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Sample records for cell carcinoma rcc

  1. GSK-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo enhances antitumor effect of sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Sorafenib treatment upregulated GSK-3β levels in RCC cells. ► Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 suppressed xenograft RCC tumor growth. ► Inhibition of GSK-3 enhanced antitumor effect of sorafenib in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for the systemic treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, sorafenib treatment has a limited effect due to acquired chemoresistance of RCC. Previously, we identified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) as a new therapeutic target in RCC. Here, we observed that sorafenib inhibits proliferation and survival of RCC cells. Significantly, we revealed that sorafenib enhances GSK-3 activity in RCC cells, which could be a potential mechanism of acquired chemoresistance. We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 potentiates sorafenib antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that combining GSK-3 inhibitor and sorafenib might be a potential new therapeutic approach for RCC treatment.

  2. GSK-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo enhances antitumor effect of sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

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    Kawazoe, Hisashi; Bilim, Vladimir N. [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Ugolkov, Andrey V., E-mail: ugolkov@northwestern.edu [Tumor Biology Core, Center for Developmental Therapeutics, Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Silverman Hall B733, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Yuuki, Kaori; Naito, Sei; Nagaoka, Akira; Kato, Tomoyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Tomita, Yoshihiko, E-mail: ytomita@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Department of Urology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Iida-nishi 2-2-2, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorafenib treatment upregulated GSK-3{beta} levels in RCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK-3 suppressed xenograft RCC tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of GSK-3 enhanced antitumor effect of sorafenib in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor approved for the systemic treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, sorafenib treatment has a limited effect due to acquired chemoresistance of RCC. Previously, we identified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) as a new therapeutic target in RCC. Here, we observed that sorafenib inhibits proliferation and survival of RCC cells. Significantly, we revealed that sorafenib enhances GSK-3 activity in RCC cells, which could be a potential mechanism of acquired chemoresistance. We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 potentiates sorafenib antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that combining GSK-3 inhibitor and sorafenib might be a potential new therapeutic approach for RCC treatment.

  3. Urine screening by Seldi-Tof, followed by biomarker identification, in a Brazilian cohort of patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Alves

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To screen proteins/peptides in urine of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC patients by SELDI-TOF (Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization - Time of Flight in search of possible biomarkers. Material and Methods Sixty-one urines samples from Clear Cell RCC and Papillary RCC were compared to 29 samples of control urine on CM10 chip. Mass analysis was performed in a ProteinChip Reader PCS 4,000 (Ciphergen Biosystems, Fremont, CA with the software Ciphergen Express 3.0. All chips were read at low and at high laser energy. For statistical analysis the urine samples were clustered according to the histological classification (Clear Cell and Papillary Carcinoma. For identification urine was loaded on a SDS PAGE gel and bands of most interest were excised, trypsinized and identified by MS/MS. Databank searches were performed in Swiss-Prot database using the MASCOT search algorithm and in Profound. Results Proteins that were identified from urine of controls included immunoglobulin light chains, albumin, secreted and transmembrane 1 precursor (protein K12, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2 and vitelline membrane outer layer 1 isoform 1. Identification of immunoglobulins and isoforms of albumin are quite common by proteomics and therefore cannot be considered as possible molecular markers. K12 and MASP-2 play important physiological roles, while vitellite membrane outer layer 1 role is unknown since it was never purified in humans. Conclusions The down expression of Protein K-12 and MASP-2 make them good candidates for RCC urine marker and should be validated in a bigger cohort including the other less common histological RCC subtypes.

  4. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

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    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Gauler, T.; Bauer, S. [Dept. of Internal Medicine (Cancer Research), Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Antoch, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Schuette, J. [Dept. of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Marien-Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq {sup 111}In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR {sup registered} -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  5. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

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    Schieda, Nicola; Van der Pol, Christian B.; Moosavi, Bardia; McInnes, Matthew D.F. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Mai, Kien T.; Flood, Trevor A. [The Ottawa Hospital, The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  6. Intracellular lipid in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC): T2 weighted (T2W) MRI and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate if pRCCs demonstrate intracellular lipid (i-lipid) at chemical-shift (CS) MRI, and assess T2W-MRI and pathologic characteristics. Sixty-two patients with a pRCC diagnosis underwent MRI over 11 years (IRB-approved). Two radiologists independently assessed for presence of i-lipid on CS-MRI and homogeneity on T2W-MRI. Inter-observer agreement was assessed via an intraclass correlation and results were compared using the Chi-square test. Discordant cases were reviewed to establish consensus. T2W SI-ratios (SI.tumor/SI.kidney) and CS-SI index were compared using independent t-tests and Spearman correlation. Two pathologists re-evaluated the histopathology. Nine of the 62 pRCCs (14.5 %) demonstrated i-lipid; agreement was moderate (ICC = 0.63). Pathology review depicted clear cells in four tumours and foamy histiocytes in five tumours. 25.8-35.4 % (ICC = 0.65) of tumours were homogeneous on T2W-MRI. No pRCC with i-lipid was considered homogeneous (p = 0.01-0.04). Overall, T2W SI-ratio and CS-SI index were 0.89 (±0.29) and -3.63 % (-7.27 to 11.42). pRCC with i-lipid had significantly higher T2W SI-ratio (p = 0.003). There was a correlation between the CS-SI index and T2W SI-ratio, (r = 0.44, p < 0.001). Intracellular lipid is uncommonly detected in pRCCs due to clear cell changes and foamy histiocytes. These tumours are associated with heterogeneously-increased SI in T2W-MRI. (orig.)

  7. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with CAIX CAR-engineered T-cells-a completed study overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Cor H J; Klaver, Yarne; Gratama, Jan W; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-06-15

    We studied safety and proof of concept of a phase I/II trial with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The CAR was based on the G250 mAb that recognized an epitope of carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX). Twelve patients with CAIX+ mRCC were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 daily infusions of 2×10(7) to 2×10(9) CAR T-cells. Circulating CAR T-cells were transiently detectable in all patients and maintained antigen-specific immune functions following their isolation post-treatment. Blood cytokine profiles mirrored CAR T-cell presence and in vivo activity. Unfortunately, patients developed anti-CAR T-cell antibodies and cellular immune responses. Moreover, CAR T-cell infusions induced liver enzyme disturbances reaching CTC grades 2-4, which necessitated cessation of treatment in four out of eight patients (cohort 1+2). Examination of liver biopsies revealed T-cell infiltration around bile ducts and CAIX expression on bile duct epithelium, adding to the notion of on-target toxicity. No such toxicities were observed in four patients that were pretreated with G250 mAb (cohort 3). The study was stopped due to the advent of competing treatments before reaching therapeutic or maximum tolerated dose in cohort 3. No clinical responses have been recorded. Despite that, from this trial numerous recommendations for future trials and their immune monitoring could be formulated, such as choice of the target antigen, format and immunogenicity of receptor and how the latter relates to peripheral T-cell persistence. PMID:27284065

  8. A dose-response relationship for time to bone pain resolution after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bony metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. To investigate the utility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of painful renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone metastases, and for a possible dose effect on time to symptom relief. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with 24 painful osseous lesions from metastatic RCC were treated with SBRT. The most common treatment regimens were 24 Gy in 3 fractions and 40 Gy in 5 fractions. The times from treatment to first reported pain relief and time to symptom recurrence were evaluated. Median follow-up was 38 weeks (1-156 weeks). Results. Seventy-eight percent of all patients had pain relief. Patients treated with a BED > 85 Gy achieved faster and more durable pain relief compared to those treated with a BED < 85 Gy. There was decrease in time to pain relief after a change in treatment regimen to 8 Gy x 5 fractions (BED = 86). There was only one patient with grade 1 skin toxicity. No neurological or other toxicity was observed. Conclusions. SBRT can safely and effectively treat painful RCC bony metastases. There appears to be a relationship between radiation dose and time to stable pain relief

  9. A dose-response relationship for time to bone pain resolution after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bony metastases

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    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Dept. of Radiology, Section of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States); Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Blanco, Angel I.; Butler, E. Brian [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital/The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States)], email: bteh@tmhs.org; Lo, Simon S. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland (United States); Amato, Robert J. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Oncology, Univ. of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To investigate the utility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of painful renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone metastases, and for a possible dose effect on time to symptom relief. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with 24 painful osseous lesions from metastatic RCC were treated with SBRT. The most common treatment regimens were 24 Gy in 3 fractions and 40 Gy in 5 fractions. The times from treatment to first reported pain relief and time to symptom recurrence were evaluated. Median follow-up was 38 weeks (1-156 weeks). Results. Seventy-eight percent of all patients had pain relief. Patients treated with a BED > 85 Gy achieved faster and more durable pain relief compared to those treated with a BED < 85 Gy. There was decrease in time to pain relief after a change in treatment regimen to 8 Gy x 5 fractions (BED = 86). There was only one patient with grade 1 skin toxicity. No neurological or other toxicity was observed. Conclusions. SBRT can safely and effectively treat painful RCC bony metastases. There appears to be a relationship between radiation dose and time to stable pain relief.

  10. Local control rates of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the bone using stereotactic body radiation therapy: Is RCC truly radioresistant?′

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlon, Maria T.; Bedrick, Edward; Bhatia, Shilpa; Kessler, Elizabeth R.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report the radiographic and clinical response rate of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) compared with conventional fractionated external beam radiation therapy (CF-EBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone lesions treated at our institution. Methods and materials Forty-six consecutive patients were included in the study, with 95 total lesions treated (50 SBRT, 45 CF-EBRT). We included patients who had histologic confirmation of primary RCC and radiographic evidence of metastatic bone lesions. The most common SBRT regimen used was 27 Gy in 3 fractions. Results Median follow-up was 10 months (range, 1-64 months). Median time to symptom control between SBRT and CF-EBRT were 2 (range, 0-6 weeks) and 4 weeks (range, 0-7 weeks), respectively. Symptom control rates with SBRT and CF-EBRT were significantly different (P = .020) with control rates at 10, 12, and 24 months of 74.9% versus 44.1%, 74.9% versus 39.9%, and 74.9% versus 35.7%, respectively. The median time to radiographic failure and unadjusted pain progression was 7 months in both groups. When controlling for gross tumor volume, dose per fraction, smoking, and the use of systemic therapy, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was significant for clinical response (hazard ratio [HR], 0.204; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.043-0.963; P = .046) and radiographic (HR, 0.075; 95% CI, 0.013-0.430; P = .004). When controlling for gross tumor volume and total dose, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was again predictive of clinical local control (HR, 0.140; 95% CI, 0.025-0.787; P = .026). Toxicity rates were low and equivalent in both groups, with no grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported. Conclusions SBRT is both safe and effective for treating RCC bone metastases, with rapid improvement in symptoms after treatment and more durable clinical and radiographic response rate. Future prospective trials are needed to further define efficacy and toxicity of treatment, especially in the setting of targeted agents

  11. Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna Vijaykumar Wader; Sujata S Kumbhar; Huddedar AD; Wasim GM Khatib

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the kidney comprised of different histological variants. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mainly diagnosed in the sixth decade of life. It is important to identify this entity because it has significantly better prognosis than the clear cell (conventional) and papillary renal cell carcinomas. The chromophobe renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from oncocytoma and clear cell ca...

  12. Renal cell carcinoma: Evolving and emerging subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Suzanne M; Divatia, Mukul; Truong, Luan; Shen, Steven; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-12-16

    Our knowledge of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rapidly expanding. For those who diagnose and treat RCC, it is important to understand the new developments. In recent years, many new renal tumors have been described and defined, and our understanding of the biology and clinical correlates of these tumors is changing. Evolving concepts in Xp11 translocation carcinoma, mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic clear cell RCC, and carcinoma associated with neuroblastoma are addressed within this review. Tubulocystic carcinoma, thyroid-like follicular carcinoma of kidney, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC are also described. Finally, candidate entities, including RCC with t(6;11) translocation, hybrid oncocytoma/chromophobe RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, and renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor are reviewed. Knowledge of these new entities is important for diagnosis, treatment and subsequent prognosis. This review provides a targeted summary of new developments in RCC. PMID:24364021

  13. Clear cell renal carcinoma with areas of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Thodavadi Subbanna; Nandini Nandish Manoli

    2012-01-01

    The classification of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is based upon various histological features which aids in determining the treatment and prognosis. We report a unique case of RCC displaying features of predominantly clear cell RCC with areas of chromophobe RCC in an unusual edematous background. The tumor cells from chromophobe RCC were positive for Hales colloidal iron stain. On Immunohistochemistry majority of them were positive for vimentin and CD10, the markers of clear cell RCC with scat...

  14. The value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD MR imaging in differentiation of renal solid mass and grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC: analysis based on the largest cross-sectional area versus the entire whole tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available To study the value of assessing renal masses using different methods in parameter approaches and to determine whether BOLD MRI is helpful in differentiating RCC from benign renal masses, differentiating clear-cell RCC from renal masses other than clear-cell RCC and determining the tumour grade.Ninety-five patients with 139 renal masses (93 malignant and 46 benign who underwent abdominal BOLD MRI were enrolled. R2* values were derived from the largest cross-section (R2*largest and from the whole tumour (R2*whole. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements were analysed based on two measurements by the same observer and the first measurement from each observer, respectively, and these agreements are reported with intra-class correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. The diagnostic value of the R2* value in the evaluation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic analysis.The intra-observer agreement was very good for R2*largest and R2*whole (all > 0.8. The inter-observer agreement of R2*whole (0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.69~0.79 was good and was significantly improved compared with the R2*largest (0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.52~0.68, as there was no overlap in the 95% confidence interval of the intra-class correlation coefficients. The diagnostic value in differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign lesions with R2*whole (AUC=0.79/0.78[observer1/observer2] and R2*largest (AUC=0.75[observer1] was good and significantly higher (p=0.01 for R2*largest[observer2] vs R2*whole[observer2], p 0.7 and were not significantly different (p=0.89/0.93 for R2*largest vs R2*whole[observer1/observer2], 0.96 for R2*whole[observer1] vs R2*largest[observer2] and 0.96 for R2*whole [observer2] vs R2*largest[observer1].BOLD MRI could provide a feasible parameter for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses and for predicting clear-cell renal cell carcinoma grading. Compared with the largest cross

  15. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  16. Local Control Rates of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) to Thoracic, Abdominal, and Soft Tissue Lesions Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    OpenAIRE

    Altoos, Basel; Amini, Arya; Yacoub, Muthanna; Bourlon, Maria T.; Kessler, Elizabeth E.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We report the radiographic response rate of SBRT compared to conventional fractionated radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) for thoracic, abdominal, skin and soft tissue RCC lesions treated at our institution. Material and methods Fifty three lesions where included in the study (36 SBRT, 17 CF-EBRT), treated from 2004 to 2014 at our institution. We included patients that had thoracic, skin & soft tissue (SST), and abdominal metastases of histologically confirmed RCC. The most common ...

  17. First Delayed Resection Findings After Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) of Human Localised Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in the IRENE Pilot Phase 2a Trial

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    Wendler, Johann Jakob, E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Ricke, Jens, E-mail: jens.Ricke@med.ovgu.de; Pech, Maciej, E-mail: macej.pech@med.ovgu.de; Fischbach, Frank, E-mail: frank.fischbach@med.ovgu.de; Jürgens, Julian, E-mail: julian.juergens@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Siedentopf, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.siedentopf@med.ovgu.de; Roessner, Albert, E-mail: albert.roessner@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Porsch, Markus, E-mail: markus.porsch@med.ovgu.de; Baumunk, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.baumunk@med.ovgu.de; Schostak, Martin, E-mail: martin.schostak@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany); Köllermann, Jens, E-mail: jens.koellermann@sana.de [Sana Klinikum Offenbach Am Main, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Liehr, Uwe-Bernd, E-mail: uwe-bernd.liehr@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionIt is postulated that focal IRE affords complete ablation of soft-tissue tumours while protecting the healthy peritumoral tissue. Therefore, IRE may be an interesting option for minimally invasive, kidney-tissue-sparing, non-thermal ablation of renal tumours.AimWith this current pilot study (“IRENE trial”), we present the first detailed histopathological data of IRE of human RCC followed by delayed tumour resection. The aim of this interim analysis of the first three patients was to investigate the ablation efficiency of percutaneous image-guided focal IRE in RCC, to assess whether a complete ablation of T1a RCC and tissue preservation with the NanoKnife system is possible and to decide whether the ablation parameters need to be altered.MethodsFollowing resection 4 weeks after percutaneous IRE, the success of ablation and detailed histopathological description were used to check the ablation parameters.ResultsThe IRE led to a high degree of damage to the renal tumours (1 central, 2 peripheral; size range 15–17 mm). The postulated homogeneous, isomorphic damage was only partly confirmed. We found a zonal structuring of the ablation zone, negative margins and, enclosed within the ablation zone, very small tumour residues of unclear malignancy.ConclusionAccording to these initial, preliminary study results of the first three renal cases, a new zonal distribution of IRE damage was described and the curative intended, renal saving focal ablation of localised RCC below <3 cm by percutaneous IRE by the NanoKnife system appears to be possible, but needs further, systematic evaluation for this treatment method and treatment protocol.

  18. First Delayed Resection Findings After Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) of Human Localised Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in the IRENE Pilot Phase 2a Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IntroductionIt is postulated that focal IRE affords complete ablation of soft-tissue tumours while protecting the healthy peritumoral tissue. Therefore, IRE may be an interesting option for minimally invasive, kidney-tissue-sparing, non-thermal ablation of renal tumours.AimWith this current pilot study (“IRENE trial”), we present the first detailed histopathological data of IRE of human RCC followed by delayed tumour resection. The aim of this interim analysis of the first three patients was to investigate the ablation efficiency of percutaneous image-guided focal IRE in RCC, to assess whether a complete ablation of T1a RCC and tissue preservation with the NanoKnife system is possible and to decide whether the ablation parameters need to be altered.MethodsFollowing resection 4 weeks after percutaneous IRE, the success of ablation and detailed histopathological description were used to check the ablation parameters.ResultsThe IRE led to a high degree of damage to the renal tumours (1 central, 2 peripheral; size range 15–17 mm). The postulated homogeneous, isomorphic damage was only partly confirmed. We found a zonal structuring of the ablation zone, negative margins and, enclosed within the ablation zone, very small tumour residues of unclear malignancy.ConclusionAccording to these initial, preliminary study results of the first three renal cases, a new zonal distribution of IRE damage was described and the curative intended, renal saving focal ablation of localised RCC below <3 cm by percutaneous IRE by the NanoKnife system appears to be possible, but needs further, systematic evaluation for this treatment method and treatment protocol

  19. Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Potential Mimic of Conventional Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma on Core Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Heath Liddell; Anton Mare; Sean Heywood; Genevieve Bennett; Hin Fan Chan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunoh...

  20. Hyponatremia as a prognostic and predictive factor in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, A N; Jensen, H K; Donskov, F; Marcussen, Niels; von der Maase, H

    2010-01-01

    Low serum sodium has recently been associated with poor survival in localised renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We now show the prognostic effect of serum sodium in patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC).......Low serum sodium has recently been associated with poor survival in localised renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We now show the prognostic effect of serum sodium in patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC)....

  1. Molecular genetics and immunohistochemistry characterization of uncommon and recently described renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qiu; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Cheng, Liang; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compromises multiple types and has been emerging dramatically over the recent several decades. Advances and consensus have been achieved targeting common RCCs, such as clear cell carcinoma, papillary RCC and chromophobe RCC. Nevertheless, little is known on the characteristics of several newly-identified RCCs, including clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, Xp11 translocation RCC, t(6;11) RCC, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient RCC, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC, ALK translocation RCC, thyroid-like follicular RCC, tubulocystic RCC and hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors (HOCT). In current review, we will collect available literature of these newly-described RCCs, analyze their clinical pathologic characteristics, discuss their morphologic and immunohistologic features, and finally summarize their molecular and genetic evidences. We expect this review would be beneficial for the understanding of RCCs, and eventually promote clinical management strategies. PMID:27041925

  2. Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Walsh, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), also known as kidney cancer, renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is a global burden. This article aims to provide a brief overview of RCC. It outlines epidemiology and presentation; invesitgation and staging; treatments and prognosis. The article also includes a focus on currently available drug treatments, and serves as an introduction to the topic.

  3. Ipsilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, M. J.; Song, J H; Kim, J H; Kim, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) in the same kidney is unusual. We report a 53-year-old man with ipsilateral synchronous renal adenocarcinoma and renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma with severe hypercalcemia and a huge staghorn calculus in the opposite kidney. The patient was admitted to the hospital because of left flank pain and intermittent fever which he had had for 2 months. Computerized tomography revealed a huge stone in...

  4. Study of the role of SETD2 mutations in clear cell renal cell carninoma (ccRCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Catarina Faria de

    2013-01-01

    Trabalho de projecto de mestrado em Bioestatística, apresentado à Universidade de Lisboa, através da Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma, ccRCC, is the most common form of Renal Cancer, accounting for 90% of these cancers cases. It is well established that the majority of these cancers happen when both alleles of VHL (Von Hippel Lindau) tumour suppressor gene are mutated. It has also been observed that patients with this form of cancer present mutations on the SETD2...

  5. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela; Piña-Oviedo Sergio; Cuevas-Ocampo Karime; Goldfarb Richard; Schwartz Mary R; Ayala Alberto G; Monzon Federico A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC) in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelate...

  6. Renal cell carcinoma in dialysis patients. A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a life-threatening complication of end-stage renal disease with an unclear pathogenesis. We evaluated RCC developing in patients undergoing dialysis. In 2624 patients undergoing hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at our hospital between July 1993 and March 2004, we performed annual screening for RCC using abdominal computed tomography and ultrasonography. Patients diagnosed with RCC underwent radical nephrectomy as well as clinical and pathologic evaluation. RCC was detected in 44 patients (1.68%; 31 males and 13 females). The age of RCC patients was 55.5±11.1 years. Dialysis duration before RCC diagnosis was 11.2±7.2 years. Most RCC were early stage and low stage by TNM classification, 43 patients had N0M0 RCC, whereas one had N1M0. Tumor size was 2.9±1.9 cm. The predominant histological type of RCC was common or conventional cell-type carcinoma (clear cell carcinoma and granular cell carcinoma). Of patients, 5 (11.4%) had bilateral RCC, and satellite tumor lesions in RCC were detected in 13 (29.5%). In 36 patients (81.8%) RCC was accompanied by acquired cystic disease of the kidney. These patients had longer dialysis durations (P=0.01) and smaller tumors (P=0.048). RCC metastasized postoperatively in 4 patients (9.1%), while one (2.3%) died of cancer. Our dialysis patients showed a higher incidence of RCC than the general population. Prognosis was favorable because tumors were detected by screening when they were small. Therefore, periodical screening for RCC seems very important in dialysis patients. (author)

  7. Translocation Renal Cell Carcinomas in Adults: A Single Institution Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Minghao; De Angelo, Patricia; Osborne, Lisa; Mondolfi, Paniz; Geller, Matthew; Yang, Youfeng; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Cai, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Translocation renal cell carcinoma is a newly recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with chromosomal translocations involving TFE3 (Xp11.2) or, less frequently, TFEB (6p21). Xp11 translocation RCC was originally described as a pediatric neoplasm representing 20–40% of pediatric RCCs with a much lower frequency in the adult population. TFEB translocation RCC is very rare, with approximately 10 cases reported in the literature. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of ad...

  8. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  9. BSND and ATP6V1G3: Novel Immunohistochemical Markers for Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    SHINMURA, KAZUYA; Igarashi, Hisaki; Kato, Hisami; Koda, Kenji; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Seishiro; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Funai, Kazuhito; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ozono, Seiichiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Differentiating between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other RCC subtypes can be problematic using routine light microscopy. This study aimed to identify novel immunohistochemical markers useful for a differential diagnosis between chromophobe RCC and other RCC subtypes. We selected 3 genes (including BSND and ATP6V1G3) that showed specific transcriptional expression in chromophobe RCC using expression data (n = 783) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subsequ...

  10. Full-Length Enrich c-DNA Libraries-Clear Cell-Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sai-Wen Tang; Jung-Yaw Lin

    2012-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common subtype of RCC, is characterized by high metastasis potential and strong resistance to traditional therapies, resulting in a poor five-year survival rate of patients. Several therapies targeted to VEGF pathway for advanced RCC have been developed, however, it still needs to discover new therapeutic targets for treating RCC. Genome-wide gene expression analyses have been broadly used to identify unknown molecular mechanisms of cancer pro...

  11. Simultaneous Development of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Multifocal Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Keng Chuang; Heng-Chang Chuang; Kwai-Fong Ng

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of multifocal urothelial carcinoma (UC) and ipsilateral renalcell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. We report a 67-year-old woman with multifocal, infiltratingurothelial carcinoma and unilateral renal cell carcinoma. She was referred to our departmentbecause of painless gross hematuria. Cystoscopy, computed tomography and retrogradepyelography studies revealed bladder, bilateral renal and ureter UC. She was treated withtransurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by bi...

  12. Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Simon; Matrana, Marc; Tsang, Christopher; Atkinson, Bradley; Choueiri, Toni K.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) encompasses a heterogeneous group of histological subtypes of which clear-cell RCC (CCRCC) is the most common comprising more than 70–80% of all cases. Papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is the next most common comprising 10–15% of cases. PRCC is refractory to chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  13. Microarray profile of human kidney from diabetes, renal cell carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kosti, Adam; Harry Chen, Hung-I; Mohan, Sumathy; Liang, Sitai; Chen, Yidong; Habib, Samy L

    2015-01-01

    Recent study from our laboratory showed that patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing kidney cancer. In the current study, we have screened whole human DNA genome from healthy control, patients with diabetes or renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or RCC+diabetes. We found that 883 genes gain/163 genes loss of copy number in RCC+diabetes group, 669 genes gain/307 genes loss in RCC group and 458 genes gain/38 genes loss of copy number in diabetes group, after removing gain/loss genes ob...

  14. Isolated abdominal wall metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: Unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Kumar; Pramod Kumar Sharma; Malay Kumar Bera

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-seven-year-old gentleman, who was a known victim of left-sided clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), presented with isolated huge parietal swelling in left anterolateral aspect of abdomen. He had undergone open left radical nephrectomy 2 years back. Parietal swelling was widely excised and histopathology revealed clear cell RCC, nuclear Fuhrman grade 2.

  15. Contemporary approach to diagnosis and classification of renal cell carcinoma with mixed histologic features

    OpenAIRE

    Monzon, Federico A; Eric Jonasch; Priya Rao; Kanishka Sircar; Pheroze Tamboli

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an important contributor to cancer-specific mortality worldwide. Targeted agents that inhibit key subtype-specific signaling pathways have improved survival times and have recently become part of the standard of care for this disease. Accurately diagnosing and classifying RCC on the basis of tumor histology is thus critical. RCC has been traditionally divided into clear-cell and non-clear-cell categories, with papillary RCC forming the most common subtype of non-...

  16. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma arising in acquired cystic disease of the kidney: an immunohistochemical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Kawada, Chiaki; Shuin, Taro; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Ohe, Chisato; Mikami, Shuji; Pan, Chin-Chen

    2011-08-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently established disease entity. However, there are few reports on genetic study of this entity. We report such a case with focus on genetic study. A 57-year-old Japanese man was found to have 3 renal tumors. Histologically, two tumors showed findings of clear cell RCC; and the other tumor showed findings of clear cell papillary RCC that was characterized by papillary growth pattern of neoplastic cells in cystic space with purely clear cell cytology. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells of clear cell papillary RCC were diffusely positive for PAX2 and cytokeratin 7, but negative for CD10, RCC Ma, and AMACR. In fluorescence in situ hybridization study for one clear cell papillary RCC, we detected polysomy for chromosome 7 and monosomy for chromosomes 17, 16, and 20. In addition, we detected mutation of VHL gene in clear cell RCC, but found no VHL gene mutation in clear cell papillary RCC. Finally, our results provide further evidence that clear cell papillary RCC may be both morphologically and genetically distinct entity from clear cell RCC and papillary RCC. PMID:20952286

  17. A Rare Case of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Confined to the Isthmus of a Horseshoe Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kongnyuy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseshoe kidney (HSK is the most common renal anomaly. Reports of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC in HSK are conflicting. Very few cases of isthmus-located RCC have been reported in the literature. We report a unique case of an isthmus-located RCC. Proper vascular and tumor imaging prior to surgery is key to successful tumor removal.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma: links and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaria, Reena; Klaassen, Zachary; Terris, Martha K

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and a summary of the most commonly associated risk factors. A literature review was performed with a focus on recent studies with a high level of evidence (large prospective cohort studies and meta-analyses). The incidence rate of RCC varies globally, with the rate rising rapidly in more developed regions, demonstrating the effects of increased use of diagnostic imaging and prevalence of modifiable risk factors. Based on the current evidence, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most well-established risk factors for sporadic RCC worldwide. Acquired cystic kidney disease is also a significant risk factor, specifically in dialysis patients. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between RCC risk and moderate alcohol consumption. Certain analgesics and occupational exposure have been linked to an increased risk of RCC, although data are limited. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may provide a protective effect. PMID:27022296

  19. Nutlin-3 Enhances Sorafenib Efficacy in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vatsyayan, Rit; Singhal, Jyotsana; Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Awasthi, Sanjay; SINGHAL, SHARAD S.

    2011-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the top ten cancers in USA. The renal tumors are highly angiogenic and are resistant to conventional interventions, particularly radiotherapy. The advent of multispecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib has improved the progression-free survival in RCC, but overall survival in recurrent and metastatic RCC is still a concern that has lead to characterization of combinatorial regimens. Hence, we studied the effect of combination of nutlin-3, an MDM2 ...

  20. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yichun Chiu; Allen W. Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN). Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy...

  1. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  2. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Buti; Melissa Bersanelli; Maddalena Donini; Andrea Ardizzoni

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to d...

  3. Renal cell carcinoma: evolving approaches to advanced non-clear cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bukowski, Ronald M; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies including sunitinib, sorafenib, and temsirolimus. Because patients with conventional clear cell histology account for 75- 80% of all patients with RCC, there has been little accumulated evidence on the treatment of patients with non-clear cell histologies. Most clinical trials have excluded them from enrolment, except for randomized studies investigating temsirolimus. Ma...

  4. Unusual Presentation of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Gluteal Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Yunus Emre Goger; Mehmet Mesut Piskin; Mehmet Balasar; Mehmet Kilinc

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has widespread and unpredictable metastatic potential. The most common sites of metastatic RCC are the lungs, lymph nodes, bones, liver, and brain; however the soft tissue metastasis is rare (2,3). Here we report a 76-year-old male patient who had renal cell carcinoma presented with gluteal metastasis. To our knowledge this is the first renal cell cancer case with gluteal metastasis at the initial diagnosis.

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  6. Collision tumor of kidney: A case of renal cell carcinoma with metastases of prostatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Vyas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous occurrence of prostatic adenocarcinoma and renal cell carcinoma is well documented in the literature. However, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a renal cell carcinoma (RCC is quite rare. Although renal cell carcinoma is the most common tumor that can harbor metastasis, metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma in a kidney harboring a RCC is quite rare. There are four cases in the literature showing metastasis of prostatic adenocarcinoma to RCC. However, as per our knowledge, this is the first case of a collision between RCC and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  7. The occult nature of intramedullary spinal cord metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are characterised by a tendency to metastasise widely, often while remaining occult. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCM) from RCC may be the presenting feature of the disease or present at any time in the disease course. This case report discusses an ISCM from RCC which became manifested at the time of resection of the primary tumour. We review the literature published on ISCM from RCC from 1990 to date comparing disease characteristics and presentations.

  8. Complete remission with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Albiges, Laurence; Oudard, Stéphane; Negrier, Sylvie; Caty, Armelle; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Joly, Florence; Duclos, Brigitte; Geoffrois, Lionel; Rolland, Frédéric; Guillot, Aline; Laguerre, Brigitte; Legouffe, Eric; Kohser, Frédéric; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Theodore, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    Complete remission (CR) is uncommon during treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but it may occur in some patients. It remains a matter of debate whether therapy should be continued after CR.

  9. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, E. R.; Yates, J. R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to pr...

  10. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Entity with Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wahal, Shailja Puri; Mardi, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) represents a rare variant of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MCRCC has been recognized as a separate subtype of RCC in the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of adult renal tumors. MCRCC is diagnosed on the basis of strict histological criteria according to 2004 WHO classification. The chief differentials diagnosis to be considered include cystic nephroma, cystic clear cell carcinoma, clear cell papillary renal cell carc...

  11. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma: a new radiological entity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) is a recently identified renal malignancy. While approximately 100 cases of TC-RCC have been reported in the pathology literature, imaging features have not yet been clearly described. The purpose of this review is to describe the main radiologic features of this rare sub-type of RCC on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based jointly on the literature and findings from a multi-institutional retrospective HIPAA-compliant review of pathology and imaging databases. Using a combination of sonographic and CT/MRI features, diagnosis of TC-RCC appeared to be strongly suggested in many cases. (orig.)

  12. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma: a new radiological entity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, F.; Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Helenon, O.; Correas, J.M. [Necker Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Lemaitre, L. [Claude Huriez Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lille (France); Andre, M. [La-Conception Hospital, Department of Radiology, Marseille (France); Meuwly, J.Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sengel, C. [Grenoble Hospital, Department of Radiology, Grenoble (France); Derchi, L. [Universita di Genova, Radiologia - DICMI, Genova (Italy); Yacoub, M. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bordeaux (France); Verkarre, V. [Necker Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) is a recently identified renal malignancy. While approximately 100 cases of TC-RCC have been reported in the pathology literature, imaging features have not yet been clearly described. The purpose of this review is to describe the main radiologic features of this rare sub-type of RCC on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based jointly on the literature and findings from a multi-institutional retrospective HIPAA-compliant review of pathology and imaging databases. Using a combination of sonographic and CT/MRI features, diagnosis of TC-RCC appeared to be strongly suggested in many cases. (orig.)

  13. Molecular Genetic Alterations in Renal Cell Carcinomas With Tubulocystic Pattern: Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma, Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma With Heterogenous Component and Familial Leiomyomatosis-associated Renal Cell Carcinoma. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Genetic Analysis of 15 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulamec, Monika; Skenderi, Faruk; Zhou, Ming; Krušlin, Božo; Martínek, Petr; Grossmann, Petr; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Kalusova, Kristyna; Kokoskova, Bohuslava; Rotterova, Pavla; Hora, Milan; Daum, Ondrej; Dubova, Magdalena; Bauleth, Kevin; Slouka, David; Sperga, Maris; Davidson, Whitney; Rychly, Boris; Perez Montiel, Delia; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic morphologic spectrum of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) may include areas resembling papillary RCC (PRCC). Our study includes 15 RCCs with tubulocystic pattern: 6 TC-RCCs, 1 RCC-high grade with tubulocystic architecture, 5 TC-RCCs with foci of PRCC, 2 with high-grade RCC (HGRCC) not otherwise specified, and 1 with a clear cell papillary RCC/renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor-like component. We analyzed aberrations of chromosomes 7, 17, and Y; mutations of VHL and FH genes; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 3p. Genetic analysis was performed separately in areas of classic TC-RCC and in those with other histologic patterns. The TC-RCC component demonstrated disomy of chromosome 7 in 9/15 cases, polysomy of chromosome 17 in 7/15 cases, and loss of Y in 1 case. In the PRCC component, 2/3 analyzable cases showed disomy of chromosome 7 and polysomy of chromosome 17 with normal Y. One case with focal HGRCC exhibited only disomy 7, whereas the case with clear cell papillary RCC/renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor-like pattern showed polysomies of 7 and 17, mutation of VHL, and loss of heterozygosity 3p. FH gene mutation was identified in a single case with an aggressive clinical course and predominant TC-RCC pattern. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) TC-RCC demonstrates variable status of chromosomes 7, 17, and Y even in cases with typical/uniform morphology. (2) The biological nature of PRCC/HGRCC-like areas within TC-RCC remains unclear. Our data suggest that heterogenous TC-RCCs may be associated with an adverse clinical outcome. (3) Hereditary leiomyomatosis-associated RCC can be morphologically indistinguishable from "high-grade" TC-RCC; therefore, in TC-RCC with high-grade features FH gene status should be tested. PMID:26447894

  14. Osteoblastic bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RCC accounts for only 2–3% of all cancers. Due to its’ non-specific symptoms disease is often diagnosed in advanced stage. Disseminated RCC frequently produces bone metastases that are almost always highly destructive, hyper vascularized and purely osteolytic. In this article we describe a case of a 71-year old male patient with disseminated osteoblastic bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and present a short review of published literature reporting cases of osteoblastic bone metastases from RCC. Our patient presented with thoracic pain aggravated by movement. He was diagnosed with predominantly osteoblastic bone metastases in the skeleton of thoracic and lumbar vertebra along with metastases in iliac bones, ribs, humerus and clavicles. Initially, origin of bone metastases was unknown, but later a small tumor in patient’s right kidney was identified. Microscopic evaluation of the open bone biopsy showed clear cell RCC with sarcomatoid differentiation. Although, due to its’ rarity, RCC is not included in the primary differential diagnosis in patients with osteoblastic metastases, such rare cases suggest that RCC may be considered in the diagnosis when there no other primary tumor is found

  15. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10-8 for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10-4 for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy

  16. Treatment of elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Elisa; Grassi, Paolo; Cavo, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Maggi, Claudia; De Braud, Filippo; Boccardo, Francesco; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) increases with age, and given the constant gain in life expectancy of the general population, both localized RCC and metastatic RCC (mRCC) are more frequently observed in the elderly population. The elderly are a heterogeneous group of patients often characterized by the presence of comorbidities, different compliance to treatment and polypharmacy. Here we review the available data with the aim to analyze the safety and efficacy of new targeted therapies (TTs) in elderly mRCC patients. TTs seem to be effective in both older and younger patients, but elderly patients appear to show reduced tolerance to treatments compared to younger patients. Prospective trials are needed to better understand how to manage mRCC in elderly patients. PMID:26654225

  17. [Outlook: Future therapy of renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lothar; Miller, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Targeted therapies have fundamentally altered the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Sunitinib today is an internationally recommended reference standard in first-line therapy; other drugs such as Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Bevacizumab (in combination with Interferon-alpha) and Sorafenib are part of the therapeutic arsenal. Practitioners thus have now more and better therapeutic options at hand, leading to a significantly improved prognosis for mRCC patients. Numerous ongoing research activities aim at the improvement of the benefits of the new compounds in the metastatic situation or application earlier in the course of the disease. Key aspects of future development in RCC are the optimization of the current therapy options by developing new targeted therapies, the search for the best combinations and sequences including the role of nephrectomy and the assessment in the adjuvant or neo-adjuvant setting. The following contribution provides an overview of ongoing studies, thus giving insight into the future therapy of RCC. PMID:20164673

  18. CD 9 and vimentin distinguish clear cell from chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljunberg Börje

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC can usually be distinguished by histologic characteristics. Occasionally, diagnosis proves challenging and diagnostic difficulty will likely increase as needle biopsies of renal lesions become more common. Methods To identify markers that aid in differentiating ccRCC from chRCC, we used gene expression profiles to identify candidate markers that correlate with histology. 39 antisera and antibodies, including 35 for transcripts identified from gene expression profiling, were evaluated. Promising markers were tested on a tissue microarray (TMA containing 428 renal neoplasms. Strength of staining of each core on the TMA was formally scored and the distribution of staining across different types of renal neoplasms was analyzed. Results Based on results from initial immunohistochemical staining of multitissue titer arrays, 23 of the antisera and antibodies were selected for staining of the TMA. For 7 of these markers, strength of staining of each core on the TMA was formally scored. Vimentin (positive in ccRCC and CD9 (positive in chRCC best distinguished ccRCC from chRCC. The combination of vimentin negativity and CD9 positivity was found to distinguish chRCC from ccRCC with a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 95.2%. Conclusion Based on gene expression analysis, we identify CD9 and vimentin as candidate markers for distinguishing between ccRCC and chRCC. In difficult cases and particularly when the amount of diagnostic tissue is limited, vimentin and CD9 staining could serve as a useful adjunct in the differential diagnosis of ccRCC and chRCC.

  19. Distinct Cytoplasmic Expression of KL-6 Mucin in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comparative Immunohistochemical Study with Other Renal Epithelial Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Mana; Higuchi, Kayoko; Shimojo, Hisashi; Uehara, Takeshi; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cytoplasmic sialyl glycoproteins is a conspicuous feature in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We compared the immunohistochemical expression of sialyl glycoproteins in chromophobe RCC with that in other types of renal tumors. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of surgically resected renal tumors (chromophobe RCC, 14 cases [10 cases of classic type and 4 cases of eosinophilic variant]; oncocytoma, 7 cases; and clear cell RCC, 9 cases) and kidneys from immature inf...

  20. Racial difference in histologic subtype of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has rapidly increased in incidence for over two decades. The most common histologic subtypes of RCC, clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe have distinct genetic and clinical characteristics; however, epidemiologic features of these subtypes have not been well characterized, particularly regarding any associations between race, disease subtypes, and recent incidence trends. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, we examined differences in the age-adjusted incidence rates and trends of RCC subtypes, including analysis focusing on racial differences. Incidence rates increased over time (2001–2009) for all three subtypes. However, the proportion of white cases with clear cell histology was higher than among blacks (50% vs. 31%, respectively), whereas black cases were more likely than white cases to have papillary RCC (23% vs. 9%, respectively). Moreover, papillary RCC incidence increased more rapidly for blacks than whites (P < 0.01) over this period. We also observed that increased incidence of papillary histology among blacks is not limited to the smallest size strata. We observed racial differences in proportionate incidence of RCC subtypes, which appear to be increasing over time; this novel finding motivates further etiologic, clinical, molecular, and genetic studies. Using national data, we observed a higher proportion of black renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases with papillary histology compared to Caucasian cases. We also observed time trends in black-white incidence differences in histologic RCC subtypes, with rapid increases in the disproportionate share of black cases with papillary histology

  1. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca2+ entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca2+ regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is a major Ca2+ entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration

  2. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Contralateral Ureter: A Rare Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley Dixon; Maria Tretiakova; John Gore; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the contralateral ureter is a rare phenomenon. We report a metastatic RCC to the contralateral ureter 5 months after right radical nephrectomy for Fuhrman grade 3/4 clear cell adenocarcinoma with pathologic T3 staging. The distal ureter was excised followed by partial ileal ureteral substitution. Pathology confirmed metastatic clear cell RCC Fuhrman grade 2/4. Ileal ureteral substitution has been shown to provide good long-term functional outcomes and ...

  3. Review of renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid features with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Keiji; Kasajima, Atsuko; Ohe, Chisato; Kawakami, Fumi; Mikami, Shuji; Matsuura, Keiko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Nagashima, Yoji; Petersson, Fredirk; Lopez, Jose I; Cohen, Ronald J; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2015-03-01

    Rhabdoid morphology in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may, like sarcomatoid change, be perceived as a type of dedifferentiation, and is a poor prognostic factor. Histologically, rhabdoid neoplastic cells are round to polygonal cells with globular eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions and eccentric vesicular nuclei and enlarged nucleoli. All types of RCC, including clear cell, papillary, chromophobe, collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, ALK-positive renal cancer and unclassified RCC, may display a variably prominent rhabdoid phenotype. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of rhabdoid cells shows positivity for vimentin and/or cytokeratin. Ultrastructurally, cytoplasmic whorls/aggregates of intermediate filaments correspond to light microscopically observed inclusions. Genetically, a previous report suggests that combined loss of BAP1 and PBRM1 may be associated with rhabdoid morphology. As with sarcomatoid change, pathologists should describe, estimate and state the proportion of tumor cells with a rhabdoid phenotype in the routine pathology report of RCC. PMID:26017874

  4. Outcome of Patients With Metastatic Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriakopoulos, Christos E; Chittoria, Namita; Choueiri, Toni K;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis. Data regarding outcome in the targeted therapy era are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinical, prognostic, and treatment parameters in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients with and without sarcomatoid histology...... of sRCC is needed to develop alternative therapeutics....

  5. Coexisting Papillary and Clear Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Same Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Ustuner; Busra Yaprak; Kerem Teke; Seyfettin Ciftci; Mucahit Kart; Kursat Yildiz; Melih Culha

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid lesion of the kidney. Bilateral synchronous benign and malignant renal tumors have been defined in some reports. However, unilateral concordance of malignant renal tumors is very rare and there are only a few cases that had synchronous different subtypes of malignant renal tumors arising within the same kidney. Herein, we describe a 67-year-old male patient who had clear cell RCC and papillary RCC in his right kidney that were successfully t...

  6. Functional epigenomics approach to identify methylated candidate tumour suppressor genes in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, M.

    2008-01-01

    Promoter region hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing is a frequent cause of tumour suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in many human cancers. Previously, to identify candidate epigenetically inactivated TSGs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we monitored changes in gene expression in four RCC cell lines after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This enabled us to identify HAI-2/SPINT2 as a novel epigenetically inactivated candidate RCC TSG. To identify further candidat...

  7. Renal cell carcinoma: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabaria R

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reena Kabaria, Zachary Klaassen, Martha K Terris Department of Surgery, Section of Urology, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: This review provides an overview of the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC and a summary of the most commonly associated risk factors. A literature review was performed with a focus on recent studies with a high level of evidence (large prospective cohort studies and meta-analyses. The incidence rate of RCC varies globally, with the rate rising rapidly in more developed regions, demonstrating the effects of increased use of diagnostic imaging and prevalence of modifiable risk factors. Based on the current evidence, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most well-established risk factors for sporadic RCC worldwide. Acquired cystic kidney disease is also a significant risk factor, specifically in dialysis patients. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between RCC risk and moderate alcohol consumption. Certain analgesics and occupational exposure have been linked to an increased risk of RCC, although data are limited. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may provide a protective effect. Keywords: renal cell carcinoma, risk factors, incidence, smoking, obesity, hypertension

  8. Spontaneous rupture of the kidney affected by multifocal papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lucio Dell'Atti

    2014-01-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) represents the second most common type of malignant renal epithelial tumor (represents the 10% of the kidney’s carcinoma) and can be subclassified in the basophile type I and eosinophile type II. We report a clinical case of spontaneous rupture of the kidney affected by multifocal (42 tumors foci) pRCC in a young man 53 years old, without showing earlier specific cancer signs and symptoms. Prognosis for type I pRCC is better than type II pRCC, but it is a...

  9. Characterizing the Impact of Lymph Node Metastases on the Survival Outcome for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Targeted Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroeger, Nils; Pantuck, Allan J; Wells, J Connor; Lawrence, Nicola; Broom, Reuben; Kim, Jenny J; Srinivas, Sandy; Yim, Jessica; Bjarnason, Georg A; Templeton, Arnoud; Knox, Jennifer; Bernstein, Ezra; Smoragiewicz, Martin; Lee, Jae; Rini, Brian I; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Wood, Lori A; Beuselinck, Benoit; Donskov, Frede; Choueiri, Toni K; Heng, Daniel Y

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether lymph node metastases (LNM) and their localization negatively affect clinical outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinicopathological features, survival outcome, and treatment response in mRCC patients with LNM...... supradiaphragmatic (SPD) LNM, subdiaphragmatic (SBD) LNM, and patients with LNM in both locations (SPD+/SBD+) without histologic considerations, and then separately in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and non-clear cell RCC (nccRCC) patients, respectively. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary outcome was...... with shorter survival outcome when metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients are treated with targeted therapies. Clinical trials should evaluate whether surgical removal of regional lymph nodes at the time of nephrectomy may improve outcomes in high-risk RCC patients....

  10. Renal Cell Carcinoma with Intraluminal Spread of the Entire Upper Urinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Shigenori Kakutani; Haruki Kume; Yoshikazu Hirano; Toshihiko Wakita; Yukio Homma

    2013-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) involving the entire upper urinary tract. A 51-year-old female was referred to us because of macroscopic hematuria. Computed tomography revealed a renal tumor filling renal pelvis and ureter, which turned to be a clear cell RCC after nephroureterectomy.

  11. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  12. Single metastatic renal cell carcinoma in gallbladder: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho; Lee, Seung Young; Yi, Kyung Sik; Park, Kil Sun; Sung, Ro Hyun [Chungbuk National Univ. Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of adult malignancy. 25% to 57% of RCC patients exhibit overt evidence of metastatic disease at initial presentation. Metastases to the gallbladder is uncommon and usually detected in only 0.4-0.6% of autopsies. We report the case of a 58 year old man who presented with a metastasis in the gallbladder from RCC. He had undergone went a right nephrectomy four years ago. There was no evidence of metastasis. A follow up abdomen CT scan taken three years after operation showed a polypoid lesion within the gallbladder. The size of the polypoid lesion had increased at the follow up CT and the enhancement pattern of lesion became similar to that of RCC. A Cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed the polyp was clear cell carcinoma of metastatic origin from kidney.

  13. Single metastatic renal cell carcinoma in gallbladder: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of adult malignancy. 25% to 57% of RCC patients exhibit overt evidence of metastatic disease at initial presentation. Metastases to the gallbladder is uncommon and usually detected in only 0.4-0.6% of autopsies. We report the case of a 58 year old man who presented with a metastasis in the gallbladder from RCC. He had undergone went a right nephrectomy four years ago. There was no evidence of metastasis. A follow up abdomen CT scan taken three years after operation showed a polypoid lesion within the gallbladder. The size of the polypoid lesion had increased at the follow up CT and the enhancement pattern of lesion became similar to that of RCC. A Cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed the polyp was clear cell carcinoma of metastatic origin from kidney

  14. Everolimus in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Preliminary Experience from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Kuan Huang; Chuang-Chi Liaw; See-Tong Pang; Cheng-Keng Chuang; Yang-Jen Chiang; Chun-Te Wu; Ying-Hsu Chang; Hung-Ming Wang; Yung-Chang Lin; Jia-Juan Hsieh; Li-Ying Ou; Shih-I Tsai; Chih-Hsun Yang; Cheng-Ta Yang; John Wen-Cheng Chang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Everolimus has been approved for second-line treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of sorafenib or sunitinib. The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of everolimus in Taiwanese patients with mRCC.Methods: Between March 2009 and August 2011, 24 mRCC patients treated with everolimus were analyzed. Prior to everolimus, each patient had received therapy with at least one vascular endothelial growth factor ...

  15. Prognostic role of PPAR-γ and PTEN in the renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chaoyang; WEI, JINXING; Tian, Xin; Li, Yang; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore association of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expressions with prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Our study subjects included 87 RCC tissues, 28 paracarcinoma tissues and 21 normal renal tissues. PPAR-γ and PTEN detection was conducted using immunohistochemistry staining. The association of PPAR-γ and PTEN with the clinical parameters and prognosis of RCC was analyzed. Kaplan-Meier method...

  16. CONVENTIONAL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH GRANULOMATOUS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Granulomatous inflammation is a distinctive pattern of chronic inflammatory reaction characterized by microscopic aggregation of activated macrophages which often develop epithelioid appearance and multinucleate giant cells. Granulomas are encountered in limited number of infectious and some non-infectious conditions. Granulomas have been described within the stroma of malignancies like carcinomas of the breast and colon, seminoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, where they represent T-cell-mediated reaction of the tumor stroma to antigens expressed by the tumor. Granulomatous reaction in association with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is uncommon, with only few published reports in the literature. We describe a case of conventional (clear cell RCC associated with epithelioid cell granulomas within the tumor parenchyma.

  17. Incidence of Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma in Low-Grade Renal Cell Carcinoma Cases: A 12-Year Retrospective Clinicopathologic Study From a Single Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simpal; Kauffman, Eric C; Kandel, Sirisa; George, Saby; Schwaab, Thomas; Xu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a recently recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma entity after 2004 World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. CCPRCC has unique histomorphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. The distinction of CCPRCC from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with clear cell morphology is crucial because the former is considered to have a favorable clinical outcome. CCPRCC may be interpreted in the past as other renal cell carcinomas, particularly low-grade clear cell RCC. In this study, the frequency of CCPRCC in previously diagnosed low-grade RCC and its clinicopathologic features were examined. A total of 126 cases of stage T1a with low nuclear grade RCC were identified from 625 consecutive RCCs removed by radical/partial nephrectomy over 12-year period (2000-2011). Archival tissue sections were retrospectively reviewed along with patient medical charts. Eight cases (1.3% of all RCC, 6.3% of pT1a low grade RCC) with characteristic histologic features of CCPRCC were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Seven cases were previously diagnosed as clear cell RCC and one as multilocular cystic RCC. Radiographically, CCPRCC favored a mid-pole location in the kidneys. At a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 20-114.5 months), there were no cases of local or distant recurrence. In conclusion, CCPRCC is not uncommon among small low-grade RCC tumors. CCPRCC can be correctly recognized by its unique histomorphological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry studies, which is important due to the excellent clinical outcome following resection. PMID:26510859

  18. Management of renal cell carcinoma presenting as inflammatory renal mass

    OpenAIRE

    Ehab Eltahawy; Mohamed Kamel; Mahmoud Ezzet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can have a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. In the immunocompromised patient fever and an inflammatory renal mass can harbor RCC. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the charts of patients who were managed at our department during 1998-2008 as renal abscess or perinephric collection. Renal ultrasound and subsequently abdominal CT was done. Medical treatment in the form of antibiotics, control of diabetes and drainage was done. Percutaneous ...

  19. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  20. Presence of intratumoral neutrophils is an independent prognostic factor in localized renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Krogh; Donskov, Frede; Marcussen, Niels; Nordsmark, Marianne; Lundbeck, Finn; von der Maase, Hans

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously demonstrated a significant negative impact of intratumoral neutrophils in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This study assessed intratumoral neutrophils in localized clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study comprised 121 consecutive patients....... CONCLUSION: The presence of intratumoral neutrophils is a new, strong, independent prognostic factor for short recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival in localized clear cell RCC....... who had a nephrectomy for localized RCC. Biomarkers (intratumoral CD8+, CD57+ immune cells, CD66b+ neutrophils, and carbonic anhydrase IX [CA IX]) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship with clinical and histopathologic features and patient outcome was evaluated. RESULTS: The...

  1. The methylated N-terminal tail of RCC1 is required for stabilisation of its interaction with chromatin by Ran in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanderson Helen S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1 is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran GTPase. Localised generation of Ran-GTP by RCC1 on chromatin is critical for nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation. Both the N-terminal tail of RCC1 and its association with Ran are important for its interaction with chromatin in cells. In vitro, the association of Ran with RCC1 induces a conformational change in the N-terminal tail that promotes its interaction with DNA. Results We have investigated the mechanism of the dynamic interaction of the α isoform of human RCC1 (RCC1α with chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP of green fluorescent protein (GFP fusions. We show that the N-terminal tail stabilises the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin and this function can be partially replaced by another lysine-rich nuclear localisation signal. Removal of the tail prevents the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin from being stabilised by RanT24N, a mutant that binds stably to RCC1α. The interaction of RCC1α with chromatin is destabilised by mutation of lysine 4 (K4Q, which abolishes α-N-terminal methylation, and this interaction is no longer stabilised by RanT24N. However, α-N-terminal methylation of RCC1α is not regulated by the binding of RanT24N. Conversely, the association of Ran with precipitated RCC1α does not require the N-terminal tail of RCC1α or its methylation. The mobility of RCC1α on chromatin is increased by mutation of aspartate 182 (D182A, which inhibits guanine-nucleotide exchange activity, but RCC1αD182A can still bind nucleotide-free Ran and its interaction with chromatin is stabilised by RanT24N. Conclusions These results show that the stabilisation of the dynamic interaction of RCC1α with chromatin by Ran in live cells requires the N-terminal tail of RCC1α. α-N-methylation is not regulated by formation of the binary

  2. Colon metastasis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei-ping; YU Yan-lan; CHEN Zhi-qiang; HUANG Xue-feng; ZHANG Zhi-gen

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of colonic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and review the literature.A 54-year-old male was referred to our hospital with a history of bloody stools and fever.A dght kidney tumor measuring about 10 cm in diameter was found by abdominal computed tomography.Right radical nephrectomy and a right hemicolectomy with ileotransversostomy were performed.Pathological diagnosis was chromophobe RCC with sarcomotoid change involving the colon.Chromophobe RCC with sarcomotoid change is very rare.

  3. Robot-Assisted Retroperitoneoscopic Surgery for Synchronous Contralateral Ureteral Metastasis of Renal-Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Hong; Chiu, Allen Wen-Shien; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) with synchronous metastasis to contralateral ureter is extremely rare with only four cases reported in the literature. We report a case of synchronous metastatic RCC to the contralateral ureter with effective robot-assisted retroperitoneoscopic nephron-sparing surgery that leads to favorable oncologic and functional outcome.

  4. The epigenetic landscape of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kluzek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common subtype of all kidney tumors. During the last few years, epigenetics has emerged as an important mechanism in ccRCC pathogenesis. Recent reports, involving large-scale methylation and sequencing analyses, have identified genes frequently inactivated by promoter methylation and recurrent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory proteins. Interestingly, three of detected genes (PBRM1, SETD2 and BAP1 are located on chromosome 3p, near the VHL gene, inactivated in over 80% ccRCC cases. This suggests that 3p alterations are an essential part of ccRCC pathogenesis. Moreover, most of the proteins encoded by these genes cooperate in histone H3 modifications. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest discoveries shedding light on deregulation of chromatin machinery in ccRCC. Newly described ccRCC-specific epigenetic alterations could potentially serve as novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and become an object of novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Gene expression profile of renal cell carcinoma clear cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall’Oglio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The determination of prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is based, classically, on stage and histopathological aspects. The metastatic disease develops in one third of patients after surgery, even in localized tumors. There are few options for treating those patients, and even the new target designed drugs have shown low rates of success in controlling disease progression. Few studies used high throughput genomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma for determination of prognosis. This study is focused on the identification of gene expression signatures in tissues of low-risk, high-risk and metastatic RCC clear cell type (RCC-CCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of approximately 55,000 distinct transcripts using the Whole Genome microarray platform hybridized with RNA extracted from 19 patients submitted to surgery to treat RCC-CCT with different clinical outcomes. They were divided into three groups (1 low risk, characterized by pT1, Fuhrman grade 1 or 2, no microvascular invasion RCC; (2 high risk, pT2-3, Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 with, necrosis and microvascular invasion present and (3 metastatic RCC-CCT. Normal renal tissue was used as control. RESULTS: After comparison of differentially expressed genes among low-risk, high-risk and metastatic groups, we identified a group of common genes characterizing metastatic disease. Among them Interleukin-8 and Heat shock protein 70 were over-expressed in metastasis and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: These findings can be used as a starting point to generate molecular markers of RCC-CCT as well as a target for the development of innovative therapies.

  6. Rate of renal cell carcinoma subtypes in different races

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sankin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We sought to identify racial differences among histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC between black and non-black patients in an equal-access health care system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We established a multi-institutional, prospective database of patients undergoing partial or radical nephrectomy between January 1, 2000 and Sept 31, 2009. For the purposes of this study, data captured included age at diagnosis, race, tumor size, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of capsular invasion, margin status, and tumor histology. RESULTS: 204 kidney tumors were identified (Table-1. Of these, 117 (57.4% were in black patients and 87 (42.6% were in non-black patients. Age at surgery ranged from 37 to 87 with a median of 62. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 22.0 cm with a median of 5.0 cm. Overall, tumors were composed of clear cell RCC in 97 cases (47.5%, papillary RCC in 65 cases (31.9%, chromophobe RCC in 13 cases (6.4%, collecting duct/medullary RCC in 2 cases (1.0%, RCC with multiple histological subtypes in 8 cases (3.9%, malignant tumors of other origin in 6 cases (2.9%, and benign histology in 13 cases (6.4%. Among black patients, papillary RCC was seen in 56 cases (47.9%, compared to 9 cases (10.3% among non-black patients (p < 0.001 (Table-2. Clear cell RCC was present in 38 (32.5% of black patients and in 59 (67.8% of non-blacks (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, papillary RCC had a much higher occurrence among black patients compared to non-black patients. This is the first study to document such a great racial disparity among RCC subtypes.

  7. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  8. Rab25 upregulation correlates with the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common urological cancer with a poor prognosis. A recent cohort study revealed that the median survival of RCC patients was only 1.5 years and that <10% of the patients in the study survived up to 5 years. In tumor development, Rab GTPase are known to play potential roles such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, communication, and drug resistance in multiple tumors. However, the correlation between Rabs expression and the occurrence, development, and metastasis of RCC remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases in RCC patients. Our results showed that high levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with RCC invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph-node metastasis (P < 0.001), and pathological stage (P < 0.01). Conversely, in 786-O and A-498 cells, knocking down Rab25 protein expression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our results also demonstrated that Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d, and further suggested that Rab25 upregulation in RCC is due to diminished expression of let-7d. These findings indicate that Rab25 might be a novel candidate molecule involved in RCC development, thus identifying a potential biological therapeutic target for RCC. - Highlights: • The transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases were analyzed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). • High levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors of RCC. • Knockdown of Rab25 protein expression reduced RCC cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d in RCC

  9. Rab25 upregulation correlates with the proliferation, migration, and invasion of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jia, Qingzhu [Biomedical Analysis Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Cytomics, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Qian [Department of Urology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Ying, E-mail: wanying_cn@163.com [Biomedical Analysis Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Cytomics, Chongqing (China)

    2015-03-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common urological cancer with a poor prognosis. A recent cohort study revealed that the median survival of RCC patients was only 1.5 years and that <10% of the patients in the study survived up to 5 years. In tumor development, Rab GTPase are known to play potential roles such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, communication, and drug resistance in multiple tumors. However, the correlation between Rabs expression and the occurrence, development, and metastasis of RCC remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases in RCC patients. Our results showed that high levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with RCC invasion classification (P < 0.01), lymph-node metastasis (P < 0.001), and pathological stage (P < 0.01). Conversely, in 786-O and A-498 cells, knocking down Rab25 protein expression inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our results also demonstrated that Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d, and further suggested that Rab25 upregulation in RCC is due to diminished expression of let-7d. These findings indicate that Rab25 might be a novel candidate molecule involved in RCC development, thus identifying a potential biological therapeutic target for RCC. - Highlights: • The transcriptional levels of 52 Rab GTPases were analyzed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). • High levels of Rab25 expression were significantly correlated with clinicopathological factors of RCC. • Knockdown of Rab25 protein expression reduced RCC cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Rab25 is a target gene of let-7d in RCC.

  10. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Burke, John M.; Manish Agrawal; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Gury Doshi; Mark T Fleming; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our though...

  11. Renal cell carcinoma in long-term survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma in early childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rare in children and comprises only 1-3% of all pediatric primary renal tumors. Recently, several case reports have described RCC developing in patients previously treated for advanced stage neuroblastoma (NB). Our experience with four patients treated for advanced stage NB during early childhood who developed RCC later in life are added to 14 others in the literature. These patients and our review of the literature suggest an association between RCC and NB that warrants further study. (orig.)

  12. Multiple metastatic deposits in the head and neck region from a renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Azlan Iskandar; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Masir, Noraidah; Goh, Bee See

    2010-10-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites. PMID:22135565

  13. Concurrent renal angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Woo Kun; Sung, Deuk Jae; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Han, Na Yeon; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Jeog Hyeon [Anam Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Concurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and angiomyolipoma (AML) is a very rare condition, especially in patients without underlying tuberous sclerosis. We present three patients with concurrent RCC and AML in the ipsilateral kidney. Concurrent RCC is difficult to differentiate radiologically from a non-fatty component of an AML because they share several imaging findings. However, several noticeable radiologic features are helpful in the diagnosis of suspected cases. This report of two cases highlights the radiologic features that distinguish RCC from non-fatty components of AML.

  14. Renal cell carcinoma manifests primarily as endobronchial mass: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial metastasis (EBM from renal cell carcinoma (RCC is a very rare entity, though pulmonary metastasis of RCC is common. Here, we present a case of RCC with EBM, in which the primary tumor was detected after the detection of secondary. A 60-year-old man presented with cough for last 2 months. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT chest followed by bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial mass at left bronhi. CECT whole abdomen revealed a left-sided renal space occupying lesion (SOL. CT guided fine needle aspiration cytology of the SOL proved it as a RCC. Palliative bronchoscopic removal of endobronchial mass by snaring diathermy was done.

  15. Are primary renal cell carcinoma and metastases of renal cell carcinoma the same cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk-Wojtaś, Aleksandra; Stec, Rafał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a process consisting of cells spreading from the primary site of the cancer to distant parts of the body. Our understanding of this spread is limited and molecular mechanisms causing particular characteristics of metastasis are still unknown. There is some evidence that primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastases of RCC exhibit molecular differences that may effect on the biological characteristics of the tumor. Some authors have detected differences in clear cell and nonclear cell component between these 2 groups of tumors. Investigators have also determined that primary RCC and metastases of RCC diverge in their range of renal-specific markers and other protein expression, gene expression pattern, and microRNA expression. There are also certain proteins that are variously expressed in primary RCCs and their metastases and have effect on clinical outcome, e.g., endothelin receptor type B, phos-S6, and CD44. However, further studies are needed on large cohorts of patients to identify differences representing promising targets for prognostic purposes predicting disease-free survival and the metastatic burden of a patient as well as their suitability as potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, in this review we have attempted to summarize studies connected with differences between primary RCC and its metastases and their influence on the biological characteristics of renal cancer. PMID:26850779

  16. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lai; Xiaodong, Teng

    2016-05-25

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  17. Klotho plays a critical role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma progression and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Hwang, Kyu-Hee; Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, Kyu-Sang; Kong, In Deok; Eom, Minseob; Cha, Seung-Kuy

    2016-05-01

    Klotho functions as a tumor suppressor predominantly expressed in renal tubular cells, the origin of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Altered expression and/or activity of growth factor receptor have been implicated in ccRCC development. Although Klotho suppresses a tumor progression through growth factor receptor signaling including insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), the role of Klotho acting on IGF-1R in ccRCC and its clinical relevance remains obscure. Here, we show that Klotho is favorable prognostic factor for ccRCC and exerts tumor suppressive role for ccRCC through inhibiting IGF-1R signaling. Our data shows the following key findings. First, in tumor tissues, the level of Klotho and IGF-1R expression are low or high, respectively, compared to that of adjacent non-neoplastic parenchyma. Second, the Klotho expression is clearly low in higher grade of ccRCC and is closely associated with clinical outcomes in tumor progression. Third, Klotho suppresses IGF-1-stimulated cell proliferation and migration by inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway. These results provide compelling evidence supporting that Klotho acting on IGF-1R signaling functions as tumor suppressor in ccRCC and suggest that Klotho is a potential carcinostatis substance for ccRCC. PMID:27162484

  18. Cancer stem cells are underestimated by standard experimental methods in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedye, Craig; Sirskyj, Danylo; Lobo, Nazleen C.; Meens, Jalna; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Robinette, Michael; Fleshner, Neil; Hamilton, Robert J; Kulkarni, Girish; Zlotta, Alexandre; Evans, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2016-01-01

    Rare cancer stem cells (CSC) are proposed to be responsible for tumour propagation and re-initiation and are functionally defined by identifying tumour-initiating cells (TICs) using the xenotransplantation limiting dilution assay (LDA). While TICs in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) appeared rare in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice, xenografts formed more efficiently from small tumour fragments, indicating the LDA underestimated ccRCC TIC frequency. Mechanistic interrogation of the LDA identified multiple steps that influence ccRCC TIC quantitation. For example, tissue disaggregation destroys most ccRCC cells, common assays significantly overestimate tumour cell viability, and microenvironmental supplementation with human extracellular factors or pharmacological inhibition of anoikis increase clonogenicity and tumourigenicity of ccRCC cell lines and primary tumour cells. Identification of these previously uncharacterized concerns that cumulatively lead to substantial underestimation of TICs in ccRCC provides a framework for development of more accurate TIC assays in the future, both for this disease and for other cancers. PMID:27121191

  19. Cancer stem cells are underestimated by standard experimental methods in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedye, Craig; Sirskyj, Danylo; Lobo, Nazleen C; Meens, Jalna; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Robinette, Michael; Fleshner, Neil; Hamilton, Robert J; Kulkarni, Girish; Zlotta, Alexandre; Evans, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A S; Ailles, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Rare cancer stem cells (CSC) are proposed to be responsible for tumour propagation and re-initiation and are functionally defined by identifying tumour-initiating cells (TICs) using the xenotransplantation limiting dilution assay (LDA). While TICs in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) appeared rare in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice, xenografts formed more efficiently from small tumour fragments, indicating the LDA underestimated ccRCC TIC frequency. Mechanistic interrogation of the LDA identified multiple steps that influence ccRCC TIC quantitation. For example, tissue disaggregation destroys most ccRCC cells, common assays significantly overestimate tumour cell viability, and microenvironmental supplementation with human extracellular factors or pharmacological inhibition of anoikis increase clonogenicity and tumourigenicity of ccRCC cell lines and primary tumour cells. Identification of these previously uncharacterized concerns that cumulatively lead to substantial underestimation of TICs in ccRCC provides a framework for development of more accurate TIC assays in the future, both for this disease and for other cancers. PMID:27121191

  20. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rombo, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selectiveanti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  1. Improving our understanding of papillary renal cell carcinoma with integrative genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Parth K; Singer, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) is a heterogeneous and incompletely understood histologic subtype of kidney cancer. Recently, authors from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network performed a comprehensive molecular characterization of pRCC. Using multiple analytic methods, they identified 4 subgroups of pRCC with varied genotypic anomalies and probabilities of overall survival. This analysis elucidated the differences between type 1 and type 2 pRCC. Furthermore, type 2 pRCC was found to be heterogeneous itself, with at least 3 subtypes with distinct molecular features. This improved characterization and insight about potential driver mutations and altered pathways may lead to the development of more targeted agents and better patient stratification in clinical trials for pRCC. PMID:27162793

  2. Bone Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have bone metastasis that are often osteolytic and cause substantial morbidity, such as pain, pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia. The presence of bone metastasis in RCC is also associated with poor prognosis. Bone-targeted treatment using bisphosphonate and denosumab can reduce skeletal complications in RCC, but does not cure the disease or improve survival. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tumor-induced changes in the bone microenvironment is needed to develop effective treatment. The “vicious cycle” hypothesis has been used to describe how tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment to drive bone destruction and tumor growth. Tumor cells secrete factors like parathyroid hormone-related peptide, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor, which stimulate osteoblasts and increase the production of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). In turn, the overexpression of RANKL leads to increased osteoclast formation, activation and survival, thereby enhancing bone resorption. This review presents a general survey on bone metastasis in RCC by natural history, interaction among the immune system, bone and tumor, molecular mechanisms, bone turnover markers, therapies and healthcare burden. PMID:27338367

  3. Identification of TGF-β-activated kinase 1 as a possible novel target for renal cell carcinoma intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fandong; Li, Yan; Tian, Xin; Fu, Liye; Yin, Yuanqin; Sui, Chengguang; Ma, Ping; Jiang, Youhong, E-mail: youyuanhongyeah@yeah.net

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Inhibition of TAK1 kinase activity suppresses NF-κB activation and RCC cell survival. • TAK1 inhibitors induces apoptotic cytotoxicity against RCC cells. • RCC cells with TAK1 depletion show reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. • TAK1 and p-NF-κB are both over-expressed in human RCC tissues. • Inhibition or depletion of TAK1 enhances the activity of vinblastine sulfate. - Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is common renal malignancy within poor prognosis. TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) plays vital roles in cell survival, apoptosis-resistance and carcinogenesis through regulating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and other cancer-related pathways. Here we found that TAK1 inhibitors (LYTAK1, 5Z-7-oxozeanol (5Z) and NG-25) suppressed NF-κB activation and RCC cell (786-O and A489 lines) survival. TAK1 inhibitors induced apoptotic cytotoxicity against RCC cells, which was largely inhibited by the broad or specific caspase inhibitors. Further, shRNA-mediated partial depletion of TAK1 reduced 786-O cell viability whiling activating apoptosis. Significantly, TAK1 was over-expressed in human RCC tissues, and its level was correlated with phosphorylated NF-κB. Finally, kinase inhibition or genetic depletion of TAK1 enhanced the activity of vinblastine sulfate (VLB) in RCC cells. Together, these results suggest that TAK1 may be an important oncogene or an effective target for RCC intervention.

  4. Glycosaminoglycan Profiling in Patients' Plasma and Urine Predicts the Occurrence of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Francesco; Volpi, Nicola; Nilsson, Helén; Nookaew, Intawat; Maruzzo, Marco; Roma, Anna; Johansson, Martin E; Stierner, Ulrika; Lundstam, Sven; Basso, Umberto; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-24

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression. Here, we used genome-scale metabolic modeling to elucidate metabolic reprogramming in 481 ccRCC samples and discovered strongly coordinated regulation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis at the transcript and protein levels. Extracellular GAGs are implicated in metastasis, so we speculated that such regulation might translate into a non-invasive biomarker for metastatic ccRCC (mccRCC). We measured 18 GAG properties in 34 mccRCC samples versus 16 healthy plasma and/or urine samples. The GAG profiles were distinctively altered in mccRCC. We derived three GAG scores that distinguished mccRCC patients with 93.1%-100% accuracy. We validated the score accuracies in an independent cohort (up to 18 mccRCC versus nine healthy) and verified that the scores normalized in eight patients with no evidence of disease. In conclusion, coordinated regulation of GAG biosynthesis occurs in ccRCC, and non-invasive GAG profiling is suitable for mccRCC diagnosis. PMID:27184840

  5. Functional significance of erythropoietin in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the molecules regulated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), is the hypoxia-responsive hematopoietic factor, erythropoietin (EPO). This may have relevance to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), where mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene are major risk factors for the development of familial and sporadic RCC. VHL mutations up-regulate and stabilize HIF, which in turn activates many downstream molecules, including EPO, that are known to promote angiogenesis, drug resistance, proliferation and progression of solid tumours. HIFs typically respond to hypoxic cellular environment. While the hypoxic microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of tumours in general, it is of special significance in the case of RCC because of the link between VHL, HIF and EPO. EPO and its receptor, EPOR, are expressed in many cancers, including RCC. This limits the use of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) to treat anaemia in cancer patients, because the rhEPO may be stimulatory to the cancer. EPO may also stimulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RCC, and pathological EMT has a key role in cancer progression. In this mini review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of EPO in RCC. The available data, either for or against the use of EPO in RCC patients, are equivocal and insufficient to draw a definitive conclusion

  6. Transcriptome network analysis reveals candidate genes for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhai; Yun-Fei Xu; Min Liu; Jun-Hua Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Context: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a kidney cancer that originates in renal parenchyma and it is the most common type of kidney cancer with approximately 80% lethal cases. Aims: To interpret the mechanism, explore the regulation of TF-target genes and TF-pathway, and identify the potential key genes of renal cell carcinoma. Settings and Design: After constructing a regulation network from differently expressed genes and transcription factors, pathway regulation network and gene onto...

  7. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Lee, Mi-Ra [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyu-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Chul; Jung, Jae Hung [Department of Urology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Seung-Kuy, E-mail: skcha@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, and Nuclear Receptor Research Consortium, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Minseob, E-mail: eomm@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) is a major Ca{sup 2+} entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration.

  8. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama Takayuki; Teratani Takumi; Takayama Tatsuya; Takaoka Naohisa; Mugiya Soichi; Ozono Seiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC,...

  9. Epigenetic change in kidney tumor: downregulation of histone acetyltransferase MYST1 in human renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MYST1 (also known as hMOF, a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs as an epigenetic mark of active genes, is mainly responsible for histone H4K16 acetylation in the cells. Recent studies have shown that the abnormal gene expression of hMOF is involved in certain primary cancers. Here we examined the involvement of hMOF expression and histone H4K16 acetylation in primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Simultaneously, we investigated the correlation between the expression of hMOF and clear cell RCC (ccRCC biomarker carbohydrase IX (CA9 in RCC. Materials and methods The frozen RCC tissues and RCC cell lines as materials, the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining approaches were used. Results RT-PCR results indicate that hMOF gene expression levels frequently downregulated in 90.5% of patients (19/21 with RCC. The reduction of hMOF protein in both RCC tissues and RCC cell lines is tightly correlated with acetylation of histone H4K16. In addition, overexpression of CA9 was detected in 100% of ccRCC patients (21/21. However, transient transfection of hMOF in ccRCC 786–0 cells did not affect both the gene and protein expression of CA9. Conclusion hMOF as an acetyltransferase of H4K16 might be involved in the pathogenesis of kidney cancer, and this epigenetic changes might be a new CA9-independent RCC diagnostic maker.

  10. Genomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Toru; Matsuura, Keiko; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Hijiya, Naoki; Narimatsu, Takahiro; Nomura, Takeo; Sato, Fuminori; Nagashima, Yoji; Kashima, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Ohyama, Chikara; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seto, Masao; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the genomic profile of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by analyzing genomic copy number aberrations. Seventy-nine tumor samples from 63 patients with RCC-ESRD were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 × 44K Oligo Micro Array (Agilent Technologies Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the 63 cases could be divided into two groups, Clusters A and B. Cluster A was comprised mainly of clear cell RCC (CCRCC), whereas Cluster B was comprised mainly of papillary RCC (PRCC), acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC. Analysis of the averaged frequencies revealed that the genomic profiles of Clusters A and B resembled those of sporadic CCRCC and sporadic PRCC, respectively. Although it has been proposed on the basis of histopathology that ACD-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC and PRCC-ESRD are distinct subtypes, the present data reveal that the genomic profiles of these types, categorized as Cluster B, resemble one another. Furthermore, the genomic profiles of PRCC, ACD-associated RCC and clear cell papillary RCC admixed in one tissue tended to resemble one another. On the basis of genomic profiling of RCC-ESRD, we conclude that the molecular pathogenesis of CCRCC-ESRD resembles that of sporadic CCRCC. Although various histologic subtypes of non-clear cell RCC-ESRD have been proposed, their genomic profiles resemble those of sporadic PRCC, suggesting that the molecular pathogenesis of non-CCRCC-ESRD may be related to that of sporadic PRCC. PMID:22145865

  11. Elevated expression of KIF18A enhances cell proliferation and predicts poor survival in human clear cell renal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, QI; CAO, BIN; NAN, NING; WANG, YU; ZHAI, XU; LI, YOUFANG; CHONG, TIE

    2016-01-01

    The function of kinesin family member 18A (KIF18A) in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is unclear. The purpose of the current study was to determine the expression and prognostic significance of KIF18A in RCC. Specimens from 273 RCC patients undergoing nephrectomies were studied. Expression of KIF18A mRNA was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or quantitative PCR, and the expression of KIF18A protein was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The expression of KIF18A in clear-cell RCC cell lines was decreased using small interfering RNA targeting KIF18A, and increased by transfection with KIF18A cDNA. The proliferative ability of RCC cells in vitro and in vivo was detected by WST-1 assay and an animal xenograft model with BALB/c nude mice, respectively. The association between KIF18A expression and overall survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The results showed that KIF18A expression was significantly increased in RCC tissues compared with normal kidney tissues. The level of KIF18A expression was significantly associated with tumor stage, histological grade, metastasis and tumor size. Moreover, KIF18A increased the proliferation of RCC cells in vitro and in vivo. KIF18A expression was upregulated in RCC and enhanced the proliferation of RCC cells. Therefore, it appears that KIF18A plays a key role in the carcinogenesis and progression of RCC, and is a novel candidate prognostic marker for RCC patients. Furthermore, silencing KIF18A expression may serve as a new therapeutic strategy against RCC.

  12. AIF Downregulation and Its Interaction with STK3 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shengqiang; Wu, Hongjin; Nie, Huan; Yue, Lei; Jiang, Huadong; Xiao, Sheng; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) plays a crucial role in caspase-independent programmed cell death by triggering chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Therefore, it might be involved in cell homeostasis and tumor development. In this study, we report significant AIF downregulation in the majority of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). In a group of RCC specimens, 84% (43 out of 51) had AIF downregulation by immunohistochemistry stain. Additional 10 kidney tumors, including an oxyphilic adenom...

  13. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandan; J; Das; Usha; Thingujam; Ananya; Panda; Sanjay; Sharma; Arun; Kumar; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography(CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT(p CT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. p CT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using p CT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of p CT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs.

  14. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  15. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Buti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC.

  16. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  17. Arginase I–Producing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Renal Cell Carcinoma Are a Subpopulation of Activated Granulocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ernstoff, Marc S; Hernandez, Claudia; Atkins, Michael; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Sierra, Rosa; Ochoa, Augusto C.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) producing arginase I are increased in the peripheral blood of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MDSC inhibit T-cell function by reducing the availability of l-arginine and are therefore considered an important tumor escape mechanism. We aimed to determine the origin of arginase I–producing MDSC in RCC patients and to identify the mechanisms used to deplete extracellular l-arginine. The results show that human MDSC are a subpopulation of activate...

  18. BSND and ATP6V1G3: Novel Immunohistochemical Markers for Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Kato, Hisami; Koda, Kenji; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Seishiro; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Funai, Kazuhito; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ozono, Seiichiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Differentiating between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other RCC subtypes can be problematic using routine light microscopy. This study aimed to identify novel immunohistochemical markers useful for a differential diagnosis between chromophobe RCC and other RCC subtypes. We selected 3 genes (including BSND and ATP6V1G3) that showed specific transcriptional expression in chromophobe RCC using expression data (n = 783) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subsequent immunohistochemical examination of 186 RCCs obtained in our patient series resulted in a strong diffuse positivity of BSND and ATP6V1G3 proteins (both of which are involved in the regulation of membrane transport) in all the chromophobe RCC specimens (23/23 cases, 100%) but not in the clear cell RCC specimens (0/153 cases, 0%) or the papillary RCC specimens (0/10 cases, 0%). BSND and ATP6V1G3 protein expressions were also detected in renal oncocytoma (13/14 cases, 92.9%) and in the distal nephron, including the collecting duct, in the normal kidney. A computational analysis of TCGA data suggested that DNA methylation was involved in the differential expression pattern of both genes among RCC subtypes. Finally, an immunohistochemical analysis showed lung carcinomas were negative (0/85 cases, 0%) for the expression of both proteins. These results suggest that BSND and ATP6V1G3 are excellent novel immunohistochemical markers for differentiating between chromophobe RCC and other subtypes of RCC, including clear cell and papillary RCCs.

  19. BSND and ATP6V1G3: Novel Immunohistochemical Markers for Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Kato, Hisami; Koda, Kenji; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Seishiro; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Yoneda, Tatsuaki; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Funai, Kazuhito; Takayama, Tatsuya; Ozono, Seiichiro; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other RCC subtypes can be problematic using routine light microscopy. This study aimed to identify novel immunohistochemical markers useful for a differential diagnosis between chromophobe RCC and other RCC subtypes. We selected 3 genes (including BSND and ATP6V1G3) that showed specific transcriptional expression in chromophobe RCC using expression data (n = 783) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subsequent immunohistochemical examination of 186 RCCs obtained in our patient series resulted in a strong diffuse positivity of BSND and ATP6V1G3 proteins (both of which are involved in the regulation of membrane transport) in all the chromophobe RCC specimens (23/23 cases, 100%) but not in the clear cell RCC specimens (0/153 cases, 0%) or the papillary RCC specimens (0/10 cases, 0%). BSND and ATP6V1G3 protein expressions were also detected in renal oncocytoma (13/14 cases, 92.9%) and in the distal nephron, including the collecting duct, in the normal kidney. A computational analysis of TCGA data suggested that DNA methylation was involved in the differential expression pattern of both genes among RCC subtypes. Finally, an immunohistochemical analysis showed lung carcinomas were negative (0/85 cases, 0%) for the expression of both proteins. These results suggest that BSND and ATP6V1G3 are excellent novel immunohistochemical markers for differentiating between chromophobe RCC and other subtypes of RCC, including clear cell and papillary RCCs. PMID:26091477

  20. Immunohistochemical Study of c-KIT (CD117) Expression in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain subtypes of Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are diagnostically challenging owing to their overlapping histopathological features. Recently, c-KIT (CD117) has come into focus as a potential diagnostic marker of some renal tumors. c-KIT also provides a potentially suitable for targeted tumor therapy. The present study was designed to investigate the expression of c-KIT in RCCs in order to evaluate its diagnostic usefulness as a phenotypic marker and to establish the basis for a new possible therapeutic modality. Material and Methods: The present work was conducted on 49 patients with RCC: Clear cell RCC (CRCC): 30 cases (61.22%); chromophobe RCC (ChRCC): 9 cases (18.37%); papillary RCC (PRCC), type I: 5 cases (10.20%); and carcinoma of the collecting ducts of Bellini (CdRCC): 5 cases (10.20%). The expression of c-KIT was assessed using immunohistochemistry. The diagnostic performance of c-KIT expression was evaluated using ROC curve analysis. Results: Overall, 11 (22.5%) cases of RCC showed c-KIT expression: 2 (6.7%) CRCC, 7 (77.8%) ChRCC, and 2 (40.0%) CdRCC. Among the study group, ChRCC had the highest frequency (p=.001) and staining score (p=.001) for c-KIT. In addition, only ChRCC showed membranous pattern of c-KIT staining, while other tumors showed cytoplasmic staining (p=.013). c-KIT showed a sensitivity of 77.78% and a specificity of 95% for the diagnosis of ChRCC. The relation between c-KIT expression and clinico pathological parameters was not significant. High grade tumors had a statistically significant higher total score of c-KIT expression (p=.023). Conclusions: c-KIT is frequently and significantly expressed in chromophobe RCC suggesting that it might play a role in its pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical detection of c-KIT expression could be used to aid histological diagnosis of chromophobe RCC with a high sensitivity and specificity. The substantial c-Kit immunoreactivity in chromophobe RCC may be of clinical importance especially in the field of

  1. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuichi; Kataoka, Masao; Hata, Junya; Akaihata, Hidenori; Ogawa, Soichiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC. PMID:26793589

  2. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Sato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC.

  3. CHROMOPHOBE RENAL CELL CARCINOMA MASQUERADING AS OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE AND GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION

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    Suresh Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromophobe (Chr RCC is a distinctive entity of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC arising from cortical portion of collecting duct of kidneys with an incidence of 3 - 5% (1. Localized Cromophobe RCC suggests a better prognosis than other type of RCC but there is a poorer outcome with sarcomatoid features or metastatic disease (1 . Renal cell carcinoma is one of the few tumors known to metastasize to the pancreas (2 . Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma (3. Of patients with pancreatic metastases, 12% present with synchronous extra pancreatic metastasis, and they have a poor prognosis . Chromophobe RCC presenting as obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction has been cited infrequently in literature (3 . The purpose of this paper is two: first, a rare case ChRCC with atypical presentation with obstructive jaundice, gastric outlet obstruction and pancreatic metastasis. Second, multidisciplinary treatment involving General surgeon, Medical Gastroenterologist, Surgical Gastroenterologist, Urologist, Interventional Radiologist and a Medical oncologist. CASE PRESENTATION: A 43 years old female presenting with features of obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction in surgical outpatient. A multidisciplinary management approach found Metastatic ChRCC the cause for gastrointestinal manifestation . CONCLUSIONS: ChRCC can be local invasion or metastatic. There are multiple sites where metastases can occur. There are many specific investigations to confirm RCC and concomitant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO, obstructive jaundice and pancreatic secondaries. This patient was diagnosed early after presentation of acute symptoms, decompression of biliary system done early by PTBD, Radical nephrectomy done with Portahepatis node which was causing obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction. Frozen section biopsy from

  4. Harnessing the p53-PUMA Axis to Overcome DNA Damage Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to DNA damage–induced apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and a major cause of treatment failure and lethal disease outcome. A tumor entity that is largely resistant to DNA-damaging therapies including chemo- or radiotherapy is renal cell carcinoma (RCC. This study was designed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of DNA damage resistance in RCC to develop strategies to resensitize tumor cells to DNA damage–induced apoptosis. Here, we show that apoptosis-resistant RCC cells have a disconnect between activation of p53 and upregulation of the downstream proapoptotic protein p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. We demonstrate that this disconnect is not caused by gene-specific repression through CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF but instead by aberrant chromatin compaction. Treatment with an HDAC inhibitor was found to effectively reactivate PUMA expression on the mRNA and protein level and to revert resistance to DNA damage–induced cell death. Ectopic expression of PUMA was found to resensitize a panel of RCC cell lines to four different DNA-damaging agents tested. Remarkably, all RCC cell lines analyzed were wild-type for p53, and a knockdown was likewise able to sensitize RCC cells to acute genotoxic stress. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA damage resistance in RCC is reversible, involves the p53-PUMA axis, and is potentially targetable to improve the oncological outcomes of RCC patients.

  5. Lactate Dehydrogenase A is a potential prognostic marker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Girgis, Hala; Masui, Olena; White, Nicole MA; Scorilas, Andreas; Rotondo, Fabio; Seivwright, Annetta; Gabril, Manal; Filter, Emily R; Girgis, Andrew HA; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Jewett, Michael AS; Evans, Andrew; Al-Haddad, Sahar; Siu, KW Michael; Yousef, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 90% of cancer-related deaths in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are caused by tumor relapse and metastasis. Thus, there is an urgent need for new molecular markers that can potentiate the efficacy of the current clinical-based models of prognosis assessment. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential significance of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), assessed by immunohistochemical staining, as a prognostic marker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma in relation...

  6. Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma t(6;11)(p21;q12) and Sickle Cell Anemia: First Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chaste, Damien; Vian, Emmanuel; Verhoest, Gregory; Blanchet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a family of rare tumors recently identified in the pediatric and young adult population. We report the first case of a young woman from French West Indies with sickle cell anemia who developed a translocation RCC t(6;11)(p21;q12). Usually people with the sickle cell condition are known to develop renal medullary carcinoma (RMC). To our knowledge, this is the first case described in the literature of a translocation RCC associated with sickle cell di...

  7. Renal cell carcinoma: evolving approaches to advanced non-clear cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y.C. Heng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC has changed dramatically with the introduction of targeted therapies including sunitinib, sorafenib, and temsirolimus. Because patients with conventional clear cell histology account for 75- 80% of all patients with RCC, there has been little accumulated evidence on the treatment of patients with non-clear cell histologies. Most clinical trials have excluded them from enrolment, except for randomized studies investigating temsirolimus. Many retrospective studies on the use of all three of these targeted therapies in patients with non-clear cell histology have demonstrated response rates ranging from 3.7%–16%. Although response rates may not be as high compared to patients with clear cell histologies, targeted therapy does provide a clinically meaningful response.

  8. Multilevel Genomics-Based Taxonomy of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengju Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive molecular characterization (including DNA methalylation and copy number, RNA, and protein expression, we classified 894 renal cell carcinomas (RCCs of various histologic types into nine major genomic subtypes. Site of origin within the nephron was one major determinant in the classification, reflecting differences among clear cell, chromophobe, and papillary RCC. Widespread molecular changes associated with TFE3 gene fusion or chromatin modifier genes were present within a specific subtype and spanned multiple subtypes. Differences in patient survival and in alteration of specific pathways (including hypoxia, metabolism, MAP kinase, NRF2-ARE, Hippo, immune checkpoint, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR could further distinguish the subtypes. Immune checkpoint markers and molecular signatures of T cell infiltrates were both highest in the subtype associated with aggressive clear cell RCC. Differences between the genomic subtypes suggest that therapeutic strategies could be tailored to each RCC disease subset.

  9. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  10. MicroRNA-194 is a Marker for Good Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofech-Mozes, Roy; Khella, Heba W Z; Scorilas, Andreas; Youssef, Leza; Krylov, Sergey N; Lianidou, Evi; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos G; Gabril, Manal; Evans, Andrew; Yousef, George M

    2016-04-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most prevalent adult kidney cancer. Prognostic markers are needed to guide patient management toward aggressive versus more conservative approaches, especially for small tumors ≤4 cm. miR-194 was reported to be downregulated in several cancers and is involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. We evaluated miR-194 as a prognostic marker in ccRCC. In a cohort of 234 patients with primary ccRCC, we correlated miR-194 expression level with multiple clinicopathological features including disease-free and overall survival, tumor size, clinical stage, and histological grade. Our results shows a stepwise decrease in miR-194 expression from normal kidney to primary ccRCC (P = 0.0032) and a subsequent decrease from primary to metastatic lesions. Additionally, patients with higher miR-194 expression has significantly longer disease-free survival (P = 0.041) and overall survival (P = 0.031) compared to those with lower expression. In multivariate analysis, miR-194-positive tumors retain significance in disease-free survival and overall survival, suggesting miR-194 is an independent marker for good prognosis in ccRCC. Moreover, miR-194 is a marker for good prognosis for patients with small renal masses (P = 0.014). These findings were validated on an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We also compared miR-194 expression between RCC subtypes. ccRCC had the highest levels, whereas chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma had comparable lower levels. Target prediction coupled with pathway analysis show that miR-194 is predicted to target key molecules and pathways involved in RCC progression. miR-194 represents a prognostic biomarker in ccRCC. PMID:26860079

  11. Present and future perspectives on immunotherapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: Going to the core or beating around the bush?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Kawashima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic lesions of renal cell carcinoma (RCC occasionally regress spontaneously after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Although this is an exceptionally rare occurrence, RCC has thus been postulated to be immunogenic. Immunotherapies, including cytokine therapy, peptide-based vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitors have therefore been used to treat patients with advanced, metastatic RCC. We review the history, trends, and recent progress in immunotherapy for advanced RCC and discuss future perspectives, with consideration of our experimental work on galectin 9 and PINCH as promising specific immunotherapy targets. 

  12. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  13. PD-1 as an emerging therapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tykodi SS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scott S Tykodi Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common primary malignant tumor of the kidney in adults, representing approximately 4% of all adult cancers in the United States. Metastatic RCC is poorly responsive to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies but can be sensitive to T-cell-directed immunotherapies such as interferon-α or interleukin-2. Despite recent progress in the application of antiangiogenic “targeted therapies” for metastatic RCC, high-dose interleukin-2 remains an appropriate first-line therapy for select patients and is associated with durable complete remissions in a small fraction of treated patients. Thus, advanced RCC provides a unique opportunity to investigate the requirements for effective antitumor immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that resistance mechanisms exploited by RCC and other tumor types may play a dominant role in limiting the effectiveness of tumor-reactive adaptive immune responses. Expression of the inhibitory coreceptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within RCC tumors, as well as the expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1 on RCC tumor cells, are strong negative prognostic markers for disease-specific death in RCC patients. Monoclonal antibodies targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 have now entered clinic trials and have demonstrated promising antitumor effects for refractory metastatic RCC. This review summarizes the results of published and reported studies of PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted therapies enrolling patients with advanced RCC, focusing on key safety, toxicity, and efficacy end points. Prospects for advanced phase clinical testing and novel therapy combinations with PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted agents are discussed. Keywords: renal cell carcinoma, immune checkpoint, immunotherapy, T-lymphocyte, PD-1, PD-L1

  14. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome

  15. More than 10 years survival with sequential therapy in a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, J.L.; Wang, F.L.; Yi, X.M.; Qin, W.J.; Wu, G.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Huan, Y. [Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, L.J.; Zhang, G.; Yu, L.; Zhang, Y.T.; Qin, R.L.; Tian, C.J. [Department of Urology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-10-31

    Although radical nephrectomy alone is widely accepted as the standard of care in localized treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), it is not sufficient for the treatment of metastatic RCC (mRCC), which invariably leads to an unfavorable outcome despite the use of multiple therapies. Currently, sequential targeted agents are recommended for the management of mRCC, but the optimal drug sequence is still debated. This case was a 57-year-old man with clear-cell mRCC who received multiple therapies following his first operation in 2003 and has survived for over 10 years with a satisfactory quality of life. The treatments given included several surgeries, immunotherapy, and sequentially administered sorafenib, sunitinib, and everolimus regimens. In the course of mRCC treatment, well-planned surgeries, effective sequential targeted therapies and close follow-up are all of great importance for optimal management and a satisfactory outcome.

  16. Potential Approaches and Recent Advances in Biomarker Discovery in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, Weronika; Kluzek, Katarzyna; Bluyssen, Hans; Wesoły, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis and monitoring of clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC), which is the most common renal malignancy, remains challenging. The late diagnosis and lack of tools that can be used to assess the progression of the disease and metastasis significantly influence the chance of survival of ccRCC patients. Molecular biomarkers have been shown to aid the diagnosis and disease monitoring for other cancers, but such markers are not currently available for ccRCC. Recently, plasma and serum circulating nucleic acids, nucleic acids present in urine, and plasma and urine proteins gained interest in the field of cancer biomarker discovery. Here, we describe the applicability of plasma and urine nucleic acids as cancer biomarkers with a particular focus on DNA, small RNA, and protein markers for ccRCC. PMID:26516358

  17. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  18. Interferon-Gamma-Induced Nitric Oxide Inhibits the Proliferation of Murine Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Tate Jr., John R. Patterson, Cruz Velasco-Gonzalez, Emily N. Carroll, Janie Trinh, Daniel Edwards, Ashok Aiyar, Beatriz Finkel-Jimenez, Arnold H. Zea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains one of the most resistant tumors to systemic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. Despite great progress in understanding the basic biology of RCC, the rate of responses in animal models and clinical trials using interferons (IFNs has not improved significantly. It is likely that the lack of responses can be due to the tumor's ability to develop tumor escape strategies. Currently, the use of targeted therapies has improved the clinical outcomes of patients with RCC and is associated with an increase of Th1-cytokine responses (IFNγ, indicating the importance of IFNγ in inhibiting tumor proliferation. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate a new mechanism by which IFNγ mediates direct anti-proliferative effects against murine renal cell carcinoma cell lines. When cultured RCC cell lines were exposed to murine recombinant IFNγ, a dose dependent growth inhibition in CL-2 and CL-19 cells was observed; this effect was not observed in Renca cells. Growth inhibition in CL-2 and CL-19 cell lines was associated with the intracellular induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein, resulting in a sustained elevation of nitric oxide (NO and citrulline, and a decrease in arginase activity. The inhibition of cell proliferation appears to be due to an arrest in the cell cycle. The results indicate that in certain RCC cell lines, IFNγ modulates L-arginine metabolism by shifting from arginase to iNOS activity, thereby developing a potent inhibitory mechanism to encumber tumor cell proliferation and survival. Elucidating the cellular events triggered by IFNγ in murine RCC cell lines will permit anti-tumor effects to be exploited in the development of new combination therapies that interfere with L-arginine metabolism to effectively combat RCC in patients.

  19. Molecular Stratification of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma by Consensus Clustering Reveals Distinct Subtypes and Survival Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Brannon, A. Rose; Reddy, Anupama; Seiler, Michael; Arreola, Alexandra; Moore, Dominic T.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Wallen, Eric M.; Nielsen, Matthew E; Liu, Huiqing; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ljungberg, Börje; Zhao, Hongjuan; BROOKS, JAMES D.; Ganesan, Shridar; Bhanot, Gyan

    2010-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the predominant RCC subtype, but even within this classification, the natural history is heterogeneous and difficult to predict. A sophisticated understanding of the molecular features most discriminatory for the underlying tumor heterogeneity should be predicated on identifiable and biologically meaningful patterns of gene expression. Gene expression microarray data were analyzed using software that implements iterative unsupervised consensus cluste...

  20. Primary extra-renal clear cell renal cell carcinoma masquerading as an adrenal mass: A diagnostic challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Roumina Hasan; Sandeep Kumar; Vidya Monappa; Anurag Ayachit

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of a nonmetastasizing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as an adrenal mass, in the presence of normal bilateral native kidneys, in a young adult. The possibility of this mass developing in a supernumerary kidney was ruled out, since no identifiable renal tissue, pelvis or ureters was seen within the mass, nor was any separate systemic arterial supply to the mass seen. The diagnosis of extra-renal clear cell RCC was based on cyto-morphological features, further ...

  1. Integrative genome-wide expression profiling identifies three distinct molecular subgroups of renal cell carcinoma with different patient outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterized by a number of diverse molecular aberrations that differ among individuals. Recent approaches to molecularly classify RCC were based on clinical, pathological as well as on single molecular parameters. As a consequence, gene expression patterns reflecting the sum of genetic aberrations in individual tumors may not have been recognized. In an attempt to uncover such molecular features in RCC, we used a novel, unbiased and integrative approach. We integrated gene expression data from 97 primary RCC of different pathologic parameters, 15 RCC metastases as well as 34 cancer cell lines for two-way nonsupervised hierarchical clustering using gene groups suggested by the PANTHER Classification System. We depicted the genomic landscape of the resulted tumor groups by means of Single Nuclear Polymorphism (SNP) technology. Finally, the achieved results were immunohistochemically analyzed using a tissue microarray (TMA) composed of 254 RCC. We found robust, genome wide expression signatures, which split RCC into three distinct molecular subgroups. These groups remained stable even if randomly selected gene sets were clustered. Notably, the pattern obtained from RCC cell lines was clearly distinguishable from that of primary tumors. SNP array analysis demonstrated differing frequencies of chromosomal copy number alterations among RCC subgroups. TMA analysis with group-specific markers showed a prognostic significance of the different groups. We propose the existence of characteristic and histologically independent genome-wide expression outputs in RCC with potential biological and clinical relevance

  2. Reduced L/B/K alkaline phosphatase gene expression in renal cell carcinoma: plausible role in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer in adults. Although several genes have been found to be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, more great efforts are needed to identify new genes which are responsible for the process. Clear cell RCC, originates from proximal tubule cells, is the most common pathological type of RCC. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a marker enzyme of brush border membrane of proximal tubular cells. Our previous studies showed a significant decreased activity of Liver/Bone/Kidney (L/B/K) alkaline phosphatase in RCC. In the present study, we explored the molecular basis of the decreased activity of ALP in RCC. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis showed decreased ALP protein in RCC. Additionally, real time PCR documented significantly reduced ALP gene expression (P = 0.009). Moreover, RCC cell lines (ACHN and A498) transfected with full length L/B/K cDNA showed decreased migratory property as well as viability of these cells as compared with controls (P = 0.000). Further, L/B/K ALP cDNA transfected cells (ACHN and A498) showed significant increased apoptosis as compared to control (P = 0.000). These findings suggest the new role of ALP in cell viability and apoptosis and involvement in RCC tumorigenesis. However, further studies are needed to explore the exact molecular mechanism. PMID:24909115

  3. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  4. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi Sato; Masao Kataoka; Junya Hata; Hidenori Akaihata; Soichiro Ogawa; Yoshiyuki Kojima

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis ...

  5. Metastasis to Paranasal Sinuses as the First Presenting Sign of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Assuncao Gouveia; José Anacleto Dutra Resende Júnior; Gustavo Ruschi Bechara; Thomás Accioly de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The clear cell carcinoma is a relatively rare tumor, represented approximately 85% by renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but has a characteristic of early metastatic, which sometimes spread to unusual places. Metastatic tumors in the paranasal sinuses are very rare. This case report a 65 years-old patient who presented sinusitis and epitaxis as a first sign of renal cell carcinoma with metastasis to the right maxillary sinus, which was opereted at Lagoa Hospital—RJ and strengthen the inclusion of th...

  6. Palliative thyroidectomy in the setting of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A secondary neoplasm of the thyroid gland is a distinctly uncommon cause of thyroid enlargement. These tumors mimic primary thyroid gland tumors and often lead to diagnostic difficulties. We report an interesting case of secondary thyroid tumor coexisting with a micropapillary carcinoma in an elderly male patient following a radical nephrectomy done 15 years prior for a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interestingly, the previously described coincidental association of thyroid and pancreatic metastases in a metastatic RCC was also noted in our patient as was demonstrated in the positron emission tomography-computed tomography which was done as part of the metastatic workup. This association needs to be further explored as also the role of palliative thyroidectomy in the setting of a metastatic RCC. The possibility of metastatic RCC should be kept as a differential during the course of the evaluation of clear cell renal tumor of the thyroid gland

  7. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Lines in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈凤莲; 李艳芬; 万云霞; 马建辉; 石卫; 储大同; 孙燕

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lines in vitro and to explore its possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: The microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to determine the anti-proliferative effects of As2O3 on human RCC lines. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate the effects of As2O3 on cell cycle and cell apoptosis. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was conducted to detect mRNA expression of Bcl-2, Bax, p53and c-myc. Results: As2O3 inhibited the growth of RCC lines in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. At the concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μmol/L, the inhibition rates of As2O3 on RCC-WCS cells were 27.60%, 30.09%, 41.03% and 50.77%, respectively. Compared with untreated RCC-WCS, there was significant difference at each concentration (P<0.01). As2O3 induced a G1 phase arrest in RCC-LSL cells,but a G2/M phase arrest in RCC-WCS and RCC-SHK. As2O3 induced cell apoptosis in these cell lines. The mRNA level of p53 and c-myc decreased, but no detectable changes of Bcl-2 and Bax were observed after As2O3 treatmen. Conclusion: As2O3 in therapeutic concentrations inhibited the in vitro growth of RCC lines via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. One of its possible mechanisms was down-regulation of p53 and c-myc. Our results suggest that As2O3 is probably a new candidate agent for the treatment of human renal carcinoma.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cell Composition in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Kira; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Goergens, André; Giebel, Bernd; Schuler, Martin; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to their minimal-invasive yet potentially current character circulating tumor cells (CTC) might be useful as a “liquid biopsy” in solid tumors. However, successful application in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has been very limited so far. High plasticity and heterogeneity of CTC morphology challenges currently available enrichment and detection techniques with EpCAM as the usual surface marker being underrepresented in mRCC. We recently described a method that enables us to identify and characterize non-hematopoietic cells in the peripheral blood stream with varying characteristics and define CTC subgroups that distinctly associate to clinical parameters. With this pilot study we wanted to scrutinize feasibility of this approach and its potential usage in clinical studies. Experimental Design Peripheral blood was drawn from 14 consecutive mRCC patients at the West German Cancer Center and CTC profiles were analyzed by Multi-Parameter Immunofluorescence Microscopy (MPIM). Additionally angiogenesis-related genes were measured by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results We detected CTC with epithelial, mesenchymal, stem cell-like or mixed-cell characteristics at different time-points during anti-angiogenic therapy. The presence and quantity of N-cadherin-positive or CD133-positive CTC was associated with inferior PFS. There was an inverse correlation between high expression of HIF1A, VEGFA, VEGFR and FGFR and the presence of N-cadherin-positive and CD133-positive CTC. Conclusions Patients with mRCC exhibit distinct CTC profiles that may implicate differences in therapeutic outcome. Prospective evaluation of phenotypic and genetic CTC profiling as prognostic and predictive biomarker in mRCC is warranted. PMID:27101285

  9. Delayed Phase Nasal Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma as a Rare Epistaxis Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Ozturk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available    Malign tumors of sinonasal area composes %1 of malignant tumors in adults and %3 of head and neck malignities. Metastasis to this area is rare but malignities that metastatic to head and neck and below down clavicula, renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the third after lung and breast cancer . As the most frequent malignancy of kidney, RCC is generally seen in male over 40 year old and forms %3 of malign tumors in adults and in RCC cases %8 of disease arises by the metastasis to head and neck which is accepted as a bad prognostic factor. In this case report, a 81 year old male patient is presented with literature datas who is underwent nephrectomy 8 years ago for RCC and referred with recurrent epistaxis and delayed phase nasal RCC metastasis.

  10. Effect of STAT1 on radiosensitivity of renal clear cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) in human renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC) and the effect of STAT1 inhibition on the radiosensitivity of RCC. Methods: The expression of STAT1 in 34 human RCC samples compared with 12 normal kidney tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry method. For in vitro experiments, a human RCC cell line, CRL-1932, was used. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the expression of total and phosporylated STAT1. Fludarabine and siRNA were respectively used to inhibit the expression of STAT1 in CRL-1932 cells. Clonogenic assay and trypan blue staining assay were used to evaluate the radiosensitivity of CRL-1932 cells. Results: The expression of both total and phosphorylated STAT1 in human RCC samples was significantly higher when compared to normal kidney tissues. Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was higher in CRL-1932 cells when compared to fibroblast and Wilm's tumor cell lines. STAT1 expression was inhibited by both fludarabine and siRNA. Radiosensitivity of CRL-1932 cells was enhanced by both fludarabine and siRNA induced STAT1 inhibition. Conclusions: STAT1 is over-expressed in both human RCC tissue and cell line. Inhibition of STAT1 can enhance the radiosensitivity of RCC cells. (authors)

  11. Comparison of fresh tissue incubation assay and the in vivo localization of monoclonal antibodies to renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few in vitro tests currently available are able to accurately predict the in vivo localization of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to cancer. We report on a fresh tissue incubation assay (FTIA) and compare the results of this assay to the in vivo localization of renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-reactive Mab A6H and control Mab AFP-22 to RCC and non-RCC xenografts implanted in nude mice. Both the FTIA and in vivo localization study demonstrated highly selective uptake of A6H in RCC but not in non-RCC xenografts. Radioimmunoscintigraphy using A6H clearly visualized RCC xenografts in every attempt, while AFP-22 did not highlight any of the tumor xenografts. The results demonstrate that FTIA may be a useful in vitro assay for selecting Mabs for in vivo application, and that radioimmunoscintigraphy is a potentially useful tool in detecting cancer sites

  12. The evolving classification of renal cell neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R

    2015-03-01

    The classification of renal cell neoplasia is morphologically based; however, this has evolved over the last 35 years with the incorporation of genetic characteristics into the diagnostic features of some tumors. The 2013 Vancouver classification recognized 17 morphotypes of renal parenchymal malignancy and two benign tumors. This classification included the newly established entities tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor family translocation RCC and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition to these newly described forms of RCC there are a number of novel tumors that are currently recognized as emerging entities. These are likely to be incorporated into subsequent classifications and include thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B mutation-associated RCC, ALK translocation RCC, tuberous sclerosis complex-associated RCC, and RCC with (angio) leiomyomatous stroma. PMID:25753529

  13. Use of FISH analysis for diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques have been used in demonstrating the chromsomal abnormalities which characterize specific subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim this study was to determine the efficiency of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in characterizing various subtypes of RCC based on the presence of specific chromosome abnormalities found in each RCC subtype. FISH was performed on touch imprint smears from eight renal cell carcinomas histologically confirmed by established criteria. In four tumors with histologic features of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), interphase fish was performed using centrometric probes for chrosomes 1, 2, 6, 10, 12, 17 and 21. All four ChRCC tumors showed one FIISH signal corresponding to one copy number for each of these chromosomes. Two papillary RCCs included in this study showed trisomy 7 and 17, and loss of chromosome Y, using the corresponding chromosome centrometric probes. Similarly, we tested two clear cell RCCs for chromosome 3 short arm deletion with DNA probe 3p21.3. Both tumors showed loss of 3p21.3 signal. We conclude that interphase fish performed on touch imprint smears is a relatively simple, rapid and reliable method for detecting chromosome abnormalities which are specific for various subtypes of RCC. (author)

  14. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Bennett; Retnagowri Rajandram; Keng Lim Ng; Gobe, Glenda C

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a...

  15. Serum ferritin in renal cell carcinoma: Effect of tumor size, volume grade, and stage

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Kamal; Singh S; Suri Amit; Vijjan Vivek; Goswami A; Khullar Madhu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the levels of serum ferritin in patients of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients and methods: Serum ferritin levels were measured preoperatively in 32 patients with radiological evidence of RCC using an enzyme immunoassay. The largest diameter of the primary tumor was measured in the pathological specimens in patients undergoing radical nephrectomy while in patients with nonoperable tumor maximum tumor dimension was taken from CT scan. Pathological staging was done according...

  16. Profile of temsirolimus in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Staehler; Nicolas Haseke; Wael Khoder; et al

    2010-01-01

    Michael Staehler, Nicolas Haseke, Wael Khoder, Christian G StiefDepartment of Urology, University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, GermanyAbstract: Temsirolimus is a potent inhibtor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In various clinical trial temsirolimus has shown an overall survival benefit for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Thus it is approved for first-line therapy in high-risk mRCC patients. We discuss the indication, side effects and clinical implication...

  17. EVALUATION OF RENAL FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA BEFORE AND AFTER RADICAL NEPHRECTOMY

    OpenAIRE

    M I Kogan; Gusev, A. A.; S. V. Evseyev

    2014-01-01

    There is an increase in the number of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) every year. At the same time radical nephrectomy (RN) remains the standard treatment of renal malignancies and the most common surgical procedure for this pathology. A considerable number of patients with kidney cancer have diminished renal function that worsens after removal of functioning kidney tissue together with a tumor. This promotes retained low overall survival rates in patients with RCC, by improving canc...

  18. De Novo Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Kidney Allograft 20 Years after Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Banshodani; Hideki Kawanishi; Seiji Marubayashi; Sadanori Shintaku; Misaki Moriishi; Fumio Shimamoto; Shinichiro Tsuchiya; Kiyohiko Dohi; Hideki Ohdan

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a kidney allograft is rare. We report the successful diagnosis and treatment of a de novo RCC in a nonfunctioning kidney transplant 20 years after engraftment. A 54-year-old man received a kidney transplant from his mother when he was 34 years old. After 10 years, chronic rejection resulted in graft failure, and the patient became hemodialysis-dependent. Intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms reveale...

  19. HUMAN PLASMA PROTEOME MAPPING IN HEALTH AND CLEAR CELL CARCINOMA OF THE KIDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma proteome from patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and controls underwent mass spectrometric mapping. A total of 247 proteins were identified; the expression of 12 proteins of them increased on transition from the controls to patients with Stages I–II and III–IV RCC. There was decreased expression of 14 proteins in this series. Out of the 26 proteins showing a change in their expressions, 7 proteins belong to acute-phase ones, 3 proteins are associated with the intercellular matrix. These proteins can be potential markers for RCC.

  20. [Solitary Bladder Metastasis of Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma: Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Satoshi; Suetomi, Takahiro; Kojou, Kousuke; Tanaka, Ken; Kurobe, Masahiro; Yoshino, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Kazumitu; Kimura, Tomokazu; Kandori, Shuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Kawai, Kouji; Miyazaki, Jun; Yano, Youko; Yamada, Kenji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Bladder metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is relatively rare, and only 43 cases have been reported in the Japanese literature. In most cases, the histology of the primary site was clear cell type. Here, we report a case of bladder metastasis of chromophobe RCC. A 74-year-old man presented with asymptomatic gross hematuria. He had a history of chromophobe RCC treated with radical nephrectomy 11 years previously. Since cystoscopy revealed a papillary pedunculated tumor, he underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TUR-Bt). The pathological diagnosis was chromophobe RCC because the histological findings were similar to those of nephrectomized specimens. Four years after TUR-Bt, the patient received bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy under the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ of urothelial cancer of the bladder but not chromophobe RCC. There was no recurrence of chromophobe RCC within 5 years follow-up after TUR-Bt. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only one other case report of bladder metastasis of chromophobe RCC in the Japanese literature. PMID:27018407

  1. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  2. Metastasis from renal cell carcinoma to thyroid presenting as rapidly growing neck mass

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin Mohammadi; Seyed Babak Mosavi Toomatari; Mohammad Ghasemi-Rad

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is commonly known as the “internist's tumor” because of its unpredictable behavior. Metastasis to the thyroid gland is rarely found in clinical practice. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We report a rare case of non-thyroid malignancies NTM from renal cell carcinoma 1.5 years after radical nephrectomy in a 58-year-old man with a rapidly growing neck mass. DISCUSSION: Malignant melanoma, breast carcinoma, lung, and skin cancer are the most common sources of ...

  3. Systematic Evaluation of the Prognostic Impact and Intratumour Heterogeneity of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Sakshi; Martinez, Pierre; Joshi, Tejal; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Santos, Claudio R.; Rowan, Andrew J.; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Bates, Paul A.; Swanton, Charles; Gerlinger, Marco

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundCandidate biomarkers have been identified for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients, but most have not been validated. ObjectiveTo validate published ccRCC prognostic biomarkers in an independent patient cohort and to assess intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) of the most promising...... the ability of published biomarkers to predict the survival of patients with clear cell kidney cancer in an independent patient cohort. Only one molecular test adds prognostic information to routine clinical assessments. This marker showed good and poor prognosis results within most individual cancers...

  4. Clonal expansion of renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittig, Simone; Køllgaard, Tania; Grønbæk, Kirsten;

    2013-01-01

    T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions is an...... indication of ongoing HLA-restricted T cell-mediated immune responses. Multiple tumors, including renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), are often infiltrated by significant amounts of T cells, the so-called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In the present study, we analyzed RCC lesions (n = 13) for the presence...... of expanded T-cell clonotypes using T-cell receptor clonotype mapping. Surprisingly, we found that RCCs comprise relatively low numbers of distinct expanded T-cell clonotypes as compared with melanoma lesions. The numbers of different T-cell clonotypes detected among RCC-infiltrating lymphocytes were...

  5. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis associated with papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chilkulwar, Abhishek; Pottimutyapu, Ramya; Wu, Fawng; Padooru, Keerthi R; Pingali, Sai Ravi; Kassem, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC), or neoplastic meningitis, occurs in about 5–20% of patients with metastatic cancer, depending on the type of the primary malignancy and kind of treatment received. The association of LMC with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a rare entity, and only two cases of papillary renal cell cancer with leptomeningeal metastasis have been reported. Leptomeningeal spread usually confers a poor prognosis despite the use of modern treatment strategies as compared to patie...

  6. Rationale for targeted therapies and potential role of pazopanib in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Clark

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter E ClarkVanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USAAbstract: Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC remains a challenging, major health problem. Recent advances in understanding the fundamental biology underlying one form of RCC, ie, clear cell (or conventional RCC, have opened the door to a series of targeted agents, such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, which have become the standard of care in managing advanced clear cell RCC. Among the newest of these agents to receive Food and Drug Administration approval in this disease is pazopanib. This review will summarize what is known about the fundamental biology that underlies clear cell RCC, the data surrounding the previously approved targeted agents for this disease, including not only the TKIs but also the mTOR inhibitors and the vascular endothelial growth factor-specific agent, bevacizumab, and the newest TKI, pazopanib. It will also explore the potential role for pazopanib relative to the other available agents and where it may fit into the armamentarium for treatment of advanced/metastatic RCC.Keywords: pazopanib, targeted therapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, clear cell renal cell carcinoma

  7. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR and distal tubule cell (CK19 markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2 of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3 showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283

  8. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  9. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsitskari Maria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults. Nephron sparing resection (partial nephrectomy has been the “gold standard” for the treatment of resectable disease. With the widespread use of cross sectional imaging techniques, more cases of renal cell cancers are detected at an early stage, i.e. stage 1A or 1B.  This has provided an impetus for expanding the nephron sparing options and especially, percutaneous ablative techniques.  Percutaneous ablation for RCC is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection or when there is a need to preserve renal function due to comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. During the last few years, percutaneous cryoablation has been gaining acceptance as a curative treatment option for small renal cancers. Clinical studies to date indicate that cryoablation is a safe and effective therapeutic method with acceptable short and long term outcomes and with a low risk, in the appropriate setting.  In addition it seems to offer some advantages over radio frequency ablation (RFA and other thermal ablation techniques for renal masses.

  10. LARGE NONFUNCTIONAL ADRENO CORTICAL CARCINOMA MASQUERADING AS RENAL CELL CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT WITH REVIEW OF LITERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignant neoplasm affecting only 1 or 2 person per million population1.Nonfunctional malignant tumors particularly present at advanced stage and are associated with poor prognosis. 2 They are difficult to differentiate from renal cell carcinoma (RCC especially if they are very large and nonfunctional compressing its native kidney. However, with good preoperative planning in such cases innocuous kidney can be saved.

  11. Epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, and risk factors for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Paglino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite only accounting for approximately 2% of all new primary cancer cases, renal cell carcinoma (RCC incidence has dramatically increased over time. Incidence rates vary greatly according to geographic areas, so that it is extremely likely that exogenous risk factors could play an important role in the development of this cancer. Several risk factors have been linked with RCC, including cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension (and antihypertensive drugs, chronic kidney diseases (also dialysis and transplantation, as well as the use of certain analgesics. Furthermore, although RCC has not generally been considered an occupational cancer, several types of occupationally-derived exposures have been implicated in its pathogenesis. These include exposure to asbestos, chlorinated solvents, gasoline, diesel exhaust fumes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, printing inks and dyes, cadmium and lead. Finally, families with a predisposition to the development of renal neoplasms were identified and the genes involved discovered and characterized. Therefore, there are now four well-characterized, genetically determined syndromes associated with an increased incidence of kidney tumors, i.e., Von Hippel Lindau (VHL, Hereditary Papillary Renal Carcinoma (HPRC, Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome (BHD, and Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (HLRCC. This review will address present knowledge about the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and risk factors of RCC.

  12. High expression of FER tyrosine kinase predicts poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Can; WU, SONG; Li, Xianxin; Wang, Yadong; Ren, Rui; LAI, YONGQING; YE, JIONGXIAN

    2012-01-01

    FER tyrosine kinase (FER) has been demonstrated to play a critical role in tumorigenesis and metastasis; however, its potential value as a novel prognostic marker for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) remains unclear. In 48 paired samples of ccRCCs and normal adjacent tissues (ADTs), real-time PCR was used to evaluate the expression of FER mRNA. The expression of FER protein was assessed in 87 ADTs and 206 samples of ccRCC using immunohistochemical methods. Statistical analysis was used...

  13. Variation in genomic landscape of clear cell renal cell carcinoma across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scelo, Ghislaine; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Greger, Liliana; Letourneau, Louis; Gonzàlez-Porta, Mar; Wozniak, Magdalena B; Bourgey, Mathieu; Harnden, Patricia; Egevad, Lars; Jackson, Sharon M; Karimzadeh, Mehran; Arseneault, Madeleine; Lepage, Pierre; How-Kit, Alexandre; Daunay, Antoine; Renault, Victor; Blanché, Hélène; Tubacher, Emmanuel; Sehmoun, Jeremy; Viksna, Juris; Celms, Edgars; Opmanis, Martins; Zarins, Andris; Vasudev, Naveen S; Seywright, Morag; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Carreira, Christine; Selby, Peter J; Cartledge, Jon J; Byrnes, Graham; Zavadil, Jiri; Su, Jing; Holcatova, Ivana; Brisuda, Antonin; Zaridze, David; Moukeria, Anush; Foretova, Lenka; Navratilova, Marie; Mates, Dana; Jinga, Viorel; Artemov, Artem; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Mazur, Alexander; Rastorguev, Sergey; Boulygina, Eugenia; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Lechner, Doris; Foglio, Mario; Gut, Ivo G; Skryabin, Konstantin; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Rung, Johan; Bourque, Guillaume; Brennan, Paul; Tost, Jörg; Banks, Rosamonde E; Brazma, Alvis; Lathrop, G Mark

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing worldwide, and its prevalence is particularly high in some parts of Central Europe. Here we undertake whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of clear cell RCC (ccRCC), the most common form of the disease, in patients from four different European countries with contrasting disease incidence to explore the underlying genomic architecture of RCC. Our findings support previous reports on frequent aberrations in the epigenetic machinery and PI3K/mTOR signalling, and uncover novel pathways and genes affected by recurrent mutations and abnormal transcriptome patterns including focal adhesion, components of extracellular matrix (ECM) and genes encoding FAT cadherins. Furthermore, a large majority of patients from Romania have an unexpected high frequency of A:T>T:A transversions, consistent with exposure to aristolochic acid (AA). These results show that the processes underlying ccRCC tumorigenesis may vary in different populations and suggest that AA may be an important ccRCC carcinogen in Romania, a finding with major public health implications. PMID:25351205

  14. RhoB Acts as a Tumor Suppressor That Inhibits Malignancy of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Pang, Haigang; Gong, Huijie; Shen, Donglai; Gu, Liangyou; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological role of RhoB in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The expression of RhoB was examined in specimens of patients and cell lines by Western blot and Immunohistochemistry. The correlation between RhoB expression and clinicopathologic variables was also analyzed. The effects of RhoB on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and invasion/migration were detected by over-expression and knockdown of RhoB level in ccRCC cells via plasmids and RNAi. The results showed that RhoB was low-expressed in ccRCC surgical specimens and cell lines compared with adjacent normal renal tissues and normal human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell lines (HKC), and its protein expression level was significantly associated with the tumor pathologic parameter embracing tumor size(P = 0.0157), pT stage(P = 0.0035), TNM stage(P = 0.0024) and Fuhrman tumor grade(P = 0.0008). Further, over-expression of RhoB remarkably inhibited the cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis, and aslo reduced the invasion and migration ability of ccRCC cells. Interestingly, up-regulation of RhoB could induce cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and led to cell cycle regulators(CyclineB1,CDK1) and pro-apoptotic protein(casp3,casp9) aberrant expression. Moreover, knockdown of RhoB in HKC cells promoted cell proliferation and migration. Taken together, our study indicates that RhoB expression is decreased in ccRCC carcinogenesis and progression. Up-regulation of RhoB significantly inhibits ccRCC cell malignant phenotype. These findings show that RhoB may play a tumor suppressive role in ccRCC cells, raising its potential value in futural therapeutic target for the patients of ccRCC. PMID:27384222

  15. F-18 FDG PET in Detecting Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the role of F-18 FDG imaging with a dual head coincidence mode gamma camera (Co-PET) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with renal masses. Material and Methods: An F-18 FDG Co-PET study was performed in 19 patients (7 F, 12 M; mean age 58.15±2.5 years, age range 45-79 years) with suspected primary renal tumors based on conventional imaging techniques, including computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) before nephrectomy or surgical resection of the mass. Results: Histologically documented RCC was present in 15 patients. Of the 19 patients with suspected primary renal tumors, F-18 FDG Co-PET was true-positive in 13, false-negative in 2, true-negative in 3, and false-positive in 1 patient. Twangiomyolipomas and one renal mass due to infarction and hemorrhage showed a true-negative Co-PET result. The patient with false-positive FDG Co-PET study was diagnosed as xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG Co-PET for RCC were 86% (13/15), 75% (3/4), and 84% (16/19), respectively. Positive predictive value for RCC was 92% and negative predictive value 60%. Conclusion: These findings suggest that F-18 FDG Co-PET may have a role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with RCC and primary staging of disease. Positive F-18 FDG study may be predictive of the presence of RCC. However, a negative study does not exclude the RCC

  16. Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Lymph Node Metastasis of a Testicular Teratoma: A Very Rare Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk Sari, Sule; Ozluk, Yasemin; Taskin, Orhun Cig; Polat, Beldan; Ozturk, Ilker; Ekenel, Meltem; Kilicaslan, Isin; Bilgic, Bilge

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of a teratoma with somatic type malignancy (TSM) in the form of papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) within supraclavicular and retroperitoneal lymph node metastases of a testicular pure teratoma. Resection of both masses revealed a teratoma without any other germ cell tumor component. A papillary carcinoma component was also detected intermingled with the teratomatous elements. The carcinoma cells displayed eosinophilic cytoplasm and prominent nucleoli. Groups of foamy histiocytes in the fibrovascular cores was a striking finding that brought pRCC to mind. Immunoreactivity for CK7, PAX8, AMACR, CD10, napsin, and vimentin along with morphologic findings confirmed renal cell differentiation. No radiological evidence of a primary renal cell carcinoma was found in the kidney. Consequently, pRCC arising in a teratoma was diagnosed. TSM is described as teratoma with a malignant component that is typically encountered in other organs and tissues. TSM in the form of pRCC is an extremely rare entity. Our case is the second example of a testicular germ cell tumor metastasis with a somatic malignancy in the form of pRCC. In conclusion, carcinomas of renal cell differentiation should be kept in mind as a rare form of TSM, especially in metastatic germ cell tumors. PMID:26936856

  17. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  18. Role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corn Paul G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Renal cell carcinoma (RCC accounts for approximately 2.6% of all cancers in the United States. While early stage disease is curable by surgery, the median survival of metastatic disease is only 13 months. In the last decade, there has been considerable progress in understanding the genetics of RCC. The VHL tumor suppressor gene is inactivated in the majority of RCC cases. The VHL protein (pVHL acts as an E3 ligase that targets HIF-1, the hypoxia inducible transcription factor, for degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS. In RCC cases with mutant pVHL, HIF-1 is stabilized and aberrantly expressed in normoxia, leading to the activation of pro-survival genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. This review will focus on the defect in the UPS that underlies RCC and describe the development of novel therapies that target the UPS. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  19. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIMEL

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Y; Schoell, MC; Freeman, RS

    2009-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIMEL and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation ...

  20. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD in Renal Cell Carcinoma – Tissue Microarray of Human Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retnagowri Rajandram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of “inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase” (ICAD, an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05 as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01 compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  1. MicroRNA-99a induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest and suppresses tumorigenicity in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growing body of evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in cancer diagnosis and therapy. MicroRNA-99a (miR-99a), a potential tumor suppressor, is downregulated in several human malignancies. The expression and function of miR-99a, however, have not been investigated in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) so far. We therefore examined the expression of miR-99a in RCC cell lines and tissues, and assessed the impact of miR-99a on the tumorigenesis of RCC. MiR-99a levels in 40 pairs of RCC and matched adjacent non-tumor tissues were assessed by real-time quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). The RCC cell lines 786-O and OS-RC-2 were transfected with miR-99a mimics to restore the expression of miR-99a. The effects of miR-99a were then assessed by cell proliferation, cell cycle, transwell, and colony formation assay. A murine xenograft model of RCC was used to confirm the effect of miR-99a on tumorigenicity in vivo. Potential target genes were identified by western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. We found that miR-99a was remarkably downregulated in RCC and low expression level of miR-99a was correlated with poor survival of RCC patients. Restoration of miR-99a dramatically suppressed RCC cells growth, clonability, migration and invasion as well as induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest in vitro. Moreover, intratumoral delivery of miR-99a could inhibit tumor growth in murine xenograft models of human RCC. In addition, we also fond that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was a direct target of miR-99a in RCC cells. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of mTOR partially phenocopied the effect of miR-99a overexpression, suggesting that the tumor suppressive role of miR-99a may be mediated primarily through mTOR regulation. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that deregulation of miR-99a is involved in the etiology of RCC partially via direct targeting mTOR pathway, which suggests that mi

  2. Aberrant expression of metallothioneins in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymar V. I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find candidate tumor suppressor genes among metallothioneins for clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Methods. Analysis of the microarray data, quantitative PCR. Results. We found three genes encoding metallothioneines that showed reduced expression in different types of renal tumors, using protocol of the cross-platform meta-analysis of microarray data with normalization on several reference genes. Decreased expression of the MT1G, MT1F, and MT1H genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma was confirmed by qPCR. Conclusions. The MT1G, MT1F and MT1H genes as well as may be considered as the candidate tumor suppressor genes for ccRCC.

  3. Levels of circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells correlate with outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Farace, F.; Gross-Goupil, M; Tournay, E; Taylor, M; Vimond, N.; Jacques, N; Billiot, F.; Mauguen, A.; Hill, C.; Escudier, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predicting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy would be of clinical value in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We tested the hypothesis that circulating endothelial cell (CEC), bone marrow-derived CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cell or plasma angiogenic factor levels are associated with clinical outcome in mRCC pts undergoing treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Methods: Fifty-five mRCC pts were prospectively monitored at baseline (day 1) a...

  4. High expression of pituitary tumor-transforming gene-1 predicts poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEI, CAN; YANG, XIAOLIANG; XI, JUNHUA; WU, WEI; YANG, ZHENXING; WANG, WEI; TANG, ZHIGUO; YING, QUANSHENG; ZHANG, YANBIN

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene-1 (PTTG1) is a recently identified oncogene involved in the progression of malignant tumors; however, the expression level of PTTG1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and its potential value as a novel prognostic marker for ccRCC remains unclear. In this study, PTTG1 mRNA and protein levels were assessed in 44 paired ccRCC tissues and adjacent normal tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Further immunohistochemical analysis was implemented in 192 samples of ccRCC to evaluate the associations between PTTG1 levels and the clinical characteristics in ccRCC. Reverse transcription qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the PTTG1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to normal tissues. In addition, the PTTG1 protein level in 192 ccRCC samples was found to be significantly correlated with T stage, N classification, metastasis, recurrence and Fuhrman grade, whereas it was not associated with age and gender. Patients with low PTTG1 levels exhibited a better survival outcome compared to those with a higher PTTG1 level. PTTG1 expression and N stage were identified as independent prognostic factors for the overall survival of ccRCC patients. The results suggested that the overexpression of PTTG1 indicates a poor prognosis in ccRCC patients and, therefore, PTTG1 may serve as a novel prognostic marker for ccRCC. PMID:25798272

  5. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell carcinoma in hemodialysis patients: A case report on three patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is derived from renal tubular epithelial cells and represents approximately 3.8% of all malignancies in adults. The incidence of renal cell carcinoma has been growing steadily and ranging from 0.6 to 14.7 for every 100,000 inhabitants. Patients with end-stage renal disease and acquired cystic kidney disease are at increased risk of developing RCC while undergoing dialysis treatment or after renal transplantation. Case report. We presented 3 patients undergoing hemodialysis, with acquired cystic kidney disease accompanied by the development of RCC. In all the patients tumor was asymptomatic and discovered through ultrasound screening in 2 patients and in 1 of the patients by post-surgery pathohistological analysis of the tissue of the kidney excised using nephrectomy. All the three patients had organ-limited disease at the time of the diagnosis and they did not require additional therapy after surgical treatment. During the follow- up after nephrectomy from 6 months to 7 years, local recurrence or metastasis of RCC were not diagnosed. Conclusion. Acquired cystic kidney disease represents a predisposing factor for the development of renal cell carcinoma in dialysis patients and requires regular ultrasound examinations of the abdomen aimed at early diagnosis of malignancies. Prognosis for patients with endstage renal disease and RCC is mostly good because these tumors are usually of indolent course.

  6. Metastatic Renal cell Carcinoma Presenting as a clear-cell Tumor in Tongue: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Abbaszadeh-Bidokhty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metastatic lesions of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for approximately 1% of all malignant oral tumors. The most common primary sources of metastatic tumors in the oral region are, from the most to the least common, the breast, lung, kidney, bone, and colon. Renal cell carcinoma accounts for nearly 3% of all adult malignancies. It usually metastasizes to the lungs, bone, adrenal glands, and regional lymph nodes. The incidence of metastasis from renal cell carcinoma to the head and neck region is very low. The tongue is considered a very rare atypical ear, nose, and throat (ENT location for metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. The present case from Iran reports tongue metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC.   Case Report: The following report is based on an 80-year old male patient with a tongue lesion and ambiguous past medical history that ultimately leads to diagnosis of a metastatic RCC. We also updated a previous literature review that was published 2008. A histopathological differential diagnosis for clear-cell tumors is also discussed.   Conclusion:  Because of the rarity of metastatic tumors of the oral region as well as the presence of other lesions with clear cells, diagnosis of metastatic clear-cell RCC in the oral cavity can be very difficult and challenging.  

  7. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athina; C; Tsili; Maria; I; Argyropoulou

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma(RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography(CT) is considered the examination of choice for thedetection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT(MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and threedimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment.

  8. State-of-the-science: An update on renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasch, Eric; Futreal, Andrew; Davis, Ian; Bailey, Sean; Kim, William Y.; Brugarolas, James; Giaccia, Amato; Kurban, Ghada; Pause, Armin; Frydman, Judith; Zurita, Amado; Rini, Brian I.; Sharma, Pam; Atkins, Michael; Walker, Cheryl; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are emerging as a complex set of diseases with major socioeconomic impact and a continued rise in incidence throughout the world. As the field of urologic oncology faces these trends, several major genomic and mechanistic discoveries have altered our core understanding of this multitude of cancers, including several new rare subtypes of renal cancers. This review will examine these new findings, and place them in the context of the well-established association of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) with mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and resultant aberrant hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling. The impact of novel ccRCC-associated genetic lesions on chromatin remodeling and epigenetic regulation is explored. The effects of VHL mutation on primary ciliary function, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and tumor metabolism are discussed. VHL proteostasis is reviewed, with the goal of harnessing the proteostatic machinery to refunctionalize mutant VHL. Translational efforts using molecular tools to understand discriminating features of ccRCC tumors and develop improved prognostic and predictive algorithms are presented and new therapeutics arising from the earliest molecular discoveries in ccRCC are summarized. By creating an integrated review of the key genomic and molecular biological disease characteristics of ccRCC and placing these data in the context of the evolving therapeutic landscape, we intend to facilitate interaction between basic, translational and clinical researchers involved in the treatment of this devastating disease, and accelerate progress towards its ultimate eradication. PMID:22638109

  9. Distinct Cytoplasmic Expression of KL-6 Mucin in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comparative Immunohistochemical Study with Other Renal Epithelial Cell Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of cytoplasmic sialyl glycoproteins is a conspicuous feature in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We compared the immunohistochemical expression of sialyl glycoproteins in chromophobe RCC with that in other types of renal tumors. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of surgically resected renal tumors (chromophobe RCC, 14 cases [10 cases of classic type and 4 cases of eosinophilic variant]; oncocytoma, 7 cases; and clear cell RCC, 9 cases) and kidneys from immature infants (4 cases) were immunostained with antibodies against sialyl glycoproteins (anti-KL-6 and anti-sialyl MUC1 antibodies). Cytoplasmic expression of KL-6 and sialyl MUC1 was distinctive in the chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytoma cells, and in the intercalated cells in collecting duct epithelia. Apical-surface staining of these sialyl glycoproteins was predominantly observed in clear RCC, in the epithelia of the distal tubule and collecting duct, and in the neonatal renal proximal tubule, but not in those of the adult renal proximal tubule. The above-mentioned observations provide additional evidence for similar phenotypic profiles of chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytoma, and the intercalated cells in collecting ducts and the oncofetal expression of sialyl glycoproteins in clear cell RCC. KL-6 is a potential tumor marker for renal tumors

  10. Downregulation of nucleolar and spindle-associated protein 1 expression suppresses cell migration, proliferation and invasion in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Lei; Xiong, Hu; Ge, Yukun; Lu, Wei; Wu, Xun; Heng, Baoli; Yu, Dexin; Wu, Song

    2016-09-01

    Nucleolar and spindle-associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) is a microtubule-binding protein that plays an essential role in mitosis and cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that NUSAP1 expression is relatively elevated in several malignancies. However, the biological roles of NUSAP1 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remain unknown. In the present study, we firstly performed reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis to reveal that the expression of NUSAP1 was relatively elevated in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) tissue specimens and RCC cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that upregulation of NUSAP1 was significantly correlated with Fuhrman grade (P<0.001), tumor size (P=0.016), clinical stage (P<0.001) and distant metastasis (P=0.023). Additionally, high expression of NUSAP1 was closely associated with a shorter overall survival time of the ccRCC patients (P=0.006). Furthermore, we investigated the biological behaviors of RCC cells in vitro, and we identified that NUSAP1 depletion inhibited RCC cell migration, proliferation and invasion, and apoptosis was induced and the cell cycle was arrested. On the basis of our studies, NUSAP1 was identified as a potential prognostic indicator and a novel therapeutic target for RCC patients. PMID:27461786

  11. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal cell carcinoma is a type of kidney cancer that starts in the lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney

  12. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie;

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...... of the hypoxia regulatory network....

  13. Immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimani, A; Berntsen, A; Svane, I M; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2009-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have a limited life expectancy but still a subset of these patients develop immune and clinical responses after immunotherapy including dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. In a recently published phase I/II trials, fourteen HLA-A2 negative patients...

  14. Radiosensitization of renal cell carcinoma in vitro through the induction of autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For patients diagnosed with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), there are few therapeutic options. Radiation therapy is predominantly used to treat metastasis and has not proven effective in the adjuvant setting for renal cancer. Furthermore, RCC is resistant to standard cytotoxic chemotherapies. Targeted anti-angiogenics are the standard of care for RCC but are not curative. Newer agents, such as mTOR inhibitors and others that induce autophagy, have shown great promise for treating RCC. Here, we investigate the potential use of the small molecule STF-62247 to modulate radiation. Materials and methods: Using RCC cell lines, we evaluate sensitivity to radiation in addition to agents that induce autophagic cell death by clonogenic survival assays. Furthermore, these were also tested under physiological oxygen levels. Results: STF-62247 specifically induces autophagic cell death in cells that have lost VHL, an essential mutation in the development of RCC. Treatment with STF-62247 did not alter cell cycle progression but when combined with radiation increased cell killing under oxic and hypoxic/physiological conditions. Conclusions: This study highlights the possibility of combining targeted therapeutics such as STF-62247 or temsirolimus with radiation to reduce the reliance on partial or full nephrectomy and improve patient prognosis.

  15. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIMEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Schoell, MC; Freeman, RS

    2009-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIMEL and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild type VHL protein (pVHL). Re-introducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIMEL protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and over-expressing pVHL inhibited BIMEL polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIMEL protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIMEL expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIMEL protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIMEL in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  16. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIM(EL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Schoell, M C; Freeman, R S

    2009-04-23

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIM(EL) and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation-induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild-type VHL protein (pVHL). Reintroducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIM(EL) protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and overexpressing pVHL inhibited BIM(EL) polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIM(EL) protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIM(EL) expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIM(EL) protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIM(EL) in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  17. Pathological clavicular fracture as ifrst presentation of renal cell carcinoma:a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Kong; Jin Wang; Huan Li; Peng Guo; Jian-Fa Xu; He-Lin Feng

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3%of all cancer cases. RCCs usually metastasize to the lungs, bones, liver, or brain. Only<1%of patients with bone metastases manifested clavicular RCC metastases. hTus, clavicular metastasis as the initial presentation of RCC is extremely rare. We report a patient with RCC metastasis to the letf clavicle, which was ifrst presented with pain caused by a pathological fracture. Magnetic resonance image revealed a renal tumor, and technetium-99m–methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy showed multiple osseous metastases. The patient eventually underwent surgery to remove the lateral end of the letf clavicle and right kidney. Histopathology revealed renal tumor and clear cell carcinoma in the clavicle. Finally, we review 17 cases of clavicular metastases originating from different malignancies.

  18. Possible Prognostic and Therapeutic Significance of c-Kit Expression, Mast Cell Count and Microvessel Density in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Marech

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most frequent renal tumor and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Tumor angiogenesis is known to play a crucial role in the etiopathogenesis of RCC and over the last few years an even deeper knowledge of its contribution in metastatic RCC development has led to the development of numerous molecular targeting agents (such as sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib. The above agents are principally directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR members and also against c-Kit receptor (c-KitR. The role of c-kitR inhibition on clear cell RCC (ccRCC, the main RCC subtype, is less well established. Whether c-kitR activation through its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF contributes significantly to the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs treatment remains to be established. It is important to underscore that the c-KitR is expressed on mast cells (MCs and cancer cells. After an examination of the c-KitR/SCF pathway, we review here the principal studies that have evaluated c-Kit expression in RCC. Moreover, we summarize some investigations that have observed the distribution of MCs in primary renal cancer and in adjacent normal tissue with appropriate histological immunohistochemical techniques. We also focus on few studies that have evaluated the correlation between RCC proliferation, MC count and microvessel density (MVD, as hallmarks of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, the aim of this review of the literature is to clarify if c-KitR expression, MC count and MVD could have prognostic significance and the possible predictive therapeutic implications in RCC.

  19. Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil Akhtar; Ahmad Shamshad; Zaheer Sufian; Mansoor Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC) is an aggressive tumor variant thought to arise predominantly from differentiation of clear cell carcinoma. A few reports of SRCC asso-ciated with non-clear cell tumors led to the presumption that SRCC may arise from any renal cell carcinoma, although direct evidence of this is lacking. We report a case of a 70-year-old male patient, who presented with acute left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have SRCC after pathological examination...

  20. Protein Expression Profiling in the Spectrum of Renal Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Valera, Elsa Li-Ning-T, Beatriz A Walter, David D. Roberts, W M Linehan, Maria J Merino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protein expression profile of a spectrum of renal cell carcinomas (RCC to find potential biomarkers for disease onset and progression and therefore, prospective therapeutic targets. A 2D-gel based proteomic analysis was used to outline differences in protein levels among different subtypes of renal cell carcinomas, including clear cell carcinomas, papillary lesions, chromophobe tumors and renal oncocytomas. Spot pattern was compared to the corresponding normal kidney from the same patients and distinctive, differentially expressed proteins were characterized by mass spectrometry. Twenty-one protein spots were found differentially expressed between clear cell RCC and normal tissue and 38 spots were found expressed in chromophobe tumors. Eleven proteins were identified, with most differentially expressed -by fold change- between clear cell tumors and the corresponding normal tissue. Two of the identified proteins, Triosephosphate isomerase 1 (TPI-1 and Heat Shock protein 27 (Hsp27, were further validated in a separate set of tumors by immunohistochemistry and expression levels were correlated with clinicopathologic features of the patients. Hsp27 was highly expressed in 82% of the tumors used for validation, and all cases showed strong immunoreactivity for TPI-1. In both Hsp27 and TPI-1, protein expression positively correlated with histologic features of the disease. Our results suggest that the subjacent cytogenetic abnormalities seen in different histological types of RCC are followed by specific changes in protein expression. From these changes, Hsp27 and TPI-1 emerged as potential candidates for the differentiation and prognosis in RCC.

  1. [Small renal cell carcinoma (≤ 4 cm): enhancement patterns on triphasic spiral CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebonato, Alberto; Pierotti, Luisa; Barberini, Francesco; Rosi, Giovanni; Macarini, Luca; Scialpi, Michele

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to define enhancement patterns of small renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (≤4 cm) by triphasic spiral CT. In 24 patients with RCC, hypervascularity and hypovascularity were identified in 12 and 12 RO, respectively, in the cortico-medullary phase (CMP). Hypervascular RCC showed increased density in the CMP (170,7±46,3 UH) and a gradual wash-out in the nephrographic phase (NP) (152,5±41 UH) and pielographic phase (PF) (99,2±38 UH). Hypovascular RCC showed increased density in the CMP (52,9±24,7 UH) and a gradual wash-out in NP (64,5±16,9 UH) and PP phases (55,0±17,3 UH). PMID:23096734

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson William; Lewis Karl; Flaig Thomas; Gonzalez Rene; Schefter Tracey E; Kavanagh Brian D; Stinauer Michelle A; Chidel Mark; Glode Michael; Raben David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) t...

  3. Clusterin inhibition using OGX-011 synergistically enhances antitumour activity of sorafenib in a human renal cell carcinoma model

    OpenAIRE

    Kususda, Y; Miyake, H; Gleave, M. E.; Fujisawa, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate whether the therapeutic activity of sorafenib could be enhanced by combining with OGX-011, an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) targeting clusterin, in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: We investigated the effects of combined treatment with OGX-011 and sorafenib on a human RCC ACHN model both in vitro and in vivo. Results: Although clusterin expression was increased by sorafenib, additional treatment of ACHN with OGX-011 signifi...

  4. Multilevel-analysis identify a cis-expression quantitative trait locus associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Xiang; Purdue, Mark P.; Ye, Yuanqing; Wood, Christopher G.; Chen, Meng; Wang, Zhaoming; Albanes, Demetrius; Pu, Xia; Huang, Maosheng; Stevens, Victoria L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Chow, Wong-Ho; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted multilevel analyses to identify potential susceptibility loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which may be overlooked in traditional genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A gene set enrichment analysis was performed utilizing a GWAS dataset comprised of 894 RCC cases and 1,516 controls using GenGen, SNP ratio test, and ALIGATOR. The antigen processing and presentation pathway was consistently significant (P = 0.001, = 0.004, and < 0.001, respectively). Versatile gene-based asso...

  5. Body size and risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    OpenAIRE

    Pischon, T.; Lahmann, PH; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A; Halkjaer, J; Overvad, K; Klipstein-Grobusch, K.; Linseisen, J.; N. Becker; Trichopoulou, A.; Benetou, V; Trichopoulos, D.; Sieri, S.; Palli, D.; Tumino, R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that obesity is related to increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, only a few studies report on measures of central vs. peripheral adiposity. We examined the association between anthropometric measures, including waist and hip circumference and RCC risk among 348,550 men and women free of cancer at baseline from 8 countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). During 6.0 years of follow-up we identified 287 inciden...

  6. Therapeutic effects and associated adverse events of multikinase inhibitors in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    TAN, QINXIANG; WANG, WEIHUA; LONG, YOUHONG; CHEN, GUOZI

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects and adverse events of the multikinase inhibitors sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib and axitinib in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was performed to assess the effects of multikinase inhibitors among patients with advanced RCC. The data of median progression-free survival (PFS), median overall survival (OS), progressive disease rate (PDR), objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 adverse e...

  7. Renal cell carcinoma containing macroscopic fat on CT mimics an angiomyolipoma due to bone metaplasia without macroscopic calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond, L; M. Atri; Sherman, C; Sharir, S

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) containing foci of macroscopic fat, which were pathologically proven to be areas of osseous metaplasia. The macroscopic fat was not associated with calcification on the pre-operative CT scan. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of RCC that contain osseous metaplasia without evidence of macroscopic calcification on CT. The finding is significant because standard imaging practice is to classify a renal mass containing intratumoral macrosc...

  8. Body composition by computed tomography as a predictor of toxicity in patients with renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cushen, Samantha J

    2014-04-21

    Sunitinib is a standard first-line option for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Body composition is a prognostic factor in cancer patients and patients with loss of skeletal muscle mass and fat-free mass (FFM) are prone to dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during targeted drug therapy. We investigated whether body composition by computed tomography predicted DLT from sunitinib in mRCC.

  9. Prognostic value of preoperative inflammatory response biomarkers in patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma and the establishment of a nomogram

    OpenAIRE

    Liangyou Gu; Xin Ma; Hongzhao Li; Luyao Chen; Yongpeng Xie; Chaofei Zhao; Guoxiong Luo; Xu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    To examine the prognostic role of inflammatory response biomarkers in sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (sRCC). From January 2004 to May 2015, 103 patients with sRCC were enrolled in this study. Preoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (dNLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and lymphocyte to monocyte ratio (LMR) were analyzed. Besides well-established clinicopathological prognostic factors, we evaluated the prognostic value of this four mark...

  10. EVALUATION OF STEROID HORMONES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Bennett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones and their receptors have important roles in normal kidney biology, and alterations in their expression and function help explain the differences in development of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease. The distinct gender difference in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, with males having almost twice the incidence as females globally, also suggests a role for sex hormones or their receptors in RCC development and progression. There was a peak in interest in evaluating the roles of androgen and estrogen receptors in RCC pathogenesis in the late 20th century, with some positive outcomes for RCC therapy that targeted estrogen receptors, especially for metastatic disease. Since that time, however, there have been few studies that look at use of steroid hormone modulators for RCC, especially in the light of new therapies such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and new immune therapies, which are having some success for treatment of metastatic RCC. This review summarises past and current literature and attempts to stimulate renewed interest in research into the steroid hormones and their receptors, which might be used to effect, for example, in combination with the other newer targeted therapies for RCC.

  11. Helical CT scan: application in the diagnosis of small renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate helical CT scan in the diagnosis of small renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Helical CT features and pathologic findings of 15 patients with small RCC are analyzed. Results: Of 13 cases of small solid RCC, 9 showed marked tumor enhancement in cortical phase, in another 4 cases the enhancement was slight to moderate. Two cases of small cystic RCC, presented enhancement of wall with nodules and the partition in cortical phase. Enhancement faded away in the following parenchymal phase and pyelographic phase. All cases had hypervascular appearance pathologically. Two cases of small cystic RCC showed clear cystic degeneration, but the solid portion was rich in vascularity. Conclusion: The multi-phasic helical CT scan is superior to the conventional CT in the diagnosis of small RCC. In most cases, tumor enhancement was strong in cortical phase but weak in parenchymal phase, they demonstrated some degree of fast wash-out phenomenon, which is a characteristic pattern of enhancement. And the authors believe this has diagnostic significance. Therefore, the acquisition of a cortical phase scan should be part of the routine helical CT protocol of small RCC

  12. Isolated omental metastasis of renal cell carcinoma after extraperitoneal open partial nephrectomy: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ömer; Mut, Tuna; Sağlıcan, Yeşim; Sag, Alan Alper; Falay, Okan; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Tabak, Levent; Esen, Tarık

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metachronous metastatic spread of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) affects almost 1/3 of the patients. They occur most frequently in lung, liver, bone and brain. Isolated omental metastasis of RCC has not been reported so far. Case presentation A 62-year-old patient previously diagnosed and treated due to pulmonary sarcoidosis has developed an omental metastatic lesion 13 years after having undergone open extraperitoneal partial nephrectomy for T1 clear-cell RCC. Constitutional symptoms and imaging findings that were attributed to the presence of a sarcomatoid paraneoplastic syndrome triggered by the development this metastatic focus complicated the diagnostic work-up. Biopsy of the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (+) lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic RCC and the patient was managed by the resection of the omental mass via near-total omentectomy followed by targeted therapy with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Discussion Late recurrence of RCC has been reported to occur in 10–20% of the patients within 20 years. Therefore lifelong follow up of RCC has been advocated by some authors. Diffuse peritoneal metastases have been reported in certain RCC subtypes with adverse histopathological features. However, isolated omental metastasis without any sign of peritoneal involvement is an extremely rare condition. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of metachronously developed, isolated omental metastasis of an initially T1 clear-cell RCC. Constitutional symptoms, despite a long interval since nephrectomy, should raise the possibility of a paraneoplastic syndrome being associated with metastatic RCC. Morphological and molecular imaging studies together with histopathological documentation will be diagnostic. PMID:26874583

  13. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wu, Kaijie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Gao, Dexuan [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated with Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong, E-mail: jt.hsieh@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); He, Dalin, E-mail: dalinhe@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  14. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment

  15. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  16. Acanthosis Nigricans associated with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz de Campos, Fernando Peixoto; Narvaez, Margarita Rosa Aveiga; Reis, Paola Vasconcellos Soares; Gomes, Augusto Cesar Marins; Paraskevopoulos, Daniela Kallíope de Sá; Santana, Frederico; Fugita, Oscar Eduardo Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acanthosis nigricans (AN), an entity recognized since the 19th century, is a dermatopathy associated with insulin-resistant conditions, endocrinopathies, drugs, chromosome abnormalities and neoplasia. The latter, also known as malignant AN, is mostly related to abdominal neoplasms. Malignant AN occurs frequently among elderly patients. In these cases, the onset is subtle, and spreading involves the flexural regions of the body, particularly the axillae, palms, soles, and mucosa. Gastric adenocarcinoma is the most frequent associated neoplasia, but many others have been reported. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), although already reported, is rarely associated with malignant AN. The authors report the case of a woman who was being treated for depression but presented a long-standing and marked weight loss, followed by darkening of the neck and the axillary regions. Physical examination disclosed a tumoral mass in the left flank and symmetrical, pigmented, velvety, verrucous plaques on both axillae, which is classical for AN. The diagnostic work-up disclosed a huge renal mass, which was resected and further diagnosed as a RCC. The post-operative period was uneventful and the skin alteration was evanescent at the first follow-up consultation. The authors call attention to the association of AN with RCC. PMID:27284539

  17. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Current treatment and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common renal tumor and accounts for 3% of all adult cancers. The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has recently evolved from being a predominantly cytokine-based treatment to the use of targeted agents, which include Sorafenib, Sunitinib, Bevacizumab, Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Pazopanib, Axitinib, and most recently Tivozanib. Despite these advances mRCC remains a major health problem. Additional studies are needed to optimize the use of these agents in both advanced and early stage disease, either in combination or sequentially. In addition the development of biomarkers should be a priority in order to guide rational tailored development of emerging agents. This literature review was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases for articles published until January 2013. Abstracts from relevant meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European society of medical oncology were also included.

  18. A case report of a xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis case mimicking the recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after partial nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakan M AlDarrab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old female presented to the urology clinic with flank pain and tenderness. After full assessment, the patient was booked for surgery for partial nephrectomy and the patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC chromophob type. Six months later, the patient came back for follow-up; a mass was detected on the same kidney. Radical nephrectomy was performed to excise what is thought to be a recurrence of RCC and the tissues were sent to pathology. The postoperative pathology report confirmed the presence of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis rather than RCC recurrence.

  19. Lapatinib versus hormone therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a randomized phase III clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravaud, Alain; Hawkins, Robert; Gardner, Jason P;

    2008-01-01

    was compared with hormone therapy (HT) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) that express EGFR and/or HER-2. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with advanced RCC who had experienced disease progression through first-line cytokine therapy--stratified by Karnofsky performance status and number...... grades) for lapatinib were rash (44%) and diarrhea (40%). CONCLUSION: Lapatinib was well tolerated with equivalent overall efficacy to HT in advanced RCC patients who had experienced disease progression while receiving cytokines, and the study supports that lapatinib prolonged OS relative to HT...

  20. Initial Presentation of Renal Cell Carcinoma as a Metastatic Mass within the Masseter Muscle: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Eun; Lee, Han Bee; Cho, Woo Ho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji Hae; Kang, Min Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Pathology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often concomitant with distant metastasis, and these metastases are the first sign of an otherwise occult primary. Whereas metastasis of RCC to the head and neck has been reported, metastasis to the masseter muscle, which is composed of skeletal muscle, is quite rare. We now report the case of a 66-year-old man who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, with RCC metastasis of a well-defined intensely enhancing hypervascular mass in the masseter muscle as the initial presentation. We present the imaging findings of this case and a literature review about radiologic differential diagnosis of intramasseteric masses.

  1. Primary extra-renal clear cell renal cell carcinoma masquerading as an adrenal mass: A diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumina Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first case of a nonmetastasizing renal cell carcinoma (RCC masquerading as an adrenal mass, in the presence of normal bilateral native kidneys, in a young adult. The possibility of this mass developing in a supernumerary kidney was ruled out, since no identifiable renal tissue, pelvis or ureters was seen within the mass, nor was any separate systemic arterial supply to the mass seen. The diagnosis of extra-renal clear cell RCC was based on cyto-morphological features, further confirmed by immunohistochemistry findings. The origin of this extra-renal clear cell renal cell is proposed to be from the mesodermal embryonic rests.

  2. Increased Expression of the Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Mediates Lipid Accumulation in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sundelin, Jeanna Perman; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lundqvist, Annika; Levin, Max; Parini, Paolo; Johansson, Martin E.; Borén, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is, in most cases, caused by loss of function of the tumor suppressor gene von Hippel-Lindau, resulting in constitutive activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha and expression of hypoxia-induced genes in normoxic conditions. Clear-cell RCC cells are characterized histologically by accumulation of cholesterol, mainly in its ester form. The origin of the increased cholesterol remains unclear, but it is likely explained by an HIF-1 alpha-driven i...

  3. Primary extra-renal clear cell renal cell carcinoma masquerading as an adrenal mass: A diagnostic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Monappa, Vidya; Ayachit, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of a nonmetastasizing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as an adrenal mass, in the presence of normal bilateral native kidneys, in a young adult. The possibility of this mass developing in a supernumerary kidney was ruled out, since no identifiable renal tissue, pelvis or ureters was seen within the mass, nor was any separate systemic arterial supply to the mass seen. The diagnosis of extra-renal clear cell RCC was based on cyto-morphological features, further confirmed by immunohistochemistry findings. The origin of this extra-renal clear cell renal cell is proposed to be from the mesodermal embryonic rests. PMID:26692677

  4. Temsirolimus in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Escudier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Temsirolimus is a novel inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, which is a central regulator of the response of tumour cells to growth and survival signals. When heavily pretreated patients with advanced solid tumours received intravenous (IV temsirolimus over a broad dose range, antitumour activity was observed in various tumour types, including advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. A study of singleagent temsirolimus in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC subsequently demonstrated antitumour activity and encouraging progression- free survival and overall survival. Temsirolimus was generally well tolerated over the 3 dose levels tested (25 mg, 75 mg or 250 mg weekly as a 30-minute IV infusion. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 treatment-related adverse events reported (n=110 were hyperglycemia (17%, hypophosphatemia (13%, anemia (9%, and hypertriglyceridemia (6%. Results from a randomized phase III study that enrolled previously untreated patients with advanced RCC and poor-prognostic features have recently demonstrated a significant increase in overall survival (p=0.0089 for patients who received temsirolimus 25 mg IV, 30-minute infusion once weekly compared with those who received interferon-alpha up to 18 million units subcutaneously thrice weekly. On the basis of improved survival, temsirolimus can be considered a first-line treatment for patients with advanced RCC.

  5. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muglia, Valdair F., E-mail: fmuglia@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CCIFM/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica. Faculdade de Medicina; Prando, Adilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imaginologia

    2015-05-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes. (author)

  6. Renal cell carcinoma: histological classification and correlation with imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the seventh most common histological type of cancer in the Western world and has shown a sustained increase in its prevalence. The histological classification of RCCs is of utmost importance, considering the significant prognostic and therapeutic implications of its histological subtypes. Imaging methods play an outstanding role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of RCC. Clear cell, papillary and chromophobe are the most common histological subtypes of RCC, and their preoperative radiological characterization, either followed or not by confirmatory percutaneous biopsy, may be particularly useful in cases of poor surgical condition, metastatic disease, central mass in a solitary kidney, and in patients eligible for molecular targeted therapy. New strategies recently developed for treating renal cancer, such as cryo and radiofrequency ablation, molecularly targeted therapy and active surveillance also require appropriate preoperative characterization of renal masses. Less common histological types, although sharing nonspecific imaging features, may be suspected on the basis of clinical and epidemiological data. The present study is aimed at reviewing the main clinical and imaging findings of histological RCC subtypes. (author)

  7. The Role of Everolimus in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Meskawi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Everolimus (RAD001 is an orally administered agent that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin serine-threonine kinase. A phase III pivotal trial on everolimus, published in 2008, provided the first evidence for the efficacy of sequential therapy for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC. In this study, everolimus was used after failure of one or several previous lines of therapy, and it demonstrated a 3-month survival benefit relative to placebo. Currently, based on the level 1 evidence, everolimus represents the molecule of choice for third-line therapy after failure of previous two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. However, second-line use after failure of one TKI is challenged by two new molecules (nivolumab and cabozantinib, which proved to have better efficacy with similar toxicity profile. In non-clear cell metastatic RCC, the current evidence recommends everolimus as a second-line therapy after failure of previous first-line sunitinib.

  8. A case–control study of occupation/industry and renal cell carcinoma risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of occupation in the etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is unclear. Here, we investigated associations between employment in specific occupations and industries and RCC, and its most common histologic subtype, clear cell RCC (ccRCC). Between 2002 and 2007, a population-based case–control study of Caucasians and African Americans (1,217 cases; 1,235 controls) was conducted within the Detroit and Chicago metropolitan areas to investigate risk factors for RCC. As part of this study, occupational histories were ascertained through in-person interviews. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) relating occupation and industry to RCC risk using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Employment in the agricultural crop production industry for five years or more was associated with RCC (OR = 3.3 [95% CI = 1.0-11.5]) and ccRCC in particular (OR = 6.3 [95% CI = 1.7-23.3], P for trend with duration of employment = 0.0050). Similarly, RCC risk was elevated for employment of five years or longer in non-managerial agricultural and related occupations (ORRCC = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.0-4.5]; ORccRCC = 3.1 [95% CI = 1.4-6.8]). Employment in the dry-cleaning industry was also associated with elevated risk (ORRCC = 2.0 [95% CI = 0.9-4.4], P for trend = 0.093; ORccRCC = 3.0 [95% CI = 1.2-7.4], P for trend = 0.031). Suggestive elevated associations were observed for police/public safety workers, health care workers and technicians, and employment in the electronics, auto repair, and cleaning/janitorial services industries; protective associations were suggested for many white-collar jobs including computer science and administrative occupations as well employment in the business, legislative, and education industries. Our findings provide support for an elevated risk of RCC in the agricultural and dry-cleaning industries and suggest that these associations may be stronger for the ccRCC subtype. Additional studies are needed to confirm these

  9. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Year Award Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Diversity Mentorship Program Eugene Van ... 300 PUVA treatments. What causes Merkel cell carcinoma? Scientists are still studying what causes this skin cancer. ...

  10. Vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A.C. van; Schouten, L.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Vegetable and fruit consumption is generally inversely associated with various cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer (NLCS) consists of 120,852 men and women, aged 55-69 years, who filled out a self-administered questionnaire that include

  11. Vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma: results from the Netherlands cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B.A. van; Schouten, L.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Vegetable and fruit consumption is generally inversely associated with various cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer (NLCS) consists of 120,852 men and women, aged 55-69 years, who filled out a self-administered questionnaire that include

  12. Outpatient-based subcutaneous interleukin-2 monotherapy in advanced renal cell carcinoma : An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieken, J; Sleijfer, DT; deLeij, L; Mulder, NH

    1996-01-01

    To minimize interleukin-2-related toxicity while retaining its efficacy, a treatment schedule utilizing subcutaneous IL-2 was evaluated in a phase II setting. Eighty unselected consecutive patients with metastatic or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mean age 58 years (range, 21 to 76), received

  13. Contemporary approach to diagnosis and classification of renal cell carcinoma with mixed histologic features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanishka Sircar; Priya Rao; Eric Jonasch; Federico A.Monzon; Pheroze Tamboli

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an important contributor to cancer-specific mortality worldwide.Targeted agents that inhibit key subtype-specific signaling pathways have improved survival times and have recently become part of the standard of care for this disease.Accurately diagnosing and classifying RCC on the basis of tumor histology is thus critical.RCC has been traditionally divided into clear-cell and non-clearcell categories,with papillary RCC forming the most common subtype of non-clear-cell RCC.Renal neoplasms with overlapping histologies,such as tumors with mixed clear-cell and papillary features and hybrid renal oncocytic tumors,are increasingly seen in contemporary practice and present a diagnostic challenge with important therapeutic implications.In this review,we discuss the histologic,immunohistochemical,cytogenetic,and clinicopathologic aspects of these differential diagnoses and illustrate how the classification of RCC has evolved to integrate both the tumor's microscopic appearance and its molecular fingerprint.

  14. ROLE OF THE MORPHOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF INTRATUMORAL MICROVESSELS AND THE PROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY OF TUMOR CELLS IN RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Gorban

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential factors for tumor growth, progression, and metastasis.Objective: to assess the relationship between the values of proliferative activity and the morphometric parameters of intratumoral microvessels in metastatic and localized carcinomas of the kidney.Materials and methods. Surgical specimens taken from 54 patients (32 men and 22 women aged 26 to 69 years (mean age 55 ± 1.5 years with the verified diagnosis of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC were studied.Conclusion. Proliferative activity and angioarchitectonics are an important biological characteristic of a tumor of unequal clinical value in RCC. Metastatic carcinoma has a higher proliferative activity and a low tumor vascularization than those of localized carcinoma.

  15. Transglutaminase 2 Expression and Its Prognostic Significance in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Min Jee; Baek, Hae Woon; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Cheol; Park, Jeong Whan; Kim, Hwal Woong; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background: A few recent studies have demonstrated a possible role of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in tumorigenesis or progression of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of this study was to examine TG2 expression and its clinicopathologic significance in a large number of human clear cell RCCs (CCRCCs). Methods: We analyzed 638 CCRCC patients who underwent partial or radical nephrectomy between 1995 and 2005. The expression of TG2 was determined by immunohistochemistry and categorized into four ...

  16. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  17. Progression of renal cell carcinoma is inhibited by genistein and radiation in an orthotopic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucuk Omer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported the potentiation of radiotherapy by the soy isoflavone genistein for prostate cancer using prostate tumor cells in vitro and orthotopic prostate tumor models in vivo. However, when genistein was used as single therapy in animal models, it promoted metastasis to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. To clarify whether these intriguing adverse effects of genistein are intrinsic to the orthotopic prostate tumor model, or these results could also be recapitulated in another model, we used the orthotopic metastatic KCI-18 renal cell carcinoma (RCC model established in our laboratory. Methods The KCI-18 RCC cell line was generated from a patient with papillary renal cell carcinoma. Following orthotopic renal implantation of KCI-18 RCC cells and serial in vivo kidney passages in nude mice, we have established a reliable and predictable metastatic RCC tumor model. Mice bearing established kidney tumors were treated with genistein combined with kidney tumor irradiation. The effect of the therapy was assessed on the primary tumor and metastases to various organs. Results In this experimental model, the karyotype and histological characteristics of the human primary tumor are preserved. Tumor cells metastasize from the primary renal tumor to the lungs, liver and mesentery mimicking the progression of RCC in humans. Treatment of established kidney tumors with genistein demonstrated a tendency to stimulate the growth of the primary kidney tumor and increase the incidence of metastasis to the mesentery lining the bowel. In contrast, when given in conjunction with kidney tumor irradiation, genistein significantly inhibited the growth and progression of established kidney tumors. These findings confirm the potentiation of radiotherapy by genistein in the orthotopic RCC model as previously shown in orthotopic models of prostate cancer. Conclusion Our studies in both RCC and prostate tumor models demonstrate that the

  18. Progression of renal cell carcinoma is inhibited by genistein and radiation in an orthotopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported the potentiation of radiotherapy by the soy isoflavone genistein for prostate cancer using prostate tumor cells in vitro and orthotopic prostate tumor models in vivo. However, when genistein was used as single therapy in animal models, it promoted metastasis to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. To clarify whether these intriguing adverse effects of genistein are intrinsic to the orthotopic prostate tumor model, or these results could also be recapitulated in another model, we used the orthotopic metastatic KCI-18 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) model established in our laboratory. The KCI-18 RCC cell line was generated from a patient with papillary renal cell carcinoma. Following orthotopic renal implantation of KCI-18 RCC cells and serial in vivo kidney passages in nude mice, we have established a reliable and predictable metastatic RCC tumor model. Mice bearing established kidney tumors were treated with genistein combined with kidney tumor irradiation. The effect of the therapy was assessed on the primary tumor and metastases to various organs. In this experimental model, the karyotype and histological characteristics of the human primary tumor are preserved. Tumor cells metastasize from the primary renal tumor to the lungs, liver and mesentery mimicking the progression of RCC in humans. Treatment of established kidney tumors with genistein demonstrated a tendency to stimulate the growth of the primary kidney tumor and increase the incidence of metastasis to the mesentery lining the bowel. In contrast, when given in conjunction with kidney tumor irradiation, genistein significantly inhibited the growth and progression of established kidney tumors. These findings confirm the potentiation of radiotherapy by genistein in the orthotopic RCC model as previously shown in orthotopic models of prostate cancer. Our studies in both RCC and prostate tumor models demonstrate that the combination of genistein with primary tumor irradiation is a more

  19. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  20. Renal-cell carcinomas in end-stage kidneys: a clinicopathological study with emphasis on clear-cell papillary renal-cell carcinoma and acquired cystic kidney disease-associated carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Ramneesh; Alexiev, Borislav A

    2012-02-01

    Clear-cell papillary renal-cell carcinoma (CCPC) and acquired cystic kidney disease-associated carcinoma (ACDAC) are neoplasms with distinct morphological characteristics that behave less aggressively than conventional renal-cell carcinomas. End-stage kidney specimens from 61 patients (47 males and 14 females) with 109 renal-cell carcinomas were selected. Papillary renal-cell carcinoma was the most common malignancy (61/109, 56%), followed by CCPC (20/109, 18%). The CCPC showed a papillary or tubular/solid architecture, clear cytoplasm, low nuclear grade, and a distinct immunohistochemical profile (RCC-, vimentin+, CK7+, p504S-). ACDAC displayed a variety of architectural patterns, eosinophilic cytoplasm, high nuclear grade, intratumoral calcium oxalate deposits, and an immunohistochemical profile similar to type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinoma (RCC+, vimentin+, CK7-/+, p504S+). Less than 5% (3/69) of pathologically staged renal-cell carcinomas in end-stage kidneys presented with lymphogenous and/or hematogenous metastases. PMID:21791489

  1. Optimizing lutetium 177-anti-carbonic anhydrase IX radioimmunotherapy in an intraperitoneal clear cell renal cell carcinoma xenograft model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muselaers, C.H.J.; Oosterwijk, E.; Bos, D.L.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Boerman, O.C.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach in the treatment of clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) antibody G250. To investigate the potential of RIT with lutetium 177 (177Lu)-labeled G250, we conducted a protein dose escalation study and subsequently an RIT st

  2. High Expression of KCa3.1 in Patients with Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma Predicts High Metastatic Risk and Poor Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Maj; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Hansen, Lars Koch; Jensen, Line; Sevelsted-Møller, Linda; Walter, Steen; Jensen, Boye L; Marcussen, Niels; Köhler, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been implicated in cancer cell growth, metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. Here we hypothesized that high mRNA and protein expression of the intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel, KCa3.1, is a molecular marker of clear cell Renal Cell...... Carcinoma (ccRCC) and metastatic potential and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed channel expression by qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and patch-clamp in ccRCC and benign oncocytoma specimens, in primary ccRCC and oncocytoma cell lines, as well as in two ccRCC cell lines (Caki-1 and Caki...... tumors). Immunohistochemistry revealed high protein expression of KCa3.1 in tumor vessels of ccRCC and oncocytoma and in a subset of ccRCC cells. Oncocytoma cells were devoid of KCa3.1 protein. In a primary ccRCC cell line and Caki-1/2-ccRCC cells, we found KCa3.1-protein as well as TRAM-34-sensitive KCa...

  3. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: further characterization of the morphologic and immunopathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soomin; Kwon, Ghee Young; Cho, Yong Mee; Jun, Sun-Young; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yong Wook; Park, Weon Seo; Shim, Jung Won

    2013-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma (ACD-RCC) is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with unique morphologic features found exclusively in the background of end-stage renal disease. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features and immumoreactive profiles of 12 cases of ACD-RCC to further characterize this recently recognized entity. Review of histologic slides was performed in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining directed to the contemporary diagnostic antibodies and the putative target therapy-related markers. Histologically, the tumors showed characteristic inter-or intracellular microlumens and eosinophilic tumor cells. Intratumoral hemosiderin deposition and degenerating foamy tumor cells were consistent findings which were not previously described. Immunohistochemically, all the tumors were positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, CD10, pan-cytokeratin, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and c-met, while negative for carbonic anhydrase-9, CD57, CD68, c-kit, pax-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. Heterogenous staining was found for CK7 and kidney-specific cadherin. Positive reaction to c-met suggests its utility as a plausible therapeutic target in ACD-RCC. Thus, we present the unique morphologic and immunopathologic features of ACD-RCC, which may be helpful in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:23471757

  4. PD-L1 Expression in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Analysis of Nephrectomy and Sites of Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Jilaveanu, L.B.; Shuch, B.; Zito, C. R.; Parisi, F.; Barr, M.; Kluger, Y.; Chen, L; Kluger, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of programmed death ligand (PD-L1/B7-H1/CD274) represents a mechanism of immune escape for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. Drugs blocking PD-L1 or its receptor are in clinical development and early data suggests that tumor PD-L1 expression may predict response. Patients and Methods: A tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of four biopsy cores from 34 matched pairs of nephrectomy and metastatic sites of clear cell RCC was used to assess PD-L1 expression by quantitative im...

  5. Current Status of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary L

    2016-06-01

    Over the last three decades, the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has continuously risen, generally attributed to the increased use of cross-sectional imaging across all medical disciplines. Fortunately, despite this rising incidence, the estimated 5-year relative survival rate has improved. This survival improvement likely parallels the stage migration of the last two decades toward an increased incidence of small renal masses (SRMs). However, this survival improvement may be secondary to improved surgical techniques and medical therapies for these malignancies. The increased incidence of SRMs has led to an expected evolution in the treatment of RCC. Minimally invasive surgical applications for the treatment of RCC have gained widespread popularity, and now these approaches to renal malignancies have surpassed open techniques in frequency of utilization. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted techniques have now been applied to both radical and partial nephrectomy procedures of varying complexity. Additionally, percutaneous ablative procedures have been applied to the treatment of some SRMs, increasing the urologist's armamentarium further. Below, we provide a review of these minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures for the treatment of RCC. PMID:27021911

  6. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor’s underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients

  7. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  8. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN. Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RPN. On the other hand, thermoablative therapy and cryoablation also play an important role in the renal preservation therapy to improve the patient procedural tolerance. Novel modalities, but limited to small number of patients, include high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU, radiosurgery, microwave therapy (MWT, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT, and pulsed cavitational ultrasound (PCU. Although initial results are encouraging, their real clinical roles are still under evaluation. On the other hand, active surveillance (AS has also been advocated by some for patients who are unfit for surgery. It is reasonable to choose the best therapeutic method among varieties of treatment modalities according to patients' age, physical status, and financial aid to maximize the treatment effect among cancer control, patient morbidity, and preservation of renal function.

  9. Acid, basic, and neutral peptidases present different profiles in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and in oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Lorena; Larrinaga, Gorka; Pérez, Itxaro; López, José I; Gil, Javier; Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Varona, Adolfo

    2008-04-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are neoplasias with high prevalence and mortality. We previously reported that several peptidases may be involved in the pathophysiology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). Now, to gain insight into the reasons that lead the various RCC types to behave very differently with regard to aggressiveness and response to anticancer treatments, we analyzed subsets of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), and renal oncocytoma (RO), a benign tumor; as well as different grades and stages of CCRCCs. Particulate APN, APB, and APA activities were decreased in both ChRCC and RO (tumor vs. nontumor tissues). Interestingly, activities were downregulated in a tumor-type specific way and the intensities of the decreases were stronger in the benign tumor than in the malignant type. Moreover, when two key histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis (high vs. low stage and grade) were analyzed, increases of activity were also observed in several of these cell surface peptidases (APN, APB). Some soluble activities (APB, Asp-AP) were also downregulated in the RCCs. With respect to genetic expression, PSA and APN were in a positive correlation related to their activities in both ChRCC and RO; but not APB, Asp-AP, APA, and PGI. These results may suggest an involvement of several peptidases in the pathophysiology of renal cancer, since they presented different patterns of activity and expression in tumors with different behaviors. PMID:18216146

  10. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Dhingra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC in the absence of history of primary tumor is difficult as it can be confused with other clear cell tumors. We report here a case of cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of RCC in a patient who had nephrectomy done 9 years back at some other centre, but did not have any records with him. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of primary internal organ malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous lesions and therefore conduct a careful examination and get necessary investigations. Prompt diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome.

  11. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with gain of chromosomes 3, 7, and 16, gain of chromosome X, and loss of chromosome Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently described. To date, there are no reports on genetic findings of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. In this article, we report the first report of G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC. A 66-year-old Japanese man was found to have a left renal tumor during the follow-up of hemodialysis consequent to chronic renal failure. Left nephrectomy was performed. Histological examination of three tumors in the left kidney showed the cribriform or microcystic growth pattern of neoplastic cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, and many oxalate crystals were observed. The G-band karyotype of ACD-associated RCC showed 49, X, +X, -Y, +3, +7, +16. These chromosomal abnormalities resemble those of sporadic papillary RCC that has been previously reported. Finally, we suggest that this tumor may show a close relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC, but a large-scale study will be needed to clarify the relationship between ACD-associated RCC and papillary RCC. PMID:21267700

  12. Review of renal cell carcinoma and its common subtypes in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Huang, Guan; Fu, Winnie; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat

    2016-05-28

    Representing 2%-3% of adult cancers, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of renal malignancies and is the most lethal neoplasm of the urologic system. Over the last 65 years, the incidence of RCC has increased at a rate of 2% per year. The increased incidence is at least partly due to improved tumor detection secondary to greater availability of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging modalities over the last few decades. Most RCCs are asymptomatic at discovery and are detected as unexpected findings on imaging performed for unrelated clinical indications. The 2004 World Health Organization Classification of adult renal tumors stratifies RCC into several distinct histologic subtypes of which clear cell, papillary and chromophobe tumors account for 70%, 10%-15%, and 5%, respectively. Knowledge of the RCC subtype is important because the various subtypes are associated with different biologic behavior, prognosis and treatment options. Furthermore, the common RCC subtypes can often be discriminated non-invasively based on gross morphologic imaging appearances, signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and the degree of tumor enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging examinations. In this article, we review the incidence and survival data, risk factors, clinical and biochemical findings, imaging findings, staging, differential diagnosis, management options and post-treatment follow-up of RCC, with attention focused on the common subtypes. PMID:27247714

  13. AIF downregulation and its interaction with STK3 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengqiang Xu

    Full Text Available Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF plays a crucial role in caspase-independent programmed cell death by triggering chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Therefore, it might be involved in cell homeostasis and tumor development. In this study, we report significant AIF downregulation in the majority of renal cell carcinomas (RCC. In a group of RCC specimens, 84% (43 out of 51 had AIF downregulation by immunohistochemistry stain. Additional 10 kidney tumors, including an oxyphilic adenoma, also had significant AIF downregulation by Northern blot analysis. The mechanisms of the AIF downregulation included both AIF deletion and its promoter methylation. Forced expression of AIF in RCC cell lines induced massive apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that AIF interacted with STK3, a known regulator of apoptosis, and enhanced its phosphorylation at Thr180. These results suggest that AIF downregulation is a common event in kidney tumor development. AIF loss may lead to decreased STK3 activity, defective apoptosis and malignant transformation.

  14. Tumor-associated macrophages are involved in tumor progression in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnes, Carl Ludwig; Bremmer, Felix; Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Strauss, Arne; Ströbel, Philipp; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a key role in cancer development. Especially, the immunosuppressive M2 phenotype is associated with increased tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. The differentiation of macrophages to the alternative phenotype M2 is mediated, inter alia, by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a rare tumor type which, based upon histological criteria, can be subdivided into two subtypes (I and II), of which type II is associated with poor prognosis. In both subtypes, typically, a dense infiltrate of macrophages is found. In the present study, the expression of CD68, CD163, M-CSF, Ki-67, and CD31 was examined in 30 type I and 30 type II papillary RCCs (n = 60). Both types of papillary RCCs contained an equally dense infiltrate of CD68-positive macrophages. Nearly all macrophages in papillary RCC type II expressed CD163, a characteristic for M2 macrophages. In type I papillary RCC, less than 30 % of macrophages expressed CD163. Furthermore, tumor cells in type II papillary RCC expressed significantly more M-CSF and showed increased (Ki-67 expression defined) proliferative activity in comparison with type I papillary RCC. In addition, the (CD31 defined) capillary density was higher in type II than in type I papillary RCC. A dense infiltrate of M2 phenotype TAM and high M-CSF expression in tumor cells are key features of type II papillary RCC. These findings might explain why the prognosis of papillary RCC type II is worse than that of type I. PMID:24327306

  15. MicroRNA-22 is downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and inhibits cell growth, migration and invasion by targeting PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenxing; Huang, Jie; Xiao, Hua; Liang, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-22 has previously been reported to be frequently downregulated in certain types of cancer. The present study examined the expression and effects of miR-22 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The results indicated that miR‑22 was downregulated in tumor tissue from patients with RCC. In addition, lower miR‑22 expression levels were associated with histological grade, tumor stage and lymph node metas-tasis. Following transfection of RCC cells with miR‑22, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, cell migration, cell invasion and luciferase assays, and western blotting were conducted. The results demonstrated that miR‑22 was able to inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion in 786‑O and A498 cells. Furthermore, the results indicated that miR‑22 may directly target phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in RCC. In conclusion, the present study suggested that the miR-22/PTEN axis may be considered a novel therapeutic target in RCC. These findings may be beneficial for the development of an effective therapy against RCC. PMID:27082730

  16. Differential expression of PD-L1 between primary and metastatic sites in clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Callea, Marcella; Albiges, Laurence; Gupta, Mamta; Cheng, Su-Chun; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Fay, André P.; Song, Jiaxi; Carvo, Ingrid; Bhatt, Rupal S.; Atkins, Michael B.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Choueiri, Toni K.; McDermott, David F.; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    PD-L1 expression in primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) increases the likelihood of response to anti-PD-1 inhibition, but fails to identify all responders. We hypothesized that PD-L1 levels assessed in randomly selected areas of the primary tumors may not accurately reflect expression levels in metastatic lesions, which are the target of systemic therapy. Therefore, we compared PD-L1 expression in a series of primary ccRCC and their metastases. Tissue blocks from 53 primary ccRCCs...

  17. Tivozanib in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepgur M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Hepgur, Sarmad Sadeghi, Tanya B Dorff, David I Quinn Division of Medical Oncology, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is an aggressive malignancy compared to other urological malignancies and has been associated with poor responses to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Interferon-a and interleukin-2 were previously utilized in a limited number of patients with good performance status due to toxicity and safety issues. Over the last decade, through advances in the understanding of the biology and pathology of RCC, the important role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in RCC has been identified. Data from randomized trials have led to the approval of first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib; however, these agents inhibit a wide variety of kinase targets and are associated with a range of adverse effects. More recently, a new generation TKI, axitinib, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Tivozanib is a novel TKI, which is a potent inhibitor of VEGF-1, VEGF-2, VEGF-3, c-kit, and PDGR kinases, with a more restricted target spectrum. Phase II and III studies have demonstrated significant activity and a favorable safety profile as an initial targeted treatment for advanced RCC. This review examines the emerging data with tivozanib for the treatment of advanced RCC. Preclinical investigations as well as Phase I, II, and III data are examined; data on the comparative benefits of tivozanib are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the future potential of tivozanib in combination, biomarkers associated with tivozanib response, and acquisition of resistance and nonkidney cancer indications. Keywords: targeted therapy, renal cell cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tivozanib

  18. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlinger, Marco; Horswell, Stuart; Larkin, James; Rowan, Andrew J.; Salm, Max P; Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73–75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome ...

  19. Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Evidence Based Review of Current Treatment Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Sankin, Alexander; Hakimi, A. Ari; Hsieh, James J.; Molina, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) over the last decade, with the development of agents that block the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The incorporation of these agents into treatment algorithms has been the result of carefully conducted clinical trials leading to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and subsequent adoption as the current standard of care. These tri...

  20. Metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma - an unusual response to Temsirolimus in second line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanculeanu, D L; Lazescu, A; Zob, D D; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R; Poteca, T D

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents 3% of all cancers, with the highest incidence occurring in the most developed countries and representing the seventh most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women. The understanding of the tumor molecular biology and the discovery of new drugs that target molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced renal cell carcinoma and improved the outcomes in the patients suffering from these affections. Studying the molecular signaling that controls the tumor growth and the progression has led to the development of molecular therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, resulting in a significant improvement in the overall survival and quality of life. Sunitinib represents an inhibitor of VEGFR 1-3, c-kit, FLT-3 and PDGFR. We present the case of a patient with metastatic clear cell RCC with a treatment effect following sequential VEGF and mTOR inhibitor treatment. Under sunitinib treatment, the patient had a progression free survival (PFS) of approximately 9 months, similar to the PFS observed in clinical trials. Sunitinib was well tolerated by this patient. Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is currently only approved for the first-line treatment of mRCC patients with poor prognosis. This study analyzes a treatment effect of second line temsirolimus in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). PMID:27453754

  1. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek [Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Brno (Czech Republic); Slaby, Ondrej, E-mail: slaby@mou.cz [Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. {yields} MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. {yields} It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. {yields} MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. {yields} Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  2. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. → MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. → It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. → MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. → Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  3. Prevalence of von Hippel-Lindau gene mutations in sporadic renal cell carcinoma: results from the Netherlands cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biallelic von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene defects, a rate-limiting event in the carcinogenesis, occur in approximately 75% of sporadic clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). We studied the VHL mutation status in a large population-based case group. Cases were identified within the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer, which includes 120,852 men and women. After 11.3 years of follow-up, 337 incident cases with histologically confirmed epithelial cancers were identified. DNA was isolated from paraffin material collected from 51 pathology laboratories and revised by one pathologist, leaving material from 235 cases. VHL mutational status was assessed by SSCP followed by direct sequencing, after testing SSCP as a screening tool in a subsample. The number of mutations was significantly higher for clear-cell RCC compared to other histological types. We observed 131 mutations in 114 out of 187 patients (61%) with clear-cell RCC. The majority of mutations were truncating mutations (47%). The mean tumor size was 72.7 mm for mutated tumors compared to 65.3 mm for wildtype tumors (p = 0.06). No statistically significant differences were observed for nuclear grade, TNM distribution or stage. In other histological types, we observed 8 mutations in 7 out of 48 patients (15%), 1 mutation in 1 of 6 oncocytoma, 3 mutations in 2 of 7 chromophobe RCC, 2 mutations in 2 of 30 papillary RCC, no mutations in 1 collecting duct carcinoma and 2 mutations in 2 of 4 unclassified RCC. VHL mutations were detected in 61% of sporadic clear-cell RCC. VHL mutated and wildtype clear-cell RCC did not differ with respect to most parameters

  4. Comparative membrane proteomics: a technical advancement in the search of renal cell carcinoma biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Francesca; Corbetta, Samuele; Savoia, Andrea; Chinello, Clizia; Cazzaniga, Marta; Rocco, Francesco; Bosari, Silvano; Grasso, Marco; Bovo, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio; Pitto, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer, accounting for 3% of adult malignancies, with high metastatic potential and radio-/chemo-resistance. To investigate the protein profile of membrane microdomains (MD), plasma membrane supramolecular structures involved in cell signaling, transport, and neoplastic transformation, we set up a proteomic bottom-up approach as a starting point for the identification of potential RCC biomarkers. We purified MD from RCC and adjacent normal kidney (ANK) tissues, through their resistance to non-ionic detergents followed by ultracentrifugation in sucrose density gradient. MD from 5 RCC/ANK tissues were then pooled and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. In order to identify the highest number of proteins and increase the amount of membrane and hydrophobic ones, we first optimized an enzymatic digestion protocol based on Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP), coupled to MD delipidation. The MS analysis led to the identification of 742 ANK MD and 721 RCC MD proteins, of which, respectively, 53.1% and 52.6% were membrane- bound. Additionally, we evaluated RCC MD differential proteome by label-free quantification; 170 and 126 proteins were found to be, respectively, up-regulated and down-regulated in RCC MD. Some differential proteins, namely CA2, CD13, and ANXA2, were subjected to validation by immunodecoration. These results show the importance of setting up different protocols for the proteomic analysis of membrane proteins, specific to the different molecular features of the samples. Furthermore, the subcellular proteomic approach provided a list of differentially expressed proteins among which RCC biomarkers may be looked for. PMID:25926002

  5. MicroRNA-126 inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis by downregulating ROCK1 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Ming; Luo, Lei; Ding, Xue-Mei; Dong, Da-Hai; Li, Bin; Ma, Xiao-Cheng; Sun, Li-Jiang

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in cancer development and progression. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) frequently undergoes metastasis and has a high mortality rate. The current study measured miRNA‑126 (miR‑126) expression levels in 128 pairs of clear cell RCC and adjacent normal kidney tissue samples by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and analyzed the association between miR‑126 and various clinicopathological parameters. In addition, cell proliferation, wound healing and cell invasion assays were conducted using RCC cells overexpressing miR‑126. Potential miR‑126 target genes and the signaling pathways that may be regulated by miR‑126 were then examined. miR‑126 expression was significantly reduced in patients with metastatic RCC compared with patients without metastasis. Consistently, overexpression of miR‑126 in RCC cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro compared with negative control miRNA. A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR‑126 targets Rho associated coiled‑coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) by directly binding the 3'‑untranslated region. Furthermore, western blotting identified miR‑126 as an important regulator of the AKT and extracellular signal‑regulated 1/2 signaling pathways. The results of the present study indicate that miR‑126 inhibits RCC cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating ROCK1. These findings suggest that miR‑126 may be valuable as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in RCC. PMID:27108693

  6. Fine mapping of the 1q21 breakpoint of the papillary venal cell carcinoma-associated (X;1) translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, MAJ; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; vanKessel, AG

    1996-01-01

    A combination of Southern blot analysis on a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques was used to map a series of DNA markers relative to the 1q21 breakpoint of the renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-associated (X;1)-(p11;q21) translocation. This b

  7. Knockdown of COUP-TFII inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through upregulating BRCA1 in renal cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia; Qin, Weijun; Jiao, Dian; Ren, Jing; Wei, Ming; Shi, Shengjia; Xi, Wenjin; Wang, He; Yang, An-Gang; Huan, Yi; Wen, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    COUP-TFII belongs to the nuclear receptor family, which is highly expressed in many kinds of tumors. Previous studies have shown that COUP-TFII can promote tumor progression through regulating tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation and migration of certain cancer cells. However, the function of COUP-TFII in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is not clear. Here, we showed that clinical RCC tumor tissues showed much higher COUP-TFII expression level than adjacent normal tissues. When COUP-TFII was knocked down in RCC 769-P and 786-O cells by siRNA or shRNA-expressing lentivirus, the cell proliferation was markedly inhibited, and apoptosis increased. Moreover, the tumor growth of COUP-TFII knockdown 769-P and 786-O xenografts in nude mice was also obviously inhibited. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot, we showed that the expression of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 was upregulated in COUP-TFII knockdown cells. Simultaneously knockdown of BRCA1 and COUP-TFII partially rescued the inhibited cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in COUP-TFII single knockdown cells. These results indicate that COUP-TFII may play an oncogenic role in RCC, and COUP-TFII may promote tumor progression through inhibiting BRCA1. PMID:27193872

  8. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. PMID:27114304

  9. A genetic polymorphism affects the risk and prognosis of renal cell carcinoma: association with follistatin-like protein 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Han, Xue; Yu, Yongwei; Ding, Yibo; Ni, Chong; Liu, Wenbin; Hou, Xiaomei; Li, Zixiong; Hou, Jianguo; Shen, Dan; Yin, Jianhua; Zhang, Hongwei; Thompson, Timothy C; Tan, Xiaojie; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have been identified, yet genetic predisposition contributes significantly to this malignancy. We previously showed that follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) was significantly down-regulated in clear cell RCC (ccRCC), in particular metastatic ccRCC. In the present study, we systemically investigated the associations of the 6 SNPs within FSTL1-coding genomic region with RCC risk and postoperative prognosis. Age- and gender-matched case-control study (417 vs 855) indicated that rs1259293 variant genotype CC was significantly associated with an increased risk of RCC, with an odds ratio of 2.004 (95% confidence internal [CI] = 1.190-3.375). Multivariate Cox regression analysis in 309 of 417 cases showed that rs1259293 genotype (CC vs TT + CT) independently predicted an unfavorable prognosis, with a hazard ratio of 2.531 (95% CI = 1.052-6.086). Expression of FSTL1 was significantly higher in adjacent renal tissues than in tumors, and significantly higher in the tissues with rs1259293 TT genotype than in those with rs1259293 TC+CC genotypes. rs1259293 C allele might generate a CTCF binding site that blocks trans-activation of FSTL1 expression. Our results indicate that rs1259293 is associated with an increased risk and unfavorable postoperative prognosis of RCC, possibly by down-regulating FSTL1 expression in renal tissues. PMID:27225192

  10. Sorafenib with interleukin-2 vs sorafenib alone in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: the ROSORC trial

    OpenAIRE

    Procopio, G.; Verzoni, E.; Bracarda, S; S. Ricci; Sacco, C; Ridolfi, L.; Porta, C.; Miceli, R.; Zilembo, N.; Bajetta, E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preclinical investigations support combining sorafenib with IL-2 in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods: In this open-label, phase II study, 128 patients with mRCC were randomised to receive oral sorafenib, 400 mg twice daily, plus subcutaneous IL-2, 4.5 million international units (MIU) five times per week for 6 in every 8 weeks, or sorafenib alone. After enrolment of the first 40 patients, IL-2 dose was reduced to improve the tolerability. Results: A...

  11. Laparoscopic resection of tumor recurrence after radical nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lessandro Curcio; Antonio Claudio Cunha; Juan Renteria; Daniel Presto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Local recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy is a rare event. Some known risk factors are: clinical/pathological stage, locorregional disease and lyimph node positivity. Since up to 30-40% of patients can achieve a disease-free status, we show a case (video) in which we performed a laparoscopic excision of a local RCC, taking advantage of all the well-known benefits of laparoscopy.Case report A 56 years old female with a history of open radical nephrec...

  12. DNA methylation profiling reveals novel diagnostic biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lasseigne, Brittany N.; Burwell, Todd C; Patil, Mohini A; Absher, Devin M.; BROOKS, JAMES D.; Myers, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the tenth most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. While it is usually lethal when metastatic, RCC is successfully treated with surgery when tumors are confined to the kidney and have low tumor volume. Because most early stage renal tumors do not result in symptoms, there is a strong need for biomarkers that can be used to detect the presence of the cancer as well as to monitor patients during and after therapy. Methods We examined genome-w...

  13. Piperlongumine and its analogs down-regulate expression of c-Met in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovine, Konstantin; Makhov, Peter; Naito, Sei; Raiyani, Henish; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey; Mehrazin, Reza; Tulin, Alexei; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G; Kolenko, Vladimir M

    2015-01-01

    The c-Met protein, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is the product of a proto-oncogene. Its only known ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), regulates cell growth, motility, migration, invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis. The aberrant expression of c-Met is often associated with poor prognosis in multiple cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Silencing or inactivation of c-Met leads to decreased viability of cancer cells, thereby making ablation of c-Met signaling an attractive concept for developing novel strategies for the treatment of renal tumors. Naturally-occurring products or substances are the most consistent source of drug development. As such, we investigated the functional impact of piperlongumine (PL), a naturally occurring alkaloid present in the Long pepper (Piper longum) on c-Met expression in RCC cells and demonstrated that PL and its analogs rapidly reduce c-Met protein and RNA levels in RCC cells via ROS-dependent mechanism. PL-mediated c-Met depletion coincided with the inhibition of downstream c-Met signaling; namely Erk/MAPK, STAT3, NF-κB and Akt/mTOR. As such, PL and PL analogs hold promise as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of metastatic RCC and the prevention of postoperative RCC recurrence. PMID:25801713

  14. Estramustine-binding protein (EMBP) in renal cell carcinoma immunohistochemistry, immunoscintigraphy and in vitro estramustine effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report shows that the human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines, A498 and CAKI-2, express the estramustine-binding protein (EMBP). The RCC cell lines investigated were highly sensitive for estramustine, with cell arrest in atypical metaphase. In vitro experiments using a fluorimetric cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) showed a pronounced cytotoxic effect mediate by estramustine. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumoru specimens from patients with RCC showed positive staining for EMBP in 12/16 cases. Immunoscintigraphy was performed in an experimental system in nude mice, heterotransplanted with the CAKI-2 cell line. A radiolabelled monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody was used. The results show a specific uptake of the antibody in the RCC tumour, expressed as a percentage of the injected dose per gram tissue, which ranged from 4.03 to 6.9. The results obtained from the basis for clinical studies on the feasibility of utilizing estramustine in the management of RCC. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal anti-EMBP antibody is of potential use for in vivo characterization of the malignancy and in the selection patients suitable for treatment with estramustine. (orig.)

  15. Urinary total arsenic and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine are associated with renal cell carcinoma in an area without obvious arsenic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most reliable and abundant markers of DNA damage. The study was designed to explore the relationship between urinary 8-OHdG and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with a high level of 8-OHdG would have a modified odds ratio (OR) of arsenic-related RCC. This case–control study was conducted with 132 RCC patients and 245 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool between November 2006 and May 2009. Pathological verification of RCC was completed by image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Concentrations of urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Level of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly associated with the OR of RCC in a dose–response relationship after multivariate adjustment. Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. The greatest OR (3.50) was seen in the individuals with high urinary 8-OHdG and high urinary total arsenic. A trend test indicated that the OR of RCC was increased with one of these factors and was further increased with both (p = 0.002). In conclusion, higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of the RCC. High levels of 8-OHdG combined with urinary total arsenic might be indicative of arsenic-induced RCC. -- Highlights: ► Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. ► Higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of RCC risk. ► Urinary 8-OHdG may modify arsenic related RCC risk.

  16. Urinary total arsenic and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine are associated with renal cell carcinoma in an area without obvious arsenic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jan-Show [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsiu-Yuan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most reliable and abundant markers of DNA damage. The study was designed to explore the relationship between urinary 8-OHdG and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with a high level of 8-OHdG would have a modified odds ratio (OR) of arsenic-related RCC. This case–control study was conducted with 132 RCC patients and 245 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool between November 2006 and May 2009. Pathological verification of RCC was completed by image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Concentrations of urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Level of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly associated with the OR of RCC in a dose–response relationship after multivariate adjustment. Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. The greatest OR (3.50) was seen in the individuals with high urinary 8-OHdG and high urinary total arsenic. A trend test indicated that the OR of RCC was increased with one of these factors and was further increased with both (p = 0.002). In conclusion, higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of the RCC. High levels of 8-OHdG combined with urinary total arsenic might be indicative of arsenic-induced RCC. -- Highlights: ► Urinary 8-OHdG was significantly related to urinary total arsenic. ► Higher urinary 8-OHdG was a strong predictor of RCC risk. ► Urinary 8-OHdG may modify arsenic related RCC risk.

  17. Characteristic findings of renal oncocytoma and clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with multiphase CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate characteristic imaging findings of tumor attenuation in 4-phase CT between renal oncocytoma (RO) and clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) of small tumor size (≤ 5 cm). Methods: Fifty-six patients with histologically confirmed renal masses (11 ROs and 45 ccRCCs) were included in this study. Heterogeneous enhancement was found all tumors during the corticomedullary phase (CMP). The CT values of the normal renal cortex, the relatively high enhanced region and the relatively less-enhanced region of the tumor were measured in each phase. Statistical comparison was carried out by Chi-square test or Mann-Whitney test. Results: In CMP, the CT value of the relatively high enhanced region in RO [163.0 HU (141.0-178.0 HU)] was significantly lower than that in ccRCC [194.0 HU (166.5-235.0 HU); Z=-2.847, P=0.004] Compared CMP with the excretory phase, the attenuation of the relatively highly enhanced region in RO [70.0 HU (41.0-86.0 HU)] were significantly lower than that in ccRCC [87.0 HU (65.0-126.5 HU)] (Z=-2.032, P=0.042). In the excretory phase, 9 of 11 ROs had a further enhancement with its relatively less-enhanced region which was significantly higher than that in ccRCC (21/45; χ2=4.391, P=0.036). Conclusions: In CMP, the CT value of the relatively high enhanced region in RO was significantly lower than that in ccRCC. Compared with ccRCC, in the excretory phase, the RO had less attenuation of the relatively highly enhanced region with homogeneous density. (authors)

  18. Functional polymorphisms in cell death pathway genes and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Qin, Chao; Wang, Meilin; Yan, Fu; Ju, Xiaobing; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ding, Qi; Li, Pu; Yang, Jian; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhengdong; Yin, Changjun

    2010-09-01

    The FAS/FAS ligand (FASL) system plays a key role in regulating apoptotic cell death, and corruption of this signaling pathway has been shown to participate in tumorigenesis. However, the effects of functional promoter polymorphisms of the CASP8, FAS, and FASL genes on risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are unknown. In this study, we genotyped CASP8 -652 6N ins/del, FAS -1377 G > A, FAS -670 A > G, and FASL -844 C > T polymorphisms in a hospital-based case-control study of 353 patients diagnosed with RCC and 365 cancer-free controls in a Chinese population. Compared with CASP8 -652 ins/ins genotype, the del/del genotype had a significantly decreased RCC risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.16-0.84]. For FAS -1377 G > A polymorphism, a significantly increased risk of RCC was found for AA (adjusted OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.03-2.64) and GA (adjusted OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.02-1.94) genotypes compared with GG genotype. When we combined these two polymorphisms together, we found that individuals carrying CASP8 -652 6N ins/del and FAS -1377 GG genotypes or CASP8 -652 6N del/del and FAS -1377 GG genotypes were associated with a statistically significantly decreased risk of RCC (adjusted OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.24-0.88 and OR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.02-0.58, respectively) compared with individuals carrying CASP8 -652 6N ins/ins and FAS -1377 AA genotypes. These results suggest that the CASP8 -652 6N ins/del and FAS -1377 G > A polymorphisms are involved in the susceptibility to developing RCC in Chinese populations. PMID:20572163

  19. Augmented telomerase activity, reduced telomere length and the presence of alternative lengthening of telomere in renal cell carcinoma: plausible predictive and diagnostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deeksha; Sharma, Ujjawal; Khajuria, Ragini; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we analyzed 100 cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for telomerase activity, telomere length and alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) using the TRAP assay, TeloTTAGGG assay kit and immunohistochemical analysis of ALT associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies respectively. A significantly higher (P=0.000) telomerase activity was observed in 81 cases of RCC which was correlated with clinicopathological features of tumor for instance, stage (P=0.008) and grades (P=0.000) but not with the subtypes of RCC (P = 0.355). Notwithstanding, no correlation was found between telomerase activity and subtypes of RCC. Strikingly, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in RCC (P=0.000) to that of corresponding normal renal tissues and it is well correlated with grades (P=0.016) but not with stages (P=0.202) and subtypes (P=0.669) of RCC. In this study, telomere length was also negatively correlated with the age of patients (r(2)=0.528; P=0.000) which supports the notion that it could be used as a marker for biological aging. ALT associated PML bodies containing PML protein was found in telomerase negative cases of RCC. It suggests the presence of an ALT pathway mechanism to maintain the telomere length in telomerase negative RCC tissues which was associated with high stages of RCC, suggesting a prevalent mechanism for telomere maintenance in high stages. In conclusion, the telomerase activity and telomere length can be used as a diagnostic as well as a predictive marker in RCC. The prevalence of ALT mechanism in high stages of RCC is warranted for the development of anti-ALT inhibitors along with telomerase inhibitor against RCC as a therapeutic approach. PMID:25769384

  20. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  1. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  2. Predictive role of vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms in the survival of renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y-Q; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a study to investigate the possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms -2578C/A, -1154G/A and -634C/G and clinical factors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) prognosis in a cohort of 336 RCC cases. A total of 336 patients with RCC were recruited from PLA General Hospital between January 2004 and December 2005. All patients were followed up until December 2010, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The follow-up time of this study was 60 months. At the time of analysis, a total of 210 died during the follow-up. The median overall survival for patients was 29.1 months (95%CI = 17.1 to 41.3 months), and the 5-year survival rate for the patients was 37.5%. Our study showed that Karnofsky performance status ≥60 could delay death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84). Patients with anemia, platelet count >400 x 10(9)/L, neutrophilia and lymphocytes >160 g/L had increased risk of death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 1.84 (1.18-2.96), 2.01 (1.27-3.25), 1.65 (1.03-2.56) and 1.49 (0.99-2.71), respectively. The VEGF -2578AA and -1154AA genotypes were significantly associated with a poor overall survival of RCC patients, with HR (95%CI) of 2.41 (1.32-5.13) and 3.77 (1.42-15.67), respectively. In conclusion, our study presented the factors regarding the prognosis of RCC patients, and high platelet and neutrophil counts, low lymphocytes, and VEGF -2578C/A and -1154G/A polymorphisms were shown to be independent factors for a lower prognosis of RCC patients. PMID:25062489

  3. Interleukin-1β mediates metalloproteinase-dependent renal cell carcinoma tumor cell invasion through the activation of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a major medical concern, as these tumors are refractory to standard therapies and prognosis is poor. Although molecularly targeted therapies have shown some promise in the treatment of this disease, advanced RCC tumors often develop resistance to these drugs. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression to advanced disease is necessary to design alternative and improved treatment strategies. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) found in aggressive RCC tumors produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Moreover, the presence of TAMs and high serum levels of IL-1β in RCC patients correlate with advanced disease. We hypothesized that IL-1β in the tumor microenvironment promotes the development of aggressive RCC tumors by directing affecting tumor epithelial cells. To address this, we investigated the role of IL-1β in mediating RCC tumor cell invasion as a measure of tumor progression. We report that IL-1β induced tumor cell invasion of RCC cells through a process that was dependent on the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and was independent of migration rate. Specifically, IL-1β induced the expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-10, and MT1-MMP in a mechanism dependent on IL-1β activation of the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (CEBPβ). Consistent with its role in MMP gene expression, CEBPβ knockdown significantly reduced invasion, but not migration, of RCC tumor cells. These results identify the IL-1β /CEBPβ/MMP pathway as a putative target in the design of anti-metastatic therapies for the treatment of advanced RCC

  4. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S.; Furness, Andrew JS; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J.; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples...

  5. CT staging of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the usefulness of computerized tomography (CT) in the characterization of renal masses, in order to stage them, determine their prognosis and their appropriate clinical and/or surgical management. Material and Methods: Between 1988 and 2001, we selected 63 patients with renal tumors that had been examined by pathology. Patient's ages ranged from 16 to 88 years (25 women, 38 men). The studies were performed with a sequential helical CT, using 5 mm thickness sections every 5mm evaluating the cortico medullar and nephrographic phases. Renal tumors were characterized and staged without any knowledge about the pathological findings; subsequently the tomographic characteristics were compared to such findings. The following characteristics were evaluated: 1) mixed solid-cystic nature; 2) size; 3) borders; 4) enhancement; 5) necrosis; 6) hemorrhage; 7) central scar; 8) presence of fat; 9) collecting system; 10) capsular invasion; 11) perirenal fat invasion; 12) vessels; 13) Gerota's fascia; 14) lymph nodes; and 15) local and/or distant metastases. Results: Of the 63 tumors, 2 were complicated cysts; of the 61 remaining tumors, 10 were angiomyolipomas, 1 was a renal lymphoma, 1 was a focal xantogranulomatose pyelonephritis, 1 was a metanephric adenoma, 3 papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 4 transitional cell tumors, 4 oncocytomas, 37 clear cell renal carcinoma. The CT could correctly characterize the 2 cystic tumors as such, as well as the 9 angiomyolipomas and the 4 transitional cell tumors. The 48 other tumors (1 angiomyolipoma, 1 lymphoma, 1 focal xantogranulomatose pyelonephritis, 1 metanephric adenoma, 3 papillary RCC, 4 oncocytomas, and 37 cell renal carcinomas) remaining were characterized as renal adenocarcinomas and CT staged. Conclusion: CT is a useful method to characterize renal masses since it determines their solid-cystic or fatty structure; aiding in many cases to define a surgical treatment. For the CT staging of renal tumors, the

  6. Twelve-year survival after multiple recurrences and repeated metastasectomies for renal cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jue

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC presents a therapeutic challenge for clinicians because of the unpredictable clinical course, resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy and the limited response to immunotherapy. Patients and Methods We report a case of a 62-year-old woman who underwent nephrectomy for T4N0 RCC, clear cell type, Fuhrman grade 3/4 in 1999. The patinet subsequently had multiple tumor recurrences. Results The patient underwent eight metastasectomies, including multiple partial left nephrectomies, right adrenalectomy, a complete left nephrectomy, and distal pancreatectomy. She remains well and tumor free 12 years after initial diagnosis. Conclusion Repeated resections after initial metastasectomy can be carried out safely and provide long-term survival in selected patients with recurrent metastasis from RCC. The findings from our case indicate that close follow-up for the early detection of recurrence and complete resection of metastases can improve the results after repeated resection.

  7. Piperlongumine and its analogs down-regulate expression of c-Met in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Golovine, Konstantin; Makhov, Peter; Naito, Sei; Raiyani, Henish; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey; Mehrazin, Reza; Tulin, Alexei; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G.; Kolenko, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Met protein, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is the product of a proto-oncogene. Its only known ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), regulates cell growth, motility, migration, invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis. The aberrant expression of c-Met is often associated with poor prognosis in multiple cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Silencing or inactivation of c-Met leads to decreased viability of cancer cells, thereby making ablation of c-Met signaling an...

  8. Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma With CAIX CAR-engineered T cells : Clinical Evaluation and Management of On-target Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Cor H. J.; Sleijfer, Stefan; van Steenbergen, Sabine; van Elzakker, Pascal; van Krimpen, Brigitte; Groot, Corrien; Vulto, Arnold; den Bakker, Michael; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Debets, Reno; Gratama, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antibody receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to 12 patients with CAIX-expressing metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 infusions of a total of 0

  9. A case–control study of occupation/industry and renal cell carcinoma risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Sara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of occupation in the etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC is unclear. Here, we investigated associations between employment in specific occupations and industries and RCC, and its most common histologic subtype, clear cell RCC (ccRCC. Methods Between 2002 and 2007, a population-based case–control study of Caucasians and African Americans (1,217 cases; 1,235 controls was conducted within the Detroit and Chicago metropolitan areas to investigate risk factors for RCC. As part of this study, occupational histories were ascertained through in-person interviews. We computed odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs relating occupation and industry to RCC risk using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Results Employment in the agricultural crop production industry for five years or more was associated with RCC (OR = 3.3 [95% CI = 1.0-11.5] and ccRCC in particular (OR = 6.3 [95% CI = 1.7-23.3], P for trend with duration of employment = 0.0050. Similarly, RCC risk was elevated for employment of five years or longer in non-managerial agricultural and related occupations (ORRCC = 2.1 [95% CI = 1.0-4.5]; ORccRCC = 3.1 [95% CI = 1.4-6.8]. Employment in the dry-cleaning industry was also associated with elevated risk (ORRCC = 2.0 [95% CI = 0.9-4.4], P for trend = 0.093; ORccRCC = 3.0 [95% CI = 1.2-7.4], P for trend = 0.031. Suggestive elevated associations were observed for police/public safety workers, health care workers and technicians, and employment in the electronics, auto repair, and cleaning/janitorial services industries; protective associations were suggested for many white-collar jobs including computer science and administrative occupations as well employment in the business, legislative, and education industries. Conclusions Our findings provide support for an elevated risk of RCC in the agricultural and dry-cleaning industries and

  10. Increased serum hepcidin-25 level and increased tumor expression of hepcidin mRNA are associated with metastasis of renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Abe Hideyuki; Arai Kyoko; Tomosugi Naohisa; Kamai Takao; Yoshida Ken-Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepcidin has an important role in iron metabolism. We investigated whether hepcidin was involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods We measured serum hepcidin-25 levels in 32 patients by liquid chromatograpy (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS, and assessed hepcidin mRNA expression in paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from the surgical specimens of 53 consecutive patients with RCC by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results The serum hepcid...

  11. Combined GSTM1-Null, GSTT1-Active, GSTA1 Low-Activity and GSTP1-Variant Genotype Is Associated with Increased Risk of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coric, Vesna M.; Simic, Tatjana P.; Pekmezovic, Tatjana D.; Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana M.; Savic Radojevic, Ana R.; Radojevic-Skodric, Sanja M.; Matic, Marija G.; Dragicevic, Dejan P.; Radic, Tanja M.; Bogdanovic, Ljiljana M.; Dzamic, Zoran M.; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate specific glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene variants as determinants of risk in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cRCC), independently or simultaneously with established RCC risk factors, as well as to discern whether phenotype changes reflect genotype-associated risk. GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genotypes were determined in 199 cRCC patients and 274 matched controls. Benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts were determined in DNA samples obtained from cRCC patients by ELISA method. Significant association between GST genotype and risk of cRCC development was found for the GSTM1-null and GSTP1-variant genotype (p = 0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Furthermore, 22% of all recruited cRCC patients were carriers of combined GSTM1-null, GSTT1-active, GSTA1-low activity and GSTP1-variant genotype, exhibiting 9.32-fold elevated cRCC risk compared to the reference genotype combination (p = 0.04). Significant association between GST genotype and cRCC risk in smokers was found only for the GSTP1 genotype, while GSTM1-null/GSTP1-variant/GSTA1 low-activity genotype combination was present in 94% of smokers with cRCC, increasing the risk of cRCC up to 7.57 (p = 0.02). Furthermore, cRCC smokers with GSTM1-null genotype had significantly higher concentration of BPDE-DNA adducts in comparison with GSTM1-active cRCC smokers (p = 0.05). GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTA1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms might be associated with the risk of cRCC, with special emphasis on GSTM1-null and GSTP1-variant genotypes. Combined GSTM1-null, GSTT1-active, GSTA1 low activity and GSTP1-variant genotypes might be considered as “risk-carrying genotype combination” in cRCC. PMID:27500405

  12. Anti-CD70 immunocytokines for exploitation of interferon-γ-induced RIP1-dependent necrosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peirong Chen

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC is an incurable disease in clear need of new therapeutic interventions. In early-phase clinical trials, the cytokine IFN-γ showed promise as a biotherapeutic for advanced RCC, but subsequent trials were less promising. These trials, however, focused on the indirect immunomodulatory properties of IFN-γ, and its direct anti-tumor effects, including its ability to kill tumor cells, remains mostly unexploited. We have previously shown that IFN-γ induces RIP1 kinase-dependent necrosis in cells lacking NF-κB survival signaling. RCC cells display basally-elevated NF-κB activity, and inhibiting NF-κB in these cells, for example by using the small-molecule proteasome blocker bortezomib, sensitizes them to RIP1-dependent necrotic death following exposure to IFN-γ. While these observations suggest that IFN-γ-mediated direct tumoricidal activity will have therapeutic benefit in RCC, they cannot be effectively exploited unless IFN-γ is targeted to tumor cells in vivo. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of two novel 'immunocytokine' chimeric proteins, in which either human or murine IFN-γ is fused to an antibody targeting the putative metastatic RCC biomarker CD70. These immunocytokines display high levels of species-specific IFN-γ activity and selective binding to CD70 on human RCC cells. Importantly, the IFN-γ immunocytokines function as well as native IFN-γ in inducing RIP1-dependent necrosis in RCC cells, when deployed in the presence of bortezomib. These results provide a foundation for the in vivo exploitation of IFN-γ-driven tumoricidal activity in RCC.

  13. Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma with Synchronous Tumor Growth in Azygoesophageal Recess and Duodenum: A Rare Cause of Anemia and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R.; Kashif, Muhammad; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has potential to present with distant metastasis several years after complete resection. The common sites of metastases include the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain. RCCs metastasize rarely to the duodenum, and duodenal metastasis presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleed is infrequently reported in literature. We present a case of synchronous presentation of duodenal and azygoesophageal metastasis manifesting as acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, four years after undergoing nephrectomy for RCC. The patient underwent further workup and was treated with radiation. The synchronous presentation is rare and stresses the importance of searching for recurrence of RCC in patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26640732

  14. Identification of DNA Methylation-Independent Epigenetic Events Underlying Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becket, Elinne; Chopra, Sameer; Duymich, Christopher E; Lin, Justin J; You, Jueng Soo; Pandiyan, Kurinji; Nichols, Peter W; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Charlet, Jessica; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A; Liang, Gangning

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in chromatin accessibility independent of DNA methylation can affect cancer-related gene expression, but are often overlooked in conventional epigenomic profiling approaches. In this study, we describe a cost-effective and computationally simple assay called AcceSssIble to simultaneously interrogate DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility alterations in primary human clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Our study revealed significant perturbations to the ccRCC epigenome and identified gene expression changes that were specifically attributed to the chromatin accessibility status whether or not DNA methylation was involved. Compared with commonly mutated genes in ccRCC, such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor, the genes identified by AcceSssIble comprised distinct pathways and more frequently underwent epigenetic changes, suggesting that genetic and epigenetic alterations could be independent events in ccRCC. Specifically, we found unique DNA methylation-independent promoter accessibility alterations in pathways mimicking VHL deficiency. Overall, this study provides a novel approach for identifying new epigenetic-based therapeutic targets, previously undetectable by DNA methylation studies alone, that may complement current genetic-based treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1954-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26759245

  15. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tamura, Masato; Hamaguchi, Nobumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Pan, Chin-Chen; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently described entity. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid changes. In this article, we present the first case of such a tumor. A 56-year-old Japanese man has received long-term hemodialysis and had a history of right renal cancer. Following the discovery of metastatic cancer in the thoracic wall, detailed imaging studies revealed a mass in the left kidney. The histologic examination of the left renal tumor showed ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically, intracytoplasmic globular inclusions in rhabdoid cells were positive for vimentin and cytokeratin CAM5.2. The G-band karyotype showed the following changes: 46, X, +X. -Y[1]/43, idem, add(2)(q31), -6, -9, -14, -15, +16, -22, +mar1[6]/46, XY[2]/abnormal cell[11]. In conclusion, pathologists and urologists should be aware that rhabdoid features may occur in ACD-associated RCC and that the loss of chromosomes 9 and 14 may occur during the process of sarcomatoid change in ACD-associated RCC. PMID:21036640

  16. Study of the diagnosis and treatment of renal cell carcinoma using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the potential applications of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in the diagnosis and treatment of human cancer is the use in the specific detection of cancer sites and the selective destruction of cancer cells. Fetal kidney was used as an immunogen to develop Mab A6H, which is highly reactive to 16/16 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines and to 16/19 human RCC specimens. RCC xenografts as small as 40 mg have been imaged clearly in radioimmunoscintigraphy studies using A6H labeled with iodine-131. In Mab-targeted radiotherapy studies, 2 doses of 100-150 uCi 131I-labeled A6H or an 131 I-labeled A6H-C5H cocktail caused tumor regression or tumor growth arrest in >80% of treated mice, while no such effect was observed in mice treated with 131I-labeled control Mab or unlabeled A6H. Internal radiation dosimetry, which was calculated by computer analysis of sequential radioimmunoscintigraphy, showed that A6H delivered approximately 35 rad/uCi of the injected dose to RCC xenografts. When the radiation dose to the tumor was 3000 rad resulted in tumor regression or growth arrest in >85% of mice. A clinical trial using 131I-labeled A6H in the diagnosis and treatment of RCC is now underway at our institution

  17. Infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages is involved in CD44 expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoya; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Koji; Shimoji, Tetsu; Kuwahara, Nao; Sakumura, Yasuo; Matsuishi, Kozue; Fujiwara, Yukio; Motoshima, Takanobu; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamada, Sohsuke; Kitada, Shohei; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Eto, Masatoshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) or cancer-initiating cells are now considered to be an important cell population related to cancer recurrence and the resistance to anti-cancer therapy. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are a main component of stromal cells and are related to cancer progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Because the detailed mechanisms allowing the maintenance of CSC in cancer tissues remain unclear, we investigated the relationship between TAM and CD44-expressing cancer cells in ccRCC. CD44 was used as a marker for CSC, and CD163 and CD204 were used as markers for TAM. CD44-positive cancer cells were detected in 37 of the 103 cases. Although statistical analysis showed no relationship between CD44-positive cancer cells and the clinical course, the distribution of CD44-positive cancer cells was significantly associated with a high density of TAM. Our in vitro study using RCC cell lines and human macrophages demonstrated that CD44 expression was upregulated by direct co-culture with macrophages. Silencing of TNF-alpha on macrophages abrogated the upregulation of CD44 expression in cancer cells. Macrophage-induced CD44 overexpression was also suppressed by NF-κB inhibitors. These results suggest that TNF-alpha derived from TAM is linked to CD44 overexpression via NF-κB signaling in ccRCC. PMID:26918621

  18. The epigenetic modifier CHD5 functions as a novel tumor suppressor for renal cell carcinoma and is predominantly inactivated by promoter CpG methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenfang; Li, Lili; Huang, Xin; Jin, Jie; Huang, Suming; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common urological cancer with steadily increasing incidence. A series of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified methylated in RCC as potential epigenetic biomarkers. We identified a 1p36.3 TSG candidate CHD5 as a methylated target in RCC through epigenome study. As the role of CHD5 in RCC pathogenesis remains elusive, we further studied its expression and molecular functions in RCC cells. We found that CHD5 was broadly expressed in most normal genitourinary tissues including kidney, but frequently silenced or downregulated by promoter CpG methylation in 78% of RCC cell lines and 44% (24/55) of primary tumors. In addition, CHD5 mutations appear to be rare in RCC tumors through genome database mining. In methylated/silenced RCC cell lines, CHD5 expression could be restored with azacytidine demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of CHD5 in RCC cells significantly inhibited their clonogenicity, migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that CHD5, as a chromatin remodeling factor, suppressed the expression of multiple targets including oncogenes (MYC, MDM2, STAT3, CCND1, YAP1), epigenetic master genes (Bmi-1, EZH2, JMJD2C), as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers (SNAI1, FN1, OCT4). Further chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the binding of CHD5 to target gene promoters. Thus, we demonstrate that CHD5 functions as a novel TSG for RCC, but is predominantly inactivated by promoter methylation in primary tumors. PMID:26943038

  19. Involvement of multiple loci on chromosome 3 in renal cell cancer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Buys, CHCM

    1997-01-01

    In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mostly occurring as sporadic cases, the short arm of chromosome 3 is a frequent target of deletion events. Taking into account cytological classifications of RCC, the deletions appear to be characteristic of clear cell or nonpapillary RCC only. This subtype constitutes

  20. Chemotherapeutic drugs sensitize human renal cell carcinoma cells to ABT-737 by a mechanism involving the Noxa-dependent inactivation of Mcl-1 or A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zantl Niko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human renal cell carcinoma (RCC is very resistant to chemotherapy. ABT-737 is a novel inhibitor of anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that has shown promise in various preclinical tumour models. Results We here report a strong over-additive pro-apoptotic effect of ABT-737 and etoposide, vinblastine or paclitaxel but not 5-fluorouracil in cell lines from human RCC. ABT-737 showed very little activity as a single agent but killed RCC cells potently when anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 or, unexpectedly, A1 was targeted by RNAi. This potent augmentation required endogenous Noxa protein since RNAi directed against Noxa but not against Bim or Puma reduced apoptosis induction by the combination of ABT-737 and etoposide or vinblastine. At the level of mitochondria, etoposide-treatment had a similar sensitizing activity and allowed for ABT-737-induced release of cytochrome c. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic drugs can overcome protection afforded by Mcl-1 and A1 through endogenous Noxa protein in RCC cells, and the combination of such drugs with ABT-737 may be a promising strategy in RCC. Strikingly, A1 emerged in RCC cell lines as a protein of similar importance as the well-established Mcl-1 in protection against apoptosis in these cells.

  1. Anti-Angiogenic Drugs in the Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma:Advances in Clinical Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole H; Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus;

    2014-01-01

    The current paradigm in attempting to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a first line treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonist and second and subsequent treatments with either a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) or a mTOR (mammalian Targ...

  2. Combined effects of DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3A polymorphisms and urinary total arsenic levels on the risk for clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Mei; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Hsieh, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-08-15

    Our previous study showed that high urinary total arsenic levels were associated with higher odds ratio (OR) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) might influence DNMT enzyme activity associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the association of five SNPs from DNMT1 (rs8101626 and rs2228611), DNMT3A (rs34048824 and rs1550117), and DNMT3B (rs1569686) with the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We also examined the combined effects of DNMT genotypes and urinary arsenic levels on ccRCC risk. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study, which included 293 subjects with ccRCC and 293 age- and gender-matched controls. The urinary arsenic species were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotypes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. We observed that the DNMT1 rs8101626 G/G genotype was significantly associated with reduced odds ratio (OR) of ccRCC [OR=0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.99]. Subjects with concurrent DNMT1 rs8101626 A/A+A/G and DNMT3A rs34048824 T/T+T/C genotypes had significantly higher OR for ccRCC [OR=2.88, 95% CI 1.44-5.77]. Participants with the high-risk genotype of DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 with concurrently high urinary total arsenic levels had even higher OR of ccRCC in a dose-response manner. This is the first study to evaluate variant DNMT1 rs8101626 and DNMT3A rs34048824 genotypes that modify the arsenic-related ccRCC risk in a geographic area without significant arsenic exposure in Taiwan. PMID:27292127

  3. PD-L1 expression in nonclear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Choueiri, T. K.; Fay, A. P.; Gray, K. P.; Callea, M; Ho, T H; Albiges, L; Bellmunt, J.; Song, J.(Pusan National University, Pusan, South Korea); Carvo, I.; Lampron, M.; Stanton, M. L.; Hodi, F. S.; McDermott, D F; Atkins, M B; Freeman, G J

    2014-01-01

    Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression in nonclear-cell RCC (non-ccRCC) and its association with clinical outcomes are unknown. In this study, we report that PD-L1 expression occurs in patients with non-ccRCC depending on histology subtype and tumour cell membrane versus immune cell scoring. In addition, we showed that patients with PD-L1-positive tumours appear to have worse clinical outcomes in non-ccRCC .

  4. Correlating Preoperative Imaging with Histologic Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Common Mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordetsky, Jennifer; Zarzour, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of distinct subtypes that have unique pathologic and imaging features as well as specific cytogenetic and molecular characteristics. As the prognosis and therapeutic strategies may differ for each subtype, correlation of the preoperative imaging with the pathologic findings is of great clinical relevance. In addition, differentiation of RCC from benign entities is ideal in order to prevent overtreatment. However, a noninvasive diagnosis with imaging alone is not always straightforward due to the overlapping appearance of RCC with benign lesions such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. With new imaging modalities, there have been significant improvements in correlating preoperative imaging with pathologic characteristics. These new discoveries are able to aid in a more specific, noninvasive, diagnosis that in turn helps direct patient management. PMID:27154238

  5. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Yamashita, Motoki; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently identified. However, there are only a few genetic studies to date. In this article, we performed an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study for six cases including one case with sarcomatoid change. As a result, we observed frequent immunohistochemical expression of AMACR. FISH of chromosome 3 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and disomy for one case. Additionally, FISH of chromosome 16 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and both trisomy and monosomy for one case. Furthermore, both the carcinomatous area and the sarcomatoid area of one ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change revealed monosomy of chromosomes 3, 9, and 16 but showed disomy of chromosome 14. In conclusion, the numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 16, irrespective of gain or loss, may be characteristic of ACD-associated RCC. PMID:22179186

  6. Interleukin-2 based immunotherapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, Frede

    2007-01-01

    neutrophils >6.0) were independent prognostic factors of short survival in patients with mRCC receiving IL-2, identifying subgroups with estimated 5-year survival rates of 60%, 25% and 0%, respectively. These features may help to select patients more likely to benefit from IL-2 based immunotherapy......The present thesis consists of 8 published articles focusing on interleukin-2 based immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This disease represents a significant challenge, as the tumor is resistant to current chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and radiation therapy. However, IL-2...... were harmful for the outcome of IL-2 based immunotherapy. In progressing patients, the leukocyte subsets in blood and tumor tissue remained unaffected by cytokine therapy. The fate of a patient with mRCC prior to IL-2 and IFN-alpha based immunotherapy cannot be determined by measuring baseline tumor...

  7. Autophagy induction by silibinin positively contributes to its anti-metastatic capacity via AMPK/mTOR pathway in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Ma, Zhenkun; Guan, Zhenfeng; Chen, Yule; Wu, Kaijie; Guo, Peng; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Zeng, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Silibinin, a dietary cancer chemopreventive flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been reported to exhibit anti-metastatic effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not fully understood. The present study aimed at examining the potential role of autophagy in regulating silibinin-induced anti-metastatic effects on RCC cells. Using RCC ACHN and 786-O cells as a model system in vitro, we found that silibinin treatment increased the expression of LC3-II, resulted in the formation of autophagolysosome vacuoles, and caused a punctate fluorescence pattern with the monomeric red fluorescence protein-enhanced green fluorescence protein-LC3 (mRFP-EGFP-LC3) protein, which all are markers for cellular autophagy. Autophagy flux was induced by silibinin in RCC cells, as determined by LC3 turnover assay. Mechanically, the adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was identified as involved in regulation of silibinin-induced autophagy. Furthermore, autophagy induction was demonstrated to positively contribute to silibinin-induced anti-metastatic effects on RCC cells in vitro. Activation of autophagy enhanced silibinin-induced inhibition of migration and invasion of RCC cells, while inhibition of autophagy attenuated it. These findings thus provide new information about the potential link between autophagy and metastasis inhibition induced by silibinin, and the induction of autophagy may shed some light into future treatment strategies for metastatic RCC. PMID:25884331

  8. Papillary renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1976 and 1987, 395 patients with kidney tumors were studied with radiological techniques and sonography. In 37 cases (9.4%) histopathology diagnosed pure papillary renal cell carcinoma. Analyzing the radiographic patterns of these neoplasms, the authors observed constantly diminished vascularity (100%) frequent calcifications (35.1%) and necrotic areas (51.3%). Such X-ray features are not specific: nevertheless, their coexistence is strongly suggestive of papillary renal cell cancer. No consistent US pattern was found; however, necrotic areas were easily demonstrated in most cases. It must be stressed how patients with papillary carcinoma experienced a longer post-operative survival; it has not yet been established whether such favorable behavior is due to low biological aggressiveness or to earlier diagnosis

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ligands induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-guang YANG; Zhi-wen ZHANG; Dian-qi XIN; Chang-jin SHI; Jie-ping WU; Ying-lu GUO; You-fei GUAN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of peroxisome proliferator-actived receptor γ (PPARγ)ligands on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human renal carcinoma cell lines.Methods: The expression of PPARγ was investigated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry.The effect of thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands on growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was measured by MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Cell death ELISA, Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining and DNA ladder assay were used to observe the effects of PPARγ ligands on apoptosis. Regulatory proteins of cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by Western blot analysis. Results:PPARγ was expressed at much higher levels in renal tumors than in the normal kidney (2.16±0.85 vs 0.90±0.73; P<0.01 ). TZD PPARγ ligands inhibited RCC cell growth in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.08 μmol/L and 11.32 μmol/L for pioglitazone, and 5.71 μmol/L and 8.38 μmol/L for troglitazone in 786-O and A498 cells, respectively. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human RCC cells following 24-h exposure to TZD. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that TZD decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a timedependent manner. Furthermore, high doses of TZD induced massive apoptosis in renal cancer cells, with increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression.Conclusion: TZD PPARγ ligands showed potent inhibitory effect on proliferation,and could induce apoptosis in RCC cells. These results suggest that ligands for PPARγ have potential antitumor effects on renal carcinoma cells.

  10. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Hernández Piñero; José Luis Rodríguez López; María de Lourdes Menéndez Villa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagn...

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Angiogenesis Inhibitor TNP-470 on Human ACHN Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾进; 梅伟; 黄海鹏; 李晓东; 孔鹏

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The contribution of angiogenesis inhibitor TNP-470 to the growth and metastasis ofACHN renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was studied. TNP-470 (40 mg/kg, every two days) was ad-ministrated to BABL/c nude mice bearing ACHN RCC. The mice were sacrificed after a treatmentduration of 31 days and the weight and volume of subcutaneous tumors as well as foci of lungmetastasis were measured. The microvascular density(MVD) of the tumor as well as the PCNAindex and apoptotic index of the tumor cells were evaluated immunohistochemically. Resultshowed that the growth of ACHN RCC was suppressed significantly and none metastasis was ob-served in TNP-470-treated mice. Compared with the control group, the MVD was decreasedmarkedly (P<0. 01) and the apoptotic index was increased significantly (P<0. 01) in the treatedgroup. The tumor volume was positively correlated to the MVD (r=0. 7144, P<0. 01) and in-versely correlated to the apoptotic index (r=-0. 8607, P<0. 01), and MVD was conversely cor-related to the apoptotic index. It was determined that TNP-470 could effectively inhibit angiogene-sis of ACHN RCC, which resulting in ischemia and hypoxia, leading to increased apoptosis, thusobviously suppressing the growth and metastasis of ACHN RCC in nude mice.

  12. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  13. Abscess formation mimicking disease progression, in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during sunitinib treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennatas Constantine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents approximately 3% of all adult cancers and is more common in males. Systemic treatment for RCC has improved following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib. The molecular targets of sunitinib are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Moreover, sunitinib has an additional anti-angiogenic effect through its inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor activation. Case presentation We present a case of intra-abdominal abscess formation mimicking disease progression, in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during sunitinib treatment. Conclusion In the advancing era of molecular therapy of solid tumours, sunitinib has demonstrated significant efficacy in the post-cytokine setting treatment of metastatic renal cancer. Concurrently, however, increasing evidence has emerged to indicate that this class of drugs exert profound immunomodulatory effects on T cells and play major roles in immune tumor surveillance.

  14. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  15. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Koya, E-mail: koyakn@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji, E-mail: 9709.ynakamo1@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo, E-mail: saga@nirs.go.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-Ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya, E-mail: higashi@shigamed.jp [Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, 5-4-30 Moriyama, Moriyama City, Shiga 524-8524 Japan (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  16. Detection, staging and clinical implications of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the epidemiologic, clinical and pathologic characteristics of symptomatic and incidental renal cell carcinoma (RCC)in Jordan.Results were compared with published Western figure. Records of 119 patients with renal tumors diagnosed during the period January1992 to December 2001at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan were reviewed. Age,gender, radiologic and biologic workup, treatment,features of tumor were reviewed. The mean patient age was 54 and the male to female ratio was 3.4:1. 26% of tumors were discoverd accidentlly.The incidental detction group had significantly small size of tumor.,lower stage and lower histological grading.In symptomatic group woman have significantly lower mean size of tumor than men. A radical nephrectomy was performed in 92% of the cases, and in 8% of the cases, conservative mangement was adopted. The present study showed that the incidence rate of RCC in Jordan is less than Western countries. Significant number of RCC were detected incidently with lower pathological stage and grade. Subsequently these clinically and histologically less aggressive lesions lead to better survival. These data efforts should be directed to the devlopment of screening protocol to detect these lesions early. (author)

  17. Impact of lymphadenectomy in management of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of regional lymphadenectomy as part of a management plan on morbidity, morbidity and survival in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients and methods: A retrospective study reviewing 158 cases diagnosed as RCC at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo university, Egypt, during the time period from 2000 to 2007. Histopathological data and significant operative and postoperative events were retrieved to compare three lymphadenectomy groups; Group A, where more than 5 nodes were dissected, Group B where 5 or less nodes were dissected and Group C where no nodal dissection was done. Results: More positive lymph nodes were seen in group A (37.8%) compared to group B (9.6%) (p= 0.002). Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with higher grade (p= 0.005), but not with larger tumor size (p= 0.221). There was no significant difference in overall survival between the three lymphadenectomy groups (p= 0.163). Overall survival was not significantly affected by lymph node status (p= 0.585). Conclusion: Regional lymphadenectomy in RCC has no impact on the mortality or morbidity.

  18. Nasal metastases from renal cell carcinoma are associated with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center poor-prognosis classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline Victoria Choong; Tiffany Tang; Wen Yee Chay; Christopher Goh; Miah Hiang Tay; Nor Azhari Mohd Zam; Puay Hoon Tan; Min-Han Tan

    2011-01-01

    Unusual sites of metastases are recognized in patients with renai cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the prognostic implications of these sites are not well understood. We used the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) risk classification for metastatic RCC to evaluate 912 consecutive patients with RCC managed at the Singapore General Hospital between 1990 and 2009. Among these patients, 301 had metastases either at diagnosis or during the course of illness. Nasal metastases, all arising from clear cell RCC, were identified histologically in 4 patients (1.3% of those with metastasis). All 4 patients were classified as MSKCC poor prognosis by current risk criteria. Nasal metastases were significantly associated with lung and bone metastases. The frequency of nasal metastases in patients with metastatic RCC is about 1%, occurring predominantly in patients with clear cell RCC. Nasal metastases are associated with poor prognosis as estimated by the MSKCC risk classification, with attendant implications for selection of targeted therapy, and are usually associated with multi-organ dissemination, including concurrent lung and bone involvement.

  19. Peroxiredoxins, thioredoxin, and Y-box-binding protein-1 are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of dialysis-associated renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Fumiyoshi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Izumi, Hiroto; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi; Nakashima, Yutaka; Takesue, Tetsuro; Naito, Seiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2013-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are exposed to increased oxidative stress and impairment of antioxidant mechanisms. We focused on dialysis renal cell carcinoma (RCC), including epithelial hyperplasia in acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK). We attempted to obtain insight into the carcinogenesis and tumor progression in terms of cellular defense mechanisms associated with oxidative stress by investigating the expression of antioxidant proteins by immunohistochemistry. We evaluated retrospectively 43 cases of dialysis RCC and, as a control group, 49 cases of sporadic RCC. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6 expression in dialysis RCC was positively correlated with the duration of dialysis. In epithelial hyperplasia, in 17 cases of acquired cystic disease of the kidney, Prxs and thioredoxin were highly expressed. Moreover, in dialysis RCC, Prx 3, 4, and 5 immunoreactivity and nuclear expression of Y-box-binding protein-1 were higher than in sporadic RCC. In dialysis RCC, Prx 3, 4, and 5 immunoreactivity positively correlated with the Fuhrman nuclear grade. These data suggest that oxidative stress during dialysis enhances antioxidant activity, with an inhibiting effect on carcinogenesis. Once cancer has developed, antioxidant activity might have a stimulating effect on the progression of dialysis RCC. PMID:23907567

  20. Loss of VHL in RCC reduces repair and alters cellular response to benzo[a]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MartenSchults

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor gene occur in the majority of sporadic renal-cell carcinomas (RCC. Loss of VHL function is associated with stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα. We and others demonstrated that there is a two-way interaction between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, which is an important mediator in the metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens, and the HIF1-pathway leading to an increased genetic instability when both pathways are simultaneously activated. The aim of this study was to investigate how environmental carcinogens, such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, which can be metabolically activated to BaP-7,8-diOH-9,10-epoxide (BPDE play a role in the etiology of renal-cell carcinomas (RCC. We exposed VHL deficient RCC4 cells, in which HIFα is stabilized regardless of oxygen tension, to 0.1µM BaP for 18 hours. The mutagenic BPDE-DNA adduct levels were increased in HIFα stabilized cells. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that absence of VHL significantly induced the mRNA levels of AhR downstream target CYP1A1. Furthermore, HPLC analysis indicated that loss of VHL increased the concentration of BaP-7,8-dihydroxydiol, the pre-cursor metabolite of BPDE. Interestingly, the capacity to repair BPDE-DNA adducts in the HIFα stabilized RCC4 cells, was markedly reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that loss of VHL affects BaP-mediated genotoxic responses in renal-cell carcinoma and decreases repair capacity.

  1. Prognostic significance of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase hinge protein expression in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Si; Liu, Yi-Dong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Wei-Juan; Xu, Le; Chang, Yuan; Xu, Jie-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase hinge protein (UQCRH), as a connecter between cytochrome c1 with cytochrome c in complex III of respiratory chain, is top-ranked hypermethylated gene in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). This study aims to evaluate the impact of UQCRH on recurrence and survival of 424 ccRCC patients enrolled retrospectively from a single institution after surgical resection using immunohistochemistry method. UQCRH was specifically downregulated in ccRCC, compared with papillary and chromophobe RCC. Moreover, patients with low UQCRH were prone to possess high T stage and TNM stage and associated with poor survival and early recurrence. UQCRH remained an independent favorable prognosticator for OS (Hazard rate [HR]: 0.510, 95% CI: 0.328-0.795, p=0.003) and RFS (HR: 0.506, 95% CI: 0.334-0.767, p=0.001) adjusting with other well-established factors using backward Cox model. Furthermore, in stratified subgroups, patients with low UQCRH had an increased risk of recurrence (HR: 0.452, 95% CI: 0.261-0.783, p=0.005) and mortality (HR: 0.386, 95% CI: 0.205-0.726, p=0.003) in subgroup of early TNM stage. Taken together, UQCRH is a potential independent favorable prognostic factor for recurrence and survival of patients with ccRCC after nephrectomy.

  2. SUSD2 is frequently downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in RCC and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingying; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Pingzhang; Li, Ting; Hu, Fengzhan; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jun; Xu, Tao; Han, Wenling

    2016-07-01

    Sushi domain containing 2 (SUSD2) is type I membrane protein containing domains inherent to adhesion molecules. There have been few reported studies on SUSD2, and they have mainly focused on breast cancer, colon cancer, and HeLa cells. However, the expression and function of SUSD2 in other cancers remain unclear. In the present study, we conducted an integrated bioinformatics analysis based on the array data from the GEO database and found a significant downregulation of SUSD2 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and lung cancer. Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that SUSD2 was frequently decreased in RCC and lung cancer tissues compared with the corresponding levels in normal adjacent tissues. The restoration of SUSD2 expression inhibited the proliferation and clonogenicity of RCC and lung cancer cells, whereas the knockdown of SUSD2 promoted A549 cell growth. Our findings suggested that SUSD2 functions as a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in RCC and lung cancer. PMID:26815503

  3. Overexpression of FOXO4 induces apoptosis of clear-cell renal carcinoma cells through downregulation of Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Hu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Forkhead box O4 (FOXO4) has been reported to be a novel tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal cancers; however, its role in clear‑cell renal carcinoma cells (ccRCC) has remained largely elusive. The present study assessed the expression levels of FOXO4 in RCC tissues and cells. Furthermore, the effects of vector‑mediated overexpression of FOXO4 on the apoptotic rate of the 786‑0 and Caki‑1 cell lines and the role of Bim in this process were investigated. The results demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of FOXO4 were decreased in renal cancer tissues and cell lines compared with those in normal tissues and cell lines. FOXO4 overexpression significantly increased the apoptotic rate of ccRCC cells in vitro, along with increased protein expression levels of Bim, cleaved‑caspase 3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein (Bax) and cytochrome c, as well as a decrease in Bcl‑2 expression. Of note, the apoptotic effects of FOXO4 overexpression in 786‑0 cells were inhibited by small interfering RNA‑mediated knockdown of Bim. The results of the present study indicated that FOXO4 has an inhibitory effect in ccRCC, at least in part through inducing apoptosis via upregulation of Bim in the mitochondria-dependent pathway. PMID:26780985

  4. Molecular characterization of clear cell renal cell carcinoma identifies CSNK2A1, SPP1 and DEFB1 as promising novel prognostic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Maj; Bjerregaard, Henriette; Halekoh, Ulrich; Jensen, Boye L; Walter, Steen; Marcussen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis associated with clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) can vary widely and novel molecular prognostic markers are needed to assess prognosis at an earlier stage. Several gene products have been investigated for this purpose, but none of them have been implemented in clinical practice...

  5. Targeted therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma: role of bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Escudier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Escudier1, Jan Cosaert2, Sangeeta Jethwa21Unité Immunothérapie, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 2F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, in combination with interferon alpha-2a (IFN, is an effective option for first-line therapy for advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Two phase III trials clearly show significant improvements in progression-free survival and response rate in patients with treatment-naïve metastatic RCC receiving bevacizumab combined with IFN compared with IFN. The dose of IFN, which was initiated at 9 MIU 3 times a week in these trials, can be reduced to effectively manage IFN-related side effects without compromising the efficacy of bevacizumab plus IFN. Bevacizumab has good tolerability with manageable side effects, both alone and in combination with other agents; the tolerability profile of bevacizumab in combination with IFN is consistent with the well-characterized and well-established profiles of these therapies. The tolerability of bevacizumab combined with IFN and the flexibility to manage IFN-related side effects are important considerations when selecting first-line therapy. With a number of options now available for RCC therapy, optimizing their use is a key consideration in improving patient benefit.Keywords: bevacizumab (Avastin®, interferon alpha, efficacy, tolerability, renal cell carcinoma (RCC, low-dose interferon

  6. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  7. MicroRNA-187, down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and associated with lower survival, inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •miR-187 is down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). •Down-regulation of miR-187 is associated with poor outcomes in patients with ccRCC. •miR-187 inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3 in ccRCC. -- Abstract: Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are frequently associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of human cancers, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Based on the preliminary deep sequencing data, we hypothesized that miR-187 may play an important role in ccRCC development. In this study, we found that miR-187 was down-regulated in both tumor tissue and plasma of ccRCC patients. Lower miR-187 expression levels were associated with higher tumor grade and stage. All patients with high miR-187 expression survived 5 years, while with low miR-187 expression, only 42% survived. Suppressed in vitro proliferation, inhibited in vivo tumor growth, and decreased motility were observed in cells treated with the miR-187 expression vector. Further studies showed that B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) is a direct target of miR-187. Over-expression of miR-187 decreased B7-H3 mRNA level and repressed B7-H3-3′-UTR reporter activity. Knockdown of B7-H3 using siRNA resulted in similar phenotype changes as that observed for overexpression of miR-187. Our data suggest that miR-187 is emerging as a novel player in the disease state of ccRCC. miR-187 plays a tumor suppressor role in ccRCC

  8. MicroRNA-187, down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and associated with lower survival, inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun [Foshan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Foshan (China); Lei, Ting [Zhongshan People’s Hospital, Zhongshan (China); Xu, Congjie [Department of Urology, Pepole’s Hospital of Hainan Province, Haikou (China); Li, Huan; Ma, Wenmin; Yang, Yunxia; Fan, Shuming [Foshan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Foshan (China); Liu, Yuchen, E-mail: s_ycliu1@stu.edu.cn [Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •miR-187 is down-regulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). •Down-regulation of miR-187 is associated with poor outcomes in patients with ccRCC. •miR-187 inhibits cell growth and migration though targeting B7-H3 in ccRCC. -- Abstract: Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are frequently associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of human cancers, including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Based on the preliminary deep sequencing data, we hypothesized that miR-187 may play an important role in ccRCC development. In this study, we found that miR-187 was down-regulated in both tumor tissue and plasma of ccRCC patients. Lower miR-187 expression levels were associated with higher tumor grade and stage. All patients with high miR-187 expression survived 5 years, while with low miR-187 expression, only 42% survived. Suppressed in vitro proliferation, inhibited in vivo tumor growth, and decreased motility were observed in cells treated with the miR-187 expression vector. Further studies showed that B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) is a direct target of miR-187. Over-expression of miR-187 decreased B7-H3 mRNA level and repressed B7-H3-3′-UTR reporter activity. Knockdown of B7-H3 using siRNA resulted in similar phenotype changes as that observed for overexpression of miR-187. Our data suggest that miR-187 is emerging as a novel player in the disease state of ccRCC. miR-187 plays a tumor suppressor role in ccRCC.

  9. Correlation analysis of VHL and Jade-1 gene expression in human renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fen Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL mRNA expression and jade family PHD finger 1 (Jade-1 gene expression in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Another aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of these two genes with clinicalpathological features of the RCC patients. Methods: A total of 75 RCC patients who received surgically therapy in our hospital were included. All patients had complete pathological data. The expression of VHL/Jade-1 was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: VHL and Jade-1 were both obviously downregulated in RCC tissues than that of the matched normal tissues, and both negatively correlated with tumor size as well as tumor grade. And we found a fine association of VHL gene expression with Jade-1. Conclusion: VHL/Jade-1 exhibited significantly decreased expression in RCC tissues and was closely related to the clinical prognosis of patients. The finding of VHL expression positively correlated with Jade-1 expression shed light and provided crucial evidence on the connection of VHL protein with Wnt/b-catenin pathway.

  10. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed

  11. Renal Cell Carcinoma of Contralateral Kidney with Secondaries in Gallbladder Eight Years After Nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kechrid Mohamed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old female underwent right nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC. The histopathology showed clear cell carcinoma. There was no evidence of metastasis. After remaining asymptomatic for eight years, she developed pain in the right loin. Abdominal ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT Scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were suggestive of a tumor mass in the right renal area, multiple tumor masses in the left kidney and a mass in the gallbladder. Cholecystectomy, left radical nephrectomy and right adrenal mass with excision of adjacent lymph nodes were performed. The histopathology from all sites was suggestive of RCC. She was maintained on hemodialysis. Two and half years later she died after surgical exploration for spinal cord decompression due to metastasis to the dorsal spine.

  12. Gene set enrichment analysis and ingenuity pathway analysis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed I; Dębski, Konrad J; Dabrowski, Michał; Czarnecka, Anna M; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide RNA expression analysis has become a routine tool that offers a great opportunity to study and understand the key role of genes that contribute to carcinogenesis. Various microarray platforms and statistical approaches can be used to identify genes that might serve as prognostic biomarkers and be developed as antitumor therapies in the future. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a serious, life-threatening disease, and there are few treatment options for patients. In this study, we performed one-color microarray gene expression (4×44K) analysis of the mRCC cell line Caki-1 and the healthy kidney cell line ASE-5063. A total of 1,921 genes were differentially expressed in the Caki-1 cell line (1,023 upregulated and 898 downregulated). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approaches were used to analyze the differential-expression data. The objective of this research was to identify complex biological changes that occur during metastatic development using Caki-1 as a model mRCC cell line. Our data suggest that there are multiple deregulated pathways associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC), including integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, IGF-I signaling, CXCR4 signaling, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. The IPA upstream analysis predicted top transcriptional regulators that are either activated or inhibited, such as estrogen receptors, TP53, KDM5B, SPDEF, and CDKN1A. The GSEA approach was used to further confirm enriched pathway data following IPA. PMID:27279483

  13. Impact of Gender in Renal Cell Carcinoma: The Relationship of FABP7 and BRN2 Expression with Overall Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheng; Takayama, Tatsuya; Takaoka, Naohisa; Fujita, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Miki; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between gender differences in fatty acid-binding protein7 (FABP7) and BRN2 (POU class 3 homeobox 2) expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the prognosis of patients with RCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS immunohistochemical (IHC) staining as well as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed in renal tissues from 103 patients (83 men, mean age = 63.6 years old; 20 women, mean age = 63.1 years old) underwent radical nephrectomy from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2010. The probability of overall patient survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS FABP7 mRNA expression was more frequent in men (P = 0.07) while BRN2 protein expression was significantly more frequent in women (P = 0.029). In particular, FABP7 was expressed in 100% of G1 renal cell carcinoma both in mRNA and protein levels. In women, FABP7 (−) and BRN2 (+) groups had a worse prognosis both in mRNA level (P = 0.038) and protein level (P = 0.058). BRN2 was expressed 100% of papillary RCC both in mRNA and protein levels. CONCLUSIONS Our results demonstrated that gender was a key factor in FABP7 and BRN2 expression in RCC, and the combination with FABP7 and BRN2 stratified by gender could be a new potential prognostic factor in patients with RCC. PMID:24653654

  14. EIF3D silencing suppresses renal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis via inducing G2/M arrest through downregulation of Cyclin B1/CDK1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiu-Wu; Chen, Lu; Hong, Yi; Xu, Dan-Feng; Liu, Xi; Li, Lin; Huang, Yi; Cui, Li-Ming; Gan, Si-Shun; Yang, Qi-Wei; Huang, Hai; Qu, Fa-Jun; Ye, Jian-Qing; Wang, Lin-Hui; Cui, Xin-Gang

    2016-06-01

    There are no effective therapies for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), except for VEGFR inhibitors with only ~50% response rate. To identify novel targets and biomarkers for RCC is of great importance in treating RCC. In this study, we observed that eukaryotic initiation factor 3d (EIF3D) expression was significantly increased in RCC compared with paracarcinoma tissue using immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. Furthermore, bioinformatics meta-analysis using ONCOMINE microarray datasets showed that EIF3D mRNA expressions in CCRCC tissue specimens were significantly higher than that in normal tissue specimens. In addition, RCC tissue microarray demonstrated that elevated EIF3D expression was positively correlated with TNM stage and tumor size. EIF3D silencing in human 786-O and ACHN CCRCC cell lines by RNA interference demonstrated that EIF3D knockdown obviously inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation, caused G2/M arrest through downregulation of Cyclin B1 and Cdk1 and upregulation of p21, and induced apoptosis shown by sub-G1 accumulation and RARP cleavage. Moreover, correlation analysis using ONCOMINE microarray datasets indicated that increased EIF3D mRNA expression was positively correlated to PCNA, Cyclin B1 and CDK1 mRNA expression in RCC. Collectively, these results provide reasonable evidences that EIF3D may function as a potential proto-oncogene that participates in the occurrence and progression of RCC. PMID:27035563

  15. Genomic architecture and evolution of clear cell renal cell carcinomas defined by multiregion sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Horswell, Stuart; Larkin, James; Rowan, Andrew J; Salm, Max P; Varela, Ignacio; Fisher, Rosalie; McGranahan, Nicholas; Matthews, Nicholas; Santos, Claudio R; Martinez, Pierre; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Gulati, Sakshi; Bates, Paul A; Stamp, Gordon; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Hazell, Steven; Futreal, P Andrew; Stewart, Aengus; Swanton, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Clear cell renal carcinomas (ccRCCs) can display intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). We applied multiregion exome sequencing (M-seq) to resolve the genetic architecture and evolutionary histories of ten ccRCCs. Ultra-deep sequencing identified ITH in all cases. We found that 73-75% of identified ccRCC driver aberrations were subclonal, confounding estimates of driver mutation prevalence. ITH increased with the number of biopsies analyzed, without evidence of saturation in most tumors. Chromosome 3p loss and VHL aberrations were the only ubiquitous events. The proportion of C>T transitions at CpG sites increased during tumor progression. M-seq permits the temporal resolution of ccRCC evolution and refines mutational signatures occurring during tumor development. PMID:24487277

  16. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  17. 8-year survival in a patient with several recurrences of renal cell carcinoma after radical nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Shivam; Eldefrawy, Ahmed; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a large renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy utilizing liver mobilization techniques similar to those used in transplantation. Despite recurrent metastases, our patient continues to survive eight years later with several metastasectomies and adjuvant chemotherapy. We report the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic American man who presented with a 4-month history of an enlarging right upper quadrant abdominal mass and hematuria. C...

  18. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasis from Biopsy Associated Hematoma Disruption during Robotic Partial Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Caputo; Ziho Lee; Andrew Harbin; Daniel Eun

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case in which a patient with a past medical history of ovarian cancer received a diagnostic renal biopsy for an incidentally discovered renal mass. During left robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN), a perinephric hematoma was encountered. The hematoma was not present on preoperative imaging and was likely a result of the renal biopsy. The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the associated hematoma were widely excised with negative surgical margins. On follow-up imaging at five months pos...

  19. Critical appraisal of axitinib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari J.; Hussain SA; Ansari A; Glaholm J

    2013-01-01

    Jawaher Ansari,1 Syed A Hussain,2 Asif Ansari,3 John Glaholm41Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK; 2Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 4University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UKAbstract: A growing understanding of the biology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has led to the development and US Food and Drug Administration approval of seven new molecular targ...

  20. Expression of Fas and Fas-L in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govedarović Vitomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The previous investigations revealed that Fas-L expression on tumor cells can be one of the reasons of tumor growth, or tumor regression, with or without activation of the immune response. Objective: The objective of our study was to investigate the expression of Fas and Fas-L in situ in normal human renal tissue as well as in different types of renal cell carcinoma (RCC according to tumor grading. Method: Expression of Fas and Fas-L was examined in 25 RCCs classified according to nuclear grades: G1-G3 and to cell type: 17 clear cells, 3 chromophilics (2 eosinophilics, 1 basophilic, 2 chromophobes and 3 spindle cells. Ten normal human kidneys were analyzed, too. Indirect immunoperoxidase technique was applied. Spread and intensity of staining of Fas and Fas-L molecules expression were scored semiquantitatively. Results: Distribution of Fas expression in these RCC was typically diffuse. However, Fas-L was almost completely absent in clear cell RCC. In 3 clear cell RCC, some tumor stromal cells exhibited strong expression of Fas-L. On the contrary, chromophilic, chromophobe and spindle cell RCCs grading from G2- G3, manifested variable combinations of Fas and Fas-L expression. Conclusion: The most of clear cell type low grade RCCs manifested intensive and extensive expression of Fas and completely absence of Fas-L. However, RCCs of high grade malignancy belonging to the clear cell, eosinophilic, chromophobe or spindle cell types can have various combinations of Fas and Fas-L expression. It may probably lead to development of different mechanisms of avoidance of immune response to RCC.

  1. Comparative study of MRI appearances in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the differential diagnostic features of subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI(DCE-MRI). Methods: The MRI appearances of 77 RCCs, including 55 clear cell RCCs (CCRCC), 14 papillary RCCs (PRCC) and 8 chromophobe RCCs (CRCC), were retrospectively analyzed and compared with findings of pathology. DCE-MRI was conducted in each case after intravenous administration of contrast agent. Region of interest measurements (cortical, nephrographic and delayed Phases) of signals within tumor and uninvolved renal cortex were used to calculate percentage signal intensity change and tumor-to-cortex enhancement index, and the data was analyzed by AVONA and t test. Results: On unenhanced and enhanced MRI, most CRCCs showed homogeneous signal (7/8). CCRCC and PRCC often show inhomogeneous signal with necrosis (36/55, 7/14). Hemorrhage and cystic degeneration were often found in PRCC (9/14). On the cortical, nephrographic and delayed phase images, CCRCCs showed greater signal intensity change [(296.15± 60.27)%, (236.33±58.31)% and (216.83±46.72)%, respectively than PRCCs (79.70±18.84)%, (122.81±27.35)% and (117.55±20.63)%, respectively], and CRCCs showed intermediate change [(119.56±40.76)%, (163.06±33.91)% and (179.72±32.89)%, respectively]. A phenomenon of quick staining and quick fainting was observed in CCRCCs. Both of CRCCs and PRCCs showed delayed enhancement. The tumor-to-cortex enhancement index at the cortical, nephrographic and delayed phases was highest for CCRCCs (1.26±0.34, 0.92±0.23 and 0.76±0.14, respectively), lowest for PRCCs (0.33±0.12, 0.41±0.23 and 0.35±0.11, respectively), and intermediate for CRCCs (0.54±0.10, 0.62±0.15 and 0.69±0.12, respectively, P<0.01). The degree of enhancement was significantly different among the 3 subtypes at the every contrast enhanced phase (F= 940.931, 124.515 and 38.194, P<0.01), so was the tumor-to-cortex enhancement index (F=798.625, 78.308 and 73.699, P

  2. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  3. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation/morphology: A clinicopathological and genetic study of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Ohe, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC with neuroendocrine differentiation/morphology (NED/NEM is exceedingly rare. We present three cases of ChRCC with NED/NEM, two of which showed positivity for neuroendocrine markers on immunohistochemical analysis. Patients ranged in age from 49 to 79 years (mean: 64.3 years. One of the three patients died of metastatic disease to multiple organs. Of the remaining two patients, one is currently alive without disease and the other is alive with disease. Histologically, all three tumors were composed of conventional ChRCC and NEM showed glandular and rosette formation. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for CK7, KAI1, E-cadherin, and c-kit in both ChRCC and neuroendocrine areas in three cases. CD56 and synaptophysin immunoreactivity were detected in two cases; in only the neuroendocrine area in one case and in both components in the other. Neuroendocrine granules were ultrastructurally observed at both neuroendocrine and conventional areas of ChRCC. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH study indicated losses of chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 10, 17, 21, and Y in both conventional ChRCC and NED in one case. In addition, losses of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 10, 13, 16p, 17, and 21 were observed in both components of the remaining one tumor. Furthermore, loss of chromosome 5 was identified only in the neuroendocrine area in this case. We concluded that the neuroendocrine area may reflect dedifferentiation within ChRCC. It is possible that losses of chromosomes 4, 5, and 16p may be involved in the neuroendocrine differentiation or progression of ChRCC.

  4. Prognostic value of preoperative inflammatory response biomarkers in patients with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma and the establishment of a nomogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangyou; Ma, Xin; Li, Hongzhao; Chen, Luyao; Xie, Yongpeng; Zhao, Chaofei; Luo, Guoxiong; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the prognostic role of inflammatory response biomarkers in sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (sRCC). From January 2004 to May 2015, 103 patients with sRCC were enrolled in this study. Preoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (dNLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and lymphocyte to monocyte ratio (LMR) were analyzed. Besides well-established clinicopathological prognostic factors, we evaluated the prognostic value of this four markers using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression models. Additionally, a nomogram was established to predict the prognosis of sRCC patients. Elevated NLR, dNLR and PLR were significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS), nevertheless, elevated LMR showed an adverse effect on reduced OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that NLR (HR = 4.07, 95% CI = 1.50–11.00, P = 0.006) retained as independent factor. Incorporation of the NLR into a prognostic model including T stage, M stage, tumor necrosis and percentage of sarcomatoid generated a nomogram, which accurately predicted OS for sRCC patients. Preoperative NLR may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker in patients with sRCC and may help with clinical decisions about treatment intervention in clinical practice. The proposed nomogram can be used for the prediction of OS in patients with sRCC. PMID:27035802

  5. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

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    Meyer Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. Methods We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. Results The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Conclusion Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response.

  6. Smac mimetic sensitizes renal cell carcinoma cells to interferon-α-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Michael; Eckhardt, Ines; Haferkamp, Axel; Fulda, Simone

    2016-05-28

    The prognosis of metastatic or relapsed renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still very poor, highlighting the need for new treatment strategies. Here, we identify a cooperative antitumor activity of interferon-α (IFNα) together with the Smac mimetic BV6 that antagonizes antiapoptotic IAP proteins. BV6 and IFNα act together to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis in various RCC cell lines. Molecular studies revealed that BV6/IFNα co-treatment triggers apoptosis independently of autocrine/paracrine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α signaling, since the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel fails to rescue cell death. Importantly, knockdown of Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP)1 significantly decreases BV6/IFNα-mediated apoptosis, whereas the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) provides no protection. This demonstrates that RIP1 protein is critically required for BV6/IFNα-induced apoptosis, while RIP1 kinase activity is dispensable, pointing to a scaffold function of RIP1. Consistently, BV6 and IFNα cooperate to trigger the interaction of RIP1, Fas-Associated Death Domain protein (FADD) and caspase-8 to form a cytosolic cell death complex that drives caspase activation. Addition of the broad-range caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) significantly protects RCC cells against BV6/IFNα-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that caspase activity is required for apoptosis. In conclusion, the combination approach of IFNα and BV6 represents a promising strategy for cooperative induction of apoptosis in RCC cells, which warrants further investigation. PMID:26912071

  7. Overexpression of FoxM1 is associated with tumor progression in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yi-Jun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fork head box M1 (FoxM1 is a proliferation-associated transcription factor essential for cell cycle progression. Numerous studies have documented that FoxM1 has multiple functions in tumorigenesis and its elevated levels are frequently associated with cancer progression. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression of FoxM1 and its prognostic significance in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. Meanwhile, the function of FoxM1 in human ccRCC was further investigated in cell culture models. Methods Real-time quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to explore FoxM1 expression in ccRCC cell lines and primary ccRCC clinical specimens. FoxM1 expression was knocked down by small interfering RNA (siRNA in Caki-1 and 786-O cells; proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis were assayed. Results FoxM1 expression was up-regulated in the majority of the ccRCC clinical tissue specimens at both mRNA and protein levels. Clinic pathological analysis showed that FoxM1 expression was significantly correlated with primary tumor stage (P P = 0.01, distant metastasis (P = 0.01, TNM stage (P P = 0.003. The Kaplan–Meier survival curves revealed that high FoxM1 expression was associated with poor prognosis in ccRCC patients (P P = 0.008. Experimentally, we found that down-regulation of FoxM1 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest with reduced expression of cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and Cdk2, and increased expression of p21 and p27. Also, down-regulation of FoxM1 reduced expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, resulting in the inhibition of migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Conclusions These results suggest that FoxM1 expression is likely to play important roles in ccRCC development and progression, and that FoxM1 is a prognostic biomarker and a

  8. Expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 2A in renal cell carcinomas and potential mechanism for kidney carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (MAT2A) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) by joining methionine and ATP. SAMe is a methyl donor for transmethylation and has an important role for DNA and/or protein methylation. MAT2A is expressed widely in many tissues especially in kidney. Several studies have demonstrated that there are abnormal expressions of MAT2A in several kinds of cancers such as liver and colon cancers. But the relationship of MAT2A between renal cell carcinomas (RCC) is less understood. The mRNA expression level of the MAT2A gene was determined in 24 RCC patients and 4 RCC cell lines, using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The MAT2A protein content was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis in 55 RCC patients. The mRNA levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were also analysized in patients using RT-PCR. The correlations between the MAT2A and HO-1 as well as COX-2 were analyzed with nonparametric Spearman method. MAT2A transcript was significantly downregulated in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis and western blotting indicated that level of MAT2A protein was decreased in cancer tissues. The statistical analysis reveals a negative correlation between MAT2A and HO-1 expression in RCC patients and cell lines (P < 0.01). This study demonstrated that MAT2A was lower expression in cancer tissues, suggesting that it may be involved in the development of RCC. MAT2A is a transcriptional corepressor for HO-1 expression by supplying SAM for methyltransferases, which may be one of potential mechanism of MAT2A as tumor suppressor in kidney carcinogenesis

  9. Application of ADC measurement in characterization of renal cell carcinomas with different pathological types and grades by 3.0 T diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value obtained with 3.0 T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) with different pathological subtypes and grades. Materials and methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with RCC and underwent DWI were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathological examination of surgical specimens. Images of DWI were obtained with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm2. The ADC values in the solid area of tumors and in the corresponding regions of contralateral normal renal parenchyma were measured and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean ADC value was significantly lower in RCC (1.381 ± 0.444 × 10−3 mm2/s) than in normal renal parenchyma (2.232 ± 0.221 × 10−3 mm2/s) (P < 0.001). The ADC value was also statistically different between clear cell RCC (CCRCC) and non-CCRCC, and between different grades of CCRCC except grade I vs II and grade III vs IV. Conclusion: ADC measurement on 3.0 T DWI provides useful information in diagnostic work-up of RCC in terms of differentiation of RCC and normal renal parenchyma, and characterization of RCC with different pathological subtypes and grades.

  10. Application of ADC measurement in characterization of renal cell carcinomas with different pathological types and grades by 3.0 T diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaoduo, E-mail: yxd98@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Lin, Meng, E-mail: linmeng77xp@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Ouyang, Han, E-mail: hbybj@sohu.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhou, Chunwu, E-mail: cjr.zhouchunwu@163.vip.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhang, Hongtu, E-mail: zhanghongtu1010@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value obtained with 3.0 T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) with different pathological subtypes and grades. Materials and methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with RCC and underwent DWI were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathological examination of surgical specimens. Images of DWI were obtained with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. The ADC values in the solid area of tumors and in the corresponding regions of contralateral normal renal parenchyma were measured and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean ADC value was significantly lower in RCC (1.381 {+-} 0.444 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than in normal renal parenchyma (2.232 {+-} 0.221 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) (P < 0.001). The ADC value was also statistically different between clear cell RCC (CCRCC) and non-CCRCC, and between different grades of CCRCC except grade I vs II and grade III vs IV. Conclusion: ADC measurement on 3.0 T DWI provides useful information in diagnostic work-up of RCC in terms of differentiation of RCC and normal renal parenchyma, and characterization of RCC with different pathological subtypes and grades.

  11. Prognostic significance of modified Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae Sung; Kim, Sun Il; Choo, Seol Ho; Jang, Seok Heun; Ahn, Hyun Soo; Kim, Se Joong

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) as a prognostic factor in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and methods Between June 1994 and July 2012, 469 patients with RCC underwent radical or partial nephrectomy at two hospitals. Among these patients, 65 with non-clear cell type histology and 16 with lymph-node or distant metastasis were excluded. The medical records of the remaining 388 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The mGPS was calculated using a selective combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin as previously described. The prognostic significance of various clinicopathological variables including mGPS was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the total 388 patients, 40 patients (10.3%) developed local recurrence or distant metastasis and 18 patients (4.6%) died of disease during the follow-up period. The univariate analysis identified CRP, mGPS, thrombocytosis, T stage, Fuhrman's nuclear grade and lymphovascular invasion as significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). The multivariate analysis indicated that mGPS (p clear cell RCC treated with radical or partial nephrectomy. These findings suggest that mGPS should be used for predicting recurrence or survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy for non-metastatic clear cell RCC. PMID:26878156

  12. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results. PMID:24228124

  13. Impact of Gender in Renal Cell Carcinoma: The Relationship of FABP7 and BRN2 Expression with Overall Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Tan; Tatsuya Takayama; Naohisa Takaoka; Hiromi Fujita; Miki Miyazaki; Takayuki Sugiyama; Seiichiro Ozono

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between gender differences in fatty acid-binding protein7 (FABP7) and BRN2 (POU class 3 homeobox 2) expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the prognosis of patients with RCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS immunohistochemical (IHC) staining as well as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed in renal tissues from 103 patients (83 men, mean age = 63.6 years old; 20 women, mean age = 63.1 years old) underwent radical nephrecto...

  14. A novel method to identify pathways associated with renal cell carcinoma based on a gene co-expression network

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Xiyun; Li, Hongyun; Liu, Bo; Chen, Jie; ZHANG, SHIBAO; Sun, Zeqiang; LIU, SHUANGQING; SUN, FAHAI; Liu, Qingyong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel method for identifying pathways associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) based on a gene co-expression network. A framework was established where a co-expression network was derived from the database as well as various co-expression approaches. First, the backbone of the network based on differentially expressed (DE) genes between RCC patients and normal controls was constructed by the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Pro...

  15. Blood pressure and risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weikert, Steffen; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias; Weikert, Cornelia; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Becker, Nikolaus; Linseisen, Jakob; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Mountokalakis, Theodore; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Sieri, Sabina; Palli, Domenico; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Verschuren, W M Monique; Ljungberg, Borje; Hallmans, Goran; Berglund, Goran; González, Carlos A; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Tormo, M J; Allen, Naomi; Roddam, Andrew; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ferrari, Pietro; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2007-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure has been implicated as a risk factor for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but prospective studies were confined to men and did not consider the effect of antihypertensive medication. The authors examined the relation among blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, and RCC in...... the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Blood pressure was measured in 296,638 women and men, recruited in eight European countries during 1992-1998, 254,935 of whom provided information on antihypertensive medication. During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years, 250 cases of...

  16. Review of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with focus on pathobiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Ohe, Chisato; Mikami, Shuji; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-09-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently established entity. In this article, we introduce the general view of this new entity. Macroscopically, the disease exclusively occurs in ACD and may arise as a dominant mass or non-dominant masses. Histologically, the tumor is characterized by a microcystic pattern, neoplastic cells with an eosinophilic or oncocytic cytoplasm and frequent intratumoral oxalate crystal deposition. Prominent nucleoli of tumor cells are often observed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells are generally positive for AMACR but negative for cytokeratin 7. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells contain abundant mitochondria in the cytoplasm. Genetically, the gain of chromosomes 3, 7, 17 and abnormality of the sex chromosome were frequently observed in several studies. In conclusion, ACD-associated RCC may be widely recognized as a distinct entity in the near future because this tumor is morphologically and genetically different from other renal tumor entities that have been previously established. PMID:21751153

  17. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg Neeraj K; Mangal Sharad; Sahu Tejram; Mehta Abhinav; Vyas Suresh P; Tyagi Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid, -tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid, and estimate H2O2-induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells. Methods: The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated. H2O2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters: cell viability (% apoptosis), nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis (ROS production evaluation). Results: The anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, - tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated. It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect (anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC-26) cell line. Conclusions: This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties. However, in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging, and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  18. Renal collecting duct carcinoma: Report of a case with unusual imaging findings regarding renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longwang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal collecting duct carcinoma (CDC is a rare and aggressive type of renal cell cancer (RCC, which is difficult to confirm before surgery. We present a case of CDC presenting a hypovascular mass on renal CTA and deteriorated renal function of the affected kidney on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, which are different from the most common RCC, clear cell RCC. Considering these findings, it would be worthwhile investigating the role of CTA and SPECT in CDC diagnosis.

  19. Renal collecting duct carcinoma: Report of a case with unusual imaging findings regarding renal function

    OpenAIRE

    Longwang Wang; Li Peng; Teng Hou; Ying Shi

    2013-01-01

    Renal collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) is a rare and aggressive type of renal cell cancer (RCC), which is difficult to confirm before surgery. We present a case of CDC presenting a hypovascular mass on renal CTA and deteriorated renal function of the affected kidney on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which are different from the most common RCC, clear cell RCC. Considering these findings, it would be worthwhile investigating the role of CTA and SPECT in CDC diagnosis.

  20. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic (≥ 14.02 μg/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg72Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: ► Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. ► A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. ► RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. ► Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  1. Long non-coding RNA Linc00152 is a positive prognostic factor for and demonstrates malignant biological behavior in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Tan, Cong; Weng, Wei-Wei; Deng, Yu; Zhang, Qiong-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Qun; Gan, Hua-Lei; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Xu, Mi-Die; Wang, Yi-Qin; Wang, Chao-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that lncRNAs play important roles in regulating gene expression and are involved in various pathological processes. In the present study, we screened the lncRNAs profile in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, and got linc00152, a differentially expressed lncRNA that haven’t been reported in ccRCC. To further explore its role in ccRCC, the level of Linc00152 was detected in 77 paired ccRCC tissues and renal cancer cell lines by qRT-PCR, and its association with overall survival was assessed by statistical analysis. Linc00152 expression was significantly up-regulated in cancerous tissues and cell lines compared with normal counterparts, and high Linc00152 expression was closely associated with advanced TNM stage. Moreover, Linc00152 was found to be able to serve as an independent predictor of overall survival. Further experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Linc00152 can significantly promote cell proliferation and invasion, inhibit cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and dramatically decrease apoptosis in both 786O and Caki-2 cell lines, whereas the opposite results were observed with attenuated Linc00152 expression. Our data suggest that Linc00152 is a novel molecule involved in ccRCC progression as well as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target.

  2. Fast clearance of lipid droplets through MAP1S-activated autophagy suppresses clear cell renal cell carcinomas and promotes patient survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-De; Yue, Fei; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Xun; He, Yongzhong; Jiang, Xianhan; Huang, Hai; Chen, Qi; Jonasch, Eric; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is composed of cells whose cytoplasm filled with lipid droplets, subcellular organelles coated with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADFP) for the storage of triacylglycerol converted from excess free fatty acids. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles such as lipid droplets. MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and promoted the survival of patients with prostate adenocarcinomas by increasing the degradation of aggregated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells causes an impairment of autophagic clearance of lipid droplets. In contrast, an overexpression of MAP1S causes an activation of autophagy flux and a reduction of lipid droplets so less DNA double strand breakage is induced. The levels of MAP1S in normal renal cells are dramatically higher than those in the ccRCC tissues and cell lines derived from renal cell carcinomas. High levels of MAP1S are associated with a reduced malignancy and metastasis of ccRCC and predict a better survival of ccRCC patients. Therefore, autophagy defects in the degradation of lipid droplets triggered by the MAP1S deficiency may enhance the initiation and development of ccRCC and reduce the survival of ccRCC patients. PMID:26701856

  3. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the ovary or fallopian tube: a clinicopathological study of 9 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Huang, He; Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common type of kidney cancer in adult, rarely metastasizes to the ovary or fallopian tube, and most cases published in the literature were case reports. Herein, we describe the clinicopathological features of 9 cases of RCC metastatic to the ovary (n = 8) or the fallopian tube (n = 1). The patients' age at the onset of primary renal tumor was available in 8 patients, ranging from 37 to 73 years (mean, 51 years; median, 50 years). Ovarian metastasis was detected prior to or concurrently with the primary renal tumors in 3 patients, and after the diagnosis of renal tumors in 6 patients. The histotypes of the RCCs were clear cell (n = 7), chromophobe (n = 1), and unclassified (n = 1). Immunohistochemical stainings were performed on the sections containing metastatic tumors in 4 cases. Interestingly, pagetoid intraepithelial spread in the tubal mucosa was observed in the case of RCC metastatic to the fallopian tube. Among the 8 patients with follow-up data, 5 died of disease and 3 were alive with disease, with a follow-up period ranging from 3.7 months to 17 years (mean, 77 months; median, 53 months) after the diagnosis of primary kidney tumors. Diagnostically, metastatic RCC may mimic primary ovarian tumors clinically, morphologically, or immunophenotypically. Pathologists should also keep in mind that both ovarian and kidney tumors express PAX8 and PAX2, the markers commonly used to diagnose metastatic RCC. In addition, chromophobe RCC only rarely metastasizes, but it can be a diagnostic challenge when it metastasizes to the ovary. PMID:27067787

  4. Automated grading of renal cell carcinoma using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent technology developments have demonstrated the benefit of using whole slide imaging (WSI in computer-aided diagnosis. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using automatic WSI analysis to assist grading of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, which is a manual task traditionally performed by pathologists. Materials and Methods: Automatic WSI analysis was applied to 39 hematoxylin and eosin-stained digitized slides of clear cell RCC with varying grades. Kernel regression was used to estimate the spatial distribution of nuclear size across the entire slides. The analysis results were correlated with Fuhrman nuclear grades determined by pathologists. Results: The spatial distribution of nuclear size provided a panoramic view of the tissue sections. The distribution images facilitated locating regions of interest, such as high-grade regions and areas with necrosis. The statistical analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size was significantly different (P < 0.001 between low-grade (Grades I and II and high-grade tumors (Grades III and IV. The receiver operating characteristics analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size distinguished high-grade and low-grade tumors with a false positive rate of 0.2 and a true positive rate of 1.0. The area under the curve is 0.97. Conclusion: The automatic WSI analysis allows pathologists to see the spatial distribution of nuclei size inside the tumors. The maximum nuclear size can also be used to differentiate low-grade and high-grade clear cell RCC with good sensitivity and specificity. These data suggest that automatic WSI analysis may facilitate pathologic grading of renal tumors and reduce variability encountered with manual grading.

  5. Collecting Duct Renal Cell Carcinoma Found to Involve the Collecting System During Partial Nephrectomy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Harbin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Collecting duct carcinoma (CDC is a rare and aggressive form of renal cell carcinoma (RCC arising from the principal cells of the collecting duct.  One third of cases present with metastatic disease, but many present in a manner similar to conventional RCC or urothelial carcinoma (UC.  We discuss a case of CDC which presented as a small mass at the cortico-medullary junction, and was discovered at robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN to be grossly involving the collecting system. A 62-year-old man presented with a small renal mass suspicious for RCC, which was found on computed tomography (CT after an episode of gross hematuria.  After thorough workup, RPN was attempted; however, intraoperatively the mass was found to be involving the collecting system.  Radical nephroureterectomy was performed, and the pathology report revealed CDC.  CDC is a rare and aggressive form of RCC.  While many cases are metastatic at diagnosis, most patients present with the incidental finding of a small renal mass.  There are no reports of a CDC involving the collecting system at RPN after negative ureteroscopy preoperatively.  The adjuvant therapeutic options for CDC are limited, and long term survival is poor.    

  6. Epistaxis as the First Manifestation of Silent Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report with Relevant Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, You Me; Kim, Bong Man

    2016-01-01

    The paranasal sinuses are known to be a rare location for metastasis. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent primary tumor to metastasize to the sinonasal region, followed by lung and breast cancer. In particular, clear cell type RCC, which represents approximately 85% of RCCs, is characterized by early metastasis, and it sometimes spreads to unusual sites (1, 2). Metastatic tumors in the paranasal sinuses are distributed in the maxillary, sphenoid, ethmoid, and frontal sinuses, in order of decreasing frequency. Symptoms are usually nonspecific, but epistaxis is the most common sign, due to the hypervascularity of the primary tumor. The prognosis is uncertain, but the 5-year survival rate fluctuates between 15% and 30%. The purpose of this case report is to document a rare case of silent RCC that first presented as epistaxis due to nasal cavity and ethmoid sinus metastasis. PMID:27110343

  7. CpG-mediated modulation of MDSC contributes to the efficacy of Ad5-TRAIL therapy against renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    James, Britnie R.; Anderson, Kristin G; Brincks, Erik L.; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Norian, Lyse A.; Masopust, David; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression occurs through the modulation of a number of physiological parameters, including the development of immunosuppressive mechanisms to prevent immune detection and response. Among these immune evasion mechanisms, the mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is a major contributor to the suppression of antitumor T-cell immunity. Patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) show increased MDSC, and methods are being explored clinically to reduce the prevalence of MDSC ...

  8. DNA methylation biomarkers predict progression-free and overall survival of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated with antiangiogenic therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Peters

    Full Text Available VEGF-targeted therapy increases both the progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS of patients with metastasized renal cell cancer (mRCC. Identification of molecular phenotypes of RCC could improve risk-stratification and the prediction of the clinical disease course. We investigated whether gene-specific DNA hypermethylation can predict PFS and OS among patients undergoing anti-VEGF-based therapy. Primary tumor tissues from 18 patients receiving targeted therapy were examined retrospectively using quantitative methylation-specific PCR analysis of CST6, LAD1, hsa-miR-124-3, and hsa-miR-9-1 CpG islands. PFS and OS were analyzed for first-line and sequential antiangiogenic therapies using the log rank statistics. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for predicting first-line therapy failure. Hypermethylation of CST6 and LAD1 was associated with both a shortened PFS (log rank p = 0.009 and p = 0.004 and OS (p = 0.011 and p = 0.043. The median PFS observed for the high and low methylation groups of CST6 and LAD1 was 2.0 vs.11.4 months. LAD1 methylation had a specificity of 1.0 (95% CI 0.65-1.0 and a sensitivity of 0.73 (95% CI 0.43-0.90 for the prediction of first-line therapy. CST6 and LAD1 methylation are candidate epigenetic biomarkers showing unprecedented association with PFS and OS as well as specificity for the prediction of the response to therapy. DNA methylation markers should be considered for the prospective evaluation of larger patient cohorts in future studies.

  9. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Renal Carcinoma: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Donalisio da Silva; Diedra Gustafson; Leticia Nogueira; Werahera, Priya N.; Molina, Wilson R.; Kim, Fernando J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is associated with poor outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Advances in the understanding of tumor molecular biology and the implementation of new drugs that target these molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced RCC and improved outcomes in these patients. Herein, we briefly describe the latest data on targeted therapies used in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Search strategy was performed according to PRISMA guide...

  10. RASSF1A protein expression and correlation with clinicopathological parameters in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machtens Stefan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic silencing of RAS association family 1A (RASSF1A tumor suppressor gene occurs in various histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC but RASSF1A protein expression in clear cell RCC as well as a possible correlation with clinicopathological parameters of patients has not been analyzed at yet. Methods 318 primary clear cell carcinomas were analyzed using tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry. Survival analysis was carried out for 187 patients considering a follow-up period of 2–240 month. Results Expression of RASSF1A was found to be significantly decreased in tumoral cells when compared to normal tubular epithelial cells. RASSF1A immunopositivity was significantly associated with pT stage, group stage and histological grade of tumors and showed a tendency for impaired survival in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Conclusion While most tumors demonstrate a loss of RASSF1A protein, a subset of tumors was identified to exhibit substantial RASSF1A protein expression and show increased tumor progression. Thus RCC tumorigenesis without depletion of RASSF1A may be associated with an adverse clinical outcome.

  11. Optimized Temporal Window for Detection and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinomas with Dynamic CT Scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Peijun Wang; Xiaohu Zhao; Xinqin Mao; Xiaolong Gao; Jun Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the optimized time period for detection and characterization of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) when the specific CT features appear during spiral dynamic CT scanning, and to optimize an effective scanning protocol of spiral CT for evaluating RCC.METHODS Twenty-four patients with RCC verified by pathology had undergone a dynamic CT (D-CT) scan. A plain scan was employed to select the target slice. Single-level dynamic scanning started at 14-17 s after the intravenous contrast media had been administered, with a scan interval of 4.9 s acquiring a total number of 17~24 frames. A regular CT scan of the whole kidney followed by a delayed single slice acquisition through the target slice in the excretory phase was performed. Images were assessed in two ways: (1) A group of experienced radiologists reviewed the CT images to find when the specific signs appeared and when the CT features of RCC were optimally displayed; (2) Data measurement of the time-density curves (T-DC) of RCC. The exact time was obtained when the densities of the tumor, renal parenchyma, medulla and aorta reached their peak enhancement, thus also the time when the density difference between tumor and parenchyma was at maximum (Max T-M). Based on the slope of the contrast media uptake curve, T-DC types were ranked from the smallest to the biggest of slope as type A, B and C.RESULTS 1. The review of the CT images by the radiologists showed that the CT features of RCC were optimally demonstrated at 70.2 s. The earliest time at which RCC CT features were examined was at 23.9 s. 2. Image data analysis: the time that the density (or CT value) of the tumor mass reached peak enhancement was at 54 s and peak value was at 80.4 Hu for RCC. The time of the maximal difference of densities between tumor and renal parenchyma was at 102 s.CONCLUSION The following proposal is the scanning protocol for detecting RCC recommended by our research: After a plain scan to determine the target level, a

  12. Imaging of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Isao; Morita, Kyoko; Hayama, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Araki, Ichiro; Higashi, Kotaro; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji; Nojima, Takayuki

    2011-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) complicated with acquired renal cystic disease in a 63-year-old male patient on long-term hemodialysis (30 years and 8 months) that was difficult because of no or poor contrast enhancement by dynamic CT scan is reported. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) in addition to dynamic CT were effective and useful for preoperative assessment of this patient. The pathological subtype of RCC in this patient was acquired cystic disease-associated RCC (ACD-associated RCC), which has been newly defined by Tickoo et al. (Am J Surg Pathol 30:141-153, 2006). PMID:20824295

  13. (1) H NMR metabolomics analysis of renal cell carcinoma cells: Effect of VHL inactivation on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Cormier, Kevin; Touaibia, Mohamed; Reyjal, Julie; Robichaud, Sarah; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Turcotte, Sandra

    2016-05-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an onco-suppressor involved in oxygen and energy-dependent promotion of protein ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Loss of function mutations of VHL (VHL-cells) result in organ specific cancers with the best studied example in renal cell carcinomas. VHL has a well-established role in deactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and in regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity. Cell culture metabolomics analysis was utilized to determined effect of VHL and HIF-1α or HIF-2α on metabolism of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). RCC cells were stably transfected with VHL or shRNA designed to silence HIF-1α or HIF-2α genes. Obtained metabolic data was analysed qualitatively, searching for overall effects on metabolism as well as quantitatively, using methods developed in our group in order to determine specific metabolic changes. Analysis of the effect of VHL and HIF silencing on cellular metabolic footprints and fingerprints provided information about the metabolic pathways affected by VHL through HIF function as well as independently of HIF. Through correlation network analysis as well as statistical analysis of significant metabolic changes we have determined effects of VHL and HIF on energy production, amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism as well as cell regulation and signaling. VHL was shown to influence cellular metabolism through its effect on HIF proteins as well as by affecting activity of other factors. PMID:26620126

  14. Do Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas Have Malignant Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Cheng, Liang; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-12-01

    There have been no recurrences or metastases of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) in 268 reported cases with follow-up in the English-language literature. We identified all our cases of CCPRCC (1990 to 2013), reviewing all cases that preceded the formal designation of the entity. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 32 cases during their initial workup. In addition, stains for carbonic anhydrase IX and cytokeratin 7 were performed on 2 cases, one with atypical follow-up and the other with a more compact morphology, although not performed initially. An extended panel with AMACR, CD10, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was added to the case with atypical follow-up. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 3p, 7, and 17 was performed on the latter case and on another clinically presumed metastatic tumor. In classic cases, immunohistochemical staining was not performed. Fifty-eight patients (31 women; 27 men) with follow-up data were included in our study; 39 cases were from our consult service. The patients' ages ranged from 36 to 83 years. Thirty-five patients had cystic or partially cystic lesions; 6 tumors were multifocal, 3 of which were bilateral. The majority (53 patients; 91.4%) presented with stage pT1 disease (size range, 0.2 to 8 cm), 2 patients presented with pT2 disease (8.5 and 10.3 cm), 1 patient presented with pT3 disease (6.5 cm sarcomatoid RCC focally extending out of the kidney), and pathologic stage was unavailable in 2 cases. Treatment consisted of 29 partial nephrectomies, 26 radical nephrectomies, 2 cryoablations, and 1 cyst ablation. The resection margins were negative in all but one case, with this case disease free after a 26-month period. Two patients had intraoperative tumor disruption and were disease free at 9 and 34 months. Five patients had synchronous ipsilateral renal cell carcinomas (non-CCPRCC). Mean follow-up time was 21 months (range, 1 to 175 mo), with all but 3 patients having no evidence of

  15. Downregulation of SAV1 plays a role in pathogenesis of high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical outcome of patients with high-grade ccRCC (clear cell renal cell carcinoma) remains still poor despite recent advances in treatment strategies. Molecular mechanism of pathogenesis in developing high-grade ccRCC must be clarified. In the present study, we found that SAV1 was significantly downregulated with copy number loss in high-grade ccRCCs. Therefore, we investigated the SAV1 function on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, we attempted to clarify the downstream signaling which is regulated by SAV1. We performed array CGH and gene expression analysis of 8 RCC cell lines (786-O, 769-P, KMRC-1, KMRC-2, KMRC-3, KMRC-20, TUHR4TKB, and Caki-2), and expression level of mRNA was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. We next re-expressed SAV1 in 786-O cells, and analyzed its colony-forming activity. Then, we transfected siRNAs of SAV1 into the kidney epithelial cell line HK2 and renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTECs), and analyzed their proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, the activity of YAP1, which is a downstream molecule of SAV1, was evaluated by western blot analysis, reporter assay and immunohistochemical analysis. We found that SAV1, a component of the Hippo pathway, is frequently downregulated in high-grade ccRCC. SAV1 is located on chromosome 14q22.1, where copy number loss had been observed in 7 of 12 high-grade ccRCCs in our previous study, suggesting that gene copy number loss is responsible for the downregulation of SAV1. Colony-forming activity by 786-O cells, which show homozygous loss of SAV1, was significantly reduced when SAV1 was re-introduced exogenously. Knockdown of SAV1 promoted proliferation of HK2 and RPTEC. Although the phosphorylation level of YAP1 was low in 786-O cells, it was elevated in SAV1-transduced 786-O cells. Furthermore, the transcriptional activity of the YAP1 and TEAD3 complex was inhibited in SAV1-transduced 786-O cells. Immunohistochemistry frequently demonstrated nuclear

  16. Lutetium-177-G250 radioimmunotherapy in an intraperitoneal clear cell renal cell carcinoma xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: Despite the good results achieved with agents targeting the VEGF and mTOR pathways, the treatment of advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) still poses a great challenge. A new approach in the treatment of ccRCC is radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) antibody G250. To investigate the potential of RIT with Lutetium-177 (Lu177) labeled G250, we conducted protein dose escalation study and subsequently a RIT study with Lu177-G250 in an intraperitoneal ccRCC mouse model. Materials and methods: 25 athymic female BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3 x 106 SK-RC-52 cells. To determine the optimal G250 protein dose, 3 weeks after inoculation the mice were injected with either 1, 3, 10, 30 or 100 μg G250 radiolabeled with 15 MBq indium-111 (In111). SPECT/CT images were made with the micro SPECT USPECT II camera 48 hours p.i. After imaging, the mice are killed and the biodistribution of In111-G250 was determined. The optimal protein dose was used in a subsequent therapy experiment in 3 groups of mice with i.p. SK-RC-52 tumors. One group (n=10) was injected with 13 MBq Lu177-G250, a control group received nonspecific antibody MOPC21 labeled with 13 MBq Lu177 (n=10) and the second control group received 20 MBq In111-G250 (n=10). Tumor growth was monitored with SPECT/CT imaging before treatment and with 3 week intervals. Primary endpoints were overall survival and toxicity. Results: The optimal G250 protein dose to target ccRCC in this model was 10 μg G250, as determined with SPECT/CT imaging and biodistribution. Treatment with 13 MBq Lu177-G250 was well tolerated. Treatment with Lu177-G250 resulted in significantly prolonged median survival of 139 days, in comparison with 49 days (Lu177-MOPC21) and 53 days In111-G250 (p=0.015). Conclusion: this is the first RIT study with radiolabeled G250 protein in mice with i.p. growing ccRCC. Treatment with Lu177-G250 resulted in significantly

  17. Renal cell carcinoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present five cases of renal cell carcinoma in children, describing its aspects on excretory urography, ultra-sonography and computerized tomography. The clinical, pathological and radiological features are compared with those of the literature. (author)

  18. Use of the University of California Los Angeles integrated staging system to predict survival in renal cell carcinoma: an international multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patard, J.J.; Kim, H.L.; Lam, J.; Dorey, F.J.; Pantuck, A.J.; Zisman, A.; Ficarra, V.; Han, K.R.; Cindolo, L.; Taille, A. De La; Tostain, J.; Artibani, W.; Dinney, C.P.; Wood, C.G.; Swanson, D.A.; Abbou, C.C.; Lobel, B.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Chopin, D.K.; Figlin, R.A.; Belldegrun, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate ability of the University of California Los Angeles Integrated Staging System (UISS) to stratify patients with localized and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) into risk groups in an international multicenter study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 4,202 patients from eight internationa

  19. Safety and clinical effect of subcutaneous human interleukin-21 in patients with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma: a phase I trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Brown, Janet; Mouritzen, Ulrik;

    2010-01-01

    This phase I study in patients with metastatic melanoma (MM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) evaluated the safety and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary antitumor activity of s.c. treatment of human recombinant interleukin 21 (IL-21)....

  20. USE OF THE SPONTANEOUS TSC2 KNOCKOUT (EKER) RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA FOR THE STUDY OF RENAL CARCINOGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kidney is a frequent site for chemically induced cancers in rodents and among the ten most frequent sites for cancer in human patients. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent upper urinary tract cancer in humans and accounts for 80-85% of malignant renal tumors. He...

  1. The 9-bp deletion at position 8272 in region V of mitochondrial DNA is associated with renal cell carcinoma outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaling; Guo, Zhanjun; Xu, Jinsheng; Zhang, Junxia; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran; Zhang, Shenglei

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is considered a mutation hotspot in various types of tumors, and mitochondrial DNA microsatellite instability (mtMSI) is associated with various cancers. We had previously identified cancer risk-associated MSIs in the D-loop region of mtDNA in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. In the present study, we further investigated the association of MSIs in the non-D-loop region of mtDNA with cancer risk and outcome of RCC. Six microsatellite loci (5892, 8272, 8280, 8281, 8289, 9777) in the non-D-loop of mtDNA were assessed. The CCCCCTCTA at position 8272 was associated with cancer outcome in an overall multivariate analysis (relative risk, 1.599; 95%CI, 1.365-1.872; p < 0.001). mtMSI at position 8272 can therefore be used as an independent prognostic marker for RCC patients. PMID:25329286

  2. Decreased expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 is associated with poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhuowei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 9 (DUSP-9 and determine its clinical significance in human ccRCCs. Methods The expression of DUSP-9 mRNA was determined in 46 paired samples of ccRCCs and adjacent normal tissues by using real-time qPCR. The expression of the DUSP-9 was determined in 211 samples of ccRCCs and 107 paired samples of adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was performed to define the relationship between the expression of DUSP-9 and the clinical features of ccRCC. Results The mRNA level of DUSP-9, which was determined by real-time RT-PCR, was found to be significantly lower in tumorous tissues than in the adjacent non-tumorous tissues (p Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that determines the relationship between DUSP-9 expression and prognosis in ccRCC. We found that decreased expression of DUSP-9 is associated with poor prognosis in ccRCC. DUSP-9 may represent a novel and useful prognostic marker for ccRCC.

  3. Autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling stimulates proliferation and migration of renal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1; also known as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] is an important mediator of monocyte recruitment during inflammatory processes. Pathologically high expression levels of MCP-1 by tumor cells have been observed in a variety of cancer types. In the majority of cases, high MCP-1 expression is associated with a poor prognosis, as infiltration of the tumor with inflammatory monocytes promotes tumor progression and metastasis. MCP-1 is also expressed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, the function and the regulation of MCP-1 was investigated in two RCC cell lines, CaKi-1 and 786-O. In both cell lines, expression of MCP-1 was significantly enhanced compared with non-cancerous control cells. As expected, secretion of MCP-1 into the medium facilitated the recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes via the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor type 2 (CCR2). As expression of CCR2 was also detected in 786-O and CaKi-1 cells, the effect of autocrine MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was evaluated in these cells. In proliferation assays, administration of an MCP-1 neutralizing antibody or of a CCR2 antagonist to CaKi-1 and 786-O cells significantly decreased cell growth; supplementation of the growth medium with recombinant human MCP-1 had no additional effect on proliferation. The migration ability of RCC cells was impaired by MCP-1 neutralization or pharmacological CCR2 inhibition, while it was stimulated by the addition of recombinant human MCP-1, compared with untreated control cells. Finally, substantial differences in the regulation of MCP-1 expression were observed between RCC cell lines. In CaKi-1 cells, expression of MCP-1 appears to be largely mediated by the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, while in 786-O cells, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Von-Hippel-Lindau appeared to be responsible for MCP-1 upregulation, as suggested by previous studies. Taken together, the results of the

  4. Unsuspected Xp11 Translocation Renal Neoplasm Associated With Contralateral Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Antonio; Addesso, Maria; Nappi, Oscar; Zeppa, Pio

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we present for the first time the coexistence of a conventional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and an undefined Xp11 translocation renal neoplasm in distinct kidneys, which was difficult to definitively classify as either carcinoma or PEComa (perivascular epithelioid cell tumor). While one of the tumors showed the morphological and immunohistochemical features of clear RCC, the other had an unusual morphology with a prominent nested pattern. Microscopically this tumor showed nests of cells with clear and eosinophilic cytoplasm and nuclei with prominent nucleoli; some hyaline globules were evident. Immunohistochemical panel showed negativity for cytokeratin-pan, cytokeratin-7, PAX8, and CD10 but positive immunostaining for cathepsin K, racemase, Melan-A, and TFE3. A subsequent, metaphase, dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the Xp11 translocation. Attention should be paid to the routine immunohistochemical profile that, in case of negativity of specific RCC markers, may suggest an Xp11 translocation renal tumor. The addition of TFE3 can easily identify the specific subtype. PMID:26729550

  5. Identification and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma Gene Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis S. Liou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray gene expression profiling has been used to distinguish histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and consequently to identify specific tumor markers. The analytical procedures currently in use find sets of genes whose average differential expression across the two categories differ significantly. In general each of the markers thus identifi ed does not distinguish tumor from normal with 100% accuracy, although the group as a whole might be able to do so. For the purpose of developing a widely used economically viable diagnostic signature, however, large groups of genes are not likely to be useful. Here we use two different methods, one a support vector machine variant, and the other an exhaustive search, to reanalyze data previously generated in our Lab (Lenburg et al. 2003. We identify 158 genes, each having an expression level that is higher (lower in every tumor sample than in any normal sample, and each having a minimum differential expression across the two categorie at a signifi cance of 0.01. The set is highly enriched in cancer related genes (p = 1.6 × 10 – 12, containing 43 genes previously associated with either RCC or other types of cancer. Many of the biomarkers appear to be associated with the central alterations known to be required for cancer transformation. These include the oncogenes JAZF1, AXL, ABL2; tumor suppressors RASD1, PTPRO, TFAP2A, CDKN1C; and genes involved in proteolysis or cell-adhesion such as WASF2, and PAPPA.

  6. Correlation between Dynamic Spiral-CT Enhancement Parameters and Tumor Angiogenesis in Renal Cell Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhong Wang; Weixia Chen; Xiuhui Zhang; Pengqiu Min; Rongbo Liu; Hengxuan Yang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prospectively investigate the correlation between the enhancement parameters of a dynamic-CT (D-CT) scan for renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and the carcinoma tissue microvessel density (MVD) in renal cell carcinomas (RCC).METHODS Twenty-four cases of renal cell carcinoma verifyied by histopathology were scanned via dynamic-CT, followed by a whole kidney scan. Enhancement parameters were derived as follows .The slope of the contrast media uptake curve (S), area under the curve(AR), the density difference before and after tissue enhancement (△HU) and tissue blood ratio (TBR) were calculated for all lesions. Time-density curve types were ranked from the lowest to the highest of the slope of the contrast media uptake curve (S) as type A, B and C. Pathologic slides corresponding to the CT imagings were subjected to CD34 monoclonal antibodies, then were evaluated with an image analyzer to count hot spots of MVD. By using the Spearman rank correlation tests, statistical analysis was performed to determine the strength of the relationship between enhancement parameters and MVD determinations.RESULTS The carcinoma tissue MVD showed a direct correlation with the enhancement parameters of D-CT (r=0.54, r=0.62, r=0.55, r=0.64, r=0.44,P< 0.05). Moreover the S, △HU, TBR and type curves all demonstrated a strong correlation with the MVD. By analyzing the various enhancement parameters of the time-density curves, the relationship between the enhancement CT parameters corresponding to the tumor's MVD was identified.CONCLUSION A dynamic spiral-CT scan may be a helpful method as a measurement of tumor angiogenesis in vivo in RCC.

  7. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  8. Evaluation of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bayrak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A subset of renal cell carcinoma (RCC patients has been shown to respond to anti-EGFR therapy. As KRAS and BRAF mutations are associated with poor response to anti-EGFR therapy in some cancers, it has been suggested that screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in RCC may be a promising strategy to identify patients who might respond to EGFR-targeted therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation status of EGFR, KRAS and BRAF in RCC patients. Renal tumors and normal renal samples from forty-eight patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer were used in this study. Histological classification of the tumors was performed according to International Union against Cancer (UICC / American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC classification. Seventeen patients (48% had clear-cell RCC, 7 (20% had chromophobe RCC, and 11 patients (32% had papillary RCC. DNA isolated from the samples was subjected to melting curve mutation analysis for EGFR, BRAF and KRAS using ABI-3130 DNA sequencer. DNA sequencing analysis of RCC samples, when compared with morphologically normal matched regions, did not show any exon mutations. Our results do not support the notion that EGFR, KRAS and BRAF might be mutated in RCC. Normal 0 false false false TR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:TR; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  9. Three Synchronous Atypical Metastases of Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma to the Maxillary Gingiva, Scalp and the Distal Phalanx of the Fifth Digit: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, Firat; Faquin, William C; Michaelson, Marc Dror; August, Meredith

    2016-06-01

    Oral cavity metastasis of malignant tumors is extremely rare and accounts for only 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can metastasize to any part of the body, with a 15% risk of metastasis to the head and neck region when the disease is disseminated and a 1% risk when it is not. RCC also is the third most common infraclavicular neoplasm that metastasizes to the oral cavity, after lung carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. In the maxillofacial region, the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are the most commonly affected sites, followed by the oral cavity. This report describes the case of a 51-year-old man with a history of clear RCC presenting with 3 synchronous atypical metastases of this tumor to the maxillary gingiva, scalp, and distal phalanx of the fifth digit. Clinical findings, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of these lesions are discussed. Metastasis of RCC should always be included in the differential diagnosis when a new oral and maxillofacial lesion appears in a patient with a history of RCC because the metastatic lesions can often present in a broad spectrum of forms. The rapid growth of these lesions should alert clinicians to avoid any delays in biopsy examination and subsequent treatment, which is usually palliative, because prognosis is usually poor. PMID:26954558

  10. Plasma IFN-γ and IL-6 levels correlate with peripheral T-cell numbers but not toxicity in RCC patients treated with CAR T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, Yarne; van Steenbergen, Sabine C L; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno; Lamers, Cor H J

    2016-08-01

    Autologous T-cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to twelve patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Here, we questioned whether plasma cytokine levels following treatment or in vitro cytokine production from the T-cell infusion products could serve as predictors for peripheral T-cell persistence or in vivo T-cell activity. We demonstrated that CAR surface as well as gene expression are down-regulated following T-cell infusion, and that peripheral numbers of CAR T-cells are best captured by flow cytometry and not by qPCR. Numbers of CAR T-cells in blood correlated with plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-6, but not with any of the other cytokines tested. Plasma IFN-γ or IL-6 levels did not correlate with liver enzyme values. Thus, out of 27 cytokines tested, IFN-γ and IL-6 levels in plasma are potential surrogate markers for CAR T-cell persistence in solid tumors. PMID:27377533

  11. Clinical experience and critical evaluation of the role of sorafenib in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zustovich F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fable Zustovich1, Giuseppe Lombardi1, Davide Pastorelli1, Patrizia Farina1, Massimo Dal Bianco2, Luca De Zorzi2, Maurizia Dalla Palma1, Ornella Nicoletto1, Vittorina Zagonel11Oncologia Medica 1, Istituto Oncologico Veneto-IRCCS, Padova, Italy; 2UO Urologia, Ospedale Sant'Antonio, ULSS 16, Padova, ItalyAbstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is a common malignancy worldwide with approximately 95,000 new cases per year and ranks as the sixth cause of cancer deaths. Until recently, the slightly active and very toxic cytokines were available for patients with advanced RCC. Advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of renal cancer. The introduction of targeted agents has led to promising possibilities for treating these highly vascularized tumors. Angiogenesis inhibition is likely to represent the main potential therapeutic target. Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with activity against tyrosine kinase receptors that are responsible for blood vessel development and has shown to be active in treating advanced RCC. In this review, we summarize the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety of sorafenib use in therapy for advanced RCC.Keywords: sorafenib, pharmacokinetics, angiogenesis 

  12. Increased interferon alpha receptor 2 mRNA levels is associated with renal cell carcinoma metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanishi Tomonori

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-α (IFN-α is one of the central agents in immunotherapy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC and binds to the IFN-α receptor (IFNAR. We investigated the role of IFNAR in RCC. Methods We quantified IFNAR mRNA expression in paired tumor and non-tumor samples from the surgical specimens of 103 consecutive patients with RCC using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and IFNAR2 protein using Western blotting. Results The absolute level of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNAs in tumor and non-tumor tissues did not correlate with the malignant and metastatic profiles. The relative yields of the PCR product from the tumor tissue to that from the corresponding non-tumor tissue (T/N for the expression of IFNAR mRNAs were calculated. While the T/N ratio of IFNAR1 did not correlate with any factor, a high T/N ratio of IFNAR2 correlated with poor differentiation (P P P P P Conclusion IFNAR2 is associated with the progression of RCC.

  13. Ruptured renal cell carcinoma in pregnancy: a rare case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela RC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Malignancy in pregnancy is rare. Carcinomas in pregnancy are mostly kidney cell mass. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the commonest malignancy in pregnancy. Because of softness and increased vascularity, rupture of renal cell carcinoma is not uncommon. Here we are presenting a rare case of renal cell carcinoma in pregnancy with spontaneous rupture resulting in massive hemoperitoneum and serious outcome because of late presentation renal cell carcinoma seldom ruptures. A 26 year old woman G2P1L1 with term pregnancy was referred to hospital 80kms away from periphery with non-progression of labour. There was antenatal record suggesting hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in second trimester. On examination, patient was in hypovolemic shock with profuse distension of abdomen. Diagnosis of abruption grade 3 or rupture uterus was made and immediate laparotomy was done. On opening the abdomen, there was hemoperitoneum but uterus was intact. Emergency LSCS done extracted a stillborn baby. There were no retro placental clots also. There was lot of necrotic tissue in the abdomen and there was a tumour arising from lower pole of left kidney which had invaded the renal vessels and had ruptured. Peripartum hysterectomy and left nephrectomy was done. Women did not respond to treatment and died. The objective of presenting this case is the dilemmas faced by the obstetrician in case of shock in 2nd stage of labour. Simple diagnostic tool like renal ultrasound will help to detect at an early stage which could improve the outcome. All cases of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy should be investigated for secondary causes of hypertension. Abdominal USG must be done for all cases of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in 2nd trimester. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment is the key in management of such condition in pregnancy. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1677-1679

  14. Glucocorticoids Suppress Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression by Enhancing Na,K-ATPase Beta-1 Subunit Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thu P.; Barwe, Sonali P.; Lee, Seung J.; McSpadden, Ryan; Franco, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Damoiseaux, Robert; Grubbs, Stephen S.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used as palliative or chemotherapeutic clinical agents for treatment of a variety of cancers. Although steroid treatment is beneficial, the mechanisms by which steroids improve outcome in cancer patients are not well understood. Na,K-ATPase beta-subunit isoform 1 (NaK-β1) is a cell-cell adhesion molecule, and its expression is down-regulated in cancer cells undergoing epithelial-to mesenchymal-transition (EMT), a key event associated with cancer progression to metastatic disease. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to identify small molecules that could up-regulate NaK-β1 expression in cancer cells. Compounds related to the glucocorticoids were identified as drug candidates enhancing NaK-β1 expression. Of these compounds, triamcinolone, dexamethasone, and fluorometholone were validated to increase NaK-β1 expression at the cell surface, enhance cell-cell adhesion, attenuate motility and invasiveness and induce mesenchymal to epithelial like transition of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells in vitro. Treatment of NaK-β1 knockdown cells with these drug candidates confirmed that these compounds mediate their effects through up-regulating NaK-β1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these compounds attenuate tumor growth in subcutaneous RCC xenografts and reduce local invasiveness in orthotopically-implanted tumors. Our results strongly indicate that the addition of glucocorticoids in the treatment of RCC may improve outcome for RCC patients by augmenting NaK-β1 cell-cell adhesion function. PMID:25836370

  15. Proteotranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Stage Specific Changes in the Molecular Landscape of Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Neely

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma comprises 2 to 3% of malignancies in adults with the most prevalent subtype being clear-cell RCC (ccRCC. This type of cancer is well characterized at the genomic and transcriptomic level and is associated with a loss of VHL that results in stabilization of HIF1. The current study focused on evaluating ccRCC stage dependent changes at the proteome level to provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ccRCC progression. To accomplish this, label-free proteomics was used to characterize matched tumor and normal-adjacent tissues from 84 patients with stage I to IV ccRCC. Using pooled samples 1551 proteins were identified, of which 290 were differentially abundant, while 783 proteins were identified using individual samples, with 344 being differentially abundant. These 344 differentially abundant proteins were enriched in metabolic pathways and further examination revealed metabolic dysfunction consistent with the Warburg effect. Additionally, the protein data indicated activation of ESRRA and ESRRG, and HIF1A, as well as inhibition of FOXA1, MAPK1 and WISP2. A subset analysis of complementary gene expression array data on 47 pairs of these same tissues indicated similar upstream changes, such as increased HIF1A activation with stage, though ESRRA and ESRRG activation and FOXA1 inhibition were not predicted from the transcriptomic data. The activation of ESRRA and ESRRG implied that HIF2A may also be activated during later stages of ccRCC, which was confirmed in the transcriptional analysis. This combined analysis highlights the importance of HIF1A and HIF2A in developing the ccRCC molecular phenotype as well as the potential involvement of ESRRA and ESRRG in driving these changes. In addition, cofilin-1, profilin-1, nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A were identified as candidate markers of late stage ccRCC. Utilization of data collected from heterogeneous biological domains strengthened

  16. Prognostic significance of two lipid metabolism enzymes, HADHA and ACAT2, in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuohui; Lu, Jiaju; Han, Liping; Wang, Xiaoqing; Man, Quanzhan; Liu, Shuai

    2016-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in adults, but there is still no acknowledged biomarker for its prognostic evaluation. Our previous proteomic data had demonstrated the dysregulation of some lipid metabolism enzymes in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). In the present study, we elucidated the expression of two lipid metabolism enzymes, hydroxyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, alpha subunit (HADHA) and acetyl-coenzyme A acetyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), using Western blotting analysis, then assessed the prognostic potential of HADHA and ACAT2 using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on a tissue microarray of 145 ccRCC tissues. HADHA and ACAT2 were downregulated in ccRCC (P < 0.05); further IHC analysis revealed that HADHA expression was significantly associated with tumor grade, stage, size, metastasis, and cancer-specific survival (P = 0.004, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.049, P < 0.001, respectively) and ACAT2 expression was significantly associated with tumor stage, size, and cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). In addition, a strong correlation was found between HADHA and ACAT2 expression (R = 0.655, P < 0.001). Further univariate survival analysis demonstrated that high stage, big tumor size, metastasis, and HADHA and ACAT2 down-expression were associated with poorer prognosis on cancer-specific survival (P = 0.007, P = 0.005, P = 0.006, P < 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively), and multivariate analysis revealed that HADHA, stage, and metastasis were identified as independent prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival in patients with ccRCC (P = 0.018, P = 0.046, P = 0.001, respectively). Collectively, these findings indicated that HADHA could serve as a promising prognostic marker in ccRCC, which indicated lipid metabolism abnormality might be involved in ccRCC tumorigenesis. PMID:26715271

  17. Soluble Serum αKlotho Is a Potential Predictive Marker of Disease Progression in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Margherita; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Divella, Chiara; Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Pontrelli, Paola; Cafiero, Cesira; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Castellano, Giuseppe; Rutigliano, Monica; Stallone, Giovanni; Bettocchi, Carlo; Ditonno, Pasquale; Gesualdo, Loreto; Battaglia, Michele; Ranieri, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of adult malignancies, and clear cell RCC (ccRCC), that has a high metastatic index and high relapse rate, is the most common histological subtype. The identification of new biomarkers in ccRCC is fundamental for stratifying patients into prognostic risk groups and to guide therapy. The renoprotective antiaging gene, αKlotho, has recently been found to work as a tumor suppressor in different human cancers. Here, we evaluated αKlotho expression in tissue and serum of ccRCC patients and correlated it with disease progression. Tissue αKlotho expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In addition, soluble serum αKlotho levels were preoperatively measured in 160 patients who underwent nephrectomy for RCC with ELISA. Estimates of cancer-specific (CSS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the most significant variables for predicting CSS and PFS. αKlotho protein levels were significantly decreased in RCC tissues compared with normal tissues (P < 0.01) and the more advanced the disease, the more evident the down-regulation. This trend was also observed in serum samples. Statistically significant differences resulted between serum αKlotho levels and tumor size (P = 0.003), Fuhrman grade (P = 0.007), and clinical stage (P = 0.0004). CSS and PFS were significantly shorter in patients with lower levels of αKlotho (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0004, respectively). At multivariate analysis low serum levels of αKlotho were independent adverse prognostic factors for CSS (HR = 2.11; P = 0.03) and PFS (HR = 2.18; P = 0.03).These results indicate that a decreased αKlotho expression is correlated with RCC progression, and suggest a key role of declining αKlotho in the onset of cancer metastasis. PMID:26559258

  18. Proteotranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Stage Specific Changes in the Molecular Landscape of Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Christopher E.; Marlow, Laura A.; Malyarenko, Dariya; Kim, Yunee; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sasinowska, Heather; Sasinowski, Maciek; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Kislinger, Thomas; Copland, John A.; Drake, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma comprises 2 to 3% of malignancies in adults with the most prevalent subtype being clear-cell RCC (ccRCC). This type of cancer is well characterized at the genomic and transcriptomic level and is associated with a loss of VHL that results in stabilization of HIF1. The current study focused on evaluating ccRCC stage dependent changes at the proteome level to provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ccRCC progression. To accomplish this, label-free proteomics was used to characterize matched tumor and normal-adjacent tissues from 84 patients with stage I to IV ccRCC. Using pooled samples 1551 proteins were identified, of which 290 were differentially abundant, while 783 proteins were identified using individual samples, with 344 being differentially abundant. These 344 differentially abundant proteins were enriched in metabolic pathways and further examination revealed metabolic dysfunction consistent with the Warburg effect. Additionally, the protein data indicated activation of ESRRA and ESRRG, and HIF1A, as well as inhibition of FOXA1, MAPK1 and WISP2. A subset analysis of complementary gene expression array data on 47 pairs of these same tissues indicated similar upstream changes, such as increased HIF1A activation with stage, though ESRRA and ESRRG activation and FOXA1 inhibition were not predicted from the transcriptomic data. The activation of ESRRA and ESRRG implied that HIF2A may also be activated during later stages of ccRCC, which was confirmed in the transcriptional analysis. This combined analysis highlights the importance of HIF1A and HIF2A in developing the ccRCC molecular phenotype as well as the potential involvement of ESRRA and ESRRG in driving these changes. In addition, cofilin-1, profilin-1, nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A were identified as candidate markers of late stage ccRCC. Utilization of data collected from heterogeneous biological domains strengthened the findings from

  19. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Materials: From May 1983 to September 1998, 35 patients with brain metastases from RCC underwent radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo; 10 patients treated initially with FSRT (FSRT group); 11 with surgery followed by conventional radiotherapy (S/CR group); and 14 with conventional radiotherapy (CR group). Survival and local control rates were determined for patients who had an ECOG performance status of 0-2. Results: Overall median survival rate was 18 months, and actuarial 1- and 2-year survival rates were 57.6% and 31.0%, respectively. Median survival rates were 25.6 months for the FSRT group, 18.7 months for the S/CR group, and 4.3 months for the CR group. Significant prognostic factors associated with survival were age less than 60 years and good performance status. In patients treated with FSRT, imaging studies revealed that 21 of 24 tumors (88%) were locally controlled during a median follow-up time of 5.2 months (range 0.5-68). Actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were 89.6% and 55.2%, respectively. No patient suffered from acute or late complications during and following FSRT. Conclusions: FSRT offers better tumor control and prolonged survival over the S/CR or CR groups, and should be considered as primary treatment for brain metastases from RCC. Patients under 60-years-old and those with a good performance status at the beginning of radiotherapy had a better prognosis.

  20. Clinicopathological characteristics of renal cell carcinoma in a dialysis patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the clinicopathological features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) occurring in chronic hemodialysis patients, we analyzed patient demographics, hemodialysis duration, pathological characteristics of the tumors and prognosis of these patients. We retrospectively reviewed the record of 16 patients who had undergone radical nephrectomy for RCC at Kawashima Hospital between November 1994 and December 2007. They ranged in age from 32 to 82 years old (mean age, 55.0), and comprised 14 males and 2 females. All the patients were clinical stage I. As for the underlying disease which caused renal failure, chronic glomerulonephritis was noted in 12 patients and diabetes mellitus was noted in 1 patient. The causes in 3 patients were unknown. The duration of hemodialysis ranged from 1 to 226 months, (90 months on average). As for the main diagnostic methods, CT was performed in 14 cases. Two patients demonstrated macroscopic hematuria Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was present in 10 patients (68.8%). Patients were divided two groups; patients who had undergone open surgery (group 1, N=7) and patients who had undergone retroperitoneoscopic surgery (group 2, N=9). The following factors were analyzed: operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative complications, hospitalization. Nephrectomy was performed for the right kidney in 8 patients, and for the left kidney in 8 patients. Operation time ranged from 90 to 150 minutes (average, 111 min), in group 1, and from 80 to 284 minutes (average, 146 min), in group 2. Bleeding volume ranged from 10 to 170 ml (average, 72 ml), in group 1, and from 10 to 50 ml (average, 15 ml), in group 2. Complications of nephrectomy were observed in 6 patients, but all were minor problems. As for hospitalization, in group 1 it was 20 days and in group 2 it was 12 days. Fifteen patients survived and are tumor free. One patient died of causes unrelated to RCC. (author)

  1. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  2. Primary clear cell renal carcinoma cells display minimal mitochondrial respiratory capacity resulting in pronounced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition by 3-Bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, H; Lindgren, D; Mandahl Forsberg, A; Mulder, H; Axelson, H; Johansson, M E

    2015-01-01

    Changes of cellular metabolism are an integral property of the malignant potential of most cancer cells. Already in the 1930s, Otto Warburg observed that tumor cells preferably utilize glycolysis and lactate fermentation for energy production, rather than the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation dominating in normal cells, a phenomenon today known as the Warburg effect. Even though many tumor types display a high degree of aerobic glycolysis, they still retain the activity of other energy-producing metabolic pathways. One exception seems to be the clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma, ccRCC, where the activity of most other pathways than that of glycolysis has been shown to be reduced. This makes ccRCC a promising candidate for the use of glycolytic inhibitors in treatment of the disease. However, few studies have so far addressed this issue. In this report, we show a strikingly reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity of primary human ccRCC cells, resulting in enhanced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition by 3-Bromopyruvate (3BrPA). This effect was largely absent in established ccRCC cell lines, a finding that highlights the importance of using biologically relevant models in the search for new candidate cancer therapies. 3BrPA markedly reduced ATP production in primary ccRCC cells, followed by cell death. Our data suggest that glycolytic inhibitors such as 3BrPA, that has been shown to be well tolerated in vivo, should be further analyzed for the possible development of selective treatment strategies for patients with ccRCC. PMID:25569102

  3. Optimal management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudier, Bernard; Albiges, Laurence; Sonpavde, Guru

    2013-04-01

    The armamentarium for the systemic therapy of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone dramatic changes over the past 6 years. While high-dose interleukin (IL)-2 remains an option for highly selected good and intermediate risk patients with clear-cell histology because of durable complete responses in a small fraction of patients, cytokine-based therapy including interferon (IFN) has been supplanted by vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Treatment decision is initially based on prognostication of the disease. As metastatic RCC (mRCC) is commonly an indolent disease, a period of observation should always been considered. For good and intermediate risk disease, pazopanib, sunitinib or the combination of bevacizumab plus IFN are considered. Notably, recent data suggest non-inferiority for the efficacy of pazopanib compared to sunitinib coupled with a better toxicity profile. A novel VEGF receptor inhibitor, tivozanib, is expected to be approved based on improvement in PFS when compared to sorafenib in the first-line setting. The use of temsirolimus for poor risk disease is supported by a phase III trial dedicated to this group of patients. The role of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the context of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors is being studied in randomized trials. Selected patients with solitary or oligometastatic disease may be eligible for metastatectomy. Following first-line VEGF inhibitors, second-line therapy with everolimus and axitinib have demonstrated benefits in progression-free survival (PFS). One phase III trial comparing sorafenib and temsirolimus in the post-sunitinib setting showed no difference in PFS, the primary endpoint, but did show a superior overall survival for sorafenib. Sorafenib, pazopanib and axitinib have all demonstrated clinical benefit following cytokines. Therapy following first-line mTOR inhibitors remains undefined, although VEGF inhibitors have demonstrated activity in

  4. Lipid-poor renal angiomyolipoma: Differentiation from clear cell renal cell carcinoma using wash-in and washout characteristics on contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    XIE, PINGKUN; Yang, Zhihui; Yuan, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a total of 82 patients (42 men and 40 women; age range, 24–84 years), including 34 patients with lipid-poor renal angiomyolipoma (AML) and 49 with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), who had undergone multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) (i.e., CT with unenhanced, corticomedullary, nephrographic and 5-min delay phase scanning) were evaluated. The peak enhancement attenuation value, net enhancement attenuation value, enhancement ratio, washout value an...

  5. miR‑30a‑5p in the tumorigenesis of renal cell carcinoma: A tumor suppressive microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Li, Yuchi; Chen, Duqun; Jin, Lu; Su, Zhengming; Liu, Jiaju; Duan, Hongfang; Li, Xiaoqing; Qi, Zhengyu; Shi, Min; Ni, Liangchao; Yang, Shangqi; Gui, Yaoting; Mao, Xiangming; Chen, Yun; Lai, Yongqing

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of malignant tumor of the adult kidney and has a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRs) are important in a wide range of biological and pathological processes, including cell differentiation, migration, growth, proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. The present study aimed to determine the role exerted by miR‑30a‑5p in the tumorigenesis of RCC. The expression levels of miR‑30a‑5p in RCC tissues and RCC‑derived cells were demonstrated to be significantly downregulated by real‑time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). Wound scratch assay, cell proliferation assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that the abilities of migration and proliferation of the RCC‑derived cells were suppressed, whereas cell apoptosis was promoted, when miR‑30a‑5p was overexpressed in these cells. N‑acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 7 (GALNT7) was predicted to be one target gene of miR‑30a‑5p by bioinformatics analysis. Luciferase reporter assay, RT‑qPCR and western blotting were performed to confirm that GALNT7 is the direct conserved target of miR‑30a‑5p. These results suggested that miR‑30a‑5p has a tumor‑suppressive role in the tumorigenesis of RCC. PMID:27035333

  6. AB109. Downregulation of tNASP inhibits proliferation through regulating cell cycle-related proteins and inactive ERK/MAPK signal pathway in renal cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianzheng; Wang, Hainan; Cheng, Gong; Wang, Shangqian; Deng, Yunfei; Song, Zhen; Xu, Aiming; Liu, Bianjiang; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nuclear auto-antigenic sperm protein (NASP), initially described as a highly auto-immunogenic testis and sperm-specific protein, is a histone chaperone that is proved to present in all dividing cells. NASP has two splice variants: testicular NASP (tNASP) and somatic form of NASP (sNASP). Only cancer, germ, transformed, and embryonic cells have a high level of expression of the tNASP. Up to now, little has been known about tNASP in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, the molecular mechanism of tNASP in RCC was explored. Methods The expression level of tNASP in 16 paired human RCC specimens was determined. Downregulation of tNASP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected in RCC cell lines. The effect of downregulation of tNASP by siRNA on cell colony formation and proliferation was examined by colony formation assay and CCK-8 assay, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and the expression of cyclin D1 and P21 were detected by Western blotting. ERK/MAPK signaling was also analyzed. Results tNASP has a relative high expression level in human RCC tissues. Via upregulation of P21 and downregulation of cyclinD1, silence of tNASP can inhibit cell proliferation, which induces cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, ERK signaling pathway is confirmed to mediate the regulation of cell cycle-related proteins caused by silence of tNASP. Conclusions Our research demonstrates that knockdown of tNASP effectively inhibits the proliferation and causes G1 phase arrest through ERK/MAPK signal pathway.

  7. Pattern of failure following surgical resection of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/objective: To identify the pattern of failure in patients with resected renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods: The records of 116 patients with unilateral non-metastatic RCC, who were treated with definitive surgery and referred to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre between 1977 and 1988, were reviewed. Distribution by stage included: T1 = 3 patients, T2 = 42 patients, T3 =71 patients. The median follow-up was 44 months, with a range of 4-267 months. Results: Loco-regional failure (LRF) developed in 8 patients, yielding a 7-year actuarial incidence of 8% for LRF, as first event. Nine patients developed local or regional recurrence + distant failure, and 58 patients had distant metastases only. Seven-year actuarial incidence of distant failure was 55%. The overall 7-year actuarial survival rate was 40%, and cause-specific survival was 45%. Conclusion: LRF was rare following nephrectomy. This data does not support the role of adjuvant radiation therapy in this disease

  8. The present approach to treatment of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the turn of the millennium, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was regarded as one of the most refractory cancers; highly resistant to both radiation and systemic therapy, and only small group of patients responded to immune modulation. Involved targeted therapies, which influence specific signal transduction pathways of tumor formation and progression, opened new options of treatment to give patients a new hope. After the first experiences with the new biologic agents we can claim, that these patients have improved a quality of life, provided stabilization of disease and prolong life of patients, but the cure is not available. However, there are so many studies with target therapies in RCC, but the most correct algorithm of treatment does not exist. Targeted therapies rarely achieve remission, prevailing a stabilisation of disease so patients have to undergo chronic treatment. In choice of optimal treatment is necessary to regard for quality of life, so usually the winner is the drug with the lowest toxic potential. (author)

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography as a potential biomarker in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: preliminary results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group Study-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mains, Jill Rachel; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Erik Morre;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computer tomography (CT) as a biomarker in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with favorable or intermediate Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk group...... and clear cell mRCC participating in an ongoing prospective randomized phase II trial comprising interleukin-2-based immunotherapy and bevacizumab were included in this preliminary analysis. All patients had a follow-up time of at least 2 years. Interpretation of DCE-CT (max slope method) was...

  10. Editor’s Pick: Targeted Agents in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Dialysis: Myths and Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Guida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR pathway, as well as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors have revolutionised the therapeutic landscape of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC in the past decade, greatly improving the survival rates of these patients. However, translating results of registrative Phase III trials into everyday clinical practice is often troublesome, since real-world patients are completely different from those enrolled in randomised controlled Phase III trials. Prospective data on active oncological treatments in mRCC patients on dialysis are dramatically lacking. This literature review summarises and critically comments on available data relative to mRCC patients on dialysis receiving either VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents, or mTOR inhibitors. Although prospective studies would definitely be warranted in these specific patient populations, all the available data suggest that mRCC patients on dialysis have the same outcome, both in terms of efficacy and safety, as mRCC patients with normal or marginally impaired kidney function, when treated with VEGF/VEGFR-targeting agents and/or mTOR inhibitors.

  11. Multilevel-analysis identify a cis-expression quantitative trait locus associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiang; Purdue, Mark P; Ye, Yuanqing; Wood, Christopher G; Chen, Meng; Wang, Zhaoming; Albanes, Demetrius; Pu, Xia; Huang, Maosheng; Stevens, Victoria L; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Virtamo, Jarmo; Chow, Wong-Ho; Tannir, Nizar M; Dinney, Colin P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-02-28

    We conducted multilevel analyses to identify potential susceptibility loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which may be overlooked in traditional genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A gene set enrichment analysis was performed utilizing a GWAS dataset comprised of 894 RCC cases and 1,516 controls using GenGen, SNP ratio test, and ALIGATOR. The antigen processing and presentation pathway was consistently significant (P = 0.001, = 0.004, and < 0.001, respectively). Versatile gene-based association study approach was applied to the top-ranked pathway and identified the driven genes. By comparing the expression of the genes in RCC tumor and adjacent normal tissues, we observed significant overexpression of HLA genes in tumor tissues, which was also supported by public databases. We sought to validate genetic variants in antigen processing and presentation pathway in an independent GWAS dataset comprised of 1,311 RCC cases and 3,424 control subjects from the National Cancer Institute; one SNP, rs1063355, was significant in both populations (P(meta-analysis) = 9.15 × 10⁻⁴, P(heterogeneity) = 0.427). Strong correlation indicated that rs1063355 was a cis-expression quantitative trait loci which associated with HLA-DQB1 expression (Spearman's rank r = -0.59, p = 5.61 × 10⁻⁶). The correlation was further validated using a public dataset. Our results highlighted the role of immune-related pathway and genes in the etiology of RCC. PMID:25784652

  12. Cytodiagnosis of myxoid adrenocortical carcinoma and role of immunocytochemistry to differentiate it from renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Mondal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC is a rare malignancy and cytodiagnosis of this tumor is not routinely encountered by a cytopathologist. Here, we report a case of ACC initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC with the help of immunocytochemistry. A 48-year-old lady presented with flank pain and abdominal mass for the last 6 months. A CT scan of her abdomen revealed a large mass arising from the upper part of the left kidney. CT-guided FNAC was performed. Cytologic smears showed pleomorphic large cells arranged discretely and in small aggregates against a myxoid background. The cells had a high nucleocytoplasmic ratio, anisonucleosis and conspicuous nucleoli. Based on cytomorphology, differential diagnoses of ACC and renal cell carcinoma (RCC were made. On immunocytochemistry, the tumor cells were synaptophysin, inhibin, vimentin and Melan-A positive but cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen negative. Thus, a cytodiagnosis of myxoid ACC was made and histopathologic examination was suggested. Subsequent histologic examination and immunohistochemistry proved the case to be myxoid ACC.

  13. Prognostic significance of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio and CRP in patients with nonmetastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma: a retrospective multicenter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wen-Kai; Wu, Xia; Yu, Tang-Hong; Wu, Yu; Yao, Xia-Juan; Hu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation has been reported to be involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. This study was designed to explore the prognostic significance of lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in nonmetastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients after treatment. Methods The retrospective study consisted of 985 patients with ccRCC who had undergone nephrectomy from 2005 to 2010 at multiple centers. The patients were divided into four groups using a quartile of LMR or CRP, and their associations with clinical characteristics and outcome were systematically estimated. Results Both low LMR and high CRP significantly diminished overall survival (OS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) in patients with ccRCC. Further investigation indicated that LMR and CRP were independent prognostic factors of both OS and MFS. Integration of LMR and CRP into a predictive model, including significant variables in multivariate analysis, established a nomogram to predict accurately the 3- and 5-year survival for nonmetastatic patients with ccRCC. Conclusion LMR and CRP represent independent prognostic factors of OS and MFS for patients with ccRCC. Incorporation of LMR and CRP into the traditional TNM staging system may improve their predictive performance.

  14. Metabonomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma: High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human serum with multivariate data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabonomic profiling using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis of human serum samples was used to characterize metabolic profiles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We found distinct, easily detectable differences between (a) RCC patients and healthy humans, (b) RCC patients with metastases and without metastases, and (c) RCC patients before and after nephrectomy. Compared to healthy human serum, RCC serum had higher levels of lipid (mainly very low-density lipoproteins), isoleucine, leucine, lactate, alanine, N-acetylglycoproteins, pyruvate, glycerol, and unsaturated lipid, together with lower levels of acetoacetate, glutamine, phosphatidylcholine/choline, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and glucose. This pattern was somewhat reversed after nephrectomy. Altered metabolite concentrations are most likely the result of the cells switching to glycolysis to maintain energy homeostasis following the loss of ATP caused by impaired TCA cycle in RCC. Serum NMR spectra combined with principal component analysis techniques offer an efficient, convenient way of depicting tumour biochemistry and stratifying tumours under different pathophysiological conditions. It may be able to assist early diagnosis and postoperative surveillance of human malignant diseases using single blood samples

  15. Decreased GATA5 mRNA expression associates with CpG island methylation and shortened recurrence-free survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GATA-5, a zinc-finger transcription factor and member of the GATA family proteins 1–6, is known to be involved in cellular differentiation. We recently found that tumor-specific hypermethylation of the GATA5 CpG island (CGI) occurs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome. In this study, we investigated whether epigenetic GATA5 alterations may result in changes in GATA5 mRNA expression levels and correlate with the observed prognostic impact of epigenetic changes in GATA5 in RCC. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction was applied to measure relative GATA5 mRNA expression levels in 135 kidney tissue samples, including 77 clear cell RCC (ccRCC) tissues and 58 paired adjacent normal renal tissue samples. Relative GATA5 expression levels were determined using the ΔΔCt method and detection of three endogenous control genes then compared to previously measured values of relative methylation. The mean relative GATA5 mRNA expression level exhibited an approximately 31-fold reduction in tumor specimens compared with corresponding normal tissues (p < 0.001, paired t-test). Decreased GATA5 mRNA expression was inversely correlated with increased GATA5 CGI methylation (p < 0.001) and was associated with shortened recurrence-free survival in ccRCC patients (p = 0.023, hazard ratio = 0.25). GATA5 mRNA expression is decreased in ccRCC, likely due to gene silencing by methylation of the GATA5 CGI. Moreover, reduced GATA5 mRNA levels were associated with a poor clinical outcome, indicating a possible role of GATA5 for the development of aggressive ccRCC phenotypes

  16. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  17. Survival advantage of partial over radical nephrectomy in patients presenting with localized renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial nephrectomy (PN) preserves renal function and has become the standard approach for T1a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there is still an ongoing debate as to which patients will actually derive greater benefit from partial than from radical nephrectomy (RN). The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of the type of surgery on overall survival (OS) in patients with localized RCC. Renal surgery was performed in 4326 patients with localized RCC (pT ≤ 3a N/M0) at six German tertiary care centers from 1980 to 2010: RN in 2955 cases (68.3%), elective (ePN) in 1108 (25.6%), and imperative partial nephrectomy (iPN) in 263 (6.1%) cases. The median follow-up for all patients was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify prognosticators for OS. PN was performed significantly more often than RN in patients presenting with lower tumor stages, higher RCC differentiation, and non-clear cell histology. Accordingly, the calculated 5 (10)-year OS rates were 90.0 (74.6)% for ePN, 83.9 (57.5)% for iPN, and 81.2 (64.7)% for RN (p < 0.001). However, multivariate analysis including age, sex, tumor diameter and differentiation, histological subtype, and the year of surgery showed that ePN compared to RN still qualified as an independent factor for improved OS (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.94, p = 0.008). Even allowing for the weaknesses of this retrospective analysis, our multicenter study indicates that in patients with localized RCC, PN appears to be associated with better OS than RN irrespective of age or tumor size

  18. Renal cell carcinoma metastases to the pancreas - Value of arterial phase imaging at MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, Michael T. [Univ. of California, Davis Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Sacramento (United States)], e-mail: Michael.corwin@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P. [Univ. of California, Davis Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Sacramento (United States); Wilson, Machelle [Univ. of California, Davis, Dept. of Public Health Sciences (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: The pancreas is an increasingly recognized site of renal cell carcinoma metastases. It is important to determine the optimal MDCT protocol to best detect RCC metastases to the pancreas. Purpose: To compare the rate of detection of renal cell carcinoma metastases to the pancreas between arterial and portal venous phase MDCT. Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CTs of the abdomen yielded six patients with metastatic RCC to the pancreas. Five of six patients had pathologically proven clear cell RCC. Two blinded reviewers independently reported the number of pancreatic lesions seen in arterial and venous phases. Each lesion was graded as definite or possible. The number of lesions was determined by consensus review of both phases. Attenuation values were obtained for metastatic lesions and adjacent normal pancreas in both phases. Results: There were a total of 24 metastatic lesions to the pancreas. Reviewer 1 identified 20/24 (83.3%) lesions on the arterial phase images and 13/24 (54.2%) lesions on the venous phase. Seventeen of 20 (85.0%) arterial lesions were deemed definite and 9/13 (69.2%) venous lesions were definite. Reviewer 2 identified 19/24 (79.2%) lesions on the arterial phase and 14/24 (58.3%) on the venous phase. Seventeen of 19 (89.5%) arterial lesions were definite and 7/14 (50%) venous lesions were definite. Mean attenuation differential between lesion and pancreas was 114 HU and 39 HU for arterial and venous phases, respectively (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Detection of RCC metastases to the pancreas at MDCT is improved using arterial phase imaging compared to portal venous phase imaging.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma metastases to the pancreas - Value of arterial phase imaging at MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The pancreas is an increasingly recognized site of renal cell carcinoma metastases. It is important to determine the optimal MDCT protocol to best detect RCC metastases to the pancreas. Purpose: To compare the rate of detection of renal cell carcinoma metastases to the pancreas between arterial and portal venous phase MDCT. Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CTs of the abdomen yielded six patients with metastatic RCC to the pancreas. Five of six patients had pathologically proven clear cell RCC. Two blinded reviewers independently reported the number of pancreatic lesions seen in arterial and venous phases. Each lesion was graded as definite or possible. The number of lesions was determined by consensus review of both phases. Attenuation values were obtained for metastatic lesions and adjacent normal pancreas in both phases. Results: There were a total of 24 metastatic lesions to the pancreas. Reviewer 1 identified 20/24 (83.3%) lesions on the arterial phase images and 13/24 (54.2%) lesions on the venous phase. Seventeen of 20 (85.0%) arterial lesions were deemed definite and 9/13 (69.2%) venous lesions were definite. Reviewer 2 identified 19/24 (79.2%) lesions on the arterial phase and 14/24 (58.3%) on the venous phase. Seventeen of 19 (89.5%) arterial lesions were definite and 7/14 (50%) venous lesions were definite. Mean attenuation differential between lesion and pancreas was 114 HU and 39 HU for arterial and venous phases, respectively (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Detection of RCC metastases to the pancreas at MDCT is improved using arterial phase imaging compared to portal venous phase imaging

  20. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  1. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  2. Triphasic Computed Tomography Enterography with Polyethylene Glycol to Detect Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastases to the Small Bowel

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Chian-Sem; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Wu, Chin-Chu; Lin, Yu-Min; Chong, Lee-Won; Hsu, Yi-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Enteroclysis was first used to diagnose small bowel obstruction in 1996. However, nasojejunal intubation required during enteroclysis causes discomfort to the patient. Triphasic computed tomography (CT) enterography, a noninvasive procedure that does not require intubation, was found to be an efficient method to diagnose small bowel lesions. We describe our experience of using triphasic CT enterography with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for diagnosing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the ...

  3. Proposal of “cyclic therapy”, a novel treatment strategy with targeted agents for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa, Masahiro; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2013-01-01

    The number of molecular targeted agents for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has gradually increased, but evidence on the optimal order of selection for such agents has not yet caught up with this trend. In addition, timing of switching molecular targeted drugs may also become an important issue for controlling the disease as types of these drugs grow in number. Based on the fact that the efficacy of a rechallenge of the drug previously used suggests the recovery of the sensitivity, a cycl...

  4. DENDRITIC CELL-BASED VACCINE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

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    D. A. Nosov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficiency and tolerance of autologous vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells (DC in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and to examine changes in immunological parameters and their association with the efficiency of the therapy. Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients with RCC received autologous vaccine therapy based on DC in 2002 to 2008. Therapy was performed in the induction mode in 16 patients before disease progression and in the adjuvant mode (8 vaccinations in 13 patients after radical nephrectomy (grade III or radical metastasectomy. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs treated with autologous tumor lysate were used to prepare the vaccine. Results. In a group of 16 patients with distant metastases, partial regressions were recorded in 2 (12.5% patients and long (> 6-month stabilizations of a tumor process were observed in other 2 (12.5% patients. The median time prior to progression was 3 (range 1.5-12 months. Thirteen patients on adjuvant treatment did not achieve the median time to progression: 4 patients showed no signs of disease progression ?12 to ?25 months after metastasectomy. Patients with a clinical effect (disease regression or long stabilization showed a significant increase in the populations of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-CD16+ T lymphocytes (natural killers (NK cells after 3 vaccinations from 23.3 to 27.2% (p = 0.018 and from 15.17 to 20.3%, respectively (p = 0.03. Prior to vaccine therapy, the count of CD3+CD16+-NK cells was thrice greater in patients with the progressive disease than that in the donor group - 11.2 and 3.5%, respectively. The baseline count of CD4+CD25+ Т lymphocytes in patients with progressive disease was also significantly higher than that in patients with the clinical effect - 12.01 and 5.6%, respectively. Conclusion. In patients with RCC, DC-based vaccine therapy is able to induce a specific anti-tumor immune response that is transformed into the clinical effect in some

  5. Renal Cell Carcinoma with IVC Thrombi; Current Concepts and Future Perspectives

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    Mohammed Ahmed Abdel-Muneem Nouh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous extension to the inferior vena cava (IVC in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is markedly increased recently mostly due to the advances in diagnostic modalities. Such vascular invasion implies a heightened biologic behavior and a surgical challenge during the course of treatment. In this study, we reviewed the classification guidelines, recent diagnostic tools and up-to-date therapeutic modalities for RCC with IVC tumor thrombi added to the prognostic significance regarding the pathologic nature of vascular invasion; cephalad extent of thrombi and any associated distant metastasis. Also, we are providing our suggestion regarding the use of angioscopy for removal of IVC thrombi in a relatively bloodless field without aggressive surgical manipulations or shunt techniques for maintenance of hemodynamic stability.

  6. RESECTION OF THE S-SHAPED CROSSED DYSTOPIC KIDNEY IN A PATIENT WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

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    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the most urgent topics in modern oncourology. This is attributable to the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with this pathology. Renal dystopia is a rather rare developmental anomaly. The literature data describing cases of the diagnosis and treatment in patients with dystopic kidney malignancies are scarce. Moreover, if a tumor is present in the solitary dystopic kidney, it is often extremely difficult to perform an organ-saving operation for a number of features of the anatomic structure of the dystopic kidney and its vascular architectonics. The paper describes a clinical case of S-shaped crossed dystopic kidney resection in a patient with RCC.

  7. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma by continuous intravenous infusion of recombinant interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, P F; Hermann, G G; von der Maase, H;

    1992-01-01

    PURPOSE: A single-center phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) administered by continuous infusion to patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients with RCC were entered onto the study. rIL-2...... (Proleukin; Eurocetus Corp, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) was administered intravenously in a dose of 18 x 10(6) IU/m2 per 24 hours. A maximum of two induction cycles and four maintenance cycles were given. Each induction cycle consisted of two rIL-2 infusion periods of 120 hours and 108 hours duration......, respectively; these were separated by a 6-day rest period. Each maintenance cycle consisted of a 120 hours rIL-2 infusion period. RESULTS: Six of 30 assessable patients (20%) responded; two (7%) with a complete response (CR) and four (13%) with a partial response (PR). The response duration for patients with...

  8. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  9. Chromophobe renal cell cancer - review of the literature and potential methods of treating metastatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnar Lubomir

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC. ChRCC is diagnosed mainly in 6th decade of life. An incidence of ChRCC is similar in both men and woman. Eighty six percent of ChRCCs cases are diagnosed in stage 1 or 2. Prognosis of ChRCC is better than in other types of RCC. Five- and 10-year disease free survival (DFS for ChRCC was 83.9% and 77.9%, respectively. Expression of immunohistological markers: cytokeratins (CK, vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, CD10 could be potentially helpful in diagnosis of different subtypes of RCC. From all conventional RCC, CD 117 was detected (overexpression in membrane of cells ChRCC. Overexpression of CD117 on cellular membranes of ChRCC could be a potential target for kinase inhibitors like: imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib. The potential targets for other kinase inhibitors (sunitinib and sorafenib in ChRCC seem to be VEGFR and PDGFR. On the basis for formulating research hypotheses which should be verified by prospective studies.

  10. Famitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a single center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen; ZHOU Ai-ping; QIN Qiong; CHANG Chun-xiao; JIANG Hao-yuan; MA Jian-hui; WANG Jin-wan

    2013-01-01

    Background Famitinib is a novel and potent multitargeting receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor.The phase I clinical study showed that famitinib was well tolerated and had a broad anti-tumor spectrum.The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of famitinib for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).Methods The data of famitinib in treating patients with mRCC from the single-center phases Ⅰ and Ⅱ clinical trials were analyzed.Famitinib was administered orally at the dose of 13-30 mg once daily until tumor progression,occurrence of intolerable adverse reactions or withdrawal of the informed consent.Results A total of 24 patients with mRCC were treated including 17 patients at a dose of 25 mg once daily,4 patients at a dose of 27 mg and 1 patient each at a dose of 13 mg,20 mg and 30 mg,respectively.Twelve (50.0%) patients achieved partial response (PR) and 9 patients achieved stable disease (SD).Progressive disease was found in 3 (12.5%) patients.The disease control rate was 87.5%.The median follow-up time was 17.6 months; the median progression free survival (PFS) was 10.7 (95% Cl7.0-14.4) months; and the estimated median overall survival (OS) time was 33.0 (95% Cl8.7-57.3) months.The adverse drug reactions mainly included hypertension (54.1%),hand-foot skin reactions (45.8%),diarrhea (33.3%),mucositis (29.2%),neutropenia (45.8%),thrombocytopenia (29.2%),hyperlipidemia (41.7%) and proteinuria (41.7%).The incidence rate of grades 3 and 4 adverse events was low,mainly including hypertension 12.5%,hand-foot skin reactions 4.2%,neutropenia 4.2%,thrombocytopenia 4.2%,hyperlipidemia 4.2% and proteinuria 12.5%.Conclusions Famitinib has significant anti-tumor activity in mRCC.The common adverse reactions are generally manageable.

  11. Epigenetic change in kidney tumor: downregulation of histone acetyltransferase MYST1 in human renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yong; Zhang Rui; Wu Donglu; Lu Zhihua; Sun Wentao; Cai Yong; Wang Chunxi; Jin Jingji

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background MYST1 (also known as hMOF), a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) as an epigenetic mark of active genes, is mainly responsible for histone H4K16 acetylation in the cells. Recent studies have shown that the abnormal gene expression of hMOF is involved in certain primary cancers. Here we examined the involvement of hMOF expression and histone H4K16 acetylation in primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Simultaneously, we investigated the correlation be...

  12. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  13. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  14. Expression and significance of histone H3K27 demethylases in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The histone H3K27 demethylases UTX and JMJD3 are important regulatory factors that modulate gene expression by altering the physical state of chromatin. Previous studies have indicated an abnormal H3K27 methylation status in carcinogenesis. We therefore investigated the expression patterns of UTX and JMJD3 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and their roles in cancer development. The mRNA expression levels of the UTX and JMJD3 genes were determined in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues in 36 patients with primary RCC, using quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction. The UTX and JMJD3 protein contents were measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. UTX and JMJD3 transcripts were significantly increased in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues (P < 0.05). mRNA levels of the inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 p16INK4a were also increased in cancer tissues (P < 0.001). Western blotting indicated that levels of both demethylases were increased in cancer tissues. The level of tri-methylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) was lower in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues, but expression of the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2 was increased (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the two H3K27 demethylases may play critical roles in the regulation of H3K27 methylation status in RCC. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that UTX and JMJD3 expression were upregulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent tissues. This study demonstrated that UTX and JMJD3 were upregulated in cancer tissues, suggesting that they may be involved in the development of primary RCC. The potential roles of H3K27 demethylases as biomarkers in the early diagnosis of RCC need to be further explored

  15. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the differentiation of low and high grade clear cell renal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate low from high Fuhrman grade renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MR images from 80 consecutive pathologically proven RCC (57 clear cell, 16 papillary and 7 chromophobe) were evaluated. Double-echo chemical shift, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were reviewed independently. Signal intensity index (SII), tumour-to-spleen SI ratio (TSR), ADC ratio, wash-in (WiI) and wash-out indices (WoI) between different phases were calculated and compared to pathological grade and size. The Fuhrman scoring system was used. Low grade (score ≤2) and high grade (score ≥3) tumours were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. No associations between grade and imaging factors were found for papillary and chromophobe RCCs. For clear cell RCCs, there was a significant association between the grade and parenchymal WiI (WiI2) (P = 0.02) or ADCr (P = 0.03). A significant association between tumour grade and size (P = 0.01), WiI2 (P = 0.02) and ADCr (P = 0.05) remained in multivariate analysis. Multiparametric MRI can be used to accurately differentiate low Fuhrman grade clear cell RCC from high grade. High Fuhrman grade (≥3) RCCs were larger, had lower parenchymal wash-in indices and lower ADC ratios than low grade. (orig.)

  16. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the differentiation of low and high grade clear cell renal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, F.; Tricaud, E.; Lasserre, A.S.; Petitpierre, F.; Le Bras, Y.; Bouzgarrou, M.; Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Bernhard, J.C. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Urology, Bordeaux (France); Yacoub, M. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bordeaux (France); Ravaud, A. [Saint-Andre Hospital, Department of Oncology, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to differentiate low from high Fuhrman grade renal cell carcinoma (RCC). MR images from 80 consecutive pathologically proven RCC (57 clear cell, 16 papillary and 7 chromophobe) were evaluated. Double-echo chemical shift, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were reviewed independently. Signal intensity index (SII), tumour-to-spleen SI ratio (TSR), ADC ratio, wash-in (WiI) and wash-out indices (WoI) between different phases were calculated and compared to pathological grade and size. The Fuhrman scoring system was used. Low grade (score ≤2) and high grade (score ≥3) tumours were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. No associations between grade and imaging factors were found for papillary and chromophobe RCCs. For clear cell RCCs, there was a significant association between the grade and parenchymal WiI (WiI2) (P = 0.02) or ADCr (P = 0.03). A significant association between tumour grade and size (P = 0.01), WiI2 (P = 0.02) and ADCr (P = 0.05) remained in multivariate analysis. Multiparametric MRI can be used to accurately differentiate low Fuhrman grade clear cell RCC from high grade. High Fuhrman grade (≥3) RCCs were larger, had lower parenchymal wash-in indices and lower ADC ratios than low grade. (orig.)

  17. Fatal case of sorafenib-associated idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in the adjuvant treatment of a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorafenib is an orally available kinase inhibitor with activity at Raf, PDGFβ and VEGF receptors that is licensed for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current evidence-based post-nephrectomy management of individuals with localized RCC consists of surveillance-based follow up. The SORCE trial is designed to investigate whether treatment with adjuvant sorafenib can reduce recurrence rates in this cohort. Here we report an idiosyncratic reaction to sorafenib resulting in fatal hepatotoxicity and associated renal failure in a 62 year-old man treated with sorafenib within the SORCE trial. This is the first reported case of sorafenib exposure associated fatal toxicity in the adjuvant setting and highlights the unpredictable adverse effects of novel adjuvant therapies

  18. Fatal case of sorafenib-associated idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in the adjuvant treatment of a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairfax BP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sorafenib is an orally available kinase inhibitor with activity at Raf, PDGFβ and VEGF receptors that is licensed for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current evidence-based post-nephrectomy management of individuals with localized RCC consists of surveillance-based follow up. The SORCE trial is designed to investigate whether treatment with adjuvant sorafenib can reduce recurrence rates in this cohort. Case presentation Here we report an idiosyncratic reaction to sorafenib resulting in fatal hepatotoxicity and associated renal failure in a 62 year-old man treated with sorafenib within the SORCE trial. Conclusion This is the first reported case of sorafenib exposure associated fatal toxicity in the adjuvant setting and highlights the unpredictable adverse effects of novel adjuvant therapies.

  19. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 dependent and Von-Hippel-Lindau independent degradation of Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and 2 alpha by selenium in clear cell renal cell carcinoma leads to tumor growth inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintala Sreenivasulu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC accounts for more than 80% of the cases of renal cell carcinoma. In ccRCC deactivation of Von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene contributes to the constitutive expression of hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha (HIF-α, transcriptional regulators of several genes involved in tumor angiogenesis, glycolysis and drug resistance. We have demonstrated inhibition of HIF-1α by Se-Methylselenocysteine (MSC via stabilization of prolyl hydroxylases 2 and 3 (PHDs and a significant therapeutic synergy when combined with chemotherapy. This study was initiated to investigate the expression of PHDs, HIF-α, and VEGF-A in selected solid cancers, the mechanism of HIF-α inhibition by MSC, and to document antitumor activity of MSC against human ccRCC xenografts. Methods Tissue microarrays of primary human cancer specimens (ccRCC, head & neck and colon were utilized to determine the incidence of PHD2/3, HIF-α, and VEGF-A by immunohistochemical methods. To investigate the mechanism(s of HIF-α inhibition by MSC, VHL mutated ccRCC cells RC2 (HIF-1α positive, 786–0 (HIF-2α positive and VHL wild type head & neck cancer cells FaDu (HIF-1α were utilized. PHD2 and VHL gene specific siRNA knockdown and inhibitors of PHD2 and proteasome were used to determine their role in the degradation of HIF-1α by MSC. Results We have demonstrated that ccRCC cells express low incidence of PHD2 (32%, undetectable PHD3, high incidence of HIF-α (92%, and low incidence of VEGF-A compared to head & neck and colon cancers. This laboratory was the first to identify MSC as a highly effective inhibitor of constitutively expressed HIF-α in ccRCC tumors. MSC did not inhibit HIF-1α protein synthesis, but facilitated its degradation. The use of gene knockdown and specific inhibitors confirmed that the inhibition of HIF-1α was PHD2 and proteasome dependent and VHL independent. The effects of MSC treatment on HIF-α were associated with

  20. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 dependent and Von-Hippel-Lindau independent degradation of Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and 2 alpha by selenium in clear cell renal cell carcinoma leads to tumor growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) accounts for more than 80% of the cases of renal cell carcinoma. In ccRCC deactivation of Von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene contributes to the constitutive expression of hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 alpha (HIF-α), transcriptional regulators of several genes involved in tumor angiogenesis, glycolysis and drug resistance. We have demonstrated inhibition of HIF-1α by Se-Methylselenocysteine (MSC) via stabilization of prolyl hydroxylases 2 and 3 (PHDs) and a significant therapeutic synergy when combined with chemotherapy. This study was initiated to investigate the expression of PHDs, HIF-α, and VEGF-A in selected solid cancers, the mechanism of HIF-α inhibition by MSC, and to document antitumor activity of MSC against human ccRCC xenografts. Tissue microarrays of primary human cancer specimens (ccRCC, head & neck and colon) were utilized to determine the incidence of PHD2/3, HIF-α, and VEGF-A by immunohistochemical methods. To investigate the mechanism(s) of HIF-α inhibition by MSC, VHL mutated ccRCC cells RC2 (HIF-1α positive), 786–0 (HIF-2α positive) and VHL wild type head & neck cancer cells FaDu (HIF-1α) were utilized. PHD2 and VHL gene specific siRNA knockdown and inhibitors of PHD2 and proteasome were used to determine their role in the degradation of HIF-1α by MSC. We have demonstrated that ccRCC cells express low incidence of PHD2 (32%), undetectable PHD3, high incidence of HIF-α (92%), and low incidence of VEGF-A compared to head & neck and colon cancers. This laboratory was the first to identify MSC as a highly effective inhibitor of constitutively expressed HIF-α in ccRCC tumors. MSC did not inhibit HIF-1α protein synthesis, but facilitated its degradation. The use of gene knockdown and specific inhibitors confirmed that the inhibition of HIF-1α was PHD2 and proteasome dependent and VHL independent. The effects of MSC treatment on HIF-α were associated with significant antitumor activity against ccRCC

  1. Assessment of Therapeutic Effect of Sunitinib by {sup 11C} Acetate PET Compared with FDG PET Imaging in a Patient with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Nobuyuki; Takahara, Noriko; Hasegawa, Yoko; Tanase, Kazuya; Miwa, Yoshiji; Akino, Hironobu; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Kudo, Takashi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Yokoyama, Osamu [Univ. of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Although sunitinib shows a high response rate in patients with untreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), quite a few patients show no therapeutic effect. Therefore, it is crucial to distinguish the patients who respond to sunitinib from those who do not as early as possible after the administration of the therapy. We herein report a case of mRCC in which {sup 11C} acetate (AC) positron emission tomography (PET) showed an early therapeutic effect of sunitinib treatment 4 weeks after its administration.

  2. NF-KappaB expression correlates with apoptosis and angiogenesis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkus Muhan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most frequently encountered tumor in the adult kidney. Many factors are known to take part in the development and progression of this tumor. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB is a family of the genes that includes five members acting in events such as inflammation and apoptosis. In this study, the role of NF-κB (p50 subunit in ccRCC and its relation to angiogenesis and apoptosis were investigated. Methods Formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks from 40 patients with ccRCC were studied. Expressions of NF-κB (p50, VEGF, EGFR, bc1-2 and p53 were detected immunohistochemically. The relationship of NF-κB with these markers and clinicopathological findings were evaluated. Results The expression of NF-κB was detected in 35 (85%, VEGF in 37 (92.5%, EGFR in 38 (95%, bc1-2 in 33 (82.5% and p53 in 13 (32.5% of 40 ccRCC patients. Statistical analyses revealed a significant relation between NF-κB expression and VEGF (p = 0.001, EGFR (p = 0.004, bc1-2 (p = 0.010 and p53 (p = 0.037. There was no significant correlation between NF-κB and such parameters as tumor grade, stage, age and sex. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that in ccRCC cases NF-κB was associated with markers of angiogenesis and apoptosis such as VEGF, EGFR, bc1-2 and p53. In addition, the results did not only suggest a close relationship between NF-κB and VEGF, EGFR, bc1-2 and p53 in ccRCC, but also indicate that NF-κB was a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of ccRCC resistant to chemotherapy.

  3. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  4. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Bukowski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, CCF Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed.Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma, bevacizumab, interferon-α

  5. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  6. The joint effects of arsenic and risk diplotypes of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Li; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shih-Shan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Su, Chien-Tien; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The association between renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and diabetes mellitus (DM), alcohol consumption, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) gene, and arsenic exposure, has been the subject of independent studies. However, few studies have examined the combined effect of these factors on RCC risk. The aim of this study was to examine the association between these risk factors and the odds ratio (OR) of RCC. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 398 RCC patients and 756 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of IRS-1 (Gly972Arg), PI3-K (Met362Ile), IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C), and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) by PCR-RFLP. Profiles of urinary arsenic were measured by high performance liquid chromatography linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Participants who had never consumed alcohol and who had high total levels of urinary arsenic and DM had a high OR of RCC. IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C) and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) were in linkage disequilibrium. Participants carrying high-risk IGFBP-3 diplotypes A-C/C-C, A-A/A-C, and C-A/C-A had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (2.80, 1.91-4.12) of RCC compared to those carrying other IGFBP-3 diplotypes. This is the first study to show that borderline significant interaction of high total levels of urinary arsenic and IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes significantly enhanced the OR of RCC. Our data also provide evidence that subjects with more risk factors (e.g., high total levels of urinary arsenic, never consumed alcohol, IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes) may experience a higher OR of RCC. PMID:27038904

  7. Regulation of the collagen cross-linking enzymes LOXL2 and PLOD2 by tumor-suppressive microRNA-26a/b in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurozumi, Akira; Kato, Mayuko; Goto, Yusuke; Matsushita, Ryosuke; Nishikawa, Rika; Okato, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Ichiro; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-05-01

    Our recent studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in human cancers revealed that microRNA-26a (miRNA-26a) and microRNA-26b (miRNA-26b) were significantly reduced in cancer tissues. To date, few reports have provided functional analyses of miR-26a or miR-26b in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-26a and miR-26b in RCC and to identify novel miR-26a/b-mediated cancer pathways and target genes involved in RCC oncogenesis and metastasis. Downregulation of miR-26a or miR-26b was confirmed in RCC clinical specimens. Restoration of miR-26a or miR-26b in RCC cell lines (786-O and A498) revealed that these miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our in silico analysis and luciferase reporter assays showed that lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) were directly regulated by these miRNAs. Moreover, downregulating the PLOD2 gene significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in RCC cells. Thus, our data showed that two genes promoting metastasis, LOXL2 and PLOD2, were epigenetically regulated by tumor-suppressive microRNAs, miR-26a and miR-26b, providing important insights into the molecular mechanisms of RCC metastasis. PMID:26983694

  8. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  9. Fumarate Hydratase-deficient Renal Cell Carcinoma Is Strongly Correlated With Fumarate Hydratase Mutation and Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Kiril; Hes, Ondrej; Agaimy, Abbas; Bonert, Michael; Martinek, Petr; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Kristiansen, Glen; Lüders, Christine; Nesi, Gabriella; Compérat, Eva; Sibony, Mathilde; Berney, Daniel M; Mehra, Rohit; Brimo, Fadi; Hartmann, Arndt; Husain, Arjumand; Frizzell, Norma; Hills, Kirsten; Maclean, Fiona; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are difficult to diagnose prospectively. We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to identify fumarate hydratase (FH)-deficient tumors (defined as FH negative, 2-succinocysteine [2SC] positive) in cases diagnosed as "unclassified RCC, high grade or with papillary pattern," or "papillary RCC type 2," from multiple institutions. A total of 124 tumors (from 118 patients) were evaluated by IHC for FH and 2SC. An FH deficiency was found in 24/124 (19%) cases. An indeterminate result (only 1 marker abnormal) was found in 27/124 (22%) cases. In a tissue microarray of 776 RCCs of different types, only 2 (0.5%) tumors, initially considered papillary type 2, were FH deficient. FH mutations were found in 19/21 FH-deficient tumors (with confirmed germline mutations in 9 of 9 tumors in which germline status could be assessed) and in 1/26 FH-indeterminate tumors identified by IHC. No FH mutations were found in 2/21 FH-deficient RCCs, 25/26 FH-indeterminate RCCs, and 10/10 RCCs demonstrating FH expression by IHC. Patients with FH-deficient RCC had a median age of 44 years (range, 21 to 65 y). Average tumor size was 8.2 cm (range, 0.9 to 18 cm). FH-deficient RCCs were characterized by at least focal macronucleoli and demonstrated 2 or more growth patterns in 93% cases. Papillary was the most common (74%) and dominant (59%) pattern, whereas other common patterns included: solid (44%), tubulocystic (41%), cribriform (41%), and cystic (33%). At presentation, 57% were stage ≥pT3, 52% had positive nodes, and 19% had distant metastases. After a mean follow-up of 27 months (range, 1 to 114 mo), 39% of patients were dead of disease, and 26% had disease progression. We conclude that FH and 2SC are useful IHC ancillary tools, which allow recognition of FH-deficient RCC. PMID:26900816

  10. Identification of Molecular Tumor Markers in Renal Cell Carcinomas with TFE3 Protein Expression by RNA Sequencing

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    Dorothee Pflueger

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available TFE3 translocation renal cell carcinoma (tRCC is defined by chromosomal translocations involving the TFE3 transcription factor at chromosome Xp11.2. Genetically proven TFE3 tRCCs have a broad histologic spectrum with overlapping features to other renal tumor subtypes. In this study,we aimed for characterizing RCC with TFE3 protein expression. Using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq as a discovery tool, we analyzed fusion transcripts, gene expression profile, and somatic mutations in frozen tissue of one TFE3 tRCC. By applying a computational analysis developed to call chimeric RNA molecules from paired-end RNA-Seq data, we confirmed the known TFE3 translocation. Its fusion partner SFPQ has already been described as fusion partner in tRCCs. In addition, an RNAread-through chimera between TMED6 and COG8 as well as MET and KDR (VEGFR2 point mutations were identified. An EGFR mutation, but no chromosomal rearrangements, was identified in a control group of five clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs. The TFE3 tRCC could be clearly distinguished from the ccRCCs by RNA-Seq gene expression measurements using a previously reported tRCC gene signature. In validation experiments using reverse transcription-PCR, TMED6-COG8 chimera expression was significantly higher in nine TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in 24 ccRCCs (P<.001 and 22 papillaryRCCs (P<.05-.07. Immunohistochemical analysis of selected genes from the tRCC gene signature showed significantly higher eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 2 (EEF1A2 and Contactin 3 (CNTN3 expression in 16 TFE3 translocated and six TFE3-expressing/non-translocated RCCs than in over 200 ccRCCs (P < .0001, both.

  11. Docetaxel enhances apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest by suppressing mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in human renal clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T D; Shang, D H; Tian, Y

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients' research; however, clinical findings in patients have been disappointing. The aims of our study were to identify better or alternative therapeutic methods that can reverse chemotherapy resistance and to enhance sensitivity to docetaxel (DOX)-based chemotherapy drugs. We evaluated the anti-proliferative effect of DOX against RCC cells. DOX was found to suppress proliferation of RCC cells under in vitro and in vivo settings. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that DOX suppressed cell growth by induction of both apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Various patterns of gene expression were observed by cluster analysis. In addition, based on network analysis using the ingenuity pathway analysis software, DOX was found to suppress phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, suggesting that the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway plays a vital role in the anti-proliferative effect of DOX against RCC. PMID:26909952

  12. MRI analysis of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze MRI manifestation and enhancement of renal cell carcinoma, and to improve the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: 48 cases of renal cell carcinoma proven by surgery and pathology were reviewed. MRI scans including T1WI, T2WI, TRUFI and contrast enhancement were carried out in all cases and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed in 15. Results: Of the 48 cases, there were clear cell carcinoma in 41, chromophobe cell carcinoma in 4 and papillary cell carcinoma in 3. The tumors were homogeneously T1 iso- or hypointense in 33 and heterogeneous in 15; homogeneously T2 hyperintense in 14, isointense in 6 and heterogeneous in 28 patients. Pseudocapsule was found in 10 cases. Contrast enhancement was homogeneous in 6, heterogeneous in 34, irregularly peripheral within the wall in 5, and homogeneously circular in 3. Conclusion: MRI can accurately diagnose renal cell carcinoma and help to determine the cell subsets. (authors)

  13. Subcutaneous fatty tissue metastasis from renal cell carcinoma detected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient who had undergone left radical nephrectomy 11 years ago for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was referred to our clinic for restaging. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) showed hypometabolic area in left frontal region of the brain and increased FDG uptake in the subcutaneous fatty tissues of the right thigh. Histopathological examination of the biopsy material from the left frontal region and right gluteal region revealed metastasis of clear cell type RCC. Seven months later, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of right cruris showed a contrast-enhancing lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, located at the subcutaneous area of posterior part of right cruris. A concomitant 18F-FDG PET/CT detected an increased FDG uptake focus in the proximal third of right cruris adjacent to the muscle planes and this finding was consistent with metastasis of RCC. (author)

  14. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  15. P2X7 receptor predicts postoperative cancer-specific survival of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Yidong; Xu, Le; An, Huimin; Chang, Yuan; Yang, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2015-09-01

    The P2X7 receptor, an ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channel, is involved in inflammation, apoptosis and cell proliferation, and thereby plays a crucial role during oncogenic transformation in various malignancies. This study aims to evaluate the impact of P2X7 receptor expression on postoperative cancer-specific survival of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A total of 273 patients with ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy at a single institution were retrospectively enrolled in this study, among which 86 patients died of this disease and six patients died of other causes. Clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were recorded. P2X7 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in clinical specimens. Kaplan-Meier method with log rank test was performed to compare survival curves. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic values of variables on CSS. Concordance index was calculated to assess prognostic accuracy of prognostic models. Median follow-up period was 90 months (range, 11-120 months). Intratumoral P2X7 expression was significantly lower than peritumoral tissues (P independent prognostic factor for CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.693; P = 0.034). The prognostic accuracy of TNM stage, UISS and SSIGN scoring models was improved when intratumoral P2X7 expression was added. Intratumoral P2X7 expression is a potential independent adverse prognostic indicator for postoperative CSS of patients with ccRCC. PMID:26179886

  16. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  17. Clinical evaluation of microRNA-145 expression in renal cell carcinoma: a promising molecular marker for discriminating and staging the clear cell histological subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Emmanuel I; Petraki, Constantina; Gregorakis, Alkiviadis; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Scorilas, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of malignancies detected in renal parenchyma are diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma (RCC), whose subtype discrimination and determination of prognosis may contribute to the selection of the adequate therapy. Recently, a new class of small non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs, has proven to be among the most promising biomarkers for providing this information. Herein, we sought to add up to this knowledge by evaluating the expression levels of microRNA-145 (miR-145) in RCC. For that purpose, total RNA from 58 cancerous and 44 adjacent non-cancerous renal tissues was firstly extracted and then polyadenylated and reverse transcribed to cDNA. MiR-145 levels were finally analyzed by developing and applying a highly sensitive real-time PCR protocol, while their clinical significance was determined via comprehensive statistical analysis. Our data showed that miR-145 was significantly downregulated in cancerous samples and could discriminate between clear cell and non-clear cell subtypes. Moreover, miR-145 expression was found to be correlated with primary tumor staging of cancerous samples, something also noticed in the clear cell RCC subset, in which miR-145 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size as well. Overall, these results indicate that miR-145 might constitute a promising molecular marker for RCC classification and staging. PMID:26866880

  18. Renal cell carcinoma in India demonstrates early age of onset & a late stage of presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Agnihotri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Clinical spectrum of most of the diseases in developing countries is different from the west. Similarly whether renal cell carcinomas (RCC in a developing country like India is seen in the same spectrum in relation to the age at presentation as in the west is not described in the literature. This study was carried out to investigate the spectrum of RCC in India with regards to age of onset, stage at presentation and survival. Methods: Patients with renal tumour, treated between January 2000 to December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in north India, were analyzed for age at presentation, clinical features and histopathological characteristics. Clinical diagnosis was made by contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Renal masses diagnosed as angiomyolipoma, infective masses and hydatid cysts were excluded from the analysis. Impact of various age groups on gender, tumour size, TNM stage, Fuhrman grade, histopathological subtypes, lymph node, inferior vena cava (IVC involvement and survival was analyzed. Patients were grouped in five age groups i.e. ≤39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and more than 70 yr of age. Results: Of the total 617 patients with 617 renal tumours (2 patients had bilateral tumours but only the larger tumour was considered clinically suspected as RCC, 586 had epithelial cell tumour and the remaining 31 had non epithelial cell tumour. The mean tumour size was 8.08±3.5 cm (median 7, range 1-25 cm. Tumour of less than 4 cm size was present in only 10.4 per cent patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 55.15±13.34 (median 56, range 14-91 yr years. A total of 30.03 per cent of renal tumours presented in patients younger than 50 yr of age. Though there was no difference in stage, Fuhrman′s grade, IVC involvement and lymph nodal spread among various age groups, younger patients had higher proportion of non clear cell RCC and only 48.59 per cent of them presented

  19. Stage-dependent prognostic impact of molecular signatures in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Weber,1,2 Matthias Meinhardt,3 Stefan Zastrow,1 Andreas Wienke,4 Kati Erdmann,1 Jörg Hofmann,1 Susanne Fuessel,1 Manfred P Wirth11Department of Urology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Department of Oncology and Hematology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany; 3Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 4Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, GermanyPurpose: To enhance prognostic information of protein biomarkers for clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs, we analyzed them within prognostic groups of ccRCC harboring different tumor characteristics of this clinically and molecularly heterogeneous tumor entity.Methods: Tissue microarrays from 145 patients with primary ccRCC were immunohistochemically analyzed for VHL (von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, Ki67 (marker of proliferation 1, p53 (tumor protein p53, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, survivin (baculoviral IAP repeat containing 5, and UEA-1 (ulex europaeus agglutinin I to assess microvessel-density.Results: When analyzing all patients, nuclear staining of Ki67 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.12 and nuclear survivin (nS; HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01–1.08 were significantly associated with disease-specific survival (DSS. In the cohort of patients with advanced localized or metastasized ccRCC, high staining of Ki67, p53 and nS predicted shorter DSS (Ki67: HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02–1.11; p53: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01–1.09; nS: HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14. In organ-confined ccRCC, patients with high p21-staining had a longer DSS (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92–0.99. In a multivariate model with stepwise backward elimination, tumor size and p21-staining showed a significant association with DSS in patients with "organ-confined" ccRCCs. The p21-staining increased the concordance index of tumor size from

  20. Type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma in a patient with schwannomatosis: Mosaic versus loss of SMARCB1 expression in respectively schwannoma and renal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebos, Theo J M; Kenter, Susan; Baas, Frank; Nannenberg, Eline A; Bleeker, Fonnet E; van Minkelen, Rick; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wesseling, Pieter; Flucke, Uta

    2016-04-01

    In schwannomatosis, germline SMARCB1 or LZTR1 mutations predispose to the development of multiple benign schwannomas. Besides these, other tumors may occur in schwannomatosis patients. We present a 45-year-old male patient who developed multiple schwannomas and in addition a malignant type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC1). We identified a duplication of exon 7 of SMARCB1 on chromosome 22 in the constitutional DNA of the patient (c.796-2246_986 + 5250dup7686), resulting in the generation of a premature stop codon in the second exon 7 copy (p.Glu330*). The mutant SMARCB1 allele proved to be retained in three schwannomas and in the pRCC1 of the patient. Loss of heterozygosity analysis demonstrated partial loss of the wild-type SMARCB1 allele containing chromosome 22, suggesting loss of that chromosome in only a subset of tumor cells, in all four tumors. Immunohistochemical staining with a SMARCB1 antibody revealed a mosaic SMARCB1 expression pattern in the three benign schwannomas, but absence of expression in the malignant tumor cells of the pRCC1. To our knowledge, this difference in SMARCB1 protein expression has not been reported before. We conclude that a germline SMARCB1 mutation may predispose to the development of pRCC1, thereby further widening the spectrum of tumors that can develop in the context of schwannomatosis. PMID:26799435

  1. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  2. Diffusion-weighted MRI in renal cell carcinoma: A surrogate marker for predicting nuclear grade and histological subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Though previous investigators have attempted to evaluate its utility in characterization of focal renal lesions, diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW MRI) in renal diseases is still an evolving field and its role in predicting the aggressiveness of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is yet to be established. Purpose: To assess whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values can be used to determine the nuclear grade and histological subtype of RCCs and to identify the tumor attributes contributing to variation in ADC values. Material and Methods: The institutional ethics committee waived the requirement of informed consent for this retrospective study. The study cohort consisted of 33 patients who underwent MRI (with diffusion-weighted imaging at b values of 0 and 500 s/mm2) and were found to have 36 pathologically-proven RCCs. ADC values were determined for solid portions of RCC, cystic/hemorrhagic areas, and normal renal parenchyma. Histological subtype, nuclear grade, and cell count were determined for each lesion. ADC values were compared between different grades and subtypes and correlation with cell count was investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn to establish cut-off ADC values. Results: There were 23 low grade (grades I and II) and 13 high grade tumors (grades III and IV). There were 32 clear-cell and four non-clear-cell RCCs. A decreasing trend of ADC values was seen with increasing grade and mean ADC of high grade RCC was significantly lower than low grade (1.3145 vs 1.6982 x 10-3 mm2/s) (P = 0.005). Mean ADC for clear-cell RCC was significantly higher than non-clear-cell RCC (1.6245 vs. 1.0412 x 10-3 mm2/s) (P = 0.005). ADC values higher than 1.7960 x 10-3 mm2/s were seen only with low grade and values greater than 1.4904 x 10-3 mm2/s were seen only with clear-cell RCC. Conclusion: ADC values provide a non-invasive means to predict the nuclear grade and histological subtype of RCC. Cellularity and morphology are other

  3. Diffusion-weighted MRI in renal cell carcinoma: A surrogate marker for predicting nuclear grade and histological subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Bhalla, Ashu S.; Gamanagatti, Shivanand (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi (India)), Email: raju152@yahoo.com; Seth, Amlesh (Dept. of Urology, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi (India)); Iyer, Venkateswaran K.; Das, Prasenjit (Dept. of Pathology, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi (India))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Though previous investigators have attempted to evaluate its utility in characterization of focal renal lesions, diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW MRI) in renal diseases is still an evolving field and its role in predicting the aggressiveness of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is yet to be established. Purpose: To assess whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values can be used to determine the nuclear grade and histological subtype of RCCs and to identify the tumor attributes contributing to variation in ADC values. Material and Methods: The institutional ethics committee waived the requirement of informed consent for this retrospective study. The study cohort consisted of 33 patients who underwent MRI (with diffusion-weighted imaging at b values of 0 and 500 s/mm2) and were found to have 36 pathologically-proven RCCs. ADC values were determined for solid portions of RCC, cystic/hemorrhagic areas, and normal renal parenchyma. Histological subtype, nuclear grade, and cell count were determined for each lesion. ADC values were compared between different grades and subtypes and correlation with cell count was investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn to establish cut-off ADC values. Results: There were 23 low grade (grades I and II) and 13 high grade tumors (grades III and IV). There were 32 clear-cell and four non-clear-cell RCCs. A decreasing trend of ADC values was seen with increasing grade and mean ADC of high grade RCC was significantly lower than low grade (1.3145 vs 1.6982 x 10-3 mm2/s) (P = 0.005). Mean ADC for clear-cell RCC was significantly higher than non-clear-cell RCC (1.6245 vs. 1.0412 x 10-3 mm2/s) (P = 0.005). ADC values higher than 1.7960 x 10-3 mm2/s were seen only with low grade and values greater than 1.4904 x 10-3 mm2/s were seen only with clear-cell RCC. Conclusion: ADC values provide a non-invasive means to predict the nuclear grade and histological subtype of RCC. Cellularity and morphology are other

  4. Paraffin-embedded tissue is less accurate than frozen section analysis for determining VHL mutational status in sporadic renal cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoest, Grégory; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Fergelot, Patricia; Jouan, Florence; Zerrouki, Salim; Dréano, Stéphane; Mottier, Stéphanie; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Denis, Marc,

    2012-01-01

    International audience INTRODUCTION: Literature controversies exist regarding the prognostic value of VHL mutations. The objective was to compare paraffin-embedded and frozen section specimens for VHL mutations detection and to evaluate the reliability of DNA analysis in formalin-fixed tissues. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) previously assessed for VHL status from frozen samples were included. Seventy-three tumor samples were known to be mutated fo...

  5. Everolimus – a new approach in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Anandappa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available G Anandappa, AE Hollingdale, TG EisenDepartment of Oncology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UKAbstract: With the increasing understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of targeted therapy, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of clear cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC. Traditionally patients with metastatic RCC have been treated with immunotherapy which has limited efficacy. The multikinase inhibitors sunitinib, sorafenib and pazopanib, the VEGF antibody bevacizumab in combination with interferon and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus have all been shown to prolong progression-free survival in phase III studies. Here we review another mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (Afinitor®; Novartis, USA which was approved in March 2009 by the US FDA for treatment of targeted-therapy refractory metastatic renal cell cancer. The phase III study of everolimus (the RECORD study was terminated early after a significant difference in efficacy was noted in the treatment arm with everolimus (progression-free survival of 4.0 months in patients on the treatment arm vs 1.9 months in the placebo arm. The most common adverse events were stomatitis, pneumonitis, fatigue and infections. We review Phase I–III data with a particular emphasis on safety data and patient focused outcomes.Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma, targeted therapy, mTOR, everolimus

  6. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC. (paper)

  7. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  8. Axitinib in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma: patient selection and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Haas, Naomi Balzer

    2016-01-01

    Background Axitinib is a next-generation, selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. It is approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) based on a demonstrated progression-free survival advantage over sorafenib in the second-line treatment setting. However, given the variety of available targeted therapies for mRCC, appropriate patient selection for the available therapies remains a significant clinical challenge. Purpose This review summarizes the available evidence on the clinical, toxicity, and pharmacologic considerations for determining appropriate patient selection for axitinib therapy. In addition, it describes recent data on the use of predictive biomarkers to guide clinical management. This paper consists of material obtained via PubMed and Medline literature searches through October 2015. Conclusion Axitinib has a well-established role in the management of mRCC. Consistent clinical efficacy has been demonstrated across prognostic risk groups and prior therapeutic exposures. Although axitinib is generally well tolerated, appropriate toxicity management is critical to maximizing drug delivery and optimizing treatment outcomes. Although incident hypertension has been associated with improved clinical outcomes on axitinib, there are currently no validated clinical or genetic predictive biomarkers to guide patient selection. PMID:27099525

  9. Management of Spinal Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Materials: SBRT was used in the treatment of patients with spinal metastases from RCC. Patients received either 24 Gy in a single fraction, 27 Gy in three fractions, or 30 Gy delivered in five fractions. Effectiveness of SBRT with respect to tumor control and palliation of pain was assessed using patient-reported outcomes. Results: A total of 48 patients with 55 spinal metastases were treated with SBRT with a median follow-up time of 13.1 months (range, 3.3-54.5 months). The actuarial 1-year spine tumor progression free survival was 82.1%. At pretreatment baseline, 23% patients were pain free; at 1 month and 12 months post-SBRT, 44% and 52% patients were pain free, respectively. No Grade 3-4 neurologic toxicity was observed. Conclusions: The data support SBRT as a safe and effective treatment modality that can be used to achieve good tumor control and palliation of pain associated with RCC spinal metastases. Further evaluation with randomized trials comparing SBRT to conventional radiotherapy may be warranted.

  10. Relationship study between platelet count and stage and grade of renal cell carcinoma in indoor patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Salehi; Zahra Panahandeh; Mahsa Olia; Seyedeh Atefeh Emadi

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Thrombocytosis has been reported in many types of malignancies and has been studied as a prognostic factor.The aim of this survey iS to investigate the relation between platelet count and stage and grade of tumor in indoor patients with renal cell carcinoma(RCC)in order to evaluate the prognostic value of thrembocytosis.Methods:In a descriptive and retrospective survey 82 patients treated by radical nephreetomy for RCC were enrolled.In all cases,TNM stage,Fuhrman grade,invasion and platelet count were recorded and entered in SPSS software for analysis.Results:In this study,76 patients (92.7%)with norlnal platelet and 6 patients(7.3%)with thrombocytosis were studied.In this survey there Was no significant correlation between the thrombocytosis and pathological stage in all patients,both genders and various age groups.In addition,the correlation between thrombocytosis and nuclear grade was investigated and a significant correlation between them in all patients and both genders Was found,Finally,there was no significant correlation between thrombocytosis and nuclear grade at various age groups.Conclusion:Prognostic indicators that can accurately predict survival rates in patients with RCC can be used to select those patients most hkdy to benefit from adjuvant therapy.In this survey there was a significant correlation between thrombocytosis and nuclear grade,however,further clinical studies are needed.

  11. Combined blood/tissue analysis for cancer biomarker discovery: application to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Prieto, DaRue A; Chan, King C; Ye, Xiaying; Valera, Vladimir A; Simpson, R Mark; Rudnick, Paul A; Xiao, Zhen; Issaq, Haleem J; Linehan, W Marston; Stein, Stephen E; Veenstra, Timothy D; Blonder, Josip

    2010-03-01

    A method that relies on subtractive tissue-directed shot-gun proteomics to identify tumor proteins in the blood of a patient newly diagnosed with cancer is described. To avoid analytical and statistical biases caused by physiologic variability of protein expression in the human population, this method was applied on clinical specimens obtained from a single patient diagnosed with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The proteomes extracted from tumor, normal adjacent tissue and preoperative plasma were analyzed using 2D-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The lists of identified proteins were filtered to discover proteins that (i) were found in the tumor but not normal tissue, (ii) were identified in matching plasma, and (iii) whose spectral count was higher in tumor tissue than plasma. These filtering criteria resulted in identification of eight tumor proteins in the blood. Subsequent Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of cadherin-5, cadherin-11, DEAD-box protein-23, and pyruvate kinase in the blood of the patient in the study as well as in the blood of four other patients diagnosed with RCC. These results demonstrate the utility of a combined blood/tissue analysis strategy that permits the detection of tumor proteins in the blood of a patient diagnosed with RCC. PMID:20121140

  12. Tumor signatures of PTHLH overexpression, high serum calcium, and poor prognosis were observed exclusively in clear cell but not non clear cell renal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High serum calcium (Ca) due to aberrant secretion of tumor parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) is a well-known paraneoplastic sign and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the status of serum Ca and tumor PTHLH expression have not been verified using the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) renal tumor classification. We retrospectively reviewed corrected serum Ca levels at initial onset (n = 683) and/or as of recurrence (n = 71) in patients with RCC. We also examined a total of 623 renal parenchymal tumor samples for PTHLH mRNA expressions by quantitative real-time PCR. High serum Ca concomitant with PTHLH overexpression in tumors was observed exclusively in clear cell RCC but not in other non clear cell subtype tumors, including papillary, chromophobe, collecting-duct, unclassified, and other rare subtype RCCs or in benign oncocytomas and angiomyolipomas. In clear cell RCC, PTHLH expression was significantly high in male patients, and was associated with a symptomatic presentation, higher grade, and higher stage cases, whereas it was not associated with VHL gene status. Univariate analyses demonstrated that high PTHLH expression was strongly associated with poor outcome both in overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for patients who underwent standard nephrectomy. Further multivariate Cox analyses revealed that the PTHLH expressions remained as independent prognostic parameters for OS but not for DFS. These data suggest that the previously characterized tumor signatures of high serum Ca due to high PTHLH expression and poor prognosis are clear cell RCC-specific features, whereas these characteristics are rare in non clear cell RCCs

  13. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  14. 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in positron emission tomography as a pathological grade predictor for renal clear cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-F FDG-PET/CT) in the prediction of Fuhrman pathological grades of renal clear cell carcinoma (cRCC). This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and written informed consent was waived. Thirty-one patients with pathologically proven cRCC underwent 18-F FDG-PET/CT for tumour staging. Maximum standardized uptake value of cRCC (tumour SUVmax) and mean SUV of the liver and spleen (liver and spleen SUVmean) were measured by two independent observers. Tumour SUVmax, tumour-to-liver SUV ratio, and tumour-to-spleen SUV ratio were correlated with the pathological grades. Logistic analysis demonstrated that only the tumour-to-liver SUV ratio was a significant parameter for differentiating high-grade (Fuhrman grades 3 and 4) tumours from low-grade (Fuhrman grades 1 and 2) tumours (P = 0.007 and 0.010 for observers 1 and 2, respectively). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for detecting tumours of Fuhrman grades 3 and 4 were 64, 100, 100, and 77 %, respectively, for observer 1, and 79, 88, 85, and 83 %, respectively, for observer 2. The tumour-to-liver SUV ratio with 18-F FDG-PET/CT appeared to be a valuable imaging biomarker in the prediction of high-grade cRCC. (orig.)

  15. Intrinsic resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors is associated with poor clinical outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on sequential therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and intrinsic resistance to receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (rTKI) treatment remains vague. We retrospectively studied treatment characteristics and outcome of mRCC patients refractory to first rTKI therapy. Thirty-five mRCC patients (male, 18; female, 11) with primary resistance to first rTKI therapy (sunitinib, n = 28; sorafenib, n = 7) and a median treatment interval of 2.4 months (1 - 4.6) were identified. In 22 patients, progressive disease (PD) was determined by a new metastatic lesion. Of these, 16 patients received subsequent therapy with 12 patients remaining refractory and 4 patients achieving disease stabilization. In 13 patients continuous growth of existing metastatic lesions determined PD. Of these, 9 received sequential therapy with 6 achieving disease stabilization. Altogether, 25 patients were treated sequentially (rTKI: n = 15; mTOR-inhibitor: n = 10) and achieved a median PFS of 3.2 months (range, 1-16.6). Fifteen patients failed to respond to either line of therapy. Disease control was not associated with type of subsequent therapy. Median OS was 14.9 months (CI: 5.5-24.4). Intrinsic resistance to rTKI is associated with a low chance of response to sequential therapy and a poor prognosis in mRCC patients

  16. A novel method to identify pathways associated with renal cell carcinoma based on a gene co-expression network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiyun; Li, Hongyun; Liu, Bo; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Shibao; Sun, Zeqiang; Liu, Shuangqing; Sun, Fahai; Liu, Qingyong

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel method for identifying pathways associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) based on a gene co-expression network. A framework was established where a co-expression network was derived from the database as well as various co-expression approaches. First, the backbone of the network based on differentially expressed (DE) genes between RCC patients and normal controls was constructed by the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) database. The differentially co-expressed links were detected by Pearson's correlation, the empirical Bayesian (EB) approach and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA). The co-expressed gene pairs were merged by a rank-based algorithm. We obtained 842; 371; 2,883 and 1,595 co-expressed gene pairs from the co-expression networks of the STRING database, Pearson's correlation EB method and WGCNA, respectively. Two hundred and eighty-one differentially co-expressed (DC) gene pairs were obtained from the merged network using this novel method. Pathway enrichment analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and the network enrichment analysis (NEA) method were performed to verify feasibility of the merged method. Results of the KEGG and NEA pathway analyses showed that the network was associated with RCC. The suggested method was computationally efficient to identify pathways associated with RCC and has been identified as a useful complement to traditional co-expression analysis. PMID:26058425

  17. 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in positron emission tomography as a pathological grade predictor for renal clear cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanahashi, Yukichi [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology Services, Gifu (Japan); Suzui, Natsuko [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Gifu (Japan); Hirose, Yoshinobu [Osaka Medical College, Department of Pathology, Osaka (Japan); Matsunaga, Kengo [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Pathology, Minokamo (Japan); Nishibori, Hironori [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Minokamo (Japan); Bae, Kyongtae T. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-F FDG-PET/CT) in the prediction of Fuhrman pathological grades of renal clear cell carcinoma (cRCC). This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and written informed consent was waived. Thirty-one patients with pathologically proven cRCC underwent 18-F FDG-PET/CT for tumour staging. Maximum standardized uptake value of cRCC (tumour SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV of the liver and spleen (liver and spleen SUV{sub mean}) were measured by two independent observers. Tumour SUV{sub max}, tumour-to-liver SUV ratio, and tumour-to-spleen SUV ratio were correlated with the pathological grades. Logistic analysis demonstrated that only the tumour-to-liver SUV ratio was a significant parameter for differentiating high-grade (Fuhrman grades 3 and 4) tumours from low-grade (Fuhrman grades 1 and 2) tumours (P = 0.007 and 0.010 for observers 1 and 2, respectively). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for detecting tumours of Fuhrman grades 3 and 4 were 64, 100, 100, and 77 %, respectively, for observer 1, and 79, 88, 85, and 83 %, respectively, for observer 2. The tumour-to-liver SUV ratio with 18-F FDG-PET/CT appeared to be a valuable imaging biomarker in the prediction of high-grade cRCC. (orig.)

  18. Elevated expression of IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands predicts poor prognosis in patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Lin; Chang, Yuan; Xu, Le; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-03-22

    IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands (ICL), namely CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11, exhibit pleiotropic roles in orchestrating immunity and angiogenesis. However, the prognosis value of them in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was still obscure. Thus, we retrospectively used immunohistochemistry approach to evaluate the impact of these ligands on recurrence and survival of non-metastatic clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients after nephrectomy. We systemically built a prespecified ICL score based on these ligands, and found specimens with high ICL score were prone to possess high Fuhrman grade, necrosis, and high-risk level of SSIGN. Moreover, ICL score stratified patients into different risk subgroups, and remained an independent adverse prognosticator for overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Meanwhile, in TCGA database, the increasing ICL mRNA predicted poor survival and early recurrence. Furthermore, after adding ICL score into SSIGN, the C-index for OS and RFS increased from 0.705 to 0.746 and 0.712 to 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, the ICL score based on expression of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 stratified non-metastatic ccRCC patients into different risk subgroups of recurrence and death, which might benefit preoperative risk stratification and guide immune therapy in the future. PMID:26910919

  19. Novel three missense mutations observed in Von Hippel-Lindau gene in a patient reported with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Santhosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome that predisposes to the development of a variety of benign and malignant tumors, especially cerebellar hemangioblastomas, retinal angiomas and clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC. We have identified of VHL gene using immunohistochemistry in a patient who was diagnosed for RCC. In order to understand the involvement of mutation in the VHL gene exon 1 was amplified and sequenced (accession number: JX 401534. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of novel missense mutations c.194 C>T, c.239 G>A, c.278 G>A, c.319 C>G, c. 337 C > G leading to the following variations p.Ala 65 Val, p.Gly 80 Asp, p.Gly 93 Glu, p.Gln 107 Glu, p.Gln 113 Glu in the protein.

  20. Scalp squamous cell carcinoma in xeroderma pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Basim A; Hanadi Alzanbagi; Osama A Samargandi; Hossam Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that appears in early childhood. Squamous cell carcinoma is not uncommon in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and mostly involving the face, head, neck, and scalp. However, squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp may exhibit an aggressive course. Case Report: Here, we present a huge squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp in a three-years-old child with xeroderma pigmentosum. In addition, we illustrate the challenges of a child...

  1. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dario Marcotullio; Giannicola Iannella; Gian Franco Macri; Caterina Marinelli; Melissa Zelli; Giuseppe Magliulo

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy....

  2. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is...

  3. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, Tufan; Coşkunoğlu, Esra Zeynep; Duran, Berkan; Çiftci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder a...

  4. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan Cicek; Esra Zeynep Coskunoglu; Berkan Duran; Egemen Ciftci

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder ...

  5. Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Sabra; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modal...

  6. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Concurrent with Bowen's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Chul; Kang, Ho Song; Park, Kyoung Tae; Oh, Young Ha; Yu, Hee Joon; Kim, Joung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy of the elderly and immunocompromised patients. It is occasionally found coexisting with other diseases, such as squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, miscellaneous adnexal tumors, and rarely Bowen disease. A 75-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of an irregularly shaped erythematous patch on the left mandibular angle. Three months later, a 1.5×1.0 cm sized painless and rapidly growi...

  7. Case of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sadaf; Jadidi, Nima; Faraj, Sheila F.; Rodriquez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal malignancy and it originates from the renal tubular epithelium. Due to the diversity in the histopathological and molecular characteristics, it is typically subclassified into five different categories. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is one subclassification and it includes two variants: sporadic and hereditary. Although the hereditary form comprises a smaller number of cases of papillary renal cell carcinoma, an understanding of the molec...

  8. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  9. Abrogation of STAT3 signaling cascade by zerumbone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Li, Feng; Kim, Chulwon; Sikka, Sakshi; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-10-01

    Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is one of the characteristic features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and often linked to its deregulated proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In the present report, we investigated whether zerumbone, a sesquiterpene, exerts its anticancer effect through modulation of STAT3 activation pathway. The pharmacological effect of zerumbone on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases and phosphatase, and apoptosis was investigated using both