay [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma, suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. This was a retrospective study. Data from 180 patients (age 56.3 ± 10.4 years; 126 men, 54 women) with histopathologically proven oesophageal carcinoma (squamous cell 115, adenocarcinoma 59, neuroendocrine carcinoma 4, small cell 1, poorly differentiated 1) who had undergone 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies for suspected recurrence were analysed. Recurrence was suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. PET/CT images were revaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus. Findings were grouped into local, nodal and distant recurrence. Results were compared to those from contrast-enhanced (CE) CT when available (109 patients). Clinical/imaging follow-up (minimum 6 months) with histopathology (when available) was taken as the reference standard. Of the 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies,166 were positive and 61 were negative for recurrent disease. PET/CT showed local recurrence in 134, nodal recurrence in 115 and distant recurrence in 47, with more than one site of recurrence in 34. The PET/CT findings were true-positive in 153 studies, true-negative in 54, false-positive in 13 and false-negative in 7. The sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 96 %, the specificity was 81 %, the positive and negative predictive values were 92 % and 89 %, respectively, and the accuracy was 91 %. PET/CT showed similar accuracy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and in those with adenocarcinoma (P = 0.181).{sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was more specific than CECT (67 % vs. 21 %; P < 0.0001). PET/CT was superior to CECT for the detection of nodal recurrence (P < 0.0001), but not local recurrence (P = 0.093) or distant metastases (P = 0.441). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT shows high accuracy in the detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma. It is more specific than

  9. Simultaneous Development of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Multifocal Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Keng Chuang; Heng-Chang Chuang; Kwai-Fong Ng

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of multifocal urothelial carcinoma (UC) and ipsilateral renalcell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. We report a 67-year-old woman with multifocal, infiltratingurothelial carcinoma and unilateral renal cell carcinoma. She was referred to our departmentbecause of painless gross hematuria. Cystoscopy, computed tomography and retrogradepyelography studies revealed bladder, bilateral renal and ureter UC. She was treated withtransurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by bi...

  10. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  11. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  12. Cells in Multidimensional Recurrent Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Leifert, G.; Strauß, T.; Grüning, T; Labahn, R.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of handwritten text on images is one task in machine learning and one solution to solve it is using multi-dimensional recurrent neural networks (MDRNN) with connectionist temporal classification (CTC). The RNNs can contain special units, the long short-term memory (LSTM) cells. They are able to learn long term dependencies but they get unstable when the dimension is chosen greater than one. We defined some useful and necessary properties for the one-dimensional LSTM cell and...

  13. Methodologies for localizing loco-regional hypopharyngeal carcinoma recurrences in relation to FDG-PET positive and clinical radiation therapy target volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes. Material and methods. Six patients treated for hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were extracted from archives. Inclusion criteria were: FDG-PET/CT for primary radiotherapy planning and clinical complete remission followed by loco-regional relapse. CT scan at the time of recurrence was also required. The recurrence volume was delineated in the follow-up scans by a radiologist. Putative points of origin (PO) of the recurrence were determined by two strategies 1) defined by an oncologist or 2) as the center-of-volume (COV) of the recurrence. The most likely recurrence point of origin on the treatment planning scan was also determined. All expert based points of origin were repeated to estimate reproducibility. The recurrence volume and PO were propagated to the treatment planning scan using a rigid transformation. Relations of the PO to target volumes, radiation doses and therapy-points-of-origin were quantified. For the volumetric methods, the overlap of the recurrence volume and target volumes was used to determine the source of the recurrence. Results. All recurrences were located in-field, but the volumetric approaches tended to designate fewer recurrences in the PET positive volume (25% for the 95% threshold, 95% confidence interval (CI):3-65%) than the observer-based methods (50% for the COV and both expert evaluations on the recurrence scan, 95% CI: 16-84%). The reproducibility of the expert POs is better on the recurrence scan than on the therapy scan. Conclusion. Volumetric approaches favor large target volumes as the source of the recurrence, thus underestimating the number of recurrences originating in the PET positive volume. Expert based and COV approaches on the recurrence scan are the most reproducible methods

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY RECURRENT NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From April 1998 to March 2000, 34 patients who had undergone previous external beam radiation therapy were retreated with 3-D CRT for locally recurrent NPC (33 poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, 1 adenoma). The patients were re-staged according to Huaqing staging system with the following distribution: T1N0M0 in 5 cases, T2N0M0 in 11 cases, T3N0M0 in 12 cases, T4N0M0 in 6 cases. The maximal dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm (median: 2.9 cm). CT simulation and 3-D planning were used to ensure full and conformal coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) by treated volume, while minimizing the absorbed dose of the adjacent normal tissue. 5-7 static conformal coplanar or noncoplanar portals were delivered for each fraction irradiation. The total dose delivered ranged from 65-70 Gy, with 2.5 Gy per fractionation, one fractionation per day, 5 days a week. Median follow-up time from 3-D CRT was 25 months (range: 12-36 months). Results: Over the follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in 3 patients, regional failure in 3, distant metastasis in 3, and six patients died; 88.2% (30/34) of the patient maintained local control, 82.4% (28/34) survived, and 76.5% (26/34) survived with no evidence of tumor. Acute complications were minor and few. The overall incidence of late complication was 20.6% (7/34), and severe complication was 14.7% (5/34), after re-irradiation with 3-D CRT. Conclusion: 3-D CRT is safety and effectiveness for most of the patients with locally recurrent NPC. Our preliminary results indicate a high local control rate and a low complication rate. The long-term curative effect and sequelae await further study.

  15. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Relapsed Solid Neoplasm; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  16. Relationship between 99Tcm-MIBI imaging and P-gp expression in patients with recurrent differential thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between 99Tcm-me- thoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) imaging and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in patient with recurrent differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) after primary definitive thyroidectomy and adjuvant mi ablation after operation. Methods: A total of 173 pathologically confirmed DTC patients were included. All had two- phase 99Tcm-MIBI static imaging preoperatively. Both early (10 min after intravenous injection) and delayed (120 min after intravenous injection) 99Tcm-MIBI tumor/non-tumor (T/NT) ratios and wash-out rates were calculated. Imaging results were analyzed by three experienced nuclear medicine physicians. At the time of follow-up (three years after diagnosis), nine (5.20%) had local tumor recurrence. Nine non-recurrent disease patients were randomized selected as controls. The postoperative carcinoma tissue specimens were obtained to detect P-gp expression through immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR technique. T test and Spearman correlation were done with SPSS 10.0. Results: In recurrent group, the early and late T/NT ratios and wash-out rates were 1.18 ± 0.28, 1.16 ± 0.24, and (17.00 ± 2.91)%. In non-recurrent group, the early and late T/NT ratios and wash-out rates were 1.54 ± 0.26, 1.65 ± 0.26, and (7.00 ± 3.21)%. Statistically higher P-gp positive cell number and P-gp gene expression were noted in recurrent than in non- recurrentgroups [(43.00 ± 8.21)% vs (26.00 ± 6.91)%, t=4.753, P99Tcm-MIBI wash-out rate among DTC patients (r=0.84, P99Tcm-MIBI wash-out rate among DTC patients and was significantly higher in recurrent than in non-recurrent groups, which might be due to higher P-gp positive cell number in recurrent than in non-recurrent groups. (authors)

  17. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m2 and 0.9 mg/m2 given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-κB-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-κB phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m2 and 0.9 mg/m2/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m2 was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m2 was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-κB activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-κB-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m2 and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-κB localization, apoptosis, and NF-κB-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary radiotherapy or reirradiation may merit future investigation

  18. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  19. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  20. Salvage chemotherapy and surgery for radio recurrent carcinoma glottis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese B

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoradiotherapy is increasingly used in advanced laryngeal cancers. Failures are generally managed by surgery. They include histologically confirmed recurrent or residual disease or a symptomatic life threatening treatment sequelae. Tumour recurrence or residivism can be managed by chemotherapy when radical surgery is either refused by the patient or if the general condition of the patient do not permit it. However surgery becomes inevitable when life threatening treatment sequelae like absolute pharyngo-oesophageal stricture and aspiration sets in.

  1. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  2. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  3. Challenging the concept of microinvasive carcinoma of the vulva: report of a case with regional lymph node recurrence and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltze Elke

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely accepted that vulvar carcinoma with a depth of invasion of less than one millimeter is sufficiently treated by vulvectomy or wide local excision without inguinal lymphadenectomy. Case presentation However, a patient with inguinal lymph node recurrence 21 months after radical vulvectomy for stage IA squamous cell carcinoma was observed. Conclusion According to a review of the literature, there are five additional cases of metastasizing vulvar cancer with a depth of invasion of less than one millimeter. Therefore, the definition of microinvasive carcinoma of the vulva based on depth of invasion alone may not be as reliable as previously thought and does not rule out inguinal lymph node involvement or recurrence. Consequently, the necessity of inguinal node dissection for microinvasive carcinoma needs to be discussed on an individual basis taking into account the age of the patient as well as the potential morbidity of extended surgery.

  4. Challenging the concept of microinvasive carcinoma of the vulva: report of a case with regional lymph node recurrence and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely accepted that vulvar carcinoma with a depth of invasion of less than one millimeter is sufficiently treated by vulvectomy or wide local excision without inguinal lymphadenectomy. However, a patient with inguinal lymph node recurrence 21 months after radical vulvectomy for stage IA squamous cell carcinoma was observed. According to a review of the literature, there are five additional cases of metastasizing vulvar cancer with a depth of invasion of less than one millimeter. Therefore, the definition of microinvasive carcinoma of the vulva based on depth of invasion alone may not be as reliable as previously thought and does not rule out inguinal lymph node involvement or recurrence. Consequently, the necessity of inguinal node dissection for microinvasive carcinoma needs to be discussed on an individual basis taking into account the age of the patient as well as the potential morbidity of extended surgery

  5. Radiation therapy of recurrences of carcinoma of the rectum and sigmoid after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciatto, S.; Pacini, P. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia)

    1982-01-01

    Loco-regional recurrences are the most common type of postsurgical relapse of rectal and sigmoid carcinoma. The authors report on 108 consecutively treated patients: site, clinical features and symptoms of the recurrences are considered together with treatment results. A symptomatic effect was generally achieved with 35 to 45 Gy, while higher doses did not improve the response. Due to the high frequency of simultaneous involvement of perineum and true pelvis the authors recommend irradiation of both regions. Palliation is the sole aim in most cases. However, curative treatment can be attempted in single perineal recurrences.

  6. Radiation therapy of recurrences of carcinoma of the rectum and sigmoid after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loco-regional recurrences are the most common type of postsurgical relapse of rectal and sigmoid carcinoma. The authors report on 108 consecutively treated patients: site, clinical features and symptoms of the recurrences are considered together with treatment results. A symptomatic effect was generally achieved with 35 to 45 Gy, while higher doses did not improve the response. Due to the high frequency of simultaneous involvement of perineum and true pelvis the authors recommend irradiation of both regions. Palliation is the sole aim in most cases. However, curative treatment can be attempted in single perineal recurrences. (Auth.)

  7. Is inconsistency of α-fetoprotein level a good prognosticator for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To identify the clinical outcomes of hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with inconsistent α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels which were initially high and then low at recurrence.METHODS: We retrospectively included 178 patients who underwent liver resection with high preoperative AFP levels (≥ 200 ng/dL). Sixty-nine HCC patients had recurrence during follow-up and were grouped by their AFP levels at recurrence: group Ⅰ, AFP ≤ 20 ng/dL (n = 16); group Ⅱ, AFP 20-200 ng/dL (n = 24); and group Ⅲ, AFP ≥ 200 n...

  8. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  10. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  11. Enigma of post-radiation edema and recurrent or residual carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistence of significant edema of the larynx beyond six months after completion of radiotherapy presents the laryngologist with a diagnostic dilemma. Review of the results of 43 cases demonstrated a high incidence of residual or recurrent carcinoma. Based upon this experience earlier and frequent laryngeal biopsies are recommended for these cases

  12. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Basal cell carcinoma with progression to metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Adsay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC or primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma is a malignant tumor considered to demonstrate differentiation towards Merkel cells that are present at the base of the epidermis or around the apical end of some hair follicles and are thought to play an yet uncertain role in sensory transduction. Here we present the case of a 54-year-old female with a basal cell carcinoma (BCC of the skin with neuroendocrine features (positivity for chromogranin that has evolved during multiple recurrences and radiotherapy into a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with morphologic and immunohistochemical features of MCC (trabecular and nesting arrangement, positivity for chromogranin, cytokeratin 20, neuron specific enolase, and also neurosecretory granules on electron microscopy. The progression from a chromogranin positive basal cell carcinoma of the skin, to a high grade neuroendocrine carcinoma demonstrates the potential for cross differentiation among skin tumors.

  14. Carcinoma verrucoso: uma variante clínico-histopatológica do carcinoma espinocelular Verrucous carcinoma: a clinical-histopathologic variant of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Zanini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma verrucoso é uma rara e indolente forma do carcinoma espinocelular descrita por Ackerman em 1948. Sua localização preferencial é a cavidade oral. Clinicamente manifesta-se como lesão verrucosa, de progressivo e lento crescimento e bom prognóstico. O tratamento de escolha é a exérese cirúrgica, devendo o paciente ser regularmente acompanhado devido ao risco de recorrências.Verrucous carcinoma is a rare and indolent variant of the squamous cell carcinoma described by Ackerman in 1948. The oral cavity is a most common site. Clinically, it presents most often as a slow-growing verrucous lesion. The prognosis is good. Treatment of choice is surgery. Patients require frequent reevaluation because recurrences may occur.

  15. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  16. MRI analysis of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze MRI manifestation and enhancement of renal cell carcinoma, and to improve the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: 48 cases of renal cell carcinoma proven by surgery and pathology were reviewed. MRI scans including T1WI, T2WI, TRUFI and contrast enhancement were carried out in all cases and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed in 15. Results: Of the 48 cases, there were clear cell carcinoma in 41, chromophobe cell carcinoma in 4 and papillary cell carcinoma in 3. The tumors were homogeneously T1 iso- or hypointense in 33 and heterogeneous in 15; homogeneously T2 hyperintense in 14, isointense in 6 and heterogeneous in 28 patients. Pseudocapsule was found in 10 cases. Contrast enhancement was homogeneous in 6, heterogeneous in 34, irregularly peripheral within the wall in 5, and homogeneously circular in 3. Conclusion: MRI can accurately diagnose renal cell carcinoma and help to determine the cell subsets. (authors)

  17. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  19. Therapeutic outcome and prognostic factors in the radiotherapy of recurrences of cervical carcinoma following surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hille, A.; Weiss, E.; Hess, C.F. [Univ. Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2003-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in patients with recurrences of cervical carcinoma. Patients and Methods: 26 patients who underwent radiation therapy for recurrences of cervical carcinoma following surgery between 1989 and 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. 17 patients had inoperable or macroscopic residual tumor. Nine patients had a complete/microscopically incomplete tumor resection. Depending on tumor burden and location of the recurrence, external-beam radiotherapy or a combination with brachytherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50-65 Gy. Results: The 5-year overall survival was 28%, relapse-free survival 24%, pelvic control 48%. Therapeutic outcome was related to the margins of resection, location of recurrence and technique of radiotherapy. In case of surgery without residual or microscopic tumor, the 5-year survival rate was 67%, with macroscopic tumor no patient was alive after 37 months (p = 0.05). 5-year overall survival was 42% for central recurrences, 10% for recurrences with pelvic wall infiltration. Recurrences confined to the vagina or paravaginal tissue had a higher 5-year overall probability as compared to all other patients (57% vs. 14%). All patients treated with combined radiotherapy were alive, whereas all patients treated only with external radiotherapy were dead after 32 months (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The probability of controlling recurrence mostly depends on a small tumor burden with the possibility of brachytherapy and/or complete surgery. Aggressive treatment modalities like radiochemotherapy and/or higher radiation doses are needed, especially for recurrences with infiltration of the pelvic wall and/or with macroscopic tumor. (orig.)

  20. Clear cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified/hyalinising clear cell carcinoma of the salivary gland: The current nomenclature, clinical/pathological characteristics and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Luca; Nikolarakos, Dimitrios; Keenan, Jonathon; Schaefer, Nathan; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NOS)/hyalinising clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is a rare entity in salivary gland tumour. The aim of the research is to review the current concepts and characteristics of this carcinoma. The clinical and pathological data of the disease obtained from literature and two original cases were analysed. Overall, 152 cases were reviewed up to the year 2014. The carcinomas were noted often in woman, in the seventh decade of life, located in oral cavity and as early-stages cancers. On pathological examination, they were characterized by tumour cells having clear cell morphology with hyalinised stroma. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the carcinoma is positive for cytokeratin and negative for myoepithelial differentiation. EWSR1-ATF1 fusion is specific for the carcinoma. Also, 9% of the reported cases had local nodal metastasis, with 6 cases demonstrating distant metastases at presentation. On follow-up, 22% of patients had recurrent or with persistent diseases after surgery. The time for the first recurrence could be as long as 24 years. Risk factors for recurrence include advanced stage at diagnosis and metastases at presentation. To conclude, HCCC is a low grade malignancy but have the potential for local metastases, recurrence, distant metastases and cancer-related death. PMID:27150676

  1. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  2. Early diffuse recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: analysis of risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Young; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Lim, Hyo Keun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the risk factors affecting early diffuse recurrence within 1 year of percutaneous ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Out of 146 patients who received transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) for treatment of recurrent HCC after percutaneous ultrasound-guided RFA, we selected 23 patients with early diffuse recurrence. Early diffuse recurrence was defined as three or more new recurrent HCCs within 1 year of initial RFA. As a control group, we selected 23 patients, matched exactly for age and sex, in which there was no local tumour progression or new recurrence after RFA. To analyse the risk factors, we examined patient factors and tumour factors. Recurrent tumours occurred from 30 to 365 days after RFA (median time, 203 days). Univariate analysis indicated that larger tumour size and poorly defined margin were significant risk factors (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that poorly defined margin was a significant risk factor (P < 0.05). Larger tumour size and poorly defined margin may be risk factors for early diffuse recurrence of HCC within 1 year of RFA. Tumours with such risk factors should be treated with a combination of TACE to minimise the potential for therapeutic failure. (orig.)

  3. Is p53 gene mutation an indicatior of the biological behaviors of recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I-Shyan Sheen; Kuo-Shyang Jeng; Ju-Yann Wu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate mutant p53 gene in primary hepatocellular carcinoma and to investigate the correlation between it and the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: Mutations of p53 gene were examined using antihuman p53 monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemical staining in 79 resected hepatocellular carcinomas. The correlations among variables of p53 positivity and invasiveness, disease free interval and survival were studied.In addition, in those who developed recurrence, the correlation among p53 positivity, clinical features and postrecurrence survival were also studied.RESULTS: Of these 79 cases, 64 (81%) had p53 mutation.Those patients with mutant p53 positivityhad significantly more tumor recurrence (76.6 % vs 40.0 %, P=0.0107).However, the COX proportional hazards model showed that p53 overexpression had only weak correlations with recurrence free interval and survival time (P=0.088 and 0.081), which was probably related to the short duration of follow-up. The invasiveness variables may be predictors of HCC recurrence. On univariate analysis, more patients with mutant p53 positivity had vascular permeation [78.1vs 40.0 %, P=0.0088, O.R. (odds ratio) =5.3], grade Ⅱ-ⅣV differentiation (98.4 vs 80.0 %, P=0.0203, O.R. =15.7), no complete capsule (82.8 vs 53.3 %, P=0.0346, O.R. =4.2)and daughter nodules (60.9 vs. 33.3 %, P=0.0527, O.R.=3.1) than patients with negative p53 staining. Onmultivariate analysis, only vascular permeation and grade of differentiation remained significant (P=0.042 and 0.012).There was no statistically significant correlation betweenthe status of p53 in the primary lesion and the clinical features of recurrent hepatocellular carcinomas examined,including extrahepatic metastasis (P=0.1103) and the number of recurrent tumors (P= 1.000) except for diseaseover more than one segment in the extent of recurrent tumors (P=0.0043). The post-recurrence median survival was lower in patients in whom p53 mutation had been detected in the

  4. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  5. Early Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma: Surgical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betekhtin M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most frequent non-melanoma skin cancer. Only 5-15% of BCC cases can be found in patients aged 20-40 years (so-called early onset. The early onset BCC is characterized by active and aggressive tumour growth, clinically presenting in most of the cases as a morpheaform, locally infiltrating or recurrent BCC. Despite the advances in the study of the pathogenesis of this tumour, surgery remains the most used, most effective and most suitable treatment modality. We describe a case of a 39-year-old woman who developed an early onset BCC of the nasolabial fold. After the subsequent surgical excision an excellent cosmetic result was achieved.

  6. Risk factors for immediate post-operative fatal recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong-Wan Kim; Young-Bae Kim; Hee-Jung Wang; Myung-Wook Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinicopathological risk factors for immediate post-operative fatal recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which may have practical implication and contribute to establishing high risk patients for pre- or post-operative preventive measures against HCC recurrence.METHODS: From June 1994 to May 2004, 269 patients who received curative resection for HCC were reviewed.Of these patients, those who demonstrated diffuse intrahepatic or multiple systemic recurrent lesions within 6mo after surgery were investigated (fatal recurrence group). The remaining patients were designated as the control group, and the two groups were compared for clinicopathologic risk factors.RESULTS: Among the 269 patients reviewed, 30patients were enrolled in the fatal recurrence group.Among the latter, 20 patients showed diffuse intrahepatic recurrence type and 10 showed multiple systemic recurrence type. Multivariate analysis between the fatal recurrence group and control group showed that preoperative serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was greater than 1 000 μg/L (P=0.02; odds ratio= 2.98),tumor size greater than 6.5 cm (P=0.03; OR=2.98),and presence of microvascular invasion (P= 0.01;OR=4.89) were the risk factors in the fatal recurrence group. The 48.1% of the patients who had all the three risk factors and the 22% of those who had two risk factors experienced fatal recurrence within 6 mo after surgery.CONCLUSION: Three distinct risk factors for immediate post-operative fatal recurrence of HCC after curative resection are pre-operative serum AFP level>1 000 μg/L,tumor size>6.5 cm, and microvascular invasion. The high risk patients with two or more risk factors should be the candidates for various adjuvant clinical trials.

  7. Frequency, risk factors and survival associated with an intrasubsegmental recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Tateishi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, hepatic resection has the advantage over radiofrequency ablation (RFA in terms of systematic removal of a hepatic segment. METHODS: We enrolled 303 consecutive patients of a single naïve HCC that had been treated by RFA at The University of Tokyo Hospital from 1999 to 2004. Recurrence was categorized as either intra- or extra-subsegmental as according to the Couinaud's segment of the original nodule. To assess the relationship between the subsegments of the original and recurrent nodules, we calculated the kappa coefficient. We assessed the risk factors for intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence independently using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. We also assessed the impact of the mode of recurrence on the survival outcome. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 201 patients in our cohort showed tumor recurrence distributed in a total of 340 subsegments. Recurrence was categorized as exclusively intra-subsegmental, exclusively extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental in 40 (20%, 110 (55%, and 51 (25% patients, respectively. The kappa coefficient was measured at 0.135 (95% CI, 0.079-0.190; P<0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that of the tumor size, AFP value and platelet count were all risk factors for both intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence. Of the patients in whom recurrent HCC was found to be exclusively intra-subsegmental, extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental, 37 (92.5%, 99 (90.8% and 42 (82.3%, respectively, were treated using RFA. The survival outcomes after recurrence were similar between patients with an exclusively intra- or extra-subsegmental recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of systematic subsegmentectomy may be limited in the patients with both HCC and chronic liver disease who frequently undergo multi-focal tumor recurrence.

  8. Peritoneal Recurrence of Initially Controlled Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman Sadykov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the presence of end-stage liver disease increases the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Liver transplantation (LT for patients within the Milan criteria has become a standard treatment for HCC in most developed centers worldwide. However, a major cause of death in cirrhotic patients with HCC after transplantation is tumor recurrence, including peritoneal recurrences, which develops rarely but presents a significant problem with regard to their management. Our experience includes two cases with HCC within the Milan criteria of peritoneal recurrences after living donor LT. Both patients had interventions for HCC in their medical history before LT, and we propose that these might have been a possible cause of the HCC peritoneal recurrence.

  9. Sequence alterations of the whole mitochondrial genome in primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Hong-hui; Song Tian; Pan Ling-ya

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations in primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas to illuminate the impact of chemotherapy on mtDNA.Methods.Complete mtDNA genomes of tumor tissue from 7 pimary ovarian carcinoma patients without treatment and 9 recurrent ones with prior chemotherapies were sequenced as well as their matched normal tissue.MtDNA alterations, including somatic mutations and new polymorphisms and consequent amino-acid alterations were compared between the two groups.Results, A large number of mtDNA new polymorphisms (69) and somatic mutations (17) were found in 16 ovarian carcinoma samples.Chemotherapy might not lead to more, heteroplasmic mutations and consequent aminoacid alterations (P>0.05) in the recurrent ovarian carcinoma patients than in the untreated ones.Conclusions: MtDNA damage was not so certainly made by chemotherapies and some of the mtDNA defects might be part of the disease process rather than a consequence of treatment.

  10. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Anaplastic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  11. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  12. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  13. Nutlin-3 Enhances Sorafenib Efficacy in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Singhal, Jyotsana; Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Awasthi, Sanjay; SINGHAL, SHARAD S.

    2011-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the top ten cancers in USA. The renal tumors are highly angiogenic and are resistant to conventional interventions, particularly radiotherapy. The advent of multispecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib has improved the progression-free survival in RCC, but overall survival in recurrent and metastatic RCC is still a concern that has lead to characterization of combinatorial regimens. Hence, we studied the effect of combination of nutlin-3, an MDM2 ...

  14. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma with rapid growth after spontaneous regression

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Tomoki; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Watanabe, Tadashi; Noda, Masao; Fuji, Nobuaki; Minami, Masahito; Itoh, Yoshito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    We report an 80-year-old man who presented with sponta- neous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He complained of sudden right flank pain and low-grade fever. The level of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II was 1137 mAU/mL. A computed tomography scan in November 2000 demonstrated a low-density mass located in liver S4 with marginal enhancement and a cystic mass of 68 mm × 55 mm in liver S6, with slightly high density content and without marginal enhancement. Angiogr...

  15. Non-small cell carcinoma: Comparison of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence assessment capability of qualitatively and/or quantitatively assessed FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yumiko, E-mail: onitan@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Matsumoto, Keiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Maniwa, Yoshimasa [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshihiro [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the capability of integrated FDG-PET/CT for assessment of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with that of standard radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 121 consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients (80 males, 41 females; mean age, 71 years) underwent pathologically and surgically confirmed complete resection, followed by prospective integrated FDG-PET/CT and standard radiological examinations. Final diagnosis of recurrence was based on the results of more than 12 months of follow-up and/or pathological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with either method for each patient by using 5-point visual scoring system, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. ROC analysis was used to compare the capability of the two methods for assessment of postoperative recurrence on a per-patient basis. The ROC-based positive test was used to determine optimal cut-off value for FDG uptake measurement at a site suspected on the basis of qualitatively assessed PET/CT. Finally, sensitivities, specificities and accuracies of all methods were compared by means of McNemar's test. Results: Areas under the curve of qualitatively assessed PET/CT and standard radiological examinations showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). At an optimal cut-off value of 2.5, specificity and accuracy of quantitatively and qualitatively assessed PET/CT were significantly higher than those of qualitatively assessed PET/CT and standard radiological examinations (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Accuracy of assessment of postoperative intra- and extrathoracic recurrence in NSCLC patients by qualitative and/or quantitative FDG-PET/CT is equivalent to or higher than that by standard radiological examinations.

  16. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  17. Late recurrence after radium interstitial radiotherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1962 and 1975, 192 patients with carcinoma of the mobile tongue were treated with radium interstitial radiotherapy, and 105 survived for five years without local recurrence. There was recurrence in the vicinity of the initial primary cancer in 16 of the 105 patients (15.2%) more than five years after the initial treatment. The site of recurrence was the homolateral side of the tongue in six patients, the contralateral side in six, and adjacent tissue in four. The treatment for recurrence was surgery, radiotherapy, and cryosurgery combined with radiotherapy in ten, four and two patients, respectively. The five-year survival rate after treatment of late recurrence was 59%, which was comparable to that after initial treatment for all patients (63%), and was significantly better than that after secondary treatment for recurrence that developed before five years (32%). One lesion of a different histological type than the initial primary cancer was diagnosed, with a high level of reliability, as radiation-induced cancer. The other late recurrences were considered clinically to be second primary cancers. (author)

  18. Efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for initial recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after curative treatment: Comparison with primary cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We compared clinical and outcome factors after RFA treatment between primary HCC and recurrent HCC. • Local tumor control and OS are similar, but DFS was significantly shorter in the recurrent group. • RFA is an effective and safe treatment option for initial recurrent small HCC. - Abstract: Objective: To determine the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for initial recurrence of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; ≤3 nodules, each nodule ≤3 cm in diameter) after curative treatment and identify prognostic factors affecting therapeutic outcome, we compared clinical and outcome factors between patients with primary HCC and those with initial recurrent HCC who underwent RFA. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, 211 HCC patients who underwent RFA were enrolled and comprised two groups: primary group (n = 139) and initial recurrent group (n = 72). We compared local tumor progression, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and RFA safety between the groups. Results: Median follow-up was 53 months. Local tumor progression rate was 5.8% in the primary group and 4.2% in the recurrent group. OS rates at 5 years and 10 years were 63.2% and 25.5% in the primary group and 54.5% and 33.4% in the recurrent group, respectively. Corresponding DFS rates were 30.7% and 14.6% and 19.2% and 11.0%. DFS was significantly shorter in the recurrent group (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–2.57; P = 0.001). In the recurrent group, time from primary HCC development to recurrence was a determinant of OS (≤2 years; HR = 3.42; 95% CI, 1.52–7.72; P = 0.003). Conclusion: Although local tumor control and OS were similar between the groups, the recurrent group had shorter DFS than the primary group. Time from primary HCC development to recurrence was a prognostic factor for recurrence of HCC

  19. Anal metastasis from recurrent breast lobular carcinoma: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Puglisi; Emanuela Varaldo; Michela Assalino; Gianluca Ansaldo; Giancarlo Torre; Giacomo Borgonovo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of isolated gastrointestinal metastasis from breast lobular carcinoma, which mimicked primary anal cancer. In July 2000, an 88-year-old woman presented with infiltrating lobular cancer (pT1/G2/N2). The patient received postoperative radiotherapy and hormonal therapy. Four years later,she presented with an anal polypoid lesion. The mass was removed for biopsy. Immunohistochemical staining suggested a breast origin. Radiotherapy was chosen for this patient, which resulted in complete regression of the lesion. The patient died 3 years after the first manifestation of gastrointestinal metastasis.According to the current literature, we consider the immunohistochemistry features that are essential to support the suspicion of gastrointestinal breast metastasis, and since we consider the gastrointestinal involvement as a sign of systemic disease, the therapy should be less aggressive and systemic.

  20. A case of small cell gastric carcinoma with an adenocarcinoma component operated curatively.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yata,Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    We present a case of a primary advanced gastric tumor that was composed of 2 different pathological components: small cell carcinoma and moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient was still alive four years after the surgery was performed, without recurrence. A large part of the tumor consisted of a diffuse sheet of small cell carcinoma, which transitioned into another small portion consisting of moderately-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma components. Therefore, this case raised the possibility that small cell gastric carcinoma may originate from totipotential stem cells of the stomach. Although small cell carcinoma progresses aggressively, and patients with it have an extremely poor prognosis, this patient recovered uneventfully after the surgical resection, and has remained in good health, without any recurrences.

  1. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  2. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duggan, Margaret M. [Department of Surgery, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Golshan, Mehra [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pochebit, Stephen [Department of Pathology, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R., E-mail: jbellon@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  3. Preoperative serum liver enzyme markers for predicting early recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Xia Wang; Chun-Ping Jiang; Yin Cao; Guang Zhang; Wei-Bo Chen; Yi-Tao Ding

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Early recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with worse prognosis after liver resection. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of com-mon liver enzyme markers in HCC early recurrence after cu-rative hepatectomy and to establish a simple predictive model for HCC early recurrence. METHODS:A total of 200 patients who had undergone curative resection for HCC were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into early recurrence (within 2 years) and non-early recurrence groups. Demographical characteristics, preopera-tive liver function parameters, surgical factors and tumor related factors of the patients were assessed by univariate analysis to identify potential signiifcant predictors for early recurrence after resection of HCC. Parameters with statisti-cal signiifcance were entered into a Cox proportional hazard model to ifnd independent risk factors. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was done to determine optimal cut-off values and the number of combined factors in multi-factor predictive model. RESULTS:Of 13 potential risk factors for early recurrence identiifed by univariate analysis, high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH>206 U/L, HR=1.711,P=0.006), high aspartate amino-transferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AST/ALT>0.96, HR=1.769,P=0.006), elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP>8.6 ng/mL, HR=2.079,P=0.007), small resection margin (≤1 cm, HR=2.354,P CONCLUSIONS:Preoperative common liver enzyme markers, LDH and AST/ALT ratio, were independently associated with early recurrence of HCC. The combination of serum liver en-zyme markers with AFP, resection margin and TNM stage bet-ter predicted early recurrence of HCC after curative resection in a simple multi-factor model.

  4. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal carcinoma--results and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the local control and survival in patients who received pelvic irradiation for locally recurrent rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The records of 519 patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma treated principally with external-beam radiation therapy between 1975 to 1985 at a single institute were retrospectively reviewed. These included 326 patients who relapsed locally following previous abdominoperineal resection, 151 after previous low anterior resection, and 42 after previous local excision or electrocoagulation for the primary. No patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy for the primary disease. Concurrent extrapelvic distant metastases were found in 164 (32%) patients at local recurrence and, in the remaining 355, the relapse was confined to the pelvis. There were 290 men and 229 women whose age ranged from 23 to 91 years (median = 65). Median time from initial surgery to radiation therapy for local recurrence was 18 months (3-138 months). Radiation therapy was given with varying dose-fractionation schedules, total doses ranging from 4.4 to 65.0 Gy (median = 30 Gy) over 1 to 92 days (median = 22 days). For 214 patients who received a total dose ≥35 Gy, radiation therapy was given in 1.8 to 2.5 Gy daily fractions. Results: The median survival was 14 months and the median time to local disease progression was 5 months from date of pelvic irradiation. The 5-year survival was 5%, and the pelvic disease progression-free rate was 7%. Twelve patients remained alive and free of disease at 5 years after pelvic irradiation. Upon multivariate analysis, overall survival was positively correlated with ECOG performance status (p = 0.0001), absence of extrapelvic metastases (p = 0.0001), long intervals from initial surgery to radiation therapy for local recurrence (p 0.0001), total radiation dose (p = 0.0001), and absence of obstructive uropathy (p = 0.0013). Pelvic disease progression-free rates were positively

  5. Clinical application of CT-guided 125I seed interstitial implantation for local recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aimed to explore the safety profile and clinical efficacy of CT-guided radioactive seed implantation in treating local recurrent rectal carcinoma. CT-guided 125I seed implantation was carried out in 20 patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma. 14 of the 20 patient had prior adjuvant external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The treatment planning system (TPS) was used preoperatively to reconstruct three dimensional images of the tumor and to calculate the estimated seed number and distribution. The median matched peripheral dose (MPD) was 120 Gy (range, 100-160 Gy). Of the 20 patients, 12 were male, 8 were female, and ages ranged from 38 to 78, with a median age of 62. Duration of follow-up was 3-34 months. The response rate of pain relief was 85% (17/20). Repeat CT scan 2 months following the procedure revealed complete response (CR) of the tumor in 2 patients, partial response (PR) in 13 patients, stable disease (SD) in 3 patients, and progressive disease (PD) in 2 patients. 75% of patients had either CR or PR. Median survival time was 18.8 months (95% CI: 3.5-22.4 months). 1 and 2 year survival rates were 75% and 25%, respectively. 4 patients died of recurrent tumor; 4 patients died of distant metastases; 9 patients died of recurrent tumor and distant metastases. 3 patients survived after 2 year follow up. Two patients were found to have mild hematochezia, which was reversible with symptomatic management. CT-guided 125I seed implantation appeared to be a safe, useful and less complicated interventional treatment option for local recurrent rectal carcinoma

  6. Scalp squamous cell carcinoma in xeroderma pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Basim A; Hanadi Alzanbagi; Osama A Samargandi; Hossam Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that appears in early childhood. Squamous cell carcinoma is not uncommon in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and mostly involving the face, head, neck, and scalp. However, squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp may exhibit an aggressive course. Case Report: Here, we present a huge squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp in a three-years-old child with xeroderma pigmentosum. In addition, we illustrate the challenges of a child...

  7. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dario Marcotullio; Giannicola Iannella; Gian Franco Macri; Caterina Marinelli; Melissa Zelli; Giuseppe Magliulo

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy....

  8. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is...

  9. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, Tufan; Coşkunoğlu, Esra Zeynep; Duran, Berkan; Çiftci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder a...

  10. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan Cicek; Esra Zeynep Coskunoglu; Berkan Duran; Egemen Ciftci

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder ...

  11. Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Sabra; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modal...

  12. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Concurrent with Bowen's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Chul; Kang, Ho Song; Park, Kyoung Tae; Oh, Young Ha; Yu, Hee Joon; Kim, Joung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy of the elderly and immunocompromised patients. It is occasionally found coexisting with other diseases, such as squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, miscellaneous adnexal tumors, and rarely Bowen disease. A 75-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of an irregularly shaped erythematous patch on the left mandibular angle. Three months later, a 1.5×1.0 cm sized painless and rapidly growi...

  13. Case of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sadaf; Jadidi, Nima; Faraj, Sheila F.; Rodriquez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal malignancy and it originates from the renal tubular epithelium. Due to the diversity in the histopathological and molecular characteristics, it is typically subclassified into five different categories. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is one subclassification and it includes two variants: sporadic and hereditary. Although the hereditary form comprises a smaller number of cases of papillary renal cell carcinoma, an understanding of the molec...

  14. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  15. Curative Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma: Rates and Patterns of Postoperative Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Neda; Margonis, Georgios Antonios; Kim, Yuhree; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and patterns of recurrence after curative-intent surgery for ACC. Methods Patients who underwent curative-intent resection for ACC between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 13 academic institutions participating in the United States ACC study group. Patients with metastasis or an R2 margin were excluded. Patterns and rates of recurrence were determined and classified as locoregional and distant recurrence. Results A total of 180 patients with a median age of 52 years (interquartile range 43–61) were identified. Most patients underwent open surgery (n = 111, 64.5 %) and had an R0 resection margin (n = 117, 75.0 %). At last followup, 116 patients (64.4 %) had experienced recurrence (locoregional only, n = 41, 36.3 %; distant only, n = 51, 45.1 %; locoregional and distant, n = 21, 18.6 %). Median time to recurrence was 18.8 months. Several factors were associated with locoregional recurrence, including left-sided ACC location (odds ratio [OR] 2.71, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.06–6.89) and T3/T4 disease (reference T1/T2, OR 3.04, 95 % CI 1.19–7.80) (both p prognosis. PMID:26282907

  16. Clinical study on external carotid artery infusion (trans-femoral) treatment of recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect and safety of external carotid artery infusion treatment of recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 20 cases of recurrent NPC (13 male and 7 female, age 36-65 years, mean 50 years) diagnosed by clinical examination (including nasopharyngoscope), serology (VCA-IgA) and imaging (CT, MR) and treated by external carotid artery infusion (trans-femoral) with adriamycin (or epi-adriamycin), cisplatin (or carboplatin), Pingyangmycin and 5-Fluorouracil. Results: Of all the patients, 8 cases (40%) had a complete response (CR), 7 cases (35%) had a partial response (PR). The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 75%. Cumulative survival rates at 1, 3 years were 90% (18/20), 50%(10/20) respectively. No severe side-effects and complications found. Conclusion: External carotid artery infusion (trans-femoral) should be effective and safe in the treatment of recurrent NPC

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma of the colon with an elevated serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen responding to combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, S; Ledakis, P; Novinski, D; Mleczko, K L; Frankforter, S; Bolton, M; Fruehling, R M; VanWie, E; Norvell, M; Muhvic, J

    2001-05-01

    Primary squamous cell colorectal carcinomas are uncommon, and their characteristics are not well known. They seem to occur most commonly in the fifth decade of life with a slight predominance for men. The most commonly reported anatomic locations are the rectum and the proximal colon. Clinical features and common diagnostic methods do not easily differentiate squamous cell colorectal carcinomas from adenocarcinomas. Because of their extremely rare occurrence, it is difficult to study their natural course, clinical behavior, and response to therapy. This report presents the case of a pure squamous cell colorectal cancer and provides a brief review of the literature, which includes 60 previously published cases. The case of a patient with T3N2M0 primary squamous cell carcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon, which was initially treated with abdominoperineal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation, is presented. During the follow-up, an elevated squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) level led to restaging computed tomography scans, which confirmed recurrent metastatic disease in the liver. Response to chemotherapy with a decrease in tumor size correlated with a decrease in the serum SCC Ag level. Although SCC Ag has been used as a tumor marker for squamous cell cancers of the lung, head and neck, uterine cervix, and esophagus, this is the first reported case of a squamous cell colon carcinoma presenting with an elevated SCC Ag at the time of recurrence. In addition, this patient showed an objective partial response to combination chemotherapy, with a decrease in the serum level of this tumor marker. PMID:12445380

  18. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma presenting with dysphagia is rare. We report a case who presented with dysphagia as the only manifestations of renal malignancy. Biopsy from the pyriform fossa nodules revealed a clear cell neoplasm. Immuno-histochemical analysis of tissue confirmed metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

  19. Simultaneous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Involving Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-01-01

    Background. The concomitant occurrence of a renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma is extremely rare with only few cases being reported. Methods. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma involving small intestine. Surgical resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma and simultaneous right nephrectomy were performed. Results. Patient developed recurrent and metastatic disease and underwent debulking surgery following by chemotherapy. Despite aggressive behavior of the retroperitoneal sarcomas, patient is currently (7 years after simultaneous resection and nephrectomy) recurrence-free. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma. Debulking surgery and chemotherapy were helpful in our case. PMID:27595033

  20. Risk Factors for Fatal Recurrence of Liver Transplant Recipients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the First Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological risk factors for fatal recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in orthotopic liver transplant recipients in the first year. Methods: From April 2002 to October 2005, 303 recipients who received orthotopic liver transplantation for HCC were reviewed. Of These patients, those who demonstrated diffuse intra-hepatic or multiple systemic recurrent lesions and died within 1 y after surgery were investigated (fatal recurrence group, 48 cases). The remaining patients were designated as the control group, and the two groups were compared for clinicopathologic risk factors by logistic regression analysis. Results: Among the 303 patients reviewed, 48 patients were enrolled in the fatal recurrence group (15.84%). Multivariate analysis between the fatal recurrence group and control group showed that the presence of vascular invasion, tumor size greater than 6.5 cm, and pre-operative serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level greater than 1000 μg/L were the risk factors in the fatal recurrence group. 85.71% of the patients who had all the three risk factors, 37.84% of those who had two risk factors, 13.64% of those who had one risk factors, and 6.71% of those who had none risk factors died because of recurrence within 1 y after transplantation. Conclusion: Three distinct risk factors attributed to fatal recurrence of liver transplant recipients for HCC are vascular invasion, tumor size ≥6.5 cm, and pre-operative serum AFP level ≥1000 μg/L. The high risk HCC patients with two or more risk factors should not to be the candidates for liver transplantation.

  1. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis. PMID:27398205

  2. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne – case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment‐resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.

  3. Correlation between CD105 expression and postoperative recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis is one of the mechanisms most critical to the postoperative recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thus, finding the molecular markers associated with angiogenesis may help identify patients at increased risk for recurrence and metastasis of HCC. This study was designed to investigate whether CD105 or CD34 could serve as a valid prognostic marker in patients with HCC by determining if there is a correlation between CD105 or CD34 expression and postoperative recurrence or metastasis. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for the CD105, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibodies was performed in 113 HCC tissue specimens containing paracarcinomatous tissue and in 14 normal liver tissue specimens. The quantitation of microvessels identified by anti-CD105 and anti-CD34 monoclonal antibodies and the semiquantitation of VEGF expression identified by anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody were analyzed in conjunction with the clinicopathological characteristics of the HCC and any available follow-up information about the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. Results CD105 was not expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of any normal liver tissue or paracarcinomatous liver tissue but was expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of all HCC tissue. In contrast, CD34 was expressed in the vascular endothelial cells of normal liver tissue, paracarcinomatous tissue, and HCC tissue in the following proportions of specimens: 86.7%, 93.8%, and 100%, respectively. The microvascular densities (MVDs of HCC determined by using an anti-CD105 mAb (CD105-MVD and an anti-CD34 mAb (CD34-MVD, were 71.7 ± 8.3 (SD and 106.3 ± 10.4 (SD, respectively. There was a significant correlation between CD105-MVD and CD34-MVD (r = 0.248, P = 0.021. Although CD34-MVD was significantly correlated with VEGF expression (r = 0.243, P = 0.024, CD105-MVD was more closely correlated (r = 0.300, P= 0.005. The

  4. High expression of Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway genes indicates a risk of recurrence of breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng KS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Shyang Jeng,1 I-Shyan Sheen,2 Wen-Juei Jeng,2 Ming-Che Yu,3 Hsin-I Hsiau,3 Fang-Yu Chang31Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan, 3Department of Medical Research, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Abnormal activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway contributing to carcinogenesis of some organs has been reported in the literature. We hypothesize that activation of the SHH pathway contributes to the recurrence of breast carcinoma.Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with invasive breast carcinoma following curative resection were enrolled in this prospective study. The ratios of messenger RNA (mRNA expression for Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, patched homolog-1 (PTCH-1, glioma-associated oncogene-1 (GLI-1, and smoothened (SMOH were measured between breast carcinoma tissue and paired noncancerous breast tissue. These ratios were compared with their clinicopathologic characteristics. These factors and the mRNA ratios were compared between patients with recurrence and those without recurrence.Results: The size of the invasive cancer correlated significantly with the ratio of SHH mRNA (P=0.001, that of PTCH-1 mRNA (P=0.005, and that of SMOH mRNA (P=0.021. Lymph node involvement correlated significantly with the ratio of SMOH mRNA (P=0.041. The correlation between Her-2 neu and the ratio of GLI-1 mRNA was statistically significant (P=0.012. Each ratio of mRNA of SHH, PTCH-1, GLI-1, and SMOH correlated significantly with cancer recurrence (P<0.001 for each.Conclusion: We suggest that high expression of SHH mRNA, PTCH-1 mRNA, GLI-1 mRNA, and SMOH mRNA in breast cancer tissue correlates with invasiveness and is a potential biomarker to predict postoperative recurrence.Keywords: SHH pathway, breast carcinoma, prediction, recurrence

  5. Renal cell carcinoma: Evolving and emerging subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Suzanne M; Divatia, Mukul; Truong, Luan; Shen, Steven; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-12-16

    Our knowledge of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rapidly expanding. For those who diagnose and treat RCC, it is important to understand the new developments. In recent years, many new renal tumors have been described and defined, and our understanding of the biology and clinical correlates of these tumors is changing. Evolving concepts in Xp11 translocation carcinoma, mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic clear cell RCC, and carcinoma associated with neuroblastoma are addressed within this review. Tubulocystic carcinoma, thyroid-like follicular carcinoma of kidney, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC are also described. Finally, candidate entities, including RCC with t(6;11) translocation, hybrid oncocytoma/chromophobe RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, and renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor are reviewed. Knowledge of these new entities is important for diagnosis, treatment and subsequent prognosis. This review provides a targeted summary of new developments in RCC. PMID:24364021

  6. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma with rapid growth after spontaneous regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoki Nakajima; Michihisa Moriguchi; Tadashi Watanabe; Masao Noda; Nobuaki Fuji; Masahito Minami; Yoshito Itoh; Takeshi Okanoue

    2004-01-01

    We report an 80-year-old man who presented with spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He complained of sudden right flank pain and low-grade fever.The level of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-Ⅱ was 1 137 mAU/mL. A computed tomography scan in November 2000 demonstrated a low-density mass located in liver S4 with marginal enhancement and a cystic mass of 68 mmx55 mm in liver S6, with slightly high density content and without marginal enhancement. Angiography revealed that the tumor in S4 with a size of 25 mm×20 mm was a typical hypervascular HCC, and transarterial chemoembolization was performed. However, the tumor in S6 was hypovascular and atypical of HCC, and thus no therapy was given. In December 2000, the cystic mass regressed spontaneously to 57 mmx44 mm, and aspiration cytology revealed bloody fluid, and the mass was diagnosed cytologically as class Ⅰ.The tumor in S4 was treated successfully with a 5 mm margin of safety around it. The PⅣKA-Ⅱ level normalized in February2001. In July 2001, the tumor regressed further but presented with an enhanced area at the posterior margin. In November2001, the enhanced area extended, and a biopsy revealed well-differentiated HCC, although the previous tumor in S4 disappeared. Angiography demonstrated two tumor stains, one was in S6, which was previously hypovascular,and the other was in S8. Subsequently, the PⅣKA-Ⅱ level started to rise with the doubling time of 2-3 wk, and the tumor grew rapidly despite repeated transarterial embolization with gel foam. In February 2003, the patient died of bleeding into the peritoneal cavity from the tumor that occupied almost the entire right lobe. Considering the acute onset of the symptoms, we speculate that local ischemia possibly due to rapid tumor growth, resulted in intratumoral bleeding and/or hemorrhagic necrosis, and finally spontaneous regression of the initial tumor in S6.

  7. The diagnosis of recurrent gastric carcinoma: high-field-strength MRI compared with barium meal of alimentary canal gastroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of high-field-strength MRI in the diagnosis of recurrent gastric cancer compared with X-ray barium meal and gastroscope examinations. Methods: All the 53 cases of postoperative recurrence of gastric cancer underwent MRI, X-ray barium meal and gastroscopy examinations. Using the results of surgery or biopsy as the gold standard, the differences in categorical data were analyzed with the Chi square test. Results: Thirty postoperative recurrent gastric carcinoma in anastomotic stoma confirmed with pathological findings. There was ten cases with adjacent tissue infiltration and remote metastasis. Thirteen cases had no recurrent gastric carcinoma. The sensibility, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for recurrent gastric carcinoma in anastomotic stoma for MRI, barium meal of alimentary canal and gastroscope were 96.6% , 86.9% , 92.4% , 90.6% , 95.2% ; 70.0% , 86.9% , 77.3% , 87.5% , 68.9% ; 96.6% , 91.3% , 94.3% , 93.5% , 95.4% respectively. The sensibility, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for recurrent gastric cancer (including adjacent tissue infiltration and remote metastasis) were 97.5% , 76.9% , 92.4% , 92.8% , 90.9% ; 52.5% , 76.9% , 58.4% , 87.5% , 34.4% ; 72.5% , 84.6% , 75.4% , 93.5% , 50.0% respectively. There were significant differences between MRI and X-ray barium meal with respect to detect recurrent gastric carcinoma in anastomotic stoma and MRI is better than X-ray barium meal to detect recurrent gastric carcinoma in anastomotic stoma (χ2=4.90, P<0.05). There were no significant differences between MRI and gastroscope with respect to detect recurrent gastric carcinoma in anastomotic stoma (χ2=0.03, P>0.05). In examination of recurrent gastric carcinoma including adjacent tissue infiltration and remote metastasis, MRI shows statistical differences with X-ray barium meal (χ2=12.46, P<0.05) and gastroscopy (χ2=5.26, P<0

  8. Preventive effect of regional radiotherapy with phosphorus-32 glass microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming Wang; Zhen-Yu Yin; Ren-Xiang Yu; You-Yuan Peng; Ping-Guo Liu; Guo-Yang Wu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the preventive effects of phosphorus-32 glass microspheres (P32-GMS) in the recurrence of massive hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) after tumor resection.METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with massive HCCs received local P32-GMS implantation after liver tumors were removed, while the other 38 patients with massive HCCs were not treated with P32-GMS after hepatectomies. The radioactivity of the blood, urine and liver were examined. The complications, HCC recurrence and overall survival rates in the patients were analyzed.RESULTS: P32-GMS implanted in the liver did not cause systemic absorption of P32. There were no significant differences of postoperative complications between the patients with and without P32-GMS treatment. The short-term (six months and 1 year) and long-term (2, 3 and over 3 years) recurrence rates in patients who received P32-GMS radiotherapy were significantly decreased, and the overall survival rates in this group were significantly improved.CONCLUSION: P32-GMS implantation in the liver can significantly decrease the postoperative recurrence and improve the overall survival in HCCs patients after hepatectomy. This therapy may provide an innovative method in prevention of HCC recurrence after operation.

  9. Preventive effect of regional radiotherapy with phosphorus-32 glass microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after hepatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ming; Yin, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Ren-Xiang; Peng, You-Yuan; Liu, Ping-Guo; Wu, Guo-Yang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the preventive effects of phosphorus-32 glass microspheres (P32-GMS) in the recurrence of massive hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) after tumor resection. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with massive HCCs received local P32-GMS implantation after liver tumors were removed, while the other 38 patients with massive HCCs were not treated with P32-GMS after hepatectomies. The radioactivity of the blood, urine and liver were examined. The complications, HCC recurrence and overall survival rates in the patients were analyzed. RESULTS: P32-GMS implanted in the liver did not cause systemic absorption of P32. There were no significant differences of postoperative complications between the patients with and without P32-GMS treatment. The short-term (six months and 1 year) and long-term (2, 3 and over 3 years) recurrence rates in patients who received P32-GMS radiotherapy were significantly decreased, and the overall survival rates in this group were significantly improved. CONCLUSION: P32-GMS implantation in the liver can significantly decrease the postoperative recurrence and improve the overall survival in HCCs patients after hepatectomy. This therapy may provide an innovative method in prevention of HCC recurrence after operation. PMID:18203282

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously published our and Johns Hopkins data titled: "Platinum-based therapy in adenosquamous pancreatic cancer: experience at two institutions” [1]. We will here like to submit a related case report as a letter to the editor to JOP in reference to the above paper. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various reported incidence rates, ranging from 0.5% to as high as 5% of pancreatic ductal carcinomas [2, 3]. Of the 1300 cases of pancreatic cancers observed at autopsy in a survey in Japan in 1992, 0.7% were squamous cell carcinoma [4]. A Mayo clinic review of very rare exocrine tumors showed an even rarer incidence of squamous cell carcinoma when compared to acinar and small cell carcinoma of the pancreas [5]. This discrepancy in the reported incidence rates related to the fact that some of the cases represent adenosquamous carcinoma rather than pure squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas. In an analysis of 25 patients, mean age at diagnosis of pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma was 62 years (range: 33–80 years and there was no gender difference [6]. There is no study about the molecular profile of squamous carcinoma of the pancreas. There are no retrospective or prospective studies about the best therapy for these tumors

  11. Genomic predictors for recurrence patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma: model derivation and validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hoon Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Typically observed at 2 y after surgical resection, late recurrence is a major challenge in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We aimed to develop a genomic predictor that can identify patients at high risk for late recurrence and assess its clinical implications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic analysis of gene expression data from human liver undergoing hepatic injury and regeneration revealed a 233-gene signature that was significantly associated with late recurrence of HCC. Using this signature, we developed a prognostic predictor that can identify patients at high risk of late recurrence, and tested and validated the robustness of the predictor in patients (n = 396 who underwent surgery between 1990 and 2011 at four centers (210 recurrences during a median of 3.7 y of follow-up. In multivariate analysis, this signature was the strongest risk factor for late recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7; p = 0.002. In contrast, our previously developed tumor-derived 65-gene risk score was significantly associated with early recurrence (p = 0.005 but not with late recurrence (p = 0.7. In multivariate analysis, the 65-gene risk score was the strongest risk factor for very early recurrence (<1 y after surgical resection (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.6; p = 0.01. The potential significance of STAT3 activation in late recurrence was predicted by gene network analysis and validated later. We also developed and validated 4- and 20-gene predictors from the full 233-gene predictor. The main limitation of the study is that most of the patients in our study were hepatitis B virus-positive. Further investigations are needed to test our prediction models in patients with different etiologies of HCC, such as hepatitis C virus. CONCLUSIONS: Two independently developed predictors reflected well the differences between early and late recurrence of HCC at the molecular level and provided new

  12. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN; Selda SEÇKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostainin...

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Sufang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lin Shaojun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Tham, Ivan W.K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Pan Jianji; Lu Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Lu, Jiade J., E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  14. Current Aspects on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial neoplasm affecting the oral cavity. This article overviews the essential points of oral squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting its risk and genomic factors, the potential malignant disorders and the therapeutic approaches. It also emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis.

  15. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Qiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which is defined as a carcinoma that exhibits pancreatic enzyme production by neoplastic cells. This review includes re-cent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ACC, imaging and pathological diagnosis and ap-proaches to treatment with reference to the literature.

  16. Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Walsh, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), also known as kidney cancer, renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is a global burden. This article aims to provide a brief overview of RCC. It outlines epidemiology and presentation; invesitgation and staging; treatments and prognosis. The article also includes a focus on currently available drug treatments, and serves as an introduction to the topic.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites

    OpenAIRE

    Jennison, Erica; Wathuge, Gayathri W; Gorard, David A

    2015-01-01

    Lesson It is rare for renal cell carcinoma to involve the peritoneum and cause malignant ascites. Furthermore, it is uncommon for malignant ascites to be a presenting feature of this cancer. An unusual case of renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites is reported, and its response to sunitinib described.

  18. Renal Cell Carcinoma in Transplanted Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    M. Naroienejad; Salouti, R

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are prescribed routinely to kidney transplant recipients to prevent rejection. These medications are associated wi th an increased risk of secondary malignancies,including renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney itself. We present a case of renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney.

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  20. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  1. Clear cell carcinoma of the larynx: one case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell carcinoma of the larynx is exceptional. Only six cases are described in the literature. We report a new case occurring in a 58-year-old man. The treatment consisted of a total laryngectomy with lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant irradiation. Local and regional recurrence occurred after 5 months. The patient died from the tumor's evolution 12 months after the diagnosis. The prognosis of clear cell carcinoma of the larynx is similar to the clear cell carcinoma of the lung and is unfavorable. (authors)

  2. Endoscopic Management of Unusual Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Sinonasal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosavi Bahar Seyed Habibollah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic  tumors in the nose and paranasal sinuses are infrequent. The origin of this metastatic tumors are often renal cell carcinoma. We present one case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma  to the nose and paranasal sinuses ,4 years after initial nephrectomy and diagnosis of stage T1N0M0 clear cell carcinoma. The patient complained of nasal obstruction and recurrent epistaxis  who was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and was successfully palliated after one year.

  3. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuichi; Kataoka, Masao; Hata, Junya; Akaihata, Hidenori; Ogawa, Soichiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC. PMID:26793589

  4. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Sato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC.

  5. Salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally recurrent oesophageal carcinoma after primary surgery: retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To determine the overall survival and gastrointestinal toxicity for patients treated with salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy after primary surgery for locoregional relapse of oesophageal carcinoma. A retrospective review of 525 patients who had a resection for oesophageal or oesophagogastric carcinoma at Princess Alexandra Hospital identified 14 patients treated with salvage definitive radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy, following localized recurrence of their disease. We analysed the patient and treatment characteristics to determine the median overall survival as the primary end point. Gastrointestinal toxicity was examined to determine if increased toxicity occurred when the stomach was irradiated within the intrathoracic radiotherapy field. The median overall survival for patients treated with curative intent using salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy was 16 months and the 2-year overall survival is 21%. One patient is in clinical remission more than 5 years after therapy. Age <60 years old and nodal recurrence were favourable prognostic factors. Treatment compliance was 93% with only one patient unable to complete the intended schedule. Fourteen per cent of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal toxicity. Salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy should be considered for good performance status patients with oesophageal carcinoma who have a locoregional relapse after primary surgery. The schedule is tolerable with low toxicity and an acceptable median survival

  6. Successful treatment of persistent bronchorrhea by gefitinib in a case with Recurrent Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimono Takatsugu

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchorrhea is one of late complaints in patients with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC and hampers their quality of life. Although an effective treatment for bronchorrhea in these patients has not been established, recently we have treated effectively one case of persistent bronchorrhea associated with clinical recurrent BAC with gefitinib (ZD1839, 'Iressa™'; AstraZeneca Japan; Osaka, Japan. Case Presentation A 63-year-old Japanese female had undergone left pneumonectomy with radical lymph node dissection (ND2a for diffuse type bronchioloalveolar carcinoma originated in left lower lobe. Multiple pulmonary metastases in right lung were found one year after operation. Pulmonary metastatic lesion has grown and she complained of progressive symptoms of massive watery sputum and dyspnea, four years after operation. Although her symptom was getting worse in spite of routine treatment, it completely disappeared within 2 weeks of starting oral gefitinib. Thereafter, she has been symptom-free and shows good partial response on repeat scan after 9 months of oral gefitinib. Conclusions The dramatic remission of persistent bronchorrhea by gefitinib in the presented case suggests that gefitinib might be a promising option for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, particularly in cases with severe bronchorrhea. Although it is not possible to comment on whether the improvement came from tumor cell death itself or suppressive effect of mucin synthesis by the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitory action.

  7. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  8. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  9. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to central compartment (level 6) lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhterov, Ilya; Rowe, Meghan E; Khorsandi, Azita S; Urken, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Alterations to drainage pathways in the head and neck as a result of surgical manipulation are not well understood. We present two unusual cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the level 6 nodal compartment following extensive treatment. Both oral squamous cell carcinoma cases exhibited metastases to the central neck compartment following extensive surgery and radiation. Each patient had prior history of multifocal oral cavity disease and recurrent neck metastases requiring salvage lymphadenectomy. Surgical interventions may alter the usual lymphatic drainage patterns. In cases of extensive treatment, all levels of the neck should be monitored for lymph node recurrence. Laryngoscope, 126:1803-1805, 2016. PMID:26490846

  10. Anal carcinoma – Survival and recurrence in a large cohort of patients treated according to Nordic guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate treatment outcome in a large population-based cohort of patients with anal cancer treated according to Nordic guidelines. Material: Clinical data were collected on 1266 patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed from 2000 to 2007 in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. 886 of the patients received radiotherapy 54–64 Gy with or without chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin or mitomycin) according to different protocols, stratified by tumor stage. Results: High age, male gender, large primary tumor, lymph node metastases, distant metastases, poor performance status, and non-inclusion into a protocol were all independent factors associated with worse outcome. Among patients treated according to any of the protocols, the 3-year recurrence-free survival ranged from 63% to 76%, with locoregional recurrences in 17% and distant metastases in 11% of patients. The highest rate of inguinal recurrence (11%) was seen in patients with small primary tumors, treated without inguinal irradiation. Conclusions: Good treatment efficacy was obtained with Nordic, widely implemented, guidelines for treatment of anal cancer. Inguinal prophylactic irradiation should be recommended also for small primary tumors

  11. Clear Cell Carcinoma and Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma: a Comparative Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth A.; Hoschar, Aaron P.; Barnes, E. Leon; Hunt, Jennifer L.; Seethala, Raja R.

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma or hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) are rare, low-grade and typically indolent malignancies that can be diagnostically challenging. In this study the clinicopathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of 17 CCCs and 12 CCOCs are examined. The differential diagnosis of clear cell malignancies in the head and neck is discussed. The relationship of CCCs and CCOCs to other clear cell tumors on the basis of their i...

  12. SKY analysis revealed recurrent numerical and structural chromosome changes in BDII rat endometrial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behboudi Afrouz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic alterations are common features of cancer cells, and some of these changes are proven to be neoplastic-specific. Such alterations may serve as valuable tools for diagnosis and classification of tumors, prediction of clinical outcome, disease monitoring, and choice of therapy as well as for providing clues to the location of crucial cancer-related genes. Endometrial carcinoma (EC is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy of the female genital tract, ranking fourth among all invasive tumors affecting women. Cytogenetic studies of human ECs have not produced very conclusive data, since many of these studies are based on karyotyping of limited number of cases and no really specific karyotypic changes have yet been identified. As the majority of the genes are conserved among mammals, the use of inbred animal model systems may serve as a tool for identification of underlying genes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis in humans. In the present work we used spectral karyotyping (SKY to identify cancer-related aberrations in a well-characterized experimental model for spontaneous endometrial carcinoma in the BDII rat tumor model. Results Analysis of 21 experimental ECs revealed specific nonrandom numerical and structural chromosomal changes. The most recurrent numerical alterations were gains in rat chromosome 4 (RNO4 and losses in RNO15. The most commonly structural changes were mainly in form of chromosomal translocations and were detected in RNO3, RNO6, RNO10, RNO11, RNO12, and RNO20. Unbalanced chromosomal translocations involving RNO3p was the most commonly observed structural changes in this material followed by RNO11p and RNO10 translocations. Conclusion The non-random nature of these events, as documented by their high frequencies of incidence, is suggesting for dynamic selection of these changes during experimental EC tumorigenesis and therefore for their potential contribution into development of this malignancy

  13. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  14. Synchronous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Dafashy, Tamer J.; Cameron K. Ghaffary; Keyes, Kyle T.; Joseph Sonstein

    2016-01-01

    While renal cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm of the kidney, its simultaneous diagnosis with a gastrointestinal malignancy is a rare, but well reported phenomenon. This discussion focuses on three independent cases in which each patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma and a unique synchronous gastrointestinal malignancy. Case 1 explores the diagnosis and surgical intervention of a 66-year-old male patient synchronously diagnosed with clear cell renal cell carcinom...

  15. Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Potential Mimic of Conventional Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma on Core Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Heath Liddell; Anton Mare; Sean Heywood; Genevieve Bennett; Hin Fan Chan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunoh...

  16. Application of high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose recurrent gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose recurrent gastric cancer. Methods: Forty three postoperative patients with gastric carcinoma were divided into two groups. The group with recurrent gastric carcinoma has 33 patients, they were clinically confirmed by barium meal of alimentary canal, CT or pathological results. There were 10 cases in control group confirmed by pathological results. All the subjects took hypotonicity agent, followed by water as negative contrast medium. Then patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging including fast spoiled gradient recalled T1WI, T2WI, diffusion weighted imaging, fast imaging employing steady state sequence, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast enhancement sequences when gastrointestinal tract was in hypotonic, patients drank or were primed with water as contrast. Results: Thirty patients were diagnosed as recurrent gastric cancer with MRI, 28 of them were confirmed by clinical results. Three patients were missed and two patients were incorrectly misdiagnosed by MRI. Wall thickness of gastric remnant was (4.5±0.3) mm and that of stomas was (6.3±1.4) mm in control group. Types of lesions were found on MRI: thickening of remnant stomach stomas was more than 8 mm (n=30), thickening of neighbor remnant stomach stomas was more than 5 mm (n=19), mass of stomas (n=11), metastasis of neighbor viscus (n=5), and metastasis of lymph nodes (n=9). On enhancement scan, 9 patients showed inhomogeneous enhancement in arterial phase and 30 patients showed gradual delayed enhancement in venous phase and equilibrium phase. Conclusion: MRI is an effective imaging method in illustrating wall thickness of gastric remnant and stomas, invasion depth by carcinoma, relationship with neighbor tissue structures and metastasis of lymph nodes and abdominal viscus. It plays an important role in directing clinical therapy. (authors)

  17. Carcinoma en Cuirasse from Recurrent Breast Cancer seen on FDG-PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Zaw Win

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our patient was a 36-year-old female diagnosed with Grade II ER+/PR−/Her-2 − ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS in the left breast. She underwent left lumpectomy and received treatment with tamoxifen and radiotherapy. Three years later, she presented with multiple diffused skin nodules on the chest and upper left arm. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT exam showed widespread metastasis in the chest, upper left arm, left axillary lymph nodes, and left suprascapular muscle. FDG-PET/CT imaging of breast carcinoma en cuirasse is very rare. FDG-PET/CT is useful in detecting recurrent breast cancer.

  18. LOCAL RECURRENCE OF TUBULOCYSTIC CARCINOMA 4 YEARS AFTER RENAL RESECTION (A CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Peters

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of a local recurrence of tubulocystic carcinoma (TCC in a 46-year-old man, a relatively good course (the relapse occurred after 4 years, who has been successfully operated on and is being followed up. This disease is a rare renal malignancy and, until recently, it has been referred to as collecting tubular carcinoma. However, this disease has come to be regarded as an independent nosological entity, by taking into account its certain morphological, immunohistohemical, and cytogenetic characteristics, as well as the nature of its course. About 80 TCC cases have been described to date. Further study of this disease and other rare renal malignancies will allow the more accurate elaboration of management tactics for such patients in terms of certain prognostic factors, which calls for a larger number of cases of this disease.

  19. Results of external beam irradiation for rectal carcinomas locally recurrent after local excision or electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of 42 patients who developed locally recurrent rectal carcinoma after initial local excision or electrocoagulation was presented. Five patients received combined surgery and radiotherapy (XRT). The remaining 37 patients were managed by XRT alone. The overall 5 years actuarial survival and local control rates were 21 and 22 percent, respectively. For patients who received XRT alone, the 5 year actuarial survival and local control rates were 20 and 15 percent, resp. The corresponding figures were 35 and 40 percent for patients who received a total XRT dose of 50 Gy or more. One patient who underwent combined treatment developed rectal and bladder incontinence requiring surgery. For patients with rectal recurrence after initial conservative surgery, XRT is an alternative to abdominoperipheral resection if major resection is contraindicated. (author). 13 refs.; 2 tabs

  20. Prominent response with helical tomotherapy in recurrent ameloblastic carcinoma of maxillary sinus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial tissue. Reports of radiotherapy treatment modalities are limited in the literature. A thirty-five year old male presented with complaints of headache radiating to his face for about six months and impaired vision. The patient’s Positron Emission Tomography (PET) showed a mass in the left maxillary sinus extending to the nasal cavity and invading the adjacent tissues. An R2 (macroscopic residual tumor) surgical resection performed to debulk the tumor. Due to the recurrence and residual mass, the patient was treated with helical tomotherapy. At 2 months post-radiotherapy, patient’s vision returned to normal. PET scan showed a significant reduction in lesion size 12 months post-radiation. In cases of ameloblastic carcinoma with, post-surgical recurrence or patients not suitable for surgical treatment, helical tomotherapy can be an effective treatment option

  1. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study, 18 patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neck and mediastinum and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with 111In-labeled pentetreotide. In nine patients with macroscopic MTC, 17 corresponding lesions were found on MRI and SRS; in addition, 13 suspicious lesions were seen on SRS only. Histological confirmation was available for 19 metastatic lesions, showing MRI to be true positive in 13 metastases, SRS in 18. In minimal residual disease (n=10), MRI and SRS were compared with the histological findings in three patients and with selective venous catheterization (SVC) in seven patients. Corresponding findings on MRI and SVC were seen in one of seven, whereas SRS and SVC showed concordant localization of tumor recurrence in five of seven. Histological examination demonstrated MTC tissue in one of three cases; MRI and SRS were false positive in one of three cases, while in the others the interpretation remained uncertain. In conclusion, SRS is a promising imaging modality for localization of MTC recurrence. MRI provides better spatial resolution and thus facilitates the planning of surgery for macroscopic metastases. In minimal residual disease, SRS turned out to be superior in detecting occult MTC recurrence, confirming SVC findings. (orig.)

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery may contribute to overall survival for patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of advanced, recurrent lesions for head and neck carcinoma both with and without lymph node involvement. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 22 patients (mean age 67 years) with advanced, recurrent head and neck carcinoma were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. All of the patients except one had biopsy confirmed disease prior to stereotactic radiosurgery. Patients included 3 rT2, 8 rT3, and 9 rT4; 8 of the patients had lymph node metastases. Marginal SRS doses were 20-42 Gy delivered in two to five fractions. Starting one month after SRS, all patients received S-1 oral chemotherapy for one year. At an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 4-39 months), for the 14 locally recurrent patients without lymph node metastases, 9 patients (64.3%) had a complete response (CR), 1 patient (7.1%) had a partial response (PR), 1 patient (7.1%) had stable disease (SD), and 3 patients (21.4%) had progressive disease (PD). For the 8 patients with lymph node metastases, 1 patient with a single retropharyngeal (12.5%) had CR; the remaining 7 patients (87.5%) all progressed. Nine patients have died from their cancer. The overall actuarial 2-year survival for the patients with and without lymph node metastases is 12.5% and 78.6%, respectively. These results show the benefit of stereotactic radiosurgery salvage treatment for advanced, recurrent lesions, without lymph node metastases in previously irradiated head and neck cancer

  3. Long-term survival following two recurrences and re-irradiation courses for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Local recurrence in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC presents is a major challenge. Patients experience substantial morbidity as well as poor survival if no further treatment is offered. Residual or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma is usually managed by chemotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT, interstitial, and intracavitary brachytherapy or salvage surgery. This case presents the treatment of two consecutive localized recurrences of NPC."n "nCase presentation: The patient was a 59-year-old man who underwent a course of radical external-beam radiotherapy for a primary NPC in 1999, then another course of external radiation in 2004 for his first recurrence, and finally a course of brachytherapy for the second recurrence in 2005. The patient is well now in 2010, with no signs of disease five years after the third radiotherapy."n "nConclusion: Our experience of re-irradiation for this twice recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma has been promising with encouraging tumor control and acceptable treatment-related toxicity profile. This case indicates the efficacy of definitive re-irradiation for regional recurrence and the necessity for long-term observation for the salvageable early-stage local failure.

  4. Breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Botticelli, A.; De Francesco, G. P.; D. Di Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In Western countries, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, whereas metastases to the breast from extramammary malignancies are extremely rare. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman, who underwent surgery in 2007 for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and who 4 years later presented with a breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  6. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Buti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC.

  7. Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    OpenAIRE

    P Venkat Baghirath; J Vijay Kumar; B Hari Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is an uncommon malignant salivary gland tumor accounting for about 1% of all intra-oral salivary gland tumors. Microscopic diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma may be challenging because of the spectrum of features which frequently overlaps with the other salivary gland tumors that contain clear cells, and thus it may be a diagnosis of exclusion. Here we, report a case of HCCC in a 36 years old female with detailed histological, histochemical and immunohis...

  8. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare; only several studies have been reported in the English literature. A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Bladder endoscopy revealed a large polypoid tumor at the bladder base. Transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. Many TUR-BT specimens were obtained. Histologically, the bladder tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positi...

  9. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  10. Multiple superficial basal cell carcinoma of the skin that appeared macroscopically healthy after radiotherapy. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Takakuwa, Sachiko; Yamada, Motohito; Ono, Hiroki; Tomita, Yasushi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-01-01

    The patient was a 76-year-old woman with multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas. She had undergone radiotherapy for a 1-year period after hysterectomy for uterine carcinoma 38 years previously, and the basal cell carcinomas coincided with the irradiated parts. No clear symptoms of chronic radioepithelitis could be found macroscopically, but the lesions were thought to represent radiation-induced carcinoma based on the histopathological findings (atrophy of the epidermis, hyalinization and sclerosis of dermal connective tissue, inflammatory cell infiltration, and capillary dilatation). The lesion was removed to the depth of the adipose tissue with a 5 mm margin around the tumor, and primary closure was achieved. No recurrences or new carcinomas have been detected during the 16 months since the operation. (K.H.)

  11. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual variant of squamous cell carcinoma invading deeper anatomic structures and is associated with a higher incidence of regional metastasis and mortality.

  12. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder arising in an unusual localization. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 604-608

  13. Mixed Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma with Spindle Cell and Clear Cell Features in the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wysocki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas, spindle cell carcinomas, and clear cell carcinomas are all rare tumors in the biliary tract. We present the first case, to our knowledge, of an extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma composed of all three types. A 65-year-old man with prior cholecystectomy presented with painless jaundice, vomiting, and weight loss. CA19-9 and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP were elevated. Cholangioscopy revealed a friable mass extending from the middle of the common bile duct to the common hepatic duct. A bile duct excision was performed. Gross examination revealed a 3.6 cm intraluminal polypoid tumor. Microscopically, the tumor had foci of conventional adenocarcinoma (CK7-positive and CA19-9-postive surrounded by malignant-appearing spindle cells that were positive for cytokeratins and vimentin. Additionally, there were separate areas of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC. Foci of clear cell carcinoma merged into both the LCNEC and the adenocarcinoma. Tumor invaded through the bile duct wall with extensive perineural and vascular invasion. Circumferential margins were positive. The patient’s poor performance status precluded adjuvant therapy and he died with recurrent and metastatic disease 5 months after surgery. This is consistent with the reported poor survival rates of biliary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas.

  14. Increased expression of SHP-1 is associated with local recurrence after radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a major cancer in southern China. Src homology phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is a tyrosine phosphatase that regulates growth, differentiation, cell cycle progression, and oncogenesis. We determined the clinical significance of SHP-1 expression in the tumours of NPC patients from southern China who were treated with radiotherapy. SHP-1 expression was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting of NPC tissue samples of 50 patients and nasopharyngeal tissues of 50 non-NPC patients who had chronic nasopharyngeal inflammation. SHP-1 expression was measured in NPC tissue samples of 206 patients by immunohistochemistry and survival analysis was performed. The tumours of NPC patients had significantly increased expression of SHP-1 at mRNA and protein levels relative to patients with chronic nasopharyngeal inflammation. Survival analysis of NPC patients indicated that SHP-1 expression was significantly associated with poor local recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008), but not with nodal recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, or overall survival. SHP-1 appears to be associated with radiation resistance of NPC cells and can be considered as a candidate marker for prognosis and/or therapeutic target in patients with this type of cancer

  15. Association between clinical features, treatment, and recurrence rate of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the palate: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Reza; Aliabadi, Ehsan; Maleki, Mohammad Javad; Barouj, Mehrdad Dehghanpour

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is both invasive and clinically unpredictable, and our aim was to evaluate the factors that affect its recurrence in the palate. We retrospectively studied 38 patients who had ACC of the palate treated surgically, and the outcome measure was recurrence during the mean (SD) followup time of 55 (18) months. Age, sex, T-stage, bony involvement, duration of follow up, histological type, perineural invasion, and surgical margins were all recorded. Results showed no association between recurrence, and age or histopathological types. However, T-stage (p=0.001), sex (p=0.04), and bony and perineural involvement (p=0.01 in each case) were significantly associated with recurrent tumour. Close superior and posterior margins (< 2mm) were also associated with recurrence (p=0.001 in each case). Large tumours with bony and perineural involvement, together with close superior and posterior surgical margins, had a higher risk of recurrence. PMID:27094499

  16. Buccal mucosa carcinoma: surgical margin less than 3 mm, not 5 mm, predicts locoregional recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most treatment failure of buccal mucosal cancer post surgery is locoregional recurrence. We tried to figure out how close the surgical margin being unsafe and needed further adjuvant treatment. Between August 2000 and June 2008, a total of 110 patients with buccal mucosa carcinoma (25 with stage I, 31 with stage II, 11 with stage III, and 43 with Stage IV classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th edition) were treated with surgery alone (n = 32), surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (n = 38) or surgery plus adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 40). Main outcome measures: The primary endpoint was locoregional disease control. The median follow-up time at analysis was 25 months (range, 4-104 months). The 3-year locoregional control rates were significantly different when a 3-mm surgical margin (≤3 versus >3 mm, 71% versus 95%, p = 0.04) but not a 5-mm margin (75% versus 92%, p = 0.22) was used as the cut-off level. We also found a quantitative correlation between surgical margin and locoregional failure (hazard ratio, 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.14 - 4.11; p = 0.019). Multivariate analysis identified pN classification and surgical margin as independent factors affecting disease-free survival and locoregional control. Narrow surgical margin ≤3 mm, but not 5 mm, is associated with high risk for locoregional recurrence of buccal mucosa carcinoma. More aggressive treatment after surgery is suggested

  17. Intrahepatic recurrence after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Analysis of the pattern and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-sun [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: forest@smc.samsung.co.kr; Cho, On Koo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Byung Hee [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yongsoo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and risks for intrahepatic recurrence after percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: We studied 62 patients with 72 HCCs ({<=}4 cm) who were treated with percutaneous RF ablation. The mean follow-up period was 19.1 months (6.0-49.1). We assessed the incidence and cumulative disease-free survival of local tumor progression (LTP) and intrahepatic distant recurrence (IDR). To analyze the risk factors, we examined the following, for the LTP: (1) tumor diameter, (2) contact with vessels, (3) degree of approximation to hepatic hilum, (4) contact with hepatic capsule, (5) presence of ablative safety margin, (6) degree of benign periablational enhancement and (7) serum alpha-fetoprotein; for the IDR: (1) severity of hepatic disease, (2) presence of HBsAg, (3) serum alpha-fetoprotein, (4) whether RF ablation was the initial treatment and (5) multiplicity of tumor for IDR. Results: The incidence of overall recurrence, LTP and IDR was 62.9%, 26.4% and 53.2%, respectively. The cumulative disease-free survival rates were 52%, 82% and 56% at 1 year, 26%, 63% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the significant risk factors for LTP were: a tumor with a diameter >3 cm, contact of HCC with a vessel and an insufficient safety margin (p < 0.05). A multivariate stepwise Cox hazard model showed that the measurement of a tumor diameter >3 cm and insufficient safety margin were independent factors. Only the increased serum alpha-fetoprotein was a significant risk factor for IDR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Intrahepatic recurrence after percutaneous RF ablation is common. Large HCC (>3 cm) with high serum alpha-fetoprotein should be treated more aggressively because of higher risk for recurrence.

  18. Presence of intratumoral neutrophils is an independent prognostic factor in localized renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Krogh; Donskov, Frede; Marcussen, Niels; Nordsmark, Marianne; Lundbeck, Finn; von der Maase, Hans

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously demonstrated a significant negative impact of intratumoral neutrophils in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This study assessed intratumoral neutrophils in localized clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study comprised 121 consecutive patients....... CONCLUSION: The presence of intratumoral neutrophils is a new, strong, independent prognostic factor for short recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival in localized clear cell RCC....... who had a nephrectomy for localized RCC. Biomarkers (intratumoral CD8+, CD57+ immune cells, CD66b+ neutrophils, and carbonic anhydrase IX [CA IX]) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship with clinical and histopathologic features and patient outcome was evaluated. RESULTS: The...

  19. Locoregional recurrence of rectal carcinoma. A CT-analysis and a target volume concept in adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients and method: 155 patients with the diagnosis of rectal carcinoma recurrences were treated in our institution between 1980 and 1995. To determine the extension of the recurrent tumor within the pelvic levels (praesacral levels S1-S5, precoccygeal-, pelvic floor level and perineal level) and the tumor infiltration of pelvic organs and muscles we analysed the pretherapeutic CT-images. The lymphnode recurrences were classified as: Pararectal-, presacral-, iliac internal-, iliac external-, iliac communis- and paraaortal recurrences. Results: Sixty-one percent of the patients with rectum exstirpation and 66% with anterior resection showed a combined local and nodal recurrence. Isolated lymph node recurrences were rare (4% and 5%). The local recurrence was mostly situated in the presacral pelvis, predominantly there was an infiltration of the presacral space at the level of S4, S5 and os coccygis regardless of the operating method and the primary tumor location. The anastomosis was involved in the tumor recurrence in 93% of the anteriorly resected patients. In 9 out of 96 patients after rectum exstirpation the pelvic region caudal of the tip of the coccyx was the origin of the recurrent tumor. Primarily all 9 patients had a deep-seated carcinoma (<6 cm ab ano). Only 2 patients showed an isolated perineal recurrence after rectum exstirpation. Two thirds of the deepseated tumors showed a vaginal involvement. The incidence of iliac internal- and presacral nodal recurrence was 47 to 59%. The incidence of iliac external lymph node recurrences was 7% after rectum exstirpation and 2% after anterior resection/Hartmann procedure. (orig./AJ)

  20. Human papillomavirus 52 positive squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Olivia Salceanu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is strongly associated with several human cancers; the most known genotypes involved being HPV 16 and HPV 18. We report the detection of HPV 52 in a sample taken from a 47-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva of the left eye. The method used for the detection of HPV was real time polymerase chain reaction. The evolution was favorable after surgical removal of the tumor and the patient was explained that long-term follow-up is essential to avoid recurrence.

  1. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  2. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  3. Role of plasma EBV DNA levels in predicting recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a western population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Daris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinomas can be cured by the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In Eastern countries, plasma levels of viral Epstein-Barr deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA are accurate in predicting recurrence, but few data are available in Western populations. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between viral Epstein-Barr DNA copy numbers in plasma and the response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival in a cohort of Western patients with stage IIb-IVb nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods We evaluated plasma samples from 36 consecutive patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. EBV copy numbers were determined after DNA extraction using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels were measured before treatment, at the end of concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy, and during the follow-up period. Pre-treatment levels significantly correlated with the initial stage and probability of relapse. Their increase was 100% specific and 71.3% sensitive in detecting loco-regional or metastatic recurrence (an overall accuracy of 94.4%. Three-year progression-free and overall survival were respectively 78.2% and 97.1%. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that patients from a Western country affected by loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma have high plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels at diagnosis. The monitoring of plasma levels is sensitive and highly specific in detecting disease recurrence and metastases.

  4. Primary clear cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    OpenAIRE

    G.Pesavento; Ferlito, A; Recher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings in three patients with clear cell carcinoma of the larynx are described. This type of neoplasm in the larynx is extremely rare. The aggressiveness of the tumour and its high biological malignancy are stressed.

  5. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is an extremely rare tumor that exhibits aggressive behavior and accounts for approximately less than 1% of all primary bladder tumors. Small cell carcinoma generally occurs in the lung, accounting for 25% of all pulmonary malignancies. SCCUB exhibits a similar microscopic and immunohistochemical appearance to that of small cell carcinoma of the lung. There is no consensus about the standard therapy, owing to its rarity. Surgical resection seems to be the mainstay of treatment for patients with limited stage, together with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Radiation therapy has same small effect for palliative purposes, as well as being an alternative to radical cystectomy. Patients with advanced stage, although given platinum-based chemotherapy, have a poor prognosis. We herein review epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pathological features, and current management of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (author)

  6. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  8. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Francisco; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Funez, Rafael; Redondo, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50) and also in metastases (6 out of 10) and recurrences (2 out of 3), but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells. PMID:22481933

  9. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50 and also in metastases (6 out of 10 and recurrences (2 out of 3, but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells.

  10. Cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas with perineural invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.; Bradford, C.R.; Corry, J.; Fagan, J.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Rodrigo, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) occurs in 2% to 6% of cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and is associated with mid-face location, recurrent tumors, high histologic grade, and increasing tumor size. Patients may be asymptomatic with PNI appreciated on pathologic examination

  11. Outpatient-based subcutaneous interleukin-2 monotherapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma : An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieken, J; Sleijfer, DT; deLeij, L; Mulder, NH

    1996-01-01

    To minimize interleukin-2-related toxicity while retaining its efficacy, a treatment schedule utilizing subcutaneous IL-2 was evaluated in a phase II setting. Eighty unselected consecutive patients with metastatic or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mean age 58 years (range, 21 to 76), received

  12. Progression of Intravesical Condyloma Acuminata to Locally Advanced Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khambati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condyloma acuminata (CA is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection. CA of the bladder, however, is an exceedingly rare lesion. We present a rare case of poorly differentiated locally invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC arising from recurrent CA of the bladder in an immunocompetent patient and discuss pathophysiology and management of this unusual condition.

  13. Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony S; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    A 63-year-old man consulted for a non-toxic thyroid nodule of 2 years’ duration. Fine needle aspiration revealed cell findings consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma. He eventually underwent total thyroidectomy. Microscopic examination revealed histologic features of Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid. He received radioactive iodine therapy and suppressive levothyroxine treatment. Post-therapy whole body iodine-131 scan revealed thyroid tissue remnants limited to the anterior neck. Fo...

  14. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    OpenAIRE

    Mamina; Sarvesh; Viswanathan; Rehana

    2014-01-01

    An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual...

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is rather rare and amounts to 3.5% of all rectal neoplasms. Though it has a clear-cut clinical picture, 29.5% of patients admitted for specialized treatment suffer from stage 4 due to inadequate diagnosis. Surgery is the most effective method of management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Radiation therapy may be an adjuvant procedure to surgery

  16. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  17. Renal vein thrombosis in transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A rare case of renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) associated with bland thrombus of the renal vein extending into the inferior vena cava is described. Tumour thrombus in renal cell carcinoma is frequently encountered, but only very rarely occurs with TCC. Bland renal vein thrombosis occurring with renal TCC has not been described before. Contrast enhanced computed tomography assisted in distinguishing between bland and tumour thrombosis and aided in surgical management

  18. Local control rate and prognosis after sequential chemoradiation for small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term outcome and the risk for local recurrence of patients with small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy (sequential chemoradiation). All consecutive patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder (n=66), treated in our institution between 1993 and 2011 were retrospectively evaluated from an institutional database. Only patients with limited disease (Tx-4N0-1M0) small cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with sequential chemoradiation (n=27) were included in this study. Recurrence rates, overall survival and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median time to recurrence was 20 months, median overall survival 26 months, 5-year overall survival 22.2%, median cancer-specific survival 47 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 39.6%. For complete responders after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n=19), median cancer-specific survival was 52 months with a 5-year cancer-specific survival 45.9% versus a median cancer-specific survival of 22 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 0.0% for incomplete responders (n=8; P=0.034). Eight patients (29.6%) underwent transurethral resections (TUR-BT) for local recurrences in the bladder. At the end of follow up, four patients had undergone cystectomy for recurrence of disease resulting in a bladder-preservation rate of 85.2%. Median time to local recurrence was 29 months and median time to distant recurrence was 10 months. Sequential chemoradiation for limited disease small cell carcinoma of the bladder results in a reasonable outcome with a high bladder preservation rate. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy represents a significant prognostic factor in this patient population. (author)

  19. ERG gene rearrangements are common in prostatic small cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lotan, Tamara L.; Gupta, Nilesh S; Wang, Wenle; Toubaji, Antoun; Haffner, Michael C; Chaux, Alcides; Hicks, Jessica L.; Meeker, Alan K.; Bieberich, Charles J.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare subtype with an aggressive clinical course. Despite the frequent occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements in acinar carcinoma, the incidence of these rearrangements in prostatic small cell carcinoma is unclear. In addition, molecular markers to distinguish prostatic small cell carcinomas from lung and bladder small cell carcinomas may be clinically useful. We examined the occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization in...

  20. Planoepitheliale cell carcinoma arising from ampullopancreatic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: We report a case of planoepitheliale cell carcinoma located in the ampulla of Vater. We report the surgical results and pathological findings of a patient with an ampullary planoepitheliale cell carcinoma. From what we know it is the first case with successful surgical treatment. Case Report: A 58-year-old woman who presented with jaundice and preoperative endoscopic and radiological procedures could not show whether the tumour was carcinoma planoepitheliale. The clinical presentation, biochemical, radiographic and endoscopic investigation pronounced advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results: We performed pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intention. Histological examination revealed: planoepitheliale cell carcinoma of the ampullo-pancreatic unit. Conclusions: In conclusion, preoperative endoscopic and radiological evaluations can all prove insufficient to distinguish between benign and malignant tumour. Thus, for malignant tumours surgeons may be forced to perform extensive surgery. (authors)

  1. Pancreatic metastasis of Merkel cell carcinoma and concomitant insulinoma: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartschuh Wolfgang

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinomas are rare neoplasm of neuroendocrine origin, usually observed in elderly people in areas with abundant sunlight, and predominantly located on the head and neck, extremities, and trunk. In many patients, a local recurrence after resection of the primary tumour and even distant metastases can be found. Case presentation We report an unusual occurrence of pancreatic metastases from a previously diagnosed Merkel cell carcinoma with the discovery of a concomitant insulinoma. An 82-year old lady suffered from recurrent attacks of hypoglycemia and presented with an abdominal mass, 2 years prior she had an excision done on her eyebrow that was reported as Merkel cell carcinoma. An extended distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy along with resection of the left flexure of the colon for her abdominal mass was carried out. Final histopathology of the mass was a poorly differentiated endocrine carcinoma in the pancreatic tail, in the peripancreatic tissue and in the surrounding soft tissue consistent with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma in addition to an insulinoma of the pancreatic body. Conclusion This is the first documented case of a metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma and a concomitant insulinoma, suggesting either a mere coincidence or an unknown neuroendocrine tumor syndrome.

  2. Clinical and survival impact of FDG PET in patients with suspicion of recurrent cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of 18F-FDG PET to the clinical management and survival outcome of patients suspected of recurrent cervical carcinoma and in line with the hypothesis that early diagnosis of recurrent cervical cancer may improve overall survival. A total of 40 patients underwent conventional imaging (CI) and FDG PET/CT for suspected cervical cancer. Clinical management decisions were recorded with CI and additional PET/CT. Discordances and concordances between CI and PET/CT results were compared to the final diagnosis as based on histopathology analysis or follow-up considered as the gold standard. The final diagnosis was established pathologically (n=25) or by median clinical follow-up for 48 months after the PET (n=15). The PET/CT was positive in 76% (20/26) of patients compared to 19% (6/26) with CI. Globally PET/CT modified the treatment plan in 55% (22/40) of patients and in 75% (18/24) when the CI was negative prior to PET/CT. These changes led to the use of previously unplanned therapeutic procedures in 37.5% (15/40). When FDG PET was positive for recurrence (>3 foci), the median overall survival was 12 months (2-70) compared to patients with PET findings with ≤1 focus for which the median survival was not attained (p=0.007). A multivariate analysis of prognostic factors demonstrated that abnormal FDG uptake (>3 foci) was the most significant factor (p<0.03) for death from cervical cancer. FDG PET is a valuable tool in the case of suspected recurrence of cervical cancer on account of its impact on treatment planning and especially in predicting patient outcome. (orig.)

  3. Cancer Stem Cells Accountability in Progression of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: The Most Recent Trends!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samapika Routray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a major role in local recurrence and metastatic spread in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. Evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are resistant to conventional therapy. So the emerging concepts of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of HNSCC should be understood carefully to be able to create new paradigms in treatment plans.

  4. Recurrence of recipient Langerhans' cell histiocytosis following bilateral lung transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, S.; Congleton, J; Carr, D; Partridge, J; Corrin, B.; Geddes, D; Banner, N.; Yacoub, M; Burke, M.

    1998-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis may cause irreversible respiratory failure due to progressive destruction of lung parenchyma and widespread cystic change. Transplantation offers a therapeutic option. A case is described of recurrence of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis which was associated with deterioration in lung function four years following bilateral lung transplantation. Patients transplanted for Langerhans' cell histiocytosis should be followed up with this complication in min...

  5. Local-regional recurrence after surgery without postoperative irradiation for carcinomas of the major salivary glands: Implications for adjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive of local-regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for carcinomas of the major salivary glands in an attempt to evaluate the potential role of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 207 patients with carcinomas of the major salivary glands were treated with definitive surgery without postoperative radiation therapy. Histology was: 67 mucoepidermoid (32%), 50 adenoid cystic (24%), 34 acinic cell (16%), 23 malignant mixed (11%), 16 adenocarcinoma (8%), 6 oncocytic (3%), 6 myoepithelial (3%), and 5 other (2%). Distribution of pathologic T-stage was: 54 T1 (26%), 83 T2 (40%), 46 T3 (22%), and 24 T4 (12%). Sixty patients (29%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range, 0.5-18.7 years). Results: The 5-year and 10-year estimates of local-regional control were 86% and 74%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazard model identified pathologic lymph node metastasis (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8; p = 0.001), high histologic grade (HR, 4.2; p = 0.003), positive margins (HR, 2.6; p = 0.03), and T3-4 disease (HR, 2.0; p = 0.04) as independent predictors of LRR. The presence of any one of these factors was associated with 10-year local-regional control rates of 37% to 63%. Conclusion: Lymph node metastasis, high tumor grade, positive margins, and T3-4 stage predict for significant rates of LRR after surgery for carcinomas of the major salivary glands. Postoperative radiation therapy should be considered for patients with these disease characteristics

  6. Recurrent peripheral odontogenic fibroma associated with basal cell budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sreeja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POdF is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. It represents the soft tissue counterpart of central odontogenic fibroma. The embryonic source of POdF has been suggested by many as arising from the rest of dental lamina that has persisted in the gingiva following its disintegration. It presents clinically as a firm, slow growing and sessile gingival mass, which is difficult to distinguish with more common inflammatory lesions. Very few cases of recurrence have been documented. It has been stated that histological budding of basal cell layer of the surface squamous epithelium is associated with higher recurrence and the presence of calcification in direct apposition to the epithelial rest is associated with lower recurrence. Hereby, we present a case which histologically exhibited budding of the basal cell layer, which could have been the reason for its recurrence.

  7. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaglo, Brandon G; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Meyer, Joshua E; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M

    2015-12-22

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  8. Depression and anxiety in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of depression and anxiety in the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). METHODS: 76 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma participated in this program. All patients were rated with the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS). The mean scores of SAS and SDS were compared to those scores of the Norm of Chinese people. In addition, the different treatment results of the patients with different levels of anxiety and depression were studied. Further, the number of patients of SAS, SDS with more than 50 score were compared between primary cancer patients and recurrent cancer patients. RESULTS: The scores of SAS, SDS and the number of patients with more than 50 score in the patients group were obviously higher than those in Chinese Norm (P<0.01).The levels of anxiety and depression in 32 patients with recurrent cancer were more severe than those of 44 patients with primary cancer. The patients with anxiety and/or depression showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Anxiety and depression are common symptoms in patients with OSCC and have negative effects on the prognosis, thus the psychological intervention for the patients must be carried out.

  9. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, B.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-10-01

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed.

  10. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed

  11. The epigenetic landscape of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kluzek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common subtype of all kidney tumors. During the last few years, epigenetics has emerged as an important mechanism in ccRCC pathogenesis. Recent reports, involving large-scale methylation and sequencing analyses, have identified genes frequently inactivated by promoter methylation and recurrent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory proteins. Interestingly, three of detected genes (PBRM1, SETD2 and BAP1 are located on chromosome 3p, near the VHL gene, inactivated in over 80% ccRCC cases. This suggests that 3p alterations are an essential part of ccRCC pathogenesis. Moreover, most of the proteins encoded by these genes cooperate in histone H3 modifications. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest discoveries shedding light on deregulation of chromatin machinery in ccRCC. Newly described ccRCC-specific epigenetic alterations could potentially serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and become an object of novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Robyn L. Gorski; Salah Abdel Jalil; Manver Razick; Ala' Abdel Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He ...

  13. Iodine-125 seed implantation as an adjunct to surgery in advanced recurrent squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, R.I.; Liberman, F.Z.; Lee, D.J.; Goldsmith, M.M.; Price, J.C. (Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Survival for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck remains poor, with the major cause of death being local recurrence. Surgical implantation of iodine-125 interstitial seeds allows tumoricidal doses of radiation to be delivered to residual tumor while minimizing radiation doses to the surrounding tissues. From 1978 to 1988, 39 implantations were performed on 35 patients for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The decision for implantation was based on positive margins or close to resection margins from frozen sections after salvage resection. The determinate 5-year disease-free survival was 41%, with both the overall and no evidence of disease 5-year survivals being 29%. Significant complications occurred in 36% of all cases. This figure increased to 56% when flap reconstruction was required. Possible reasons for this seemingly high complication rate are discussed. Considering the advanced nature of these recurrent carcinomas, surgical resection with iodine-125 seed implantation appears to be an effective method of managing disease that might otherwise be judged unresectable and treated for palliation only.

  14. Iodine-125 seed implantation as an adjunct to surgery in advanced recurrent squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck remains poor, with the major cause of death being local recurrence. Surgical implantation of iodine-125 interstitial seeds allows tumoricidal doses of radiation to be delivered to residual tumor while minimizing radiation doses to the surrounding tissues. From 1978 to 1988, 39 implantations were performed on 35 patients for extensive recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The decision for implantation was based on positive margins or close to resection margins from frozen sections after salvage resection. The determinate 5-year disease-free survival was 41%, with both the overall and no evidence of disease 5-year survivals being 29%. Significant complications occurred in 36% of all cases. This figure increased to 56% when flap reconstruction was required. Possible reasons for this seemingly high complication rate are discussed. Considering the advanced nature of these recurrent carcinomas, surgical resection with iodine-125 seed implantation appears to be an effective method of managing disease that might otherwise be judged unresectable and treated for palliation only

  15. Cetuximab in combination with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Ou, Xiaomin; Shen, Chunying; Hu, Chaosu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in the combined treatment for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (R/M NPC). Between March 2007 and November 2011, a total of 30 R/M NPC patients treated with comprehensive therapy including cetuximab were retrospectively enrolled. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered in recurrent disease with a median dose of 60 Gy. Chemotherapy regimens included TP/TPF (docetaxel 60-75 mg/m d1+DDP 25 mg/m d1-3±5-FU 500 mg/m/day with 120-h infusion), GP (gemcitabine 1.0 g/m d1, d8+DDP 25 mg/m d1-3), and PC (paclitaxel 60 mg/m/week d1+carboplatin AUC 2/week d1). Acute and late toxicities were documented by the radiation oncologists. The median age of the patients was 44 years (range 26-62). A total of 21 patients (70%) achieved response (CR+PR). The median survival time, time to progression, and 2-year overall survival were 23.6, 12.2 months, and 53.3%, respectively. Cetuximab appears to be effective and well tolerated when combined with chemoradiation therapy for the treatment of R/M NPC. PMID:26352217

  16. Undetected human papillomavirus DNA and uterine cervical carcinoma. Association with cancer recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time course of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA clearance was studied in patients with carcinoma of the cervix during follow-up after primary radical radiotherapy (RT). This study investigated the relationship between timing of HPV clearance and RT effectiveness. A total of 71 consecutive patients who were treated for cervical cancer with primary radical radiotherapy and high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy were enrolled in the study. Samples for HPV DNA examination were taken before (1) treatment, (2) every brachytherapy, and (3) every follow-up examination. The times when HPV DNA was undetected were analyzed for association with recurrence-free survival. HPV DNA was not detected in 13 patients (18 %) before RT. Of the 58 patients with HPV DNA detected before treatment, HPV DNA was not detected in 34 % during treatment and in 66 % after the treatment. Within 6 months after RT, HPV DNA was detected in 0 % of all patients. The patients were followed up for a median period of 43 months (range 7-70 months). In all, 20 patients were found to develop recurrence. The 3-year cumulative disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 71 ± 5.4 % for all 71 patients. In multivariate analysis, DFS was significantly associated with HPV (detected vs. not detected) with a hazard ratio of 0.07 (95 % confidence interval 0.008-0.6, p = 0.009). In this study, patients in whom HPV was not detected had the worst prognosis. Six months after RT, HPV DNA was detected in 0 % of the patients. Patients in whom HPV DNA could not be detected before treatment need careful follow-up for recurrence and may be considered for additional, or alternative treatment. (orig.)

  17. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma on cirrhosis: Strategies to avoid tumor recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Vivarelli; Andrea Risaliti

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms worldwide and in most cases it is associated with chronic liver disease. Liver trans-plantation (LT) is potentially the optimal treatment for those patients with HCC who have a poor functional hepatic reserve due to their underlying chronic liver disease. However, due to the limited availability of donors, only those patients whose oncologic profile is favorable can be considered for LT. Despite the care-ful selection of candidates based on strict rules, 10 to 20% of liver transplant recipients who have HCC in the native cirrhotic liver develop tumor recurrence after transplantation. The selection criteria pres-ently employed to minimize the risk of recurrence are based on gross tumor characteristics defined by imaging techniques; unfortunately, the accuracy of imaging is far from being optimal. Furthermore, mi-croscopic tumor features that are strictly linked with prognosis can not be assessed prior to transplanta-tion. Pre-transplantation tumor downstaging may allow transplantation in patients initially outside the selection criteria and seems to improve the progno-sis; it also provides information on tumor biology. The main peculiarity of the transplantation setting, when this is compared with other modalities of treatment, is the need for pharmacological immunosuppression: this is based on drugs that have been demonstrated to increase the risk of tumor development. As HCC is an aggressive malignancy, immunosuppression has to be handled carefully in patients who have HCC at the time of transplantation and new categories of immu-nosuppressive agents should be considered. Adjuvant chemotherapy following transplantation has failed to show any significant advantage. The aim of the pres-ent study is to review the possible strategies to avoid recurrence of HCC after liver transplantation based on the current clinical evidence and the more recent de-velopments and to discuss possible future directions.

  18. Aromatase inhibitors - a viable option for recurrent granulosa cell tumour of ovary: overview and case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granulosa cell tumour of the ovary in adults is a rare tumour of low malignant potential affecting middle aged peri or post menopausal patients. These tumours are often diagnosed at an early stage, due to their hormonally active nature. They, however, have unique distinguishing histologic features and behaviour of frequent and late local or systemic relapses. The diagnosis can be challenging with unusual presentations. There is high association of endometrial carcinoma. Surgery is the mainstay of management in early low risk disease, while radiotherapy and systemic platinum based chemotherapy are employed in higher stage with poor prognostic indices. Survival is good in early stage disease. Recurrent, progressive, and treatment refractory disease is not infrequent and poses management challenge. Endocrine manipulation and hormone treatment are employed in few cases with equivocal results, as reported in literature. We present a case of recurrent and treatment refractory GCT in a postmenopausal patient, managed by aromatase inhibitor Anastrozole with reasonable efficacy. (author)

  19. Gallbladder small cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Toshiyuki; Haraguchi, Masashi; Irie, Junji; Yoshimoto, Tomoko; Uehara, Ryohei; Ito, Shinichiro; Tokai, Hirotaka; Noda, Kazumasa; Tada, Nobuhiro; Hirabaru, Masataka; Inoue, Keiji; Minami, Shigeki; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-12-01

    Gallbladder small cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises only 0.5 % of all gallbladder cancer and consists of aggressive tumors with poor survival outcomes against current treatments. These tumors are most common in elderly females, particularly those with cholecystolithiasis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with gallbladder small cell carcinoma. The patient had intermittent right upper quadrant abdominal pain and was admitted to our hospital due to suspected acute cholecystitis. She regularly received medical treatment for diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. On initial laboratory evaluation, the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were markedly elevated. She underwent computed tomography (CT) for screening. CT images showed a thick-walled gallbladder containing multiple stones and multiple 3-cm-sized round nodular lesions, which were suggestive of metastatic lymph nodes. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage was performed, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of enlarged lymph nodes resulted in a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. However, we could not identify the primary lesion before the surgery because of no decisive factors. We performed cholecystectomy because there was a possibility of cholecystitis recurrence risk and also partial liver resection because we suspected tumor invasion. The final pathological diagnosis was neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder, small cell type. The tumor stage was IVb, T3aN1M1. The patient died 13 weeks after the surgery. In the present paper, we review the current available English-language literature of gallbladder SCC. PMID:27457076

  20. Primary abdominal wall clear cell carcinoma arising from incisional endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Burcu Gundogdu; Isin Ureyen; Gunsu Kimyon; Hakan Turan; Nurettin Boran; Gokhan Tulunay; Dilek Bulbul; Taner Turan; M Faruk Kose

    2013-01-01

    A 49 year-old patient with the complaint of a mass located in the caesarean scar was admitted. There was a fixed mass 30í30 mm in diameter with regular contour located at the right corner of the pfannenstiel incision. Computed tomography revealed a (40í50í50) mm solid mass lesion with margins that cannot be distinguished from the uterus, bladder and small intestines and a heterogeneous mass lesion (50í45í55) mm in diameter, located in the right side of the anterior abdominal wall. Cytoreductive surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Final pathology was clear cell carcinoma. Clear cell carcinoma arising from an extraovarian endometriotic focus was diagnosed and the patient received 6 cycles paclitaxel-carboplatin chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. The patient who was lost to follow-up applied to our clinic 2 years after surgery with a recurrent mass in the left inguinal region. After 3 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient's tumoral mass in the left inguinal region was excised. The result of the pathology was carcinoma metastasis. It is decided that the following treatment of the patient should be palliative radiation therapy. The patient who underwent palliative radiation therapy died of disease after 4 months of the second operation.

  1. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as a solitary cutaneous facial metastasis: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Neil A; Anderson, Helen L; Al-Dujaily, Saad

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma is well known for its frequency to metastasise, particularly to lungs, liver, bones and brain. Metastasis to the skin is much less common. Presentation as a result of the skin lesion is even more unusual, with only 14 previously reported cases in the English literature. The majority of these cases have been reported in patients with recurrent disease or with other metastases. Case presentation We present only the second case of non-recurrent renal cell carcinom...

  2. In Vitro Chemosensitivity Testing of Primary and Recurrent Breast Carcinomas and Its Clinical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi LI; Haiping SONG; Wenshan HE; Yuan TIAN; Tao HUANG

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in vitro chemosensitivity testing was conducted on primary cultured breast cancer cells from 96 patients with breast cancer, and the results showed that the cells from a few patients with primary breast cancer developed multidrug resistance (MDR) prior to the first chemotherapy exposure. All the cells from the recurrent cancer patients had MDR. The findings suggested that patients having MDR would benefit from high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimens. In vitro chemosensitivity screening, which was aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing side effects, helps in choosing individualized treatment for breast cancer.

  3. Squamous carcinoma of the penis and previous recurrent balanitis: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, J J; Wanas, T M

    1991-01-01

    A 33 year old uncircumcised Caucasian male who had a 7 year history of intermittent erosive balanitis and herpes, presented with an 18 month history of progressively worsening penile ulceration not responding to the usual medication. Biopsy of the glans penis carried out in view of the long standing ulceration showed a sqamous cell carcinoma of the penis. As there was no response to radiotherapy, partial penectomy was carried out. The importance of early biopsy is emphasised when ulcerative l...

  4. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  5. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules ≤2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules ≤2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were ≤2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p 2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring ≤2 cm should be treated by RFA

  6. Use of the gamma probe and of 99mTc-DMSA (V) in the identification of the neck recurrence of medullary carcinoma thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, a malignant neoplasm of para follicular C cells, represent about 5-10% of thyroid tumors. The symptoms are related to local invasion and hormonal secretion. The clinical course is variable, from indolent cases to extremely aggressive. Many radionuclide imaging have been described to locate metastasis of medullary cancer. Tl-201 and Tc-99m (V)DMS A showed to be useful in the evaluation o persistent elevated serum calcitonin levels. On the other hand, the use of the 131 I-Mibg, that is the isotope more used, has not been demonstrating efficiency in identifying metastasis. Our objective is to report a case of a patient with medullary thyroid carcinoma in which the follow-up use DMS A(V) demonstrated a recurrence no identified for other methods. A 34-year-old man had a diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma and has submitted a total thyroidectomy and neck lymph node dissection. He presented elevated serum calcitonin levels and DMS A(V) scintigraphy demonstrated focal area of pathologic uptake at the medline of the neck, but the surgical exploration was negative. He persisted with high calcitonin levels and it was used a new DMS A(V). On this occasion he was submitted to the radio-guided surgery that located the recurrence and it was confirmed with anatomo-pathologic exam. This case allowed to demonstrate that the use of radionuclide associated to the gamma-probe is promising, allowing a precise surgical approach. (author)

  7. The role of squamous cell carcinoma antigen as a prognostic and predictive factor in carcinoma of uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Although the role of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) as a predictive and prognostic factor for uterine cervical cancer has been identified ed in previous studies, 1) the effective patient group of screening for recurrence with SCC-Ag, 2) the relationship between SCC-Ag and recurrence site, and 3) the relationship between the change of SCC-Ag and treatment outcome or recurrence have not been described. The study included 506 patients with histologically proven uterine cervical cancer between January 1994 and December 2010. We determining the serum SCC-Ag level before treatment and after treatment, and conducted a retrospective review of the patients' records. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of SCC-Ag for the detection of tumor recurrence by comparing biochemical recurrence with clinical recurrence. The pretreatment SCC-Ag level and the proportion of patients over 1.5 ng/mL were higher in poor prognostic patient group. In the univariate and multivariate analysis, pretreatment SCC-Ag showed a statistically significant correlation with tumor size, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, pathology. In patients with biochemical recurrence vs. those without, 5-year DFS and OS were 27.6 vs. 92.7% (p{<=}0.001) and 53.7 vs. 92.5% (p{<=}0.001), respectively. Our study reconfirmed the known function of pretreatment SCC-Ag, but could not confirm the function of biochemical response as a predictive factor for treatment and as a prognostic factor. There was no statistically significant relationship between SCC-Ag level and recurrence site. We confirmed the role of SCC-Ag as a follow-up tool for recurrence of disease and which patient groups SCC-Ag was more useful for.

  8. The role and progress of interventional therapy in the prevention and treatment of postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The articles concerning intensive effect and progress of interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence were comprehensively reviewed. Along with unceasing abundance of all interventional methods (including transcatheter arterial chemoemblization (TACE), percutaneous dehydrated ethanol injection, radio frequency ablation, percutaneous microwave therapy, argon-helium cryoablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound and radionuclide interventional therapy, etc), combined interventional therapies mainly TACE were increasingly appreciated in postoperative HCC recurrence, but still have to be further standardized. With further emerging and maturing of new technologies, such as antiangiogenesis, gene therapy and targeted therapy on HCC metastatic and recurrence specific cycle; the effect of combined therapy will be further promoted. Interventional therapy will play an important role in the prevention and treatment of postoperative HCC recurrence in the foreseen furture. (authors)

  9. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  11. Prognostic value of preoperative absolute lymphocyte count in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma following thermal ablation: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Xin Li, Zhiyu Han, Zhigang Cheng, Jie Yu, Xiaoling Yu, Ping Liang Department of Interventional Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of preoperative absolute lymphocyte count (ALC in recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (RHCC following thermal ablation. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between preoperative ALC and the clinicopathologic factors and long-term prognosis in 423 RHCC patients who underwent curative thermal ablation. Correlation analysis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC calculation, Kaplan–Meier curves, and multivariate regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: The median time to recurrence was 12 months for RHCC patients after thermal ablation. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, preoperative ALC was an independent risk factor for cancer recurrence, along with tumor differentiation and α-fetoprotein level. ALC ≥1.64×109/L defined by ROC calculation was associated with prolonged survival (area under the curve 0.741, P<0.001. Patients with ALC ≥1.64×109/L showed a mean survival of 20.2 months versus 11.6 months for patients with ALC <1.64×109/L (P<0.001. Patients were stratified into high and low groups according to ALC status. After excluding the basic parameters between groups, the 1- and 3-year recurrence rates in the high group were 20.9% and 29.5%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of the low group (58.4% and 71.9%, respectively; P<0.001. The recurrence-free survival rates in the two groups analyzed by Kaplan–Meier curves were significantly different (P<0.001. Conclusion: Preoperative ALC is a powerful prognostic factor for RHCC recurrence after thermal ablation, which suggests that maintaining a high ALC in RHCC patients might improve cancer outcomes. Keywords: absolute lymphocyte count, recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma, thermal ablation, recurrence  

  12. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  15. Diagnosis of Thymic Clear Cell Carcinoma by Cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Seema A.; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia G.; Mohamed Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the thymus is a rare tumor. Few cases of clear-cell carcinoma of thymus have been documented (Truong et al., 1990 and Wolfe III et al., 1983). All these cases were diagnosed by histopathological examination of the tissue. Diagnosis of thymic clear cell carcinoma on cytology is extremely challenging. Here we report the first case of thymic clear cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytological examination of the pericardial fluid with the help of immunocytochemistry. Differentia...

  16. Resident Stem Cells and Renal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetta Bussolati; Alessia Brossa; Giovanni Camussi

    2011-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis tumors are maintained by a cancer stem cell population which is able to initiate and maintain tumors. Tumor-initiating stem cells display stem or progenitor cell properties such as self-renewal and capacity to re-establish tumors that recapitulate the tumor of origin. In this paper, we discuss data relative to the presence of cancer stem cells in human renal carcinoma and their possible origin from normal resident stem cells. The cancer stem cells ...

  17. Ovarian Small Cell Carcinoma in a 12-year-old Girl: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Sang Won; Yang, Seung Ha [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Small cell carcinoma of the ovary occurs mainly in young women and is extremely rare in a patient younger than 16 years of age. Early distant metastases or recurrence of this type of tumor is common and the response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy has been disappointing. The prognosis of this type of tumor is very poor. We report the ultrasonography, PET/CT and MRI findings of a small cell carcinoma of the ovary with severe peritoneal metastases in a 12-year-old girl.

  18. Ovarian Small Cell Carcinoma in a 12-year-old Girl: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell carcinoma of the ovary occurs mainly in young women and is extremely rare in a patient younger than 16 years of age. Early distant metastases or recurrence of this type of tumor is common and the response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy has been disappointing. The prognosis of this type of tumor is very poor. We report the ultrasonography, PET/CT and MRI findings of a small cell carcinoma of the ovary with severe peritoneal metastases in a 12-year-old girl

  19. A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated effectively by gemcitabine and sunitinib

    OpenAIRE

    Morizane, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Hideto; Yao, Akihisa; Isoyama, Tadahiro; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with renal cell carcinoma developed lung metastases after treatment with left radical nephrectomy (pT3bN0M0, clear cell renal carcinoma, Fuhrman G3 >2). The patient received treatment with gemcitabine and interferon-α and achieved complete response after seven cycles of therapy. However, eight months later, local recurrence was discovered in the renal fossa. We changed the therapeutic strategy to sunitinib, a multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The patient achieved a com...

  20. An unusual presentation of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma in mandibular anterior region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu M Ganvir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare, potentially aggressive odontogenic epithelial tumor with tendency for recurrence. It was first described as a clinicopathological entity in 1985 and to date only 73 cases has been reported in English literature. A case of CCOC in 64-year-old male patient in mandibular anterior region is presented which when recurred in soft tissue 5 years after wide surgical resection of mandible, revealed a biphasic pattern as against monophasic pattern of primary neoplasm and was unusually associated with primary squamous cell carcinoma, suggestive of hybrid tumor.

  1. Efficacy of gemcitabine and cetuximab combination treatment in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MASEKI, SHINICHIRO; IJICHI, KEI; NAKANISHI, HAYAO; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; OGAWA, TETSUYA; Murakami, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) may be curable with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy in its early stages. However, recurrence and metastasis often prevail following primary treatment in advanced stage cases and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we investigated the combination therapy of gemcitabine and cetuximab for HNSCC. The UM-SCC-6 and UM-SCC-23 HNSCC cell lines were analyzed following treatment with gemcitabine and cetuximab. To deter...

  2. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  3. Glycogen Rich Clear Cell Breast Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Çınkır, Havva Yeşil; Dilek, Gülay Bilir; Demirci, Ayşe; Başal, Fatma Buğdaycı; Aydın, Kübra; Demirci, Umut; Öksüzoğlu, Berna; Alkış, Necati

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare type of breast carcinoma. Tumoral tissue is consist of intracytoplasmic glycogen-rich clear cells. We presented in here a 44-year old woman diagnosed with glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma.

  4. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving floor of the mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sah Kunal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basaloid squamous cell carcinomas of oral mucosa are uncommon. Majority of them can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinoma by their aggressive clinical course and their histopathological features. This case report presents a case of 70-year-old male with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving the floor of the mouth.

  5. Concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and chemotherapy for postoperative recurrence of mediastinal lymph node metastases in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a phase 2 single-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy plus concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy on the postoperative recurrence of mediastinal lymph node metastases in esophageal cancer patients. Ninety-eight patients were randomly enrolled to receive either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy alone (group A) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (group B). A radiation dose of 62–70 Gy/31–35 fractions was delivered to the recurrent tumor. Furthermore, the patients in group B simultaneously received weekly doses of cisplatin (30 mg/m2), and the survival outcomes and toxic effects were compared. The response rate of group B (91.8%) was significantly greater than that of group A (73.5%) (χ2 = 5.765, P = 0.016). The 1- and 3-year survival rates of group B (85.7% and 46.9%, respectively) were also greater than those of group A (69.4% and 28.6%, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in the 5-year survival rates. The numbers of patients who died of distant metastases in groups A and B were 13 (26.5%) and 5 (10.2%), respectively (χ2 = 4.356, P = 0.036). Acute radiation-related esophagitis and granulocytopenia in group B was frequent. However, intergroup differences in terms of late toxicity were not significant. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) is a practical and feasible technique to treat the recurrence of mediastinal lymph node metastases of postoperative esophageal cancer. In addition, concurrent chemotherapy can increase local tumor control, decrease the distant metastasis rate, and increase the long-term survival rate

  6. Peri-Transplant Change in AFP Level: a Useful Predictor of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Recurrence Following Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Choi, Young Rok; Kim, Hyeyoung; Suh, Suk-Won; Jeong, Jae Hong; Lee, Jeong-Moo; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-07-01

    Pretransplant alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a useful tumor marker predicting recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known, however, about the relationship between changes in AFP concentration and prognosis. This study investigated the clinical significance of change in peri-transplant AFP level as a predictor of HCC recurrence. Data from 125 HCC patients with elevated pretransplant AFP level who underwent liver transplantation (LT) between February 2000 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with AFP normalization within 1 month after LT were classified into the rapid normalization group (n = 97), with all other patients classified into the non-rapid normalization group (n = 28). Tumor recurrence was observed in 17 of the 97 patients (17.5%) with rapid normalization; of these, 11 patients had high AFP levels and six had normal levels at recurrence. In contrast, tumor recurrence was observed in 24 of the 28 patients (85.7%) without rapid normalization, with all 24 having high AFP levels at recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that non-rapid normalization (harzard ratio [HR], 4.41, P AFP level at 1 month is a useful clinical marker for HCC recurrence. Therefore, an adjuvant strategy and/or intensive screening are needed for patients who do not show rapid normalization. PMID:27366001

  7. Parametric response mapping of dynamic CT for predicting intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jonghoon [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Electronic Electrical and Computer Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jongbum [Yonsei University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-min [Hanyang University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyunjin [Sungkyunwkan University, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of our study was to determine the diagnostic value of a novel image analysis method called parametric response mapping (PRM) for prediction of intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This retrospective study was approved by the IRB. We recruited 55 HCC patients who achieved complete remission (CR) after TACE and received longitudinal multiphasic liver computed tomography (CT). The patients fell into two groups: the recurrent tumour group (n = 29) and the non-recurrent tumour group (n = 26). We applied the PRM analysis to see if this technique could distinguish between the two groups. The results of the PRM analysis were incorporated into a prediction algorithm. We retrospectively removed data from the last time point and attempted to predict the response to therapy of the removed data. The PRM analysis was able to distinguish between the non-recurrent and recurrent groups successfully. The prediction algorithm detected response to therapy with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76, while the manual approach had AUC 0.64. Adopting PRM analysis can potentially distinguish between recurrent and non-recurrent HCCs and allow for prediction of response to therapy after TACE. (orig.)

  8. Serous carcinoma of endometrium in combination with neuroendocrine small-cell: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudie, Lorna A; Khan, Faizan; Radi, Michael J; Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial serous carcinomas are very clinically aggressive, which constitutes 40% of all deaths and recurrences associated with endometrial cancer. Small-cell carcinoma of the endometrium is relatively rare but aggressive, and often presents a component of endometrioid carcinoma, and is not generally associated with serous carcinoma. Herein, we report a case of 74-year-old African-American female, who presented with intermittent post-menopausal bleeding for > 1-month. She underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, sentinel lymph node mapping, and pelvic-and-aortic lymphadenectomy. Final pathology was consistent with serous carcinoma of the endometrium in combination with neuroendocrine small-cell carcinoma. This extremely rare combination of tumors presents a challenge for treatment. The mainstay of treatment seems to be surgery followed by chemotherapy ± radiation therapy. To our knowledge, it represents an under-reported area of gynecological medicine. PMID:27508271

  9. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  10. An Iranian male with syringoid eccrine carcinoma misdiagnosed as basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Binesh Fariba; Akhavan Ali; Kafaie Parichehr; Navabii Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Syringoid carcinoma (syringoid eccrine carcinoma, or eccrine epithelioma) is a rare cutaneous tumor with some controversy regarding its correct definition. This tumor shows a slow growth and has often been for many years, some decades before diagnosis. It may also be difficult to differentiate from its benign counterpart (syringoma) or other adnexal carcinoma and cutaneous metastasis. There have been limited case reports of syringoid carcinoma in foreign literatures but none from Iran. Here we report a case of syringoid carcinoma in a 52 year-old Iranian man. Syringoid eccrine carcinoma is a very rare and uncommon diagnosed tumor thought to be derived from eccrine sweat apparatus. It locally invasive, destructive and often shows recurrence. It may also be difficult to differentiate from metastatic adenocarcinoma.

  11. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  12. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: A Possible Role of S-1 as Chemotherapy for Acinar Cell Carcinoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tameyoshi Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignancy, accounting for 1-2% of pancreatic exocrine malignancies. This rarity makes it difficult to standardize a protocol of treatment for acinar cell carcinoma. Case report A 71-year-old male without any particular past history was referred to our institute with abdominal distention and mild liver dysfunction. Computed tomography (CT revealed a cystic lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, which originated from the neck of pancreas and had solid nodules inside. Several nodules were demonstrated surrounding the cystic tumor. Laparotomy and histological study demonstrated peritoneal dissemination of acinar cell carcinoma. The patient was treated with S-1 monotherapy (80 mg/m2 for four weeks with a two-week interval as one cycle. After one cycle of S-1 monotherapy, CT demonstrated remarkable shrinkage of the main tumor and disappearance of the nodules on the peritoneum. The patient underwent a radical distal pancreatectomy. The patient was then treated with 16 cycles of S-1 monotherapy after the radical pancreatectomy and remains without any recurrence of the disease two years later. Conclusion Initially inoperable acinar cell carcinoma was treated by monotherapy using S-1, resulting in curative operation and two years disease free survival post operation. S-1 might be more effective on acinar cell carcinoma, rather than gemcitabine

  13. Melphalan, Carboplatin, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive CNS Embryonal or Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Medulloepithelioma; Ototoxicity; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  14. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  15. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul, E-mail: rophc@skku.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  16. Sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma component of the urinary bladder: a case report with review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an uncommon neoplasm characterized histopathologically by the presence of malignant spindle cell and epithelial components. Albeit extremely rare, sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma has been reported. Herein, we describe an additional case of sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and review the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. An 82-year-old Japanese mal...

  17. CONVENTIONAL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH GRANULOMATOUS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Granulomatous inflammation is a distinctive pattern of chronic inflammatory reaction characterized by microscopic aggregation of activated macrophages which often develop epithelioid appearance and multinucleate giant cells. Granulomas are encountered in limited number of infectious and some non-infectious conditions. Granulomas have been described within the stroma of malignancies like carcinomas of the breast and colon, seminoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, where they represent T-cell-mediated reaction of the tumor stroma to antigens expressed by the tumor. Granulomatous reaction in association with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is uncommon, with only few published reports in the literature. We describe a case of conventional (clear cell RCC associated with epithelioid cell granulomas within the tumor parenchyma.

  18. NUPTIAL PAD AMPUTATION IN AN AMERICAN BULLFROG (LITHOBATES CATESBEIANUS) WITH SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latney, La'Toya V; Miller, Erica; Pessier, Allan P

    2015-12-01

    A 7-yr-old male captive American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) presented with a 2-wk history of an enlarged, ulcerated nuptial pad on the mediopalmar surface of the first digit of the left carpus. A 3-mm wedge biopsy of the mass was not diagnostic and differentials included an epidermal inclusion cyst or squamous cell carcinoma. No fungal or acid-fast organisms were cultured or noted on impression smear. Wide surgical resection of the mass and associated first digit were performed. Histopathology confirmed squamous cell carcinoma associated with the dermal nuptial gland with neoplastic cells extending close to deep surgical margins. Two months after surgery, no recurrence was noted. Although experimental tumor studies in amphibians are well documented, clinical reports of cutaneous neoplasia management in captive amphibians are scarce. Squamous cell carcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis when male anurans present with nuptial gland enlargement. PMID:26667557

  19. Talactoferrin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  20. The enigma of post-radiation oedema and residual or recurrent carcinoma of the larynx and pyriform fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistence of significant laryngeal oedema following radiotherapy presents the surgeon with a diagnostic dilemma. Though the oedema may represent a prolonged response to irradiation, the possibility of residual carcinoma must be considered. Several authors have commented upon it and have suggested frequent biopsies to prove the presence of residual or recurrent neoplasm (Ward et al., 1975; Lederman, 1970; Calcaterra et al., 1972). Some reluctance to laryngeal biopsy has been exercised to avoid inciting a fulminant perichondritis. However, the difficulty of obtaining a positive biopsy in a post-irradiated case is well known, and repeated negative biopsies do not exclude the presence of a residual tumour. The present paper studies 52 histopathologically proven cases of carcinoma of the larynx and laryngopharynx which had received radiotherapy earlier. These cases underwent salvage radical surgery on clinical suspicion of residual/recurrent tumour, manifested by persistence of significant laryngeal oedema and/or fixation of the larynx. No positive biopsies have been obtained following radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Choroidal metastasis from tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Elghissassi, Ibrahim; Inrhaoun, Hanane; Ismaili, Nabil; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal metastases from renal carcinoma are rare. Most reported cases describe a clear cell carcinoma histologic subtype. Metastatic tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma to the choroid plexus is very exceptional. We report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma who presented two years later with metastatic disease to lungs and presternal soft tissue and three months after with choroidal metastasis revealed on ophtalmoscopic examination and magne...

  2. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  3. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  4. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of feline oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma are described. In both cases, diagnosis was achieved by radiography, endoscopy and cytology, and later confirmed by histology. One cat underwent oesophagectomy followed by end-to-end anastomosis, but died three days postsurgery; the second cat was euthanased after diagnosis

  5. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  6. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to...

  7. Comparison of metabolic and receptor imaging in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma with histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S; Baum, R P; Hertel, A; Schumm-Draeger, P M; Usadel, K H; Hör, G

    1998-09-01

    Early diagnosis of metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) provides the optimal condition for curative outcome. The aim of this study was to appraise the detection of metastases in patients with recurrent MTC using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide and pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid [99mTc(V)-DMSA] in comparison with histopathological findings. Eighteen MTC patients with persistently elevated tumour marker (calcitonin, carcinoembryonic antigen) levels underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide (222 MBq) with early (4 h after injection) and delayed (24 h) whole-body scans and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Metabolic whole-body and SPET imaging using 500 MBq 99mTc(V)-DMSA was performed 4 h after injection. Metabolic and receptor imaging revealed 51 sites of focal accumulation in the 18 patients investigated. Comparison with histological findings revealed that metabolic and receptor imaging had a sensitivity of 84% for the diagnosis of MTC. Using [111In-DTPA-d-Phe1]-pentetreotide, SPET discovered four lymph node metastases in two patients in whom planar views had previously identified only one lymph node metastasis, and provided no new information in the other 16 patients. In comparison, SPET studies [using 99mTc(V)-DMSA] additionally localized eight lymph node metastases in four patients and confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic metastases (n=5) in another patient in whom conventional imaging modalities and planar views had previously detected only three liver metastases. Overall, lesion detection sensitivities for 99mTc(V)-DMSA and [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide were 69% and 29%, respectively. Five surgically removed foci were adjudged false-positive with respect to MTC metastases. False-positve results were caused by lymphadenitis, an enchondroma and a pheochromocytoma (histologically proven). The smallest lesion identified by metabolic imaging was a 6 mm in diameter lymph node

  8. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  9. Intra-arterial chemotherapy in locally advanced or recurrent carcinomas of the penis and anal canal: an active treatment modality with curative potential

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Arnaud; Berney, Christophe Roger Yves; Rohner, Stéphane; Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Morel, Philippe; Marti, Marc-Claude; Aapro, M.; Alberto, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced or recurrent carcinomas of the penis (PE) and of the anal canal (AC) after conventional treatment is dismal. We report 16 patients (eight with AC carcinomas and eight with PE cancers) treated by intra-arterial (IA) chemotherapy. Fifteen of them were treated for locally advanced or recurrent disease and one in an adjuvant setting. The chemotherapy was administered via a femoral IA catheter with its tip located above the aortic bifurcation, under the inferior m...

  10. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  11. Para-recurrent lymph node metastasis was a significant predictor for cervical lymph nodes metastasis in thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate correlation factors of cervical lymph nodes metastasis in thoracic esophageal carcinoma. Methods: Local-regional metastasis of lymph node for 126 cases with esophageal squamous cell cancer after surgery from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. Risk factors of cervical lymph nodes metastasis were examined by multiple Logistic regression analysis. Results: In 126 cases, supraclavicular lymph node metastasis rate was 43.7% (55/126). By logistic regression, none of the primary site, T stage, N stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis rate, lymph node metastasis degree and number of lymph nodes metastatic field was not the high risk of cervical lymph nodes metastasis. In addition, multivariate analysis found that lymph node metastasis in mediastinum region 1 was high risk factor for lymph node metastasis of region 1 (χ2 =12.14, 9.27, P =0.000, 0.002), lymph node metastasis in region III and region 2 were high risk factors for lymph node metastasis of region IIa (χ2 =14.56, 8.27, 8.02, 3.93, P =0.000, 0.004, 0.005, 0.047). Conclusion: Mediastinal para-recurrent nerve lymph node metastasis is a significant predictor for cervical lymph nodes metastasis. (authors)

  12. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26636434

  14. Do Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas Have Malignant Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Cheng, Liang; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-12-01

    There have been no recurrences or metastases of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) in 268 reported cases with follow-up in the English-language literature. We identified all our cases of CCPRCC (1990 to 2013), reviewing all cases that preceded the formal designation of the entity. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 32 cases during their initial workup. In addition, stains for carbonic anhydrase IX and cytokeratin 7 were performed on 2 cases, one with atypical follow-up and the other with a more compact morphology, although not performed initially. An extended panel with AMACR, CD10, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was added to the case with atypical follow-up. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 3p, 7, and 17 was performed on the latter case and on another clinically presumed metastatic tumor. In classic cases, immunohistochemical staining was not performed. Fifty-eight patients (31 women; 27 men) with follow-up data were included in our study; 39 cases were from our consult service. The patients' ages ranged from 36 to 83 years. Thirty-five patients had cystic or partially cystic lesions; 6 tumors were multifocal, 3 of which were bilateral. The majority (53 patients; 91.4%) presented with stage pT1 disease (size range, 0.2 to 8 cm), 2 patients presented with pT2 disease (8.5 and 10.3 cm), 1 patient presented with pT3 disease (6.5 cm sarcomatoid RCC focally extending out of the kidney), and pathologic stage was unavailable in 2 cases. Treatment consisted of 29 partial nephrectomies, 26 radical nephrectomies, 2 cryoablations, and 1 cyst ablation. The resection margins were negative in all but one case, with this case disease free after a 26-month period. Two patients had intraoperative tumor disruption and were disease free at 9 and 34 months. Five patients had synchronous ipsilateral renal cell carcinomas (non-CCPRCC). Mean follow-up time was 21 months (range, 1 to 175 mo), with all but 3 patients having no evidence of

  15. [Endometrial adenocarcinoma and clear cell carcinoma in a young woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jing; Liu, Nan; Liu, Guo-Bing

    2016-05-20

    A 26-year-old unmarried woman with irregular menstruation for 4 years was admitted for an intrauterine space-occupying mass. Pathological examination before surgery showed moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopically assisted epifascial panhysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimens reported moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma and stage II clear cell carcinoma. The patient then received chemotherapy and remained alive without evidence of recurrence. Young women with polycystic ovarian syndrome are at high risk of developing endometrial carcinoma, but concurrent clear cell carcinoma is rare. Careful evaluation before and after treatment are essential to improve the patients prognosis. PMID:27222196

  16. Rituximab, Romidepsin, and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Exome profiling of primary, metastatic and recurrent ovarian carcinomas in a BRCA1-positive patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian carcinoma is a common, and often deadly, gynecological cancer. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are present in at least a fifth of patients. Uncovering other genes that become mutated subsequent to BRCA1/BRCA2 inactivation during cancer development will be helpful for more effective treatments. We performed exome sequencing on the blood, primary tumor, omental metastasis and recurrence following therapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, from a patient carrying a BRCA1 S1841R mutation. We observed loss of heterozygosity in the BRCA1 mutation in the primary and subsequent tumors, and somatic mutations in the TP53 and NF1 genes were identified, suggesting their role along with BRCA1 driving the tumor development. Notably, we show that exome sequencing is effective in detecting large chromosomal rearrangements such as deletions and amplifications in cancer. We found that a large deletion was present in the three tumors in the regions containing BRCA1, TP53, and NF1 mutations, and an amplification in the regions containing MYC. We did not observe the emergence of any new mutations among tumors from diagnosis to relapse after chemotherapy, suggesting that mutations already present in the primary tumor contributed to metastases and chemotherapy resistance. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing of matched samples from one patient is a powerful method of detecting somatic mutations and prioritizing their potential role in the development of the disease

  18. Micro RNA expression profiles as adjunctive data to assess the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, C T; D'Souza, M; McCall, M; Safadjou, S; Ryan, C; Kashyap, R; Marroquin, C; Orloff, M; Almudevar, A; Godfrey, T E

    2012-02-01

    Donor livers are precious resources and it is, therefore, ethically imperative that we employ optimally sensitive and specific transplant selection criteria. Current selection criteria, the Milan criteria, for liver transplant candidates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are primarily based on radiographic characteristics of the tumor. Although the Milan criteria result in reasonably high survival and low-recurrence rates, they do not assess an individual patient's tumor biology and recurrence risk. Consequently, it is difficult to predict on an individual basis the risk for recurrent disease. To address this, we employed microarray profiling of microRNA (miRNA) expression from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues to define a biomarker that distinguishes between patients with and without HCC recurrence after liver transplant. In our cohort of 64 patients, this biomarker outperforms the Milan criteria in that it identifies patients outside of Milan who did not have recurrent disease and patients within Milan who had recurrence. We also describe a method to account for multifocal tumors in biomarker signature discovery. PMID:22008552

  19. Cancer stem cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance in high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hongxia; CHENG, WENJUN; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancer cells are eliminated by debulking surgery and chemotherapy during initial treatment, it is believed that only a subset of cancer cells, that is, cancer stem cells, may be an important source of tumor recurrence and drug resistance. This review highlights our current understanding of high-grade serous carcinoma, ovarian cancer stem cells, common methods for enrichment of ovarian cancer stem cells, mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and potential strategi...

  20. Extensive central nervous system involvement in Merkel cell carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderström Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare malignant cutaneous neoplasm that is locally invasive and frequently metastasizes to lymph nodes, liver, lungs, bone and brain. The incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma has increased in the past three decades. Case presentation A 65-year-old Caucasian man presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and a three-month history of balance disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large meningeal metastasis. The radiologic workup showed retroperitoneal and inguinal lymph node metastases. Biopsy of the inguinal lymph nodes showed metastases of Merkel cell carcinoma. Biopsy from three different suspected skin lesions revealed no Merkel cell carcinoma, and the primary site of Merkel cell carcinoma remained unknown. Leptomeningeal metastases, new axillary lymph node metastases, and intraspinal (epidural and intradural metastases were detected within six, seven and eight months, respectively, from the start of symptoms despite treating the intracranial metastasis with gamma knife and the abdominal metastases with surgical dissection and external radiotherapy. This indicates the aggressive nature of the disease. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of an intracranial meningeal metastasis of Merkel cell carcinoma treated with gamma knife and of intraspinal intradural metastases of Merkel cell carcinoma. Despite good initial response to radiotherapy, recurrence and occurrence of new metastases are common in Merkel cell carcinoma.

  1. Interleukin-2 or Observation Following Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  2. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  3. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma with Sialomucin Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Young; Cho, Sung Bin; Chung, Kee Yang; Kim, You Chan

    2006-01-01

    Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a variant of BCC with a characteristic clear cell component that may occupy all or part of the tumor islands. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining for glycogen is variably positive, and mild deposition of sulfated mucin has been noted. However, to our knowledge, clear cell BCC with sialomucin deposition has not been reported. Here we report a case of clear cell BCC showing sialomucin deposition. The clear tumor cells stained with PAS and showed incomple...

  4. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  5. Coexistence of squamous cell tracheal papilloma and carcinoma treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Dimitrios; Gogakos, Apostolos; Rallis, Thomas; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Asteriou, Christos; Tagarakis, Georgios; Organtzis, John; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Tsavlis, Drosos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillomatosis presents, most frequently, as multiple lesions of the respiratory tract, which are usually considered benign. Malignant degeneration into squamous cell carcinoma is quite common, although curative approaches vary a lot in modern literature. Case report We report a case of a 66-year-old male patient with the coexistence of multiple squamous cell papilloma and carcinoma in the upper trachea with severe airway obstruction that was diagnosed through bronchoscopy and treated by performing an urgent tracheostomy, followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence after a 12-month follow-up period. Conclusion This study underlines the diagnostic and therapeutic value of bronchoscopy as well as multimodality palliative treatment in such cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to describe an immediate treatment protocol with tracheostomy and concurrent chemotherapy/radiotherapy in a patient with squamous cell tracheal papilloma and carcinoma. PMID:26730195

  6. 980nm laser for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjabo, A. D.; Cema, I.; Lihacova, I.; Derjabo, L.

    2013-06-01

    Begin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is most common skin cancer over the world. There are around 20 modalities for BCC treatment. Laser surgery is uncommon option. We demonstrate our long term follow up results. Aim: To evaluate long term efficacy of a 980nm diode laser for the difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: 167 patients with 173 basal cell carcinoma on the nose were treated with a 980 nm diode laser from May 1999 till May 2005 at Latvian Oncology center. All tumors were morphologically confirmed. 156 patients were followed for more than 5 years. Results: The lowest recurrence rate was observed in cases of superficial BCC, diameterConclusions: 980 nm diode laser is useful tool in dermatology with high long term efficacy, good acceptance by the patients and good cosmetics results.

  7. COX-2 and PPARγ expression are potential markers of recurrence risk in mammary duct carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In women with duct carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) receiving breast conservation therapy (BCT), in-breast recurrences are seen in approximately 10%, but cannot be accurately predicted using clinical and histological criteria. We performed a case-control study to identify protein markers of local recurrence risk in DCIS. Women treated for DCIS with BCT, who later developed in-breast recurrence (cases) were matched by age and year of treatment to women who remained free of recurrence (controls). A total of 69 women were included in the study, 31 cases and 38 controls. Immunohistochemical evaluation of DCIS tissue arrays was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2/neu, cyclin D1, p53, p21, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Two markers were significantly different between cases and controls on univariate analysis: strong COX-2 expression was associated with increased risk of recurrence, with 67% vs. 24% positivity in cases and controls p = 0.006; and nuclear expression of PPARγ was associated with protection from recurrence with 4% vs. 27% positivity in cases and controls, p = 0.024. In a multivariate model which included size, grade, COX-2 and PPARγ positivity, we found COX-2 positivity to be a strong independent risk factor for recurrence (OR 7.90, 95% CI 1.72–36.23)., whereas size and grade were of borderline significance. PPARγ expression continued to demonstrate a protective trend, (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06–1.84). Our findings suggest that COX-2 and PPARγ should be investigated further as biologic markers to predict DCIS recurrence, particularly since they are also potential therapeutic targets

  8. COX-2 and PPARγ expression are potential markers of recurrence risk in mammary duct carcinoma in-situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiley Elizabeth L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In women with duct carcinoma in-situ (DCIS receiving breast conservation therapy (BCT, in-breast recurrences are seen in approximately 10%, but cannot be accurately predicted using clinical and histological criteria. We performed a case-control study to identify protein markers of local recurrence risk in DCIS. Methods Women treated for DCIS with BCT, who later developed in-breast recurrence (cases were matched by age and year of treatment to women who remained free of recurrence (controls. Results A total of 69 women were included in the study, 31 cases and 38 controls. Immunohistochemical evaluation of DCIS tissue arrays was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2/neu, cyclin D1, p53, p21, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ. Two markers were significantly different between cases and controls on univariate analysis: strong COX-2 expression was associated with increased risk of recurrence, with 67% vs. 24% positivity in cases and controls p = 0.006; and nuclear expression of PPARγ was associated with protection from recurrence with 4% vs. 27% positivity in cases and controls, p = 0.024. In a multivariate model which included size, grade, COX-2 and PPARγ positivity, we found COX-2 positivity to be a strong independent risk factor for recurrence (OR 7.90, 95% CI 1.72–36.23., whereas size and grade were of borderline significance. PPARγ expression continued to demonstrate a protective trend, (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06–1.84. Conclusion Our findings suggest that COX-2 and PPARγ should be investigated further as biologic markers to predict DCIS recurrence, particularly since they are also potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva: analysis of fifteen cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To document various clinical presentations and management options of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in patients attending ophthalmic out patients department (OPD) of a tertiary care centre. This case series was carried out in the Department of Ophthalmology Civil Hospital and, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi and were reviewed from June 2004 to December 2007. Socio-demographic data and clinical features of patients with biopsy proven conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma were recorded and analysed. All patients underwent complete ophthalmic examination by a fellow ophthalmologist and clinical findings were recorded on a prescribed Performa. Data was analysed in terms of frequency, means and median by SPSS for windows V.15. Seventy-two percent of the patients were male and 28% were female, more than 80% of patients were in the age group of seventy years and above. Eighteen percent of patients developed intraocular invasion and the eyes had to be enucleated. CSCC occurs in sun damaged ocular surface usually at limbus, elderly men are more commonly involve, recurrence is a feature of disease and high risk in older individual. In our treatment we used various therapies, excision with clear margin, topical mitomycin C adjunctive cryotherapy and amniotic graft. (author)

  10. Surgical Treatment of Primary Esophageal Small-cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the clinical biocharacteristics of primary esophageal small-cell carcinoma (PESC) and factors influencing prognosis and to find rational indications for combination therapy. Methods: To analyze the clinical materials of 47 patients who had undergone an operation with PESC and to compare it with those patients with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) or primary esophageal adenocarcinoma (PEAC). Results: The overall resectability, morbidity and 30-day mortality rates of PESC were 93.6%, 17.0%and 2.1% respectively, similar to those of ESCC or PEAC. TNM staging and lymph node metastasis were the major determinants influencing long-term survival. Tumor length, depth of tumor invasion and type of operation had little influence on long-term prognosis. The 5-year survival rate of PESC was 7.5%, which was much lower than that of ESCC and PEAC (P<0.01). Among the 42 deceased patents, one died of anastomotic leakage and the others died of remote metastasis and recurrence. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not help improve the patients' long-term survival. Conclusions: Compared with ESCC and PEAC, PESC is the most malignant type with early lymphatic and hematogenous metastases and poor prognosis. Lymph node metastasis is the major factor influencing the prognosis. Patients in stage 0, I and II a of PESC are indicated for surgical resection, while those in stage II b, III or IV should be managed with non-surgical combined therapy.

  11. Salvage surgery for local failure of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local failure rates following treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have been reported to be in the range of 25%-48%. This study investigated the pattern of failure for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and evaluated salvage surgery for local recurrent disease. The tumor files of 549 patients undergoing treatment for SCC of the oral cavity between 1980 and 2000 at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital were reviewed. Of 549 patients, 289 were initially treated with radiation therapy for their primary tumor, and 260 with surgery, either with or without radiation therapy. One hundred and sixty-one patients developed failures, yielding a failure rate of 29.3%. The site of recurrent tumor was local in 72 (13.1%) patients, regional in 89 (16.2%) patients, and distant in 5 (0.9%) patients. Local failure developed in 49 (17.0%) patients with radiation therapy and in 23 (8.8%) patients with surgery. Out of these 72 patients with local failure, 41 (56.9%) patients had salvage surgery for their disease. Twenty-five (73.5%) of the 34 patients initially treated with radiation therapy were salvaged with surgery, and 4 (57.1%) of the 7 patients initially treated with surgery were cured with further surgery. For the treatment of patients with local failure, the disease should be diagnosed more carefully than untreated disease. The disease that has recurred after radiation therapy may be more likely to be salvaged by surgery, however, the disease that has developed after surgery may have a limited indication for re-surgery. (author)

  12. Incidence of Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma in Low-Grade Renal Cell Carcinoma Cases: A 12-Year Retrospective Clinicopathologic Study From a Single Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simpal; Kauffman, Eric C; Kandel, Sirisa; George, Saby; Schwaab, Thomas; Xu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a recently recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma entity after 2004 World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. CCPRCC has unique histomorphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. The distinction of CCPRCC from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with clear cell morphology is crucial because the former is considered to have a favorable clinical outcome. CCPRCC may be interpreted in the past as other renal cell carcinomas, particularly low-grade clear cell RCC. In this study, the frequency of CCPRCC in previously diagnosed low-grade RCC and its clinicopathologic features were examined. A total of 126 cases of stage T1a with low nuclear grade RCC were identified from 625 consecutive RCCs removed by radical/partial nephrectomy over 12-year period (2000-2011). Archival tissue sections were retrospectively reviewed along with patient medical charts. Eight cases (1.3% of all RCC, 6.3% of pT1a low grade RCC) with characteristic histologic features of CCPRCC were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Seven cases were previously diagnosed as clear cell RCC and one as multilocular cystic RCC. Radiographically, CCPRCC favored a mid-pole location in the kidneys. At a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 20-114.5 months), there were no cases of local or distant recurrence. In conclusion, CCPRCC is not uncommon among small low-grade RCC tumors. CCPRCC can be correctly recognized by its unique histomorphological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry studies, which is important due to the excellent clinical outcome following resection. PMID:26510859

  13. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostaining by p53 and COX-2 was performed on sections of the paraffin blocks.Results: p53 expression was observed in 98% of basal cell carcinoma, 88.9% of squamous cell carcinoma and all actinic keratosis cases. p53 expression was also noted in non-dysplastic appearing epithelium in actinic keratosis cases. COX-2 expression was seen in 90, 100 and 88.9% of the basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis groups, respectively. Skin appendages, inflammatory cells and vascular structures were also stained by COX-2 besides tumor tissue. COX-2 expression increased by the p53 expression increase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and COX-2 expressions were not related in terms of tumor type in the BCC and were not related in terms of differentiation in SCC.Conclusion: The existence of p53 expression in actinic keratosis cases has supported the idea that p53 plays a role in the early steps of carcinogenesis in skin cancers. The fact that the expression of COX-2 increases in line with the increase of p53 expression in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cases indicates that COX-2 expression may be affected by p53

  15. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods: a total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results: local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion: in the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. (author)

  16. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otavio Alberto; Rapoport, Abrao, E-mail: arapoport@uol.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dedivitis, Rogerio Aparecido; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandao, Lenine Garcia [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao aulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods: a total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results: local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion: in the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. (author)

  17. High False-Positive Rate of Cytokeratin-19 in Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ruey-Ho Kao; Li-Chih Huang

    2002-01-01

    Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) harbors a higher metastatic potential thanother head and neck cancers. In order to seek a possible surrogate marker forearly detection of recurrent or metastatic disease, we tested the feasibility ofcytokeratin-19 (CK-19)-nested reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) for detecting circulating tumor cells in NPC patients.Methods: Two tubes of blood were sequentially collected in individual draws from 7NPC patients and 15 healthy perso...

  18. Detection of Thyroid Metastasis of Renal Transitional Cell Carcinoma Using FDG PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong-il; Lee, Jong Jin; Paik, Jin Ho; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    A 69-year-old man who was diagnosed with renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) underwent F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting recurrence after chemotherapy. FDG PET/CT revealed multiple new hypermetabolic lesions in many places, including the right thyroid gland. Biopsy of the thyroid lesion was performed, and a diagnosis of metastatic TCC was made. We could detect thyroid metastasis of renal TCC by FDG PET/CT.

  19. Detection of Thyroid Metastasis pf Renal Transitional Cell Carcinoma Using FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 69 year old man who was diagnosed with renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) underwent F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting recurrence after chemotherapy. FDG PET/CT revealed multiple new hypermetabolic lesions in many places, including the right thyroid gland. Biopsy of the thyroid lesion was performed,and a diagnosis of metastatic TCC was made. We could detect thyroid metastasis of renal TCC by FDG PET/CT.

  20. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the liver associated with hepatolithiasis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Lei Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the liver is rare and reported sporadically. Up to date, only 24 such cases have been reported in the literature. It is associated with hepatic teratoma, congenital cysts, solitary benign non-parasitic hepatic cysts, hepatolithiasis/Caroli’s disease or cirrhosis. We reported a case of primary SCC of the liver associated with multiple intrahepatic cholesterol gallstones. The patient underwent hepatectomy followed by radiotherapy, and has survived for over 19 mo without recurrence.

  1. Role of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in the Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Eric P. Arruda; Higgins, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and typically aggressive form of skin cancer. It most commonly affects the elderly and has a predilection for the sun-exposed skin of the head and neck region. Other etiological factors include immune suppression, organ transplantation, and polyoma virus infection. MCC has a propensity to spread to regional lymphatics with a high locoregional recurrence rate. Since its discovery in 1972, treatment paradigms have shifted, with no consensus on optimal manag...

  2. Functional microarray analysis suggests repressed cell-cell signaling and cell survival-related modules inhibit progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Fernando A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer shows a great diversity in its clinical behavior which cannot be easily predicted using the currently available clinical or pathological markers. The identification of pathways associated with lymph node metastasis (N+ and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC may increase our understanding of the complex biology of this disease. Methods Tumor samples were obtained from untreated HNSCC patients undergoing surgery. Patients were classified according to pathologic lymph node status (positive or negative or tumor recurrence (recurrent or non-recurrent tumor after treatment (surgery with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy. Using microarray gene expression, we screened tumor samples according to modules comprised by genes in the same pathway or functional category. Results The most frequent alterations were the repression of modules in negative lymph node (N0 and in non-recurrent tumors rather than induction of modules in N+ or in recurrent tumors. N0 tumors showed repression of modules that contain cell survival genes and in non-recurrent tumors cell-cell signaling and extracellular region modules were repressed. Conclusions The repression of modules that contain cell survival genes in N0 tumors reinforces the important role that apoptosis plays in the regulation of metastasis. In addition, because tumor samples used here were not microdissected, tumor gene expression data are represented together with the stroma, which may reveal signaling between the microenvironment and tumor cells. For instance, in non-recurrent tumors, extracellular region module was repressed, indicating that the stroma and tumor cells may have fewer interactions, which disable metastasis development. Finally, the genes highlighted in our analysis can be implicated in more than one pathway or characteristic, suggesting that therapeutic approaches to prevent tumor progression should target more than one gene or pathway

  3. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma with expression of KIT and PDGFRA and showing diverse differentiations into plasmacytoid, clear cell, acantholytic, nested, and spindle variants, and into adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and pleomorphic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Various tumors can arise in the urinary bladder (UB); most common is urothelial carcinoma (UC). UC of the UB have many variants. Other types of carcinomas such as adenocarcinoma (AC) and small cell carcinoma (SmCC) can occur in UB carcinomas. Expression of KIT and PDGFRA has not been reported. A 66-year-old man admitted to our hospital because of hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed papillary invasive tumor and a transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. The TUR-BT showed UC, AC, Sm...

  4. Nomograms for predicting survival and recurrence in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma. An international collaborative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganly, Ian; Amit, Moran; Kou, Lei; Palmer, Frank L.; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Katabi, Nora; Yu, Changhong; Kattan, Michael W.; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Naomi, Ramer; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M.; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Ali, Safina; Czerwonka, Lukas; Goldstein, David P.; Gil, Ziv; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the rarity of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), information on outcome is based upon small retrospective case series. The aim of our study was to create a large multiinstitutional international dataset of patients with ACC in order to design predictive nomograms for outcome. Methods ACC patients managed at 10 international centers were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded and an international collaborative dataset created. Multivariable competing risk models were then built to predict the 10 year recurrence free probability (RFP), distant recurrence free probability (DRFP), overall survival (OS) and cancer specific mortality (CSM). All predictors of interest were added in the starting full models before selection, including age, gender, tumor site, clinical T stage, perineural invasion, margin status, pathologic N-status, and M-status. Stepdown method was used in model selection to choose predictive variables. An external dataset of 99 patients from 2 other institutions was used to validate the nomograms. Findings Of 438 ACC patients, 27.2% (119/438) died from ACC and 38.8% (170/438) died of other causes. Median follow-up was 56 months (range 1–306). The nomogram for OS had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N-status and M-status) with a concordance index (CI) of 0.71. The nomogram for CSM had the same variables, except margin status, with a concordance index (CI) of 0.70. The nomogram for RFP had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N status and perineural invasion) (CI 0.66). The nomogram for DRFP had 6 variables (gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, pathologic N-status, perineural invasion and margin status) (CI 0.64). Concordance index for the external validation set were 0.76, 0.72, 0.67 and 0.70 respectively. Interpretation Using an international collaborative database we have created the first nomograms which

  5. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Initially Presented as a Tongue Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz ALTINEL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma is one of the most common tumours after lung and breast cancer to metastasize to the head and neck. Initial presentation by tongue metastasis is extremely rare. A 67-year-oldmale presented with a 4.8 cm mass on his tongue. The result of the punch biopsy from the tongue was diagnosed as a clear cell variant of squamous cell carcinoma. The biopsy was reevaluated due to the renal mass found during the check-up and the rapid enlargement of the mass. The excision of the tongue mass and the radical nephrectomy material confirmed the diagnosis of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the tongue and renal cell carcinoma in the kidney. Since metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the tongue is uncommon it may cause difficulties in diagnosis and proper management. The metastasis of renal cell carcinoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis among the clear cell neoplasms.

  6. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn L. Gorski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy without evident source of bleeding. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE showed three bleeding lesions in the jejunum and ileum. Push enteroscopy revealed a proximal jejunum bleeding mass that was suspicious for malignancy. Histopathology demonstrated poorly differentiated carcinoma. Given the patient’s history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma, and similarity of histologic changes to the old renal cell cancer specimen, metastatic renal cell carcinoma was felt to be the responsible etiology.

  7. Expression of Osteopontin in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and its Surgical Margins-An Immunohistochemical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Malathi; Thiyagarajan, Muthukumar; Munuswamy, Balu David; Jayamani, Logeswari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the advances in the treatment modalities offered for oral squamous cell carcinoma. The recurrence rate of it still remains quite high. Early detection of recurrence will improve the outcome and the survival of the patient. Osteopontin, a transformation–related phosphorylated protein in epithelial cells has been closely related with tumourigenesis. This study was undertaken to explore the potential of OPN as a tumour marker of recurrence in OSCC. Aim To analyse the expression of Osteopontin (OPN) in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC), patient matched tumour free surgical margins and normal oral mucosa and to correlate with local & loco regional recurrence. Materials and Methods Twenty cases each of formalin fixed paraffin embedded blocks of histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC, patient matched tumour free surgical margins and normal oral mucosal tissues were obtained from the archives of the Oral Pathology & Microbiology Department, Faculty of Dental Sciences, SRU and Govt. Arignar Anna Memorial Cancer Hospital, Kancheepuram. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed with an antibody to Osteopontin protein. Patients with secondary tumours and those treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy were excluded from this study. Results The expression of OPN was elevated in 95% of tumours & 55% of histologically tumour free margin samples. There was negative OPN expression in normal mucosal samples. The result of the study was statistically analysed using Pearson chi-square test and was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion OPN can be used as a diagnostic marker in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma. In the tumour free surgical margins, elevated levels of OPN may predict a significantly increased risk of recurrence. PMID:26675878

  8. Glioblastoma recurrence patterns near neural stem cell regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linda; Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Ye, Xiaobu; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Redmond, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma (GBM) cancer stem cells and their neural stem cell counterparts are hypothesized to contribute to tumor progression. We examined whether GBM contrast enhancement contact with neurogenic regions (NR) affect recurrence patterns, as contrast enhancement reflects regions of blood–brain barrier breakdown. Methods 102 patients with primary GBM, treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2006 and 2009, were included. All patients underwent surgical resection followed by adjuvant IMRT (60 Gy/30 fractions) and concomitant temozolomide. Initial and recurrent tumor distance from the subventricular zone (SVZ) or subgranular zone (SGZ) was measured. Tumors were categorized as NR contacting or non-contacting. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between tumor contact and recurrence pattern. Results 49 of 102 (48.0%, 95% CI: 0.386–0.576) tumors contacted NRs at initial presentation, and, of these tumors, 49/49 (100%) contacted NRs at recurrence. Of 53 tumors that were initially non-contacting, 37/53 (69.8%, 95% CI: 0.565–0.804) recurred contacting NRs. In total, 86/102 (84.3%, 95% CI: 0.760–0.901) recurrent GBM contacted NRs compared with 49/102 (48%, 95% CI: 0.386–0.576) at initial presentation. Of the recurrent tumors that did not contact NRs, 16/53 (30.1%, 95% CI: 0.195–0.435) recurred medially toward NRs with a significant decrease in distance between tumor contrast enhancement and NRs. 16/49 (32.6%, 95% CI: 0.212–0.466) initially NR-contacting GBMs recurred out-of field while 7/53 (13.2%, 95% CI: 0.0655–0.248) initially non-contacting recurred out of the radiation treatment field (p = 0.0315, Odds ratio: 3.19, 95% CI: 1.18–8.62). Conclusions GBM contrast-enhancing recurrence is significantly associated with proximity to NRs. NR-contacting initial tumors were more likely to recur out of radiation treatment fields. PMID:26276527

  9. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  10. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Unusual Gross Appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Nikumbh, Dhiraj B.; Sunil V. Jagtap; Gaurav Jain; Roopali K Mali

    2011-01-01

    Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (MCRCC) represents a rare variant of clear cell (conventional) renal cell carcinomas. Attributable to its distinct characteristics in prognosis and its natural history, MCRCC was recognised as a separate subtype of renal cell carcinoma in the 2004 WHO classification of adult renal tumors. We report this case of MCRCC from antemortem surgical specimen, due to its unusual gross appearance and a rare clinical entity.

  11. Sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: Cytohistopathological correlation of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti Indranil; Giri Amita; Majumdar Kaushik; DE, Anuradha

    2010-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinomas of the kidney are rare neoplasms constituting about 1-5% of all renal malignant neoplasms. These are aggressive tumors and are commonly associated with conventional (clear cell) renal cell carcinomas, but cases associated with chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are sparse. Cytological features of such lesions have rarely been reported. Here, we report a unique case of a 48-year-old male patient who presented with right flank lump and pain. A fine needle...

  12. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Unusual Gross Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj B Nikumbh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (MCRCC represents a rare variant of clear cell (conventional renal cell carcinomas. Attributable to its distinct characteristics in prognosis and its natural history, MCRCC was recognised as a separate subtype of renal cell carcinoma in the 2004 WHO classification of adult renal tumors. We report this case of MCRCC from antemortem surgical specimen, due to its unusual gross appearance and a rare clinical entity.

  13. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yichun Chiu; Allen W. Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN). Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy...

  14. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  15. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinokawa, Yuko; Ohtuki, Akiko; Hattori, Mariko; Sadamasa, Hiroko; Hiruma, Masataro; Matumoto, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118-1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124-125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  16. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of a 50-year-old female patient with the malignancy at a less common location. Diagnosis was given based on the histopathologic findings. The demographic data and understanding for this tumor needs to be strengthened by reporting all new cases, which are diagnosed, in literature.

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Pant-Purohit, Mukta; López Beltrán, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Cheng, Lian

    2010-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder(SCCUB) is a rare and aggressive cancer of the bladder.SCCUB is part of neuroendocrine family of tumors thataffect several organ systems including respiratory,gastrointestinal and male and female genitourinary tract.SCCUB affect males predominantly with common riskfactors include smoking, bladder calculi, bladdermanipulation, and chronic cystitis. Prognosis of SCCUBremains poor due to high metastatic potential and lack ofsymptoms in earlier stages of...

  18. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Burke, John M.; Manish Agrawal; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Gury Doshi; Mark T Fleming; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our though...

  19. Basal cell carcinoma of the perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Adriane Ann; Dabade, Tushar; Dandekar, Monisha; Rogers, Gary; Rosmarin, David

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. Most BCCs are found on areas of UV-damaged skin, The study of BCCs of sun-protected regions, however, suggests a more complex pathogenesis. We present a case of BCC of the perineum in a man with no previous history of skin cancer. This is the first report of BCC in this region and one of a small body of cases arising on or near the genital and perianal regions.

  20. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Buti; Melissa Bersanelli; Maddalena Donini; Andrea Ardizzoni

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to d...