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Sample records for cell carcinoma in-situ

  1. Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetley, Sujata; Jairajpuri, Zeeba S.; Hassan, Mohammad J.; Madaan, Garima; Jain, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium, whether primary or secondary to cervical cancer, is a rare entity. Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma in situ is even more uncommon; it usually occurs in postmenopausal women and has a strong association with pyometra. We report a 60-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman who presented to the Hakeem Abdul Hameed Centenary Hospital, New Delhi, India, in May 2014 with a lower abdominal swelling corresponding in size to a pregnancy of 26 gestational weeks and vaginal discharge of one year’s duration. A total abdominal hysterectomy with a bilateral salpingooophorectomy was performed, which revealed an enlarged uterus with pyometra. Histopathology showed that the entire endometrial lining had been replaced with malignant squamous cells without invasion of the myometrium. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumour cells were positive for p63 with a high Ki-67 labelling index. No adjuvant therapy was required and the patient was disease-free at a seven-month follow-up. PMID:26629388

  2. Myoepithelial cells in lobular carcinoma in situ: distribution and immunophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jindal, Sonali; Martel, Maritza; Wu, Yaping; Schedin, Pepper; Troxell, Megan

    2016-09-01

    Myoepithelial cells have important physical and paracrine roles in breast tissue development, maintenance, and tumor suppression. Recent molecular and immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated phenotypic alterations in ductal carcinoma in situ-associated myoepithelial cells. Although the relationship of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and myoepithelial cells was described in 1980, further characterization of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells is lacking. We stained 27 breast specimens harboring abundant LCIS with antibodies to smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and calponin. Dual stains for E-cadherin/smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and CK7/p63 were also performed. In each case, the intensity and distribution of staining in LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells were compared with normal breast tissue on the same slide. In 78% of the cases, LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells demonstrated decreased staining intensity for one or more myoepithelial markers. The normal localization of myoepithelial cells (flat against the basement membrane, pattern N) was seen in 96% of LCIS, yet 85% of cases had areas with myoepithelial cell cytoplasm oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane (pattern P), and in 30% of cases, myoepithelial cells appeared focally admixed with LCIS cells (pattern C). This study characterizes detailed architectural and immunophenotypic alterations of LCIS-associated myoepithelial cells. The finding of variably diminished staining favors application of several myoepithelial immunostains in clinical practice. The interaction of LCIS with myoepithelial cells, especially in light of the perpendicular and central architectural arrangements, deserves further mechanistic investigation. PMID:27195907

  3. Carcinoma in situ testis, the progenitor of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Daugaard, G;

    2005-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT), including seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, teratomas and yolk sac tumours, have a common precursor, the carcinoma in situ (CIS) cell. Recent gene expression studies displaying close similarity of CIS cells to embryonic stem cells support the longstanding theory...

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the external auditory canal.

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    Shu, Min-Tsan; Lin, Hung-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Chien; Chang, Kuo-Ming

    2006-08-01

    We report two cases of carcinoma in situ in the external auditory canal (EAC), presenting with symptoms such as pain, long-term itching of the ear, easy contact bleeding, canal otorrhea and hearing loss. Otoscopic examination revealed granulation tissue and a greyish-black tumour with irregular surface. The first patient had previously been diagnosed with otitis externa with persistent ear itching for the past three years. The second patient had received tympanoplasty for treatment of chronic otitis media on the right ear ten years ago. The first case was treated with wide excision, whereas the second patient received resection of the skin of the EAC together with its adjacent soft tissue, followed by skin grafting. No tumour recurrence was noted in the fourth and third post-operative year for the first and second patient respectively. We suggest that EAC carcinoma can be detected early and treated. PMID:16719955

  5. MicroRNA expression profiling of carcinoma in situ cells of the testis

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    Novotny, Guy Wayne; Belling, Kirstine Christensen; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram;

    2012-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours, seminoma (SE) and non-seminoma (NS), of young adult men develop from a precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS), which resembles foetal gonocytes and retains embryonic pluripotency. We used microarrays to analyse microRNA (miRNA) expression in 12 human testis samples...... with CIS cells and compared it with miRNA expression profiles of normal adult testis, testis with Sertoli-cell-only that lacks germ cells, testis tumours (SE and embryonal carcinoma (EC), an undifferentiated component of NS) and foetal male and female gonads. Principal components analysis revealed...... that the miRNA expression profile changes during testis development and that the miRNA profile of adult testis with CIS cells shares characteristic similarities with the expression in foetal gonocytes....

  6. Carcinoma in situ of contralateral testis in patients with testicular germ cell cancer: study of 27 cases in 500 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Maase, H; Rørth, M; Walbom-Jørgensen, S; Sørensen, B L; Christophersen, I S; Hald, T; Jacobsen, G K; Berthelsen, J G; Skakkebaek, N E

    1986-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testis was diagnosed in 27 of 500 patients (5.4%) with unilateral testicular germ cell cancer. Eight of the 27 patients received intensive chemotherapy for spread of their initial testicular cancer. Follow up biopsy studies did not detect changes of carcinoma...... in situ in any of these patients, and none developed a contralateral testicular tumour (observation time 12-88 months). Of the remaining 19 patients with carcinoma in situ, seven developed contralateral testicular cancer. The estimated risk of developing invasive growth was 40% within three years and...... 50% within five years. None of the 473 patients without carcinoma in situ detected by screening biopsy developed contralateral testicular cancer (observation time 12-96 months). No serious complications arose from the biopsy procedures. All patients with unilateral testicular germ cell cancer should...

  7. Multimodal confocal mosaics enable high sensitivity and specificity in screening of in situ squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados Luyando, Maria del Carmen; Bar, Anna; Snavely, Nicholas; Jacques, Steven; Gareau, Daniel S.

    2014-02-01

    Screening cancer in excision margins with confocal microscopy may potentially save time and cost over the gold standard histopathology (H and E). However, diagnostic accuracy requires sufficient contrast and resolution to reveal pathological traits in a growing set of tumor types. Reflectance mode images structural details due to microscopic refractive index variation. Nuclear contrast with acridine orange fluorescence provides enhanced diagnostic value, but fails for in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where the cytoplasm is important to visualize. Combination of three modes [eosin (Eo) fluorescence, reflectance (R) and acridine orange (AO) fluorescence] enable imaging of cytoplasm, collagen and nuclei respectively. Toward rapid intra-operative pathological margin assessment to guide staged cancer excisions, multimodal confocal mosaics can image wide surgical margins (~1cm) with sub-cellular resolution and mimic the appearance of conventional H and E. Absorption contrast is achieved by alternating the excitation wavelength: 488nm (AO fluorescence) and 532nm (Eo fluorescence). Superposition and false-coloring of these modes mimics H and E, enabling detection of the carcinoma in situ in the epidermal layer The sum mosaic Eo+R is false-colored pink to mimic eosins' appearance in H and E, while the AO mosaic is false-colored purple to mimic hematoxylins' appearance in H and E. In this study, mosaics of 10 Mohs surgical excisions containing SCC in situ and 5 containing only normal tissue were subdivided for digital presentation equivalent to 4X histology. Of the total 16 SCC in situ multimodal mosaics and 16 normal cases presented, two reviewers made 1 and 2 (respectively) type-2 errors (false positives) but otherwise scored perfectly when using the confocal images to screen for the presence of SCC in situ as compared to the gold standard histopathology. Limitations to precisely mimic H and E included occasional elastin staining by AO. These results suggest that

  8. The emerging phenotype of the testicular carcinoma in situ germ cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Bartkova, Jirina; Samson, Michel;

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the existing knowledge on the phenotype of the carcinoma in situ (CIS) cell. CIS is a common pre-invasive precursor of testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and young adults. These tumours display a variety of histological forms. Classical seminoma proliferates along...... differentiation and pluripotency, CIS cells found in adult patients seem to be predestined for further malignant progression into one or the other of the two main types of overt tumours. A new concept of phenotypic continuity of differentiation of germ cells along germinal lineage with a gradual loss of embryonic...... that CIS cells originate from primordial germ cells or gonocytes and not from germ cells in the adult testis....

  9. Expression of immunohistochemical markers for testicular carcinoma in situ by normal human fetal germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Graem, N;

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that carcinoma in situ of the testis (CIS), which is the precursor of invasive testicular germ cell tumours, may arise from fetal germ cells during fetal development rather than later in life. In order to corroborate this hypothesis, we undertook the present...... alternative explanation. However, we speculate that a transformation of normal fetal germ cells into CIS cells may take place before the end of the 9th week of fetal development. Furthermore, the expression of c-kit in early human fetal germ cells indicates that the c-kit and its ligand play a role in the......-like alkaline phosphatase, the protooncogene c-kit protein product, and the antigens for the monoclonal antibodies TRA-1-60 and M2A. The relative numbers of fetal germ cells that demonstrated positive reaction with the markers were calculated. RESULTS: The vast majority of the germ cells (75-100%) in the first...

  10. Il-6 signaling between ductal carcinoma in situ cells and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts mediates tumor cell growth and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Osuala, Kingsley O.; Sameni, Mansoureh; Shah, Seema; Aggarwal, Neha; Simonait, Michelle L.; Franco, Omar E.; Hong, Yan; Hayward, Simon W.; Behbod, Fariba; Mattingly, Raymond R.; Sloane, Bonnie F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer in which approximately half the patients will progress to invasive cancer. Gaining a better understanding of DCIS progression may reduce overtreatment of patients. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 increases with pathological stage and grade, and is associated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are present ...

  11. Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Microdissected Cell Populations Indicates that Testicular Carcinoma In situ Is an Arrested Gonocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, S. B.; Almstrup, K.; Dalgaard, M.;

    2009-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancers in young adult men derive from a precursor lesion called carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis. CIS cells were suggested to arise from primordial germ cells or gonocytes. However, direct studies on purified samples of CIS cells are lacking. To overcome this problem, we...

  12. Radiation therapy of recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma in-situ: a case report

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    Noone Robert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also referred to as anal squamous carcinoma in-situ, or Bowen's disease of the anus, make up less than 1% of all digestive system cancers in the United States. The treatment of choice is surgical resection with anal mapping. However, this disease often recurs or persists, requiring additional surgery for these patients. This can compromise the anal sphincter leading to leakage. In this case report, we discuss the efficacy of radiation therapy as a modality to treat post-excisional recurrent Bowen's disease, which may prevent sphincter compromise, leading to improved quality of life. Case presentation An 84-year-old Caucasian woman presented with post-excisional persistent/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in-situ. The initial lesion measured 3 cm in diameter on the right lateral side of the anal margin. A standard surgery consisting of wide local excision with anal mapping was performed. The margins were clear and our patient was followed up. Our patient recurred with a 1.2 × 0.8 cm lesion on the left anal verge extending to the anal canal. A biopsy along with mapping was done, and 2 of the 17 mapping specimens were positive for carcinoma in-situ, one in the anal canal. Due to the location of the positive anal mapping, and in order to prevent sphincter compromise on re-excision, our patient was offered definitive radiation therapy. Two years after radiation therapy, our patient showed no signs of recurrent disease and had good sphincter control. Conclusion Although the main treatment modality for treating persistent/recurrent Bowen's disease is surgery, an alternative approach using external beam radiation for CIS may be enough to provide a cure for some patients with recurrent disease.

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of embryonal marker TRA-1-60 in carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors of the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Alexander; Andrews, P W; Jørgensen, N; Müller, Jørn; Graem, N; Skakkebaek, N E

    1993-01-01

    Testicular cancer is preceded by the noninvasive stage of carcinoma in situ (CIS). According to a recent hypothesis, testicular CIA cells are germ cells transformed in fetal life. The idea of an embryonal origin of testicular germ cell neoplasia would be strengthened by the finding of antigenic s...

  14. Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ; Report of a rare disease

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    Sujata Jetley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the endometrium, whether primary or secondary to cervical cancer, is a rare entity. Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma in situ is even more uncommon; it usually occurs in postmenopausal women and has a strong association with pyometra. We report a 60-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman who presented to the Hakeem Abdul Hameed Centenary Hospital, New Delhi, India, in May 2014 with a lower abdominal swelling corresponding in size to a pregnancy of 26 gestational weeks and vaginal discharge of one year’s duration. A total abdominal hysterectomy with a bilateral salpingooophorectomy was performed, which revealed an enlarged uterus with pyometra. Histopathology showed that the entire endometrial lining had been replaced with malignant squamous cells without invasion of the myometrium. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumour cells were positive for p63 with a high Ki-67 labelling index. No adjuvant therapy was required and the patient was disease-free at a seven-month follow-up.

  15. Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ: Report of a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetley, Sujata; Jairajpuri, Zeeba S; Hassan, Mohammad J; Madaan, Garima; Jain, Reena

    2015-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium, whether primary or secondary to cervical cancer, is a rare entity. Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma in situ is even more uncommon; it usually occurs in postmenopausal women and has a strong association with pyometra. We report a 60-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman who presented to the Hakeem Abdul Hameed Centenary Hospital, New Delhi, India, in May 2014 with a lower abdominal swelling corresponding in size to a pregnancy of 26 gestational weeks and vaginal discharge of one year's duration. A total abdominal hysterectomy with a bilateral salpingooophorectomy was performed, which revealed an enlarged uterus with pyometra. Histopathology showed that the entire endometrial lining had been replaced with malignant squamous cells without invasion of the myometrium. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumour cells were positive for p63 with a high Ki-67 labelling index. No adjuvant therapy was required and the patient was disease-free at a seven-month follow-up. PMID:26629388

  16. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Yamashita, Motoki; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been recently identified. However, there are only a few genetic studies to date. In this article, we performed an immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study for six cases including one case with sarcomatoid change. As a result, we observed frequent immunohistochemical expression of AMACR. FISH of chromosome 3 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and disomy for one case. Additionally, FISH of chromosome 16 showed trisomy for three cases, monosomy for two cases, and both trisomy and monosomy for one case. Furthermore, both the carcinomatous area and the sarcomatoid area of one ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change revealed monosomy of chromosomes 3, 9, and 16 but showed disomy of chromosome 14. In conclusion, the numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 16, irrespective of gain or loss, may be characteristic of ACD-associated RCC. PMID:22179186

  17. Sperm Concentration, Testicular Volume and Age Predict Risk of Carcinoma In Situ in Contralateral Testis of Men with Testicular Germ Cell Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, Camilla Nymann; Daugaard, Gedske; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Jørgensen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether semen quality or some easily attainable clinical parameters might be used to estimate the risk of contralateral carcinoma in situ in patients with unilateral testicular germ cell tumors.......We investigated whether semen quality or some easily attainable clinical parameters might be used to estimate the risk of contralateral carcinoma in situ in patients with unilateral testicular germ cell tumors....

  18. Carcinoma in situ in the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørth, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Andersson, L;

    2000-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis is a common precursor of germ-cell tumours in adults and adolescents, with the exception of spermatocytic seminoma. This article reviews existing knowledge on the pathobiology, genetic aspects and epidemiology of CIS, discusses current hypotheses concerning...

  19. Treatment options for carcinoma in situ testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M S; Gundgaard, M.G.; Daugaard, G

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ testis (CIS) is known as the precursor of germ cell cancer of the testis. International guidelines on diagnosis and treatment are inconsistent. Some countries offer routine biopsies of the contralateral testicle in relation to orchidectomy for testicular cancer, whereas other...

  20. Expression of the c-kit protein product in carcinoma-in-situ and invasive testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1994-01-01

    , CIS and overtly invasive human male germ cell tumours were analysed immunohistochemically for expression of the c-kit proto-oncogene protein product. Testicular tissue samples from 36 patients with various types of testicular germ cell neoplasia and 19 control specimens were stained using an indirect...... addition, we propose that the c-kit protein product is a new marker for carcinoma-in-situ of the testis....

  1. Embryonic stem cell-like features of testicular carcinoma in situ revealed by genome-wide gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Wirkner, Ute;

    2004-01-01

    their stoichiometry on progression into embryonic carcinoma. We compared the CIS expression profile with patterns reported in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which revealed a substantial overlap that may be as high as 50%. We also demonstrated an over-representation of expressed genes in regions of 17q and......Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the common precursor of histologically heterogeneous testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), which in recent decades have markedly increased and now are the most common malignancy of young men. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we identified >200 genes highly...

  2. BCG for carcinoma in situ.

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    Jakse, G

    1992-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the most effective intravesical therapy of carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder. Six, weekly instillations of BCG result in a complete remission in about 70-80% of patients. The optimal dose however has still to be defined, and the value of maintenance therapy is also a matter of debate. Recurrent tumours after complete remission occur mainly in the distal ureter and prostatic urethra. In these patients, cystectomy may be required. In about 60-80% of patients, local (e.g. cystitis) and/or systemic (e.g. fever, malaise) side effects are observed. The occurrence of cystitis is associated with the number of instillations, BCG dose and a positive skin test. Systemic side effects are connected with pre-existing dysuria or bacterial cystitis and with traumatic catheterization. Severe toxicity occurs in about 5% of the patients. Prognostic parameters indicating complete remission have yet to be determined, but there is evidence that cytokines detected in the urine and immune-cell infiltration into the bladder wall revealed by immunohistochemistry, can be of value in this respect. PMID:1396945

  3. Stem cell pluripotency factor NANOG is expressed in human fetal gonocytes, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Almstrup, K; Nielsen, J E;

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: NANOG is a key regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and pluripotency. Our recent genome-wide gene expression profiling study of the precursor of testicular germ cell tumours, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), showed close similarity between ESC and CIS, including high NANOG...... expression. In the present study we analysed the protein expression of NANOG during normal development of human testis and in a large series of neoplastic/dysgenetic specimens. METHODS AND RESULTS: We detected abundant expression of NANOG in CIS and in CIS-derived testicular tumours with marked differences...... earlier than for OCT-4. We detected no expression at the protein level in normal testis. CONCLUSIONS: NANOG is a new marker for testicular CIS and germ cell tumours and the high level of NANOG along with OCT-4 are determinants of the stem cell-like pluripotency of the preinvasive CIS cell. Timing of NANOG...

  4. An electronic brachytherapy technique for treating squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the digit: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Arterbery, V Elayne; Watson, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the digit presents a complex management problem, which is usually treated with surgery or radiation or topical agents. The outcome of the surgical treatment can be an undesirable cosmetic result and loss of function. We report a unique Electronic Brachytherapy technique to treat the digit, which uses a 50 Kv miniaturized X-ray source with specialized applicators. Case presentation A 62-year-old African-American male was presented with a 12-month h...

  5. Epidermotropic pagetoid spread and squamous cell carcinoma in situ in the overlying epidermis of Merkel cell carcinoma

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    Toshiyuki Yamamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old female visited the Department of Dermatology at Tokyo Metropolitan Bokuto Hospital, complaining of a nodule in the face. She was diagnosed as Merkel cell carcinoma by a skin biopsy in another clinic, and referred to our hospital for operation. A physical examination revealed a dome-shaped reddish nodule, sized 1-cm in diameter, in the center of the left cheek. Cervical lymph nodes were not palpable.

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma (Bowen’s disease in situ in three cats Carcinoma espinocelular in situ (doença de Bowen em três gatos

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    L.G. Conceição

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Três casos de carcinoma multicêntrico in situ de células escamosas (doença de Bowen são descritos na espécie felina. As neoplasias ocorreram em gatos idosos e acometeram a região pré-auricular, cervical, abdominal e flancos. Um gato apresentou lesão única e os demais apresentaram lesões multifocais, que se caracterizaram por placas que variavam de hiperceratóticas a verruco-crostosas e eram hiperpigmentadas. Algumas eram ulceradas, com fissuras que sangravam facilmente. Histologicamente, as células neoplásicas encontravam-se confinadas à epiderme e aos folículos pilosos, sem o envolvimento da membrana basal. Em um dos casos houve melhora significativa das lesões após terapia oral com acitretina.

  7. In situ quantitation of inflammatory mononuclear cells in ductal infiltrating breast carcinoma. Relation to prognostic parameters.

    OpenAIRE

    An, T.; Sood, U.; Pietruk, T.; Cummings, G.; Hashimoto, K; Crissman, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined inflammatory mononuclear cells in 10 fibroadenomas and 56 ductal infiltrating type carcinomas of the breast to see whether the distribution of various subpopulations of the mononuclear cells were correlated with known histologic, biochemical, and clinical parameters of the cancers. T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages were quantitated on frozen tissue sections, which were stained with monoclonal antibodies, as demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase techni...

  8. Transition from Preinvasive Carcinoma In Situ to Seminoma Is Accompanied by a Reduction of Connexin 43 Expression in Sertoli Cells and Germ Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Brehm, Ralph; Rüttinger, Christina; Fischer, Petra; Gashaw, Isabella; Winterhager, Elke; Kliesch, Sabine; Bohle, Rainer M.; Steger, Klaus; Bergmann, Martin ,

    2006-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) represents the preinvasive stage of human germ cell tumors, but the mechanism leading to pubertal proliferation and invasive malignancy remains unknown. Among testicular gap junctional proteins, connexin 43 (Cx43) represents the predominant Cx, and, previously, an inverse correlation between synthesis of Cx43 protein and progression of tumor development was detected. In the present study, using cDNA microarray analysis, in situ hybridization, semiquantitative reverse t...

  9. Transition from Preinvasive Carcinoma In Situ to Seminoma Is Accompanied by a Reduction of Connexin 43 Expression in Sertoli Cells and Germ Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph Brehm; Christina Ruttinger; Petra Fischer; Isabella Gashaw; Elke Winterhager; Sabine Kliesch; Bohle, Rainer M.; Klaus Steger; Martin Bergmann

    2006-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) represents the preinvasive stage of human germ cell tumors, but the mechanism leading to pubertal proliferation and invasive malignancy remains unknown. Among testicular gap functional proteins, connexin 43 (Cx43) represents the predominant Cx, and, previously, an inverse correlation between synthesis of Cx43 protein and progression of tumor development was detected. In the present study, using cDNA microarray analysis, in situ hybridization, semi quantitative reverse ...

  10. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume in normal germ cells and carcinoma in situ of the human testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Müller, J

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ of the testis may appear many years prior to the development of an invasive tumour. Using point-sampled intercepts, base-line data concerning unbiased stereological estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (nuclear vV) were obtained in 50 retrospective serial...... testicular biopsies from 10 patients with carcinoma in situ. All but two patients eventually developed an invasive growth. Testicular biopsies from 10 normal adult individuals and five prepubertal boys were included as controls. Nuclear vV in testicular carcinoma in situ was significantly larger than that of...... in carcinoma in situ with or without co-existing invasion, and no characteristic pattern of nuclear vV was disclosed by following the lesion in serial biopsies over time from individual patients. Estimation of nuclear vV may represent an adjuvant tool in morphologically puzzling cases of testicular...

  11. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

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    Giuseppe Perrone

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23% of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001; in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively. No relationship was evident with tumour size (T and regional lymph node (N status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004. Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  12. A novel double staining strategy for improved detection of testicular carcinoma in situ cells in human semen samples

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    Nielsen, J E; Kristensen, D M; Almstrup, K;

    2012-01-01

    /alkaline phosphatase were absent. A combination of immunocytological staining for AP-2¿ or OCT3/4 and rapid cytochemical alkaline phosphatase reaction was subsequently developed. This approach was tested in 22 patients with TGCT. In 14 patients (63.6%), double stained cells were found and thus the method was proven......Prompted by the recently reported expression of POU5F1 (OCT3/4) in epididymis, a panel of markers for carcinoma in situ (CIS) testis and testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT), including AP-2¿(TFAP2C), NANOG, OCT3/4, KIT, placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), M2A/PDPN and MAGE-A4 were examined...... by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridisation in urogenital epithelia, which may interfere with detection of CIS cells in semen. In addition to OCT3/4, the expression of AP-2¿ and NANOG or their variants was detected in urogenital epithelia, while other CIS markers, including PLAP...

  13. Clinical presentation of minimally invasive and in situ squamous cell carcinoma of the anus in homosexual men.

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    Forti, R L; Medwell, S J; Aboulafia, D M; Surawicz, C M; Spach, D H

    1995-09-01

    From January 1988 to December 1993, we identified six men with minimally invasive (stage I) squamous cell carcinoma of the anus and 10 men with anal carcinoma in situ (CIS). Of the six patients with invasive carcinoma, four were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including one with AIDS. Of the 10 patients with CIS, eight were infected with HIV, including four with AIDS. Anal pain and bleeding were the most common symptoms of minimally invasive anal cancer and anal CIS. Anal irritation, burning, or pruritus occurred more frequently in patients with CIS, whereas anal ulcers, masses, or abscesses were more frequent in patients with minimally invasive cancer. Several patients with CIS had a discrete area of leukoplakia in the anal canal or a pigmented plaque of the anus and anal canal. These lesions were not observed in patients with minimally invasive anal cancer. The symptoms and signs of early-stage anal cancer in men at risk for developing HIV infection or men infected with HIV often resemble those of other common anorectal diseases in homosexual men. Anal cancer in HIV-infected men is not limited to those individuals with AIDS. PMID:8527551

  14. Single-Cell Genetic Analysis of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ and Invasive Breast Cancer Reveals Enormous Tumor Heterogeneity yet Conserved Genomic Imbalances and Gain of MYC during Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin; Berroa Garcia, Lissa Y.; Bradley, Amanda; Ortiz-Melendez, Clarymar; Lee, Woei-Jyh; Christensen, Rebecca; Prindiville, Sheila A.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Soballe, Peter W; HU, YUE; Chowdhury, Salim A.; Schwartz, Russell; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Ried, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a precursor lesion of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. To understand the dynamics of genomic alterations in this progression, we used four multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panels consisting of the oncogenes COX2, MYC, HER2, CCND1, and ZNF217 and the tumor suppressor genes DBC2, CDH1, and TP53 to visualize copy number changes in 13 cases of synchronous DCIS and IDC based on single-cell analyses. The DCIS had a lower degree of ...

  15. Colonisation of basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis by malignant melanoma in situ in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise J. Smith

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Although malignant melanoma (MM and both basal cell carcinoma (BCC and actinic keratosis (AK are sun-induced lesions, the coexistence of these entities at the same anatomical site (collision tumour is exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with a known history of xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV who presented with 2 separate skin lesions over the middle and upper right forearm, respectively. The clinical impression was that of BCCs or squamous cell lesions. On histological examination, both specimens showed features of melanoma in situ (MIS. In the first lesion, MIS merged with and colonised a superficial and focally invasive BCC. In the second lesion, MIS merged with an AK. No separate invasive nests of malignant melanoma were seen in either specimen. The atypical melanocytes were highlighted by Melan-A and HMB-45 immunostaining, whereas the epithelial cells in both the BCC and AK stained with the pancytokeratin MNF-116. The patient had a previous history of multiple MMs and non-melanomatous skin cancers and finally developed widespread metastatic malignant melanoma, which proved fatal. The rare and interesting phenomenon of collision tumours may pose diagnostic difficulties. To our knowledge, this is the first reported simultaneous presentation of cytologically malignant collision tumours in a patient with XPV.

  16. Treatment Options for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... website . Treatment Options for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) Treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ may include ... About™ Breast Cancer Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer Surgery to Reduce the Risk ...

  17. Silencing of HSulf-2 expression in MCF10DCIS.com cells attenuate ductal carcinoma in situ progression to invasive ductal carcinoma in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Ashwani; McKean, Hiedi; Kim, Hyunseok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Mcguire, Jacie; Roberts, Lewis R; Goetz, Matthew P.; Shridhar, Viji

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a heterogeneous group of proliferative cellular lesions that have the potential to become invasive. Very little is known about the molecular alterations involved in the progression from DCIS to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Heparan endosulfatase (HSulf-2) edits sulfate moieties on heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and has been implicated in modulating heparin binding growth factor signaling, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. H...

  18. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions. PMID:27197512

  19. Histomorfometria e índice proliferativo (Ki-67 no carcinoma escamocelular in situ de pregas vocais Histomorphometry and proliferative index in squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the vocal cords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Barros Soares Mendonça

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As displasias da laringe são precursoras do carcinoma escamocelular invasivo e constituem lesões pouco comuns, pois a maior parte dos casos é detectada como carcinoma invasor. OBJETIVO: Caracterizar as displasias acentuadas/carcinoma in situ da prega vocal quanto a área do epitélio, diâmetro dos núcleos e índice proliferativo, comparando esses dados com os obtidos no epitélio escamoso normal e de transição. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Entre as 1.400 biópsias e peças cirúrgicas de lesões intraepiteliais e carcinomas invasivos de laringe (1994-2006, foram selecionados cinco casos (0,35% pareados com dois controles de epitélio normal e com a idade; todos foram submetidos a análise morfométrica e imuno--histoquímica (Ki-67. RESULTADOS: Comparando-se o epitélio displásico com o normal e de transição observou-se maior área e diâmetro nuclear no epitélio displásico; não houve diferenças significativas no diâmetro dos núcleos por camada entre o epitélio displásico e de transição; e o índice proliferativo foi maior no epitélio displásico com núcleos corados em todas camadas e menor com núcleos limitados a camada basal e parabasal no epitélio normal e de transição. CONCLUSÃO: verifica-se maior área no epitélio displásico. O diâmetro dos núcleos do epitélio displásico e do de transição são semelhantes, mas este apresenta núcleos uniformes em toda extensão em contraste com o pleomorfismo do epitélio displásico. O índice proliferativo (Ki-67 contribui para o diagnóstico diferencial das lesões escamosas da prega vocal, pois no carcinoma in situ/displasia acentuada observa-se maior número de núcleos marcados, os quais são vistos em todas as camadas no epitélio.INTRODUCTION: Laryngeal dysplasias, precursors of squamous cell carcinomas, are uncommon lesions, inasmuch as most cases are diagnosed as invasive carcinomas. OBJECTIVE: To characterize severe dysplasia/in situ carcinoma of the vocal

  20. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer L. Peterson; Vallow, Laura A.; Stephanie L. Hines; Buskirk, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a noninvasive form of breast cancer that has increased in incidence over the past several decades secondary to screening mammography. DCIS now represents 20–30% of all newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer. Patients with DCIS typically present with an abnormal mammogram, and diagnosis is most commonly obtained with an imageguided biopsy. Historically, mastectomy was considered the primary curative option for patients with DCIS. However, treatm...

  1. Comedo-ductal carcinoma in situ: A paradoxical role for programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar, Malathy P. V.; Tait, Larry; Pauley, Robert J.; Wu, Gen Sheng; Santner, Steven J.; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Shekhar, Varun; Nassar, Hind; Visscher, Daniel W.; Heppner, Gloria H.; Miller, Fred R.

    2008-01-01

    Comedo-DCIS is a histologic subtype of preinvasive breast neoplasia that is characterized by prominent apoptotic cell death and has greater malignant potential than other DCIS subtypes. We investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis in comedo-DCIS and its role in conversion of comedo-DCIS to invasive cancer. Clinical comedo-DCIS excisions and the MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer model which produces lesions resembling comedo-DCIS were analyzed. Apoptotic luminal and myoepithelial cells were ide...

  2. Simultaneous stereotactic body radiation therapy of a primary non-small cell lung cancer and synchronous carcinoma in situ in a medically inoperable patient: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The co-incidence of synchronous intraepithelial neoplasia and early stage invasive lung cancer is not a rare phenomenon. The need for curative treatment and the invasive potential of squamous cell pulmonary carcinoma in situ have been a topic of controversy. Surgical resection still remains the treatment of choice. Varieties of endoscopic techniques such as brachytherapy were developed as an alternative to surgery in selected patients. External beam radiation therapy has been used traditionally in combination with endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of roentgenographically occult lung cancer, and can be offered for all patients, but is handicapped, because these tumors are radiographically invisible. We report the first case of a pulmonary carcinoma in situ that was successfully treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

  3. Transition from Preinvasive Carcinoma In Situ to Seminoma Is Accompanied by a Reduction of Connexin 43 Expression in Sertoli Cells and Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Brehm

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma in situ (CIS represents the preinvasive stage of human germ cell tumors, but the mechanism leading to pubertal proliferation and invasive malignancy remains unknown. Among testicular gap functional proteins, connexin 43 (Cx43 represents the predominant Cx, and, previously, an inverse correlation between synthesis of Cx43 protein and progression of tumor development was detected. In the present study, using cDNA microarray analysis, in situ hybridization, semi quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR from tissue homogenates, RT-PCR from microdissected tubules with normal spermatogenesis and CIS, and seminoma cells from invasive seminoma, we asked whether reduction of Cx43 protein is accompanied by a change of Cx43 transcripts. We detected a significant downregulation of Cx43 at mRNA level in Sertoli and germ cells starting in seminiferous tubules infiltrated with CIS and resulting in a complete loss in seminoma cells. It was demonstrated that downregulation of Cx43 expression in neoplastic human testis takes place at the transcriptional level and starts in CIS. This reduction of Cx43 expression further suggests that early intratubular derangement in Cx43 gene expression and disruption of intercellular communication between Sertoli cells and/or Sertoli and preinvasive tumor cells may play a role in the progression phase of human seminoma development.

  4. Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-03-13

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  5. Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2008-05-07

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  6. Classification of ductal carcinoma in situ by gene expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hannemann, Juliane; Velds, Arno; Halfwerk, Johannes BG; Kreike, Bas; Johannes L. Peterse; van de Vijver, Marc J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is characterised by the intraductal proliferation of malignant epithelial cells. Several histological classification systems have been developed, but assessing the histological type/grade of DCIS lesions is still challenging, making treatment decisions based on these features difficult. To obtain insight in the molecular basis of the development of different types of DCIS and its progression to invasive breast cancer, we have studied differences in...

  7. Sensitivity of in situ detection with biotinylated probes of human papilloma virus type 16 DNA in frozen tissue sections of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walboomers, J M; Melchers, W J; Mullink, H; Meijer, C J; Struyk, A; Quint, W G; van der Noordaa, J; ter Schegget, J

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivity of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA detection by DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated probes (bio-DISH) was estimated by performing this technique on snap-frozen tissue sections of 10 cervical squamous cell carcinomas containing increasing amounts of HPV-16 as determined by Southern blot hybridization. A protocol using serial sections for bio-DISH and DNA extraction was used. The number of positively stained cells and the detection limit were strongly dependent on the treatment of the sections with proteinase K prior to hybridization. At low proteinase K concentration (0.1 micrograms/ml), the detection limit appeared to be 30-40 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell, whereas morphology was preserved. A high proteinase K concentration (1-5 micrograms/ml) often resulted in an increase in the number of positively stained cells but also in a poor morphology. The detection limit was improved to at least 20 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell. PMID:2837906

  8. DUCTAL CARCINOMA IN SITU OF THE BREAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Methods: Clinicopathological and follow-up data were collected in 52 patients with DCIS. Results: The clinic data showed that 50 patients had signs of breast lumps or/and nipple discharges, 2 patients presented abnormal mammography; 2 patients had lymph node involved; and 14 patients were accompanied with intraductal papillomatosis. All patients were Received surgical therapy. The follow-up data showed 1 patient locally recurred after lumpectomy, and was underwent mastectomy again, then cured. There were no patients died of DCIS. Conclusion: Mastectomy should be a standard surgical mode, and the prognosis of DCIS was favorable, but mammography for screening of asymptomatic women should be strengthened to find DCIS.

  9. Transcription factor AP-2gamma is a developmentally regulated marker of testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian;

    2004-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: AP-2gamma is developmentally regulated and associated with the undifferentiated phenotype in germ cells. This transcription factor may be involved in self-renewal and survival of immature germ cells and tissue-specific stem cells. AP-2gamma is a novel marker of testicular CIS and CIS-derived...... protein level in normal human tissues and a panel of tumors and tumor-derived cell lines. In the gonads, we established the ontogeny of expression of AP-2gamma in normal and dysgenetic samples. We also investigated the regulation of AP-2gamma by steroids and retinoic acid. RESULTS: We detected abundant AP......-2gamma in testicular CIS and in testicular germ cell tumors of young adults and confirmed differential expression of AP-2gamma in somatic tumors. We found that AP-2gamma expression was regulated by retinoic acid in an embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2). The investigation of ontogeny of AP-2gamma...

  10. Detection of Human Papilloma Virus Type 16 E6 mRNA in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by In Situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-rong Jiang; Peng Wang; Yong Li; Tao Ning; Xiao-song Rao; Bao-guoLiu

    2010-01-01

    Objective:Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma(LSCC)is a common malignant tumor in Northeast China and is frequently associated with well-established risk factors like smoking and alcohol abuse.Human papilloma virus(HPV)is an epitheliotropic oncogenic virus that has been detected in a variety of head and neck tumors including LSCC.This retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection in patients with LSCC.Methods:In situ hybridization was performed in 99 patients with LSCC to detect the expression of HPV-16 E6mRNA.Results:The positive rate of HPV16 E6 mRNA was 36.36%(36/99)in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma(LSCC),whereas only 3 of 50(6%)specimens of the normal laryngeal mucosa as a control group showed positive results(P0.05).Conclusion:The results suggest that the increased prevalence of HPV infection compared to normal laryngeal mucosa and the fact that high-risk HPV types(especially type 16)were the most frequently identified do not allow the exclusion of HPV as a risk factor in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.However,their clinical value remains to be further investigated.

  11. Detection of Human Papilloma Virus Type 16 E6 mRNA in Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by In Situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-rong Jiang; Peng Wang; Yong Li; Tao Ning; Xiao-song Rao; Bao-guoLiu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma(LSCC) is a common malignant tumor in Northeast China and is frequently associated with well-established risk factors like smoking and alcohol abuse.Human papilloma virus (HPV) is an epitheliotropic oncogenic virus that has been detected in a variety of head and neck tumors including LSCC.This retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection in patients with LSCC.Methods: In situ hybridization was performed in 99 patients with LSCC to detect the expression of HPV-16 E6 mRNA.Results: The positive rate of HPV 16 E6 mRNA was 36.36%(36/99) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC),whereas only 3 of 50(6%) specimens of the normal laryngeal mucosa as a control group showed positive results(P0.05).Conclusion: The results suggest that the increased prevalence of HPV infection compared to normal laryngeal mucosa and the fact that high-risk HPV types(especially type 16) were the most frequently identified do not allow the exclusion of HPV as a risk factor in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.However,their clinical value remains to be further investigated.

  12. Overexpression of NDRG2 Increases Iodine Uptake and Inhibits Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Growth In Situ and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Anqi; Wang, Chengguo; Sun, Jiachen; Gao, Jianjun; Tao, Liang; Du, Xilin; Zhao, Huadong; Yang, Jiandong; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an uncommon and highly aggressive tumor of the neuroendocrine system, which derives from the neuroendocrine C cells of the thyroid gland. Except for surgical resection, there are not very many effective systemic treatment options for MTC. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) had a significantly lower expression in MTC compared with normal thyroid tissue. However, the function of NDRG2 in MTC oncogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that overexpression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of TT cells (human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells) in vitro and suppressed the development of MTC in a nude mouse xenograft model. Further analysis revealed that NDRG2 arrested the cell cycle G0/G1 phase progression and induced TT cell apoptosis. Moreover, NDRG2 overexpression may mediate the antiproliferative effect by reducing cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein levels. We also found aberrant NDRG2-mitigated TT cell migration and invasion in vitro. Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active I(-) transport into the thyroid follicular cells, and radionuclide treatment is a promising therapy for MTC. Our current data revealed that NDRG2 overexpression enhanced NIS level in TT cells and increased their iodine uptake in vitro. Furthermore, (99m)TcO4(-) radionuclide imaging of the xenograft tumors indicated that NDRG2 could promote NIS-mediated radionuclide transport. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NDRG2 is a critical molecule in the regulation of MTC biological behavior and a potential promoter in radioactive iodine therapy. PMID:26802650

  13. Ductal carcinoma in situ: a challenging disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Altintas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS represents a heterogenous group of lesions with variable malignant potential. Although it is clearly pre-invasive, not all lesions progress to an invasive malignant disease. The significant increase in the frequency of diagnosis is the result of both widespread use of screening mammography and better recognition among pathologists. Treatment is controversial, but for several decades total mastectomy has been considered as the appropriate treatment. The tendency to be less aggressive in terms of surgery has followed the pattern of events observed in the treatment of invasive breast carcinomas. More recently, it has become clear that breastconserving procedures could be applied and selected on the basis of diagnostics and risk factors. When all patients with DCIS are considered, the overall mortality is extremely low, only about 1–2%. On the other hand, breast-conserving surgery is only curative in 75–85%; 50% of the local recurrences have proven to be invasive with a mortality rate of 12–15%. There is no place for axillary node dissection, adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy in the treatment. Important factors in predicting local recurrence are age, family history, nuclear grade, comedo-type necrosis, tumor size and margin width. With the addition of radiation therapy to excisional surgery, there is a 50% reduction in the overall local recurrence rate. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index (VNPI, recently updated, is a tool that quantifies measurable prognostic factors that can be used in the decision-making process of treatment. Recent data from large cohort studies and randomized trials have emerged to guide treatment. DCIS is now understood to have diverse malignant potential and it is unlikely that there will be a single treatment for this wide range of lesions. Advances in molecular biology and gene expression profiling of human breast tumors have been providing important insights into the relationship

  14. Human papillomavirus (HPV) in vulvar dysplasia and carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Jette; Poulsen, H; Horn, T;

    1995-01-01

    Surgical specimens from 62 patients with vulvar dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were morphologically investigated. Lesions were classified according to WHO (mild, moderate, severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ) and according to Toki et al. (1991) (warty, basaloid, combined warty/basaloid or bas...... PCR. No case revealed more than one type of HPV. HPV type 6, 11, 18, and 31 were not detected by PCR. The results indicate a correlation between HPV type 16 and 33 and dysplasia/carcinoma in situ in the vulva....

  15. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Peterson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast is a noninvasive form of breast cancer that has increased in incidence over the past several decades secondary to screening mammography. DCIS now represents 20–30% of all newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer. Patients with DCIS typically present with an abnormal mammogram, and diagnosis is most commonly obtained with an imageguided biopsy. Historically, mastectomy was considered the primary curative option for patients with DCIS. However, treatment of DCIS continues to evolve, and now treatment strategies also include breast-conserving therapy, which consists of local excision followed by radiation therapy or local excision alone. Multiple randomized trials have confirmed a decrease in ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in patients treated with local excision followed by radiation therapy compared with local excision alone. Ongoing clinical trials attempt to identify a subgroup of DCIS patients at low risk for recurrence who may not benefit from radiation therapy. In addition, because the majority of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences occur near the original primary tumor site, partial breast irradiation is currently under investigation as a treatment option for DCIS patients. Randomized trials have shown tamoxifen can reduce the risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast tumor recurrences while the role of aromatase inhibitors is the subject of current clinical trials. DCIS represents a complex pathologic entity, and treatment optimization requires a multidisciplinary approach.

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and qPCR to detect Merkel cell polyomavirus physical status and load in Merkel cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugg, Anke M; Rennspiess, Dorit; zur Hausen, Axel; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Cathomas, Gieri; Becker, Jürgen C; Schrama, David

    2014-12-15

    The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is detected in 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Clonal integration and tumor-specific mutations in the large T antigen are strong arguments that MCPyV is a human tumor virus. However, the relationship between viral presence and cancer induction remains discussed controversially. Since almost all studies on virus prevalence are based on PCR techniques, we performed MCPyV fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on MCC to gain information about the quality of the viral presence on the single cell level. MCPyV-FISH was performed on tissue microarrays containing 62 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples including all tumor grades of 42 patients. The hybridization patterns were correlated to the qPCR data determined on corresponding whole tissue sections. Indeed, MCPyV-FISH and qPCR data were highly correlated, i.e. 83% for FISH-positive and 93% for FISH-negative cores. Accordingly, the mean of the qPCR values of all MCPyV-positive cores differed significantly from the mean of the negative cores (p = 0.0076). Importantly, two hybridization patterns were definable in the MCPyV-FISH: a punctate pattern (85%) indicating viral integration, which correlated with a moderate viral abundance and a combination of the punctate with a diffuse pattern (15%), suggesting a possible coexistence of integrated and episomal virus which was associated with very high viral load and VP1 expression. Thus, MCPyV-FISH adds important information on the single cell level within the histomorphological context and could therefore be an important tool to further elucidate MCPyV related carcinogenesis. PMID:24771111

  17. Basal cytokeratin as a potential marker of low risk of invasion in ductal carcinoma in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando N. Aguiar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Biological markers that predict the development of invasive breast cancer are needed to improve personalized therapy for patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ. We investigated the role of basal cytokeratin 5/6 in the risk of invasion in breast ductal carcinoma in situ. METHODS: We constructed tissue microarrays using 236 ductal carcinoma in situ samples: 90 pure samples (group 1 and 146 samples associated with invasive carcinoma (group 2. Both groups had similar nuclear grades and were obtained from patients of similar ages. The groups were compared in terms of estrogen (ER and progesterone receptor (PR status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 expression, cytokeratin 5/6 immunostaining, human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR membrane staining and molecular subtype, as indicated by their immunohistochemistry profiles. RESULTS: ER/PR-negative status was predictive of invasion, whereas HER2 superexpression and cytokeratin 5/6-positive status were negatively associated with invasion. Among the high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ cases, a triple-positive profile (positive for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 and cytokeratin 5/6 expression by neoplastic cells were negatively associated with invasion. In the low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ subgroup, only cytokeratin 5/6 expression exhibited a negative association with the probability of invasion. CONCLUSION: The immunohistochemical expression of cytokeratin 5/6 by ductal carcinoma in situ epithelial cells may provide clinically useful information regarding the risk of progression to invasive disease.

  18. S100A7 (Psoriasin), highly expressed in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), is regulated by IFN-gamma in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work was to explore signal transduction pathways used in the regulation of S100A7 (psoriasin). Members of the S100 gene family participate in many important cellular functions. Psoriasin, S100A8 (calgranulin A) and S100A9 (calgranulin B) are expressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), as well as in the hyperproliferative skin disease, psoriasis. In the latter condition, a disturbance in the STAT pathway has recently been reported. This pathway is implicated in the regulation of IFN-gamma, widely recognized as a key cytokine in psoriasis. IFN-gamma also exerts anti-tumor action in a number of tumor cell types, including breast cancer. We therefore examined the effect of IFN-gamma and STAT-signaling on the psoriasin expression. We established a TAC2 mouse mammary epithelial cell line with tetracycline-inducible psoriasin expression (Tet-Off). Viability in cell culture was estimated using MTS assay. Protein and gene expression were evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Statistical analyses were assessed using a one-tailed, paired t-test. We report the downregulation of psoriasin by IFN-gamma in the MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell line, as well as the downregulation of psoriasin induced by anoikis in cell lines derived from different epithelial tissues. In contrast, IFN-gamma had no suppressive effect on calgranulin A or calgranulin B. IFN-gamma is an important activator of the STAT1 pathway and we confirmed an active signaling pathway in the cell lines that responded to IFN-gamma treatment. In contrast, in the SUM190 breast carcinoma cell line, IFN-gamma did not suppress the expression of endogenous psoriasin. Moreover, a reduced phosphorylation of the STAT1 protein was observed. We showed that IFN-gamma treatment and the inhibition of the transcription factor NFkappaB had a synergistic effect on psoriasin levels. Finally, in TAC2 cells with tetracycline-induced psoriasin expression, we observed the increased viability of

  19. A Common MicroRNA Signature Consisting of miR-133a, miR-139-3p, and miR-142-3p Clusters Bladder Carcinoma in Situ with Normal Umbrella Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Angela Y.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Domingo-Domenech, Josep; Bonal, Dennis M.; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Silva, Jose M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs with critical roles in a large variety of biological processes such as development and tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling has been reported to be a powerful tool to classify tissue samples, including cancers, based on their developmental lineage. In this study, we have profiled the expression of miRNAs in bladder carcinoma in situ (CIS) and distinct cell compartments of the normal bladder, namely umbrella and basal-intermediate urothelial cells, as well ...

  20. Emerging applications of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. I. Management of invasive transitional cell human bladder carcinoma. II. Fluorescent in situ hybridization Comets for the identification of damaged and repaired DNA sequences in individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey-Martin, V J; Ho, E T; McKeown, S R; Johnston, S R; McCarthy, P J; Rajab, N F; Downes, C S

    1998-01-01

    ABSTRACT I: Management of invasive transitional cell human bladder carcinoma. The two main treatment options for invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma are radiotherapy or primary cystectomy with urinary diversion or bladder substitution. Approximately 50% of patients fail to respond to radiotherapy and such patients so treated are disadvantaged by the absence of predictive information regarding their radiosensitivity, since the tumour gains additional time for metastatic spread before cystectomy is performed. The SF2 clonogenic assay, which measures the surviving fraction of tumour cells after 2 Gy X-ray irradiation, is regarded as a good measure of radiosensitivity. However, the assay is time consuming and provides results for only approximately 70% of human tumours. In this paper three bladder transitional cell carcinoma cell lines (HT1376, UMUC-3 and RT112) were exposed to X-irradiation (0-10 Gy). We have compared the responses obtained using a clonogenic assay and a more clinically feasible alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. A very good inverse correlation was obtained between cell survival (clonogenic assay) and mean tail moment (Comet assay) for the three cell lines, indicating that the Comet assay can be used to predict the radio-responsiveness of individual cell lines. The clinical usefulness of the assay for predicting response to radiotherapy in bladder cancer patients is currently being investigated. ABSTRACT II: Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) Comets for the identification of damaged and repaired DNA sequences in individual cells. In mammalian cells the extent of DNA damage is partly and the rate of DNA repair very considerably dependent on DNA position and transcription. This has been established by biochemical techniques which are labour intensive and require large numbers of cells. The Comet assay for overall DNA damage and repair is relatively simple and allows individual cells to be examined. Here we present a

  1. What is the malignant nature of human ductal carcinoma in situ?

    OpenAIRE

    Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive, genetically abnormal carcinoma progenitor cells have been propagated from human and mouse breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions, providing new insights into breast cancer progression. The survival of DCIS cells in the hypoxic, nutrient-deprived intraductal niche could promote genetic instability and the derepression of the invasive phenotype. Understanding potential survival mechanisms, such as autophagy, that might be functioning in DCIS lesions provides strategies for arr...

  2. Fibroblast Hepatocyte Growth Factor Promotes Invasion of Human Mammary Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Jedeszko, Christopher; Victor, Bernadette C; Podgorski, Izabela; Sloane, Bonnie F.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) acting through its specific proto-oncogene receptor c-Met has been suggested to play a paracrine role in the regulation of tumor cell migration and invasion. The transition from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast carcinoma is marked by infiltration of stromal fibroblasts and the loss of basement membrane. We hypothesized that HGF produced by the infiltrating fibroblasts may alter proteolytic pathways in DCIS cells and...

  3. Are we closer to seeing carcinoma in situ in the upper urinary tract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboumarzouk, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is observed increase in detection rate of upper urinary tract urothelial cancer worldwide. This is a result of improved imaging as well as implementation of novel technologies of direct visualization of upper urinary tract. Standard techniques still remain insufficient to diagnose flat urothelial lesions. Carcinoma in situ is characterized by flat disordered proliferation of urothelial cells with marked cytologic abnormality, which occur within one cell layer as well as full thickness urothelium and therefore requires a better technology to pick up early and subtle mucosal changes. Material and methods The review presents available diagnostic tools in detection of upper urinary tract urothelial cancer and their ability to depict carcinoma in situ. Results Ureterorenoscopy is an investigation of choice as various promising techniques are under pilot investigations to enhance visualization of upper urinary tract carcinoma in situ. So far only photodynamic diagnosis has been reported to be as effective in detection of carcinoma in situ in the upper as within the lower urinary tract. Conclusions Although we are close to see upper urinary tract carcinoma in situ all new promising diagnostic techniques still require further validation in multicenter clinical trials to indicate any change to current recommendations. PMID:27551552

  4. The immune microenvironment of breast ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Elizabeth; Taube, Janis M; Elwood, Hillary; Sharma, Rajni; Meeker, Alan; Warzecha, Hind Nassar; Argani, Pedram; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Emens, Leisha A

    2016-03-01

    The host immune response has a key role in breast cancer progression and response to therapy. However, relative to primary invasive breast cancers, the immune milieu of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is less understood. Here, we profile tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of the immune checkpoint ligand programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in 27 cases of DCIS with known estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) expression using tissue microarrays. Twenty-four cases were pure DCIS and three had associated invasive ductal carcinoma. Tumors were stained by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1, as well as the lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, FoxP3, and CD20. The expression of PD-L1 by DCIS carcinoma cells and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was determined, and the average tumor infiltrating lymphocytes per high power field were manually scored. None of the DCIS cells expressed PD-L1, but 81% of DCIS lesions contained PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. DCIS with moderate-diffuse tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was more likely to have PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P=0.004). Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes with high levels of PD-L1 expression (>50% cells) were seen only in triple-negative DCIS (P=0.0008), and PD-L1-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were seen only in ER+/HER-2-DCIS (P=0.12). The presence of PD-L1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes was associated with a younger mean patient age (P=0.01). Further characterization of the DCIS immune microenvironment may identify useful targets for immune-based therapy and breast cancer prevention. PMID:26769139

  5. Optimizing Staining Protocols for Laser Microdissection of Specific Cell Types from the Testis Including Carcinoma In Situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Si Brask; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Nielsen, John Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdis......Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser......-containing cells, which is useful for isolation of the androgen-producing Leydig cells. Both protocols retain a morphology that is compatible with laser microdissection and yield RNA of a quality suitable for PCR and microarray analysis....

  6. Evidence that active demethylation mechanisms maintain the genome of carcinoma in situ cells hypomethylated in the adult testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, D G; Nielsen, J E; Jørgensen, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    absent. Both maintenance and de novo methyltransferases were detected in CIS cells.Conclusion:The data are consistent with the presence of an active DNA de-methylation pathway in CIS cells. The hypomethylated genome of CIS cells may contribute to phenotypic plasticity and invasive capabilities of this...

  7. Genomic differences between pure ductal carcinoma in situ and synchronous ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Shinn Young; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Lee, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Although ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) precedes invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), the related genomic alterations remain unknown. To identify the genomic landscape of DCIS and better understand the mechanisms behind progression to IDC, we performed whole-exome sequencing and copy number profiling for six cases of pure DCIS and five pairs of synchronous DCIS and IDC. Pure DCIS harbored well-known mutations (e.g., TP53, PIK3CA and AKT1), copy number alterations (CNAs) and chromothripses, but h...

  8. Morphology transitions induced by chemotherapy in carcinomas in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.; Vilela, M. J.

    2003-05-01

    Recently, we have proposed a nutrient-limited model for the avascular growth of tumors including cell proliferation, motility, and death [S. C. Ferreira, Jr., M. L. Martins, and M. J. Vilela, Phys. Rev. E 65, 021907 (2002)], which qualitatively reproduces commonly observed morphologies for carcinomas in situ. In the present work, we analyze the effects of distinct chemotherapeutic strategies on the patterns, scaling, and growth laws obtained for the nutrient-limited model. Two kinds of chemotherapeutic strategies were considered, namely, those that kill cancer cells and those that block cell mitosis but allow the cell to survive for some time. Depending on the chemotherapeutic schedule used, the tumors are completely eliminated, reach a stationary size, or grow following power laws. The model suggests that the scaling properties of the tumors are not affected by the mild cytotoxic treatments, although a reduction in growth rates and an increase in invasiveness are observed. For the strategies based on antimitotic drugs, a morphological transition in which compact tumors become more fractal under aggressive treatments was seen.

  9. Increased risk of carcinoma in situ in patients with testicular germ cell cancer with ultrasonic microlithiasis in the contralateral testicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    We compared clinical and histological data regarding the contralateral testicle in a population of men diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer to find features associated with an increased risk of bilateral neoplasia.......We compared clinical and histological data regarding the contralateral testicle in a population of men diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer to find features associated with an increased risk of bilateral neoplasia....

  10. [Carcinoma in situ of the penis rapidly progressing after carbon dioxide laser treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuro; Yonese, Junji; Kin, Taisei; Samejima, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Fukui, Iwao; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2002-03-01

    Laser treatment is considered to be effective in treating carcinoma in situ of the penis. We, however, report a case with carcinoma in situ of the penis which developed invasive carcinoma and inguinal lymphnode metastases only 6 months after the laser treatment. A 74-year-old man with pseudophimosis presented with redness of the glans penis. A physical examination revealed thick erythema, 12 millimeters in diameter, around the external urethral meatus. Histologically, biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma in situ. No metastasis was suspected by physical examination and imaging studies. Although the lesion appeared to slightly extend into the urethra, it was primarily treated with the CO2 laser. Six months after the treatment, however, local recurrence was confirmed by the touch smear cytology, resulting in the partial amputation of the penis. The histopathological examination revealed subepithelial and marked lymphatic invasion of the tumor and positive margin in the urethral stump (squamous cell carcinoma in situ). Further, since bilateral superficial inguinal lymphnode swelling appeared, total amputation of the penis with perineal urethrotomy and pelvic/inguinal lymphnode dissection was performed subsequently. The metastases to bilateral inguinal lymphnodes were confirmed histologically. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and has been alive and well without evidence of disease 40 months after the initial treatment. PMID:11968805

  11. Natural Gas Contrast PET-CT Diagnosis of Carcinoma in Situ of the Papilla of Vater: Report of a Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign and malignant villous adenoma (papillary adenoma) of the ampulla or papilla of Vater is a rare tumor and carcinoma in situ in the papilla is much rarer still. Terminologically, carcinoma in situ is defined as an epithelial malignant tumor in which tumor cells are confined to the epithelium, not invading the basement membrane. This communication describes a case of carcinoma in situ of the papilla of Vater visually detected by natural gas-contrast 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT, confirmed by duodenoscopy and pathology, and treated by extended pancreatic operation

  12. Testicular carcinoma in situ associated with rhabdomyosarcoma of the spermatic cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistal, M; Fachal, C; Paniagua, R

    1989-08-01

    A 12-year-old boy had an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in the distal portion of the spermatic cord. The tumor partially surrounded the testis, infiltrated the testicular tunics and formed an intratesticular nodule near the rete testis. The unaffected testicular parenchyma exhibited the characteristic germ cells of carcinoma in situ. We describe an association between these 2 types of tumors. PMID:2746753

  13. Immunoreactive neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is expressed in testicular carcinoma-in-situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, J L; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1996-01-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a well-known marker of tumours that have neuroendocrine origin. High levels of NSE have also been described in various types of testicular germ cell neoplasms, particularly in seminomas. To evaluate the presence of NSE in testicular carcinoma-in situ (CIS), a...

  14. Testosterone production is better preserved after 16 than 20 Gray irradiation treatment against testicular carcinoma in situ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne K; Petersen, Jørgen H; Petersen, Peter M; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Jørgensen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    20 Gy and 37 with 16 Gy RT. Measurements of sex hormone-binding globulin and basic and stimulated testosterone, as well as luteinizing hormone levels were performed. RESULTS: The follow-up periods for the patients treated without additional chemotherapy were for the 20 Gy and 16 Gy group mean....../median/min-max: 9.0/10.0/1.0-20.3 years and 4.0/3.1/0.4-14.1 years, respectively. During the follow-up period, men treated with 16 Gy RT had stable testosterone levels (-1.1%/year, p = 0.4), whereas men treated with 20 Gy had an annual decrease of 2.4% (p = 0.008). For the latter group, the testosterone decrease...... anticipated a similar increase in the patients treated with 20 Gy but instead observed a decrease (-3.1%, p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: RT at 16 and 20 Gy seem to affect Leydig cell function differently, with 16 Gy RT better preserving testosterone levels and thus being preferred from an endocrinological point of...

  15. Regression of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ After Treatment with Acupuncture

    OpenAIRE

    Dehen, Regina

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a case of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that regressed after treatment with acupuncture, Chinese herbs, and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The natural history of DCIS remains to be elucidated, and it is unclear whether all DCIS cases progress to invasive breast cancer. Surgery plus radiation therapy or mastectomy is recommended for women in whom this potentially nonprogressive cancer is detected. This case supports the developing trend toward activ...

  16. Detection of gonadal carcinoma in situ in childhood and implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, R A; Cussen, L J

    1991-09-01

    Cells with the characteristic features of carcinoma in situ (CIS) were detected in histological sections of the gonads of three of seven children with clinical syndromes associated with a high risk of gonadal neoplasia. It is suggested that early detection of these cells may be useful in resolving problems of management, including gonadectomy and decisions about sex of rearing. Early detection of CIS cells may have a place in the management of the undescended testis. PMID:1877934

  17. MR imaging of mucinous carcinoma of the breast associated with ductal carcinoma in situ: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mucinous carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon carcinoma containing mucin that is associated with a mucocele-like tumor or other malignant tumors. We report the MR imaging findings of two cases, a mucinous carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), associated with mucocele-like tumor. The mucinous carcinoma showed a gradually enhancing kinetic pattern on the dynamic MR and high signal intensity on the T2-weighted images. The MR findings were indistinguishable from a common benign mass of the breast

  18. Ductal carcinoma - In-situ (DCIS) of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To discuss clinical and treatment related issues in the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; intraductal carcinoma) of the breast. Background: Ductal carcinoma in situ was rarely diagnosed twenty years ago, except as an incidental finding in an otherwise benign biopsy specimen or as a palpable mass. Now, with the wide acceptance of mammography as a screening tool, DCIS represents 25% of all new breast cancers. With the success story of breast conserving surgery and radiation for early invasive carcinoma, the logical assumption was that this treatment would work equally as well for non-invasive cancer. Materials and Methods: This course will focus on long-term outcome after breast-conservation surgery and radiation for mammographically-detected DCIS. Pathologic characteristics and their relationship to clinical endpoints will be discussed. Results after treatment using breast-conserving surgery with radiation, breast-conserving surgery without radiation, and mastectomy will be compared. Results from both randomized studies and single and multi-institution retrospective reviews will be presented. Conclusions: Long-term results suggest that with careful follow-up, breast cancer specific survival equivalent with mastectomy can be achieved in selected cases of DCIS treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation. Further follow-up will be required to define whether a subset of these patients, likely based on size, grade, margins, and perhaps cytogenetic prognostic factors, exists for whom the radiation may safely be omitted

  19. Evaluation of gene amplification and protein expression of HER-2/neu in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the sixth most frequent neoplasia in Brazil. It is usually associated with a poor prognosis because it is often at an advanced stage when diagnosed and there is a high frequency of lymph node metastases. It is important to know what prognostic factors can facilitate diagnosis, optimize therapeutic decisions, and improve the survival of these patients. A member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, c-erbB-2, has received much attention because of its therapeutic implications; however, few studies involving fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of HER-2/neu gene amplification and protein expression in ESCC have been conducted. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of HER-2/neu gene amplification using FISH, and to correlate the results with immunohistochemical expression and clinical-pathological findings. One hundred and ninety-nine ESCC cases were evaluated using the Tissue Microarray (TMA) technique. A polyclonal antibody against c-erbB-2 was used for immunohistochemistry. Analyses were based on the membrane staining pattern. The results were classified according to the Herceptest criteria (DAKO): negative (0/1+), potential positive (2+) and positive (3+). The FISH reactions were performed according to the FISH HER2 PharmDx (DAKO) protocol. In each case, 100 tumor nuclei were evaluated. Cases showing a gene/CEN17 fluorescence ratio ≥ 2 were considered positive for gene amplification. The c-erbB-2 expression was negative in 117/185 cases (63.2%) and positive in 68 (36.8%), of which 56 (30.3%) were 2+ and 12 (6.5%) were 3+. No significant associations were found among protein expression, clinicopathological data and overall survival. Among the 47 cases analyzed, 38 (80.9%) showed no gene amplification while 9 (19.1%) showed amplification, as demonstrated by FISH. Cases that were negative (0/1+) and potential positive (2+) for c-erbB-2 expression by immunohistochemistry showed no

  20. Quantitative histopathological variables in in situ and invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekarl, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1993-01-01

    This study was carried out to compare quantitative histopathological estimates obtained in normal breast epithelium (N = 15), lobular carcinoma in situ (N = 29), ductal carcinoma in situ (N = 24), invasive lobular carcinoma (N = 39), and invasive ductal carcinoma (N = 71) of the female breast...... nuclear volume fraction, Vv(nuc/tis). The vv(nuc), aH(nuc), and MI were, on average, larger in ductal than in lobular carcinomas (2p < or = 0.01), whereas the mean NI was smaller in ductal carcinomas (2p = 3.10(-4). Comparing estimates obtained in tumors of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (N = 11) with...... lesions, and invasive carcinomas. Overlaps were, however, evident among the groups. There were no significant differences between means of the quantitative variables obtained in carcinoma in situ of the ductal and the lobular type with or without accompanying invasive carcinoma (2p > or = 0.22). A close...

  1. Low CD10 mRNA Expression Identifies High-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Toussaint, Jérôme; Durbecq, Virginie; Altintas, Sevilay; Doriath, Valérie; Rouas, Ghizlane; Paesmans, Marianne; Bedard, Philippe; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Tjalma, Wiebren A.; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Optimal management of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is controversial, and many patients are still overtreated. The local death of myoepithelial cells (MECs) is believed to be a pre-requisite to tumor invasion. We thus hypothesized that loss of CD10 expression, a MEC surface peptidase, would signify basement membrane disruption and confer increased risk of relapse in DCIS. The aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the prognostic value of CD10 in DCIS. Experimental D...

  2. A 2D Mechanistic Model of Breast Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) Morphology and Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, Kerri-Ann; Wininger, Michael; Bhanot, Gyan; Ganesan, Shridar; Barnard, Nicola; Shinbrot, Troy

    2009-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a non-invasive tumor in which cells proliferate abnormally, but remain confined within a duct. Although four distinguishable DCIS morphologies are recognized, the mechanisms that generate these different morphological classes remain unclear, and consequently the prognostic strength of DCIS classification is not strong. To improve the understanding of the relation between morphology and time course, we have developed a 2D in silico particle mode...

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  4. Breast Ductal Carcinoma in Situ: Morphologic and Kinetic MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adequate diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) could lead to efficacious treatment. Due to the fact that DCIS lesions can progress to invasive carcinomas and that the sensitivity of the standard examination – mammography – is between 70 and 80%, use of a more sensitive diagnostic tool was needed. In detection of DCIS, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) has the sensitivity up to 96%. Morphological features and kinetic parameters were evaluated to define the most regular morphological, kinetic and morpho-kinetic patterns on MRI assessment of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We retrospectively assessed eighteen patients with 23 histologically confirmed lesions (mean age, 52.4 ± 10.5 years). All patients were clinically and mammographically examined prior to MRI examination. DCIS appeared most frequently as non-mass-like lesions (12 lesions, 52.17%). The differences in the frequency of lesion types were statistically significant (P<0.05). The following morphological patterns were detected: A: no specific morphologic features, B: linear/branching enhancement, C: focal mass-like enhancement, D: segmental enhancement, E: segmental enhancement in triangular shape, F: diffuse enhancement, G: regional heterogeneous enhancement in one quadrant not conforming to duct distribution and H: dotted or granular type of enhancement with patchy distribution. The difference in the frequency of the proposed patterns was statistically significant (P<0.05). There were eight lesions with mass enhancement, and six with segmental lesions: regional and triangular. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of enhancement curve types (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the frequency of morpho-kinetic patterns. Non-mass-like lesions, lesions with focal or segmental distribution, with a “plateau” enhancement curve type were the most frequent findings of DCIS lesions on MRI

  5. Gene expression profiling reveals sequential changes in gastric tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Hee Lee; Seung-Hyun Bang; Seung-Koo Lee; Kyu-Young Song; In-Chul Lee

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression profiles of premalignant and/or preclinical lesions of gastric cancers.METHODS: We analyzed the expression profiles of normal gastric pit, tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ using microdissected cells from routine gastric biopsies. For the DNA microarray analysis of formalin-fixed samples,we developed a simple and reproducible RNA extraction and linear amplification procedure applying two polymerasebinding sites. The amplification procedure took only 8 h and yielded comparable DNA microarray data between formalin-fixed tissues and unfixed controls.RESULTS: In comparison with normal pit, adenoma/carcinoma showed 504 up-regulated and 29 down-regulated genes at the expected false significance rate 0.15%. The differential expression between adenoma and carcinoma in situ was subtle: 50 and 22 genes were up-, and down-regulated in carcinomas at the expected false significance rate of 0.61%, respectively. Differentially expressed genes were grouped according to patterns of the sequential changes for the 'tendency analysis' in the gastric mucosaadenoma-carcinoma sequence.CONCLUSION: Groups of genes are shown to reflect the sequential expression changes in the early carcinogenic steps of stomach cancer. It is suggested that molecular carcinogenic pathways could be analyzed using routinely processed biopsies.

  6. Ductal carcinoma in situ: a disease entity that merits more recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereere, E; Papadimitriou, K; Tjalma, W; Altintas, S

    2015-08-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive breast carcinoma that remains in the milk ducts. It is a poorly understood disease and its natural history is not well known. This is because once diagnosed, DCIS is usually treated. It is known however that ductal carcinoma is a precursor of invasive breast carcinoma, as 14-53% can become invasive over a period of 10 years, if left untreated. With increasing knowledge about the molecular biology of DCIS, more insight is given in its relation to invasive breast cancer. Diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ is increasing in the last few years. This is likely caused by the increased mammographic screening for breast cancer and the higher quality of mammographic images. DCIS represents about one fifth of all mammographically detected breast cancers. Risk factors for the development of ductal carcinoma in situ are: low parity, late age at first birth and menopause, and Body Mass Index. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is a useful scoring system to grade DCIS. DCIS is graded by scoring four characteristics: patient's age, margin width, tumor size and pathological classification. It allows us to divide DCIS lesions into different groups according to risk of local recurrence: low risk, intermediate risk and high risk. Each group requires a different treatment, respectively: local excision of the tumor; local excision and radiotherapy; and mastectomy. The use of tamoxifen in the treatment of DCIS is still controversial, but research so far has encouraging results. Interesting developments have been made in the use of Her-2 pulsed dendritic cell vaccination before DCIS surgery. PMID:25916193

  7. Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna Vijaykumar Wader; Sujata S Kumbhar; Huddedar AD; Wasim GM Khatib

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the kidney comprised of different histological variants. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mainly diagnosed in the sixth decade of life. It is important to identify this entity because it has significantly better prognosis than the clear cell (conventional) and papillary renal cell carcinomas. The chromophobe renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from oncocytoma and clear cell ca...

  8. ERG gene rearrangements are common in prostatic small cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lotan, Tamara L.; Gupta, Nilesh S; Wang, Wenle; Toubaji, Antoun; Haffner, Michael C; Chaux, Alcides; Hicks, Jessica L.; Meeker, Alan K.; Bieberich, Charles J.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare subtype with an aggressive clinical course. Despite the frequent occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements in acinar carcinoma, the incidence of these rearrangements in prostatic small cell carcinoma is unclear. In addition, molecular markers to distinguish prostatic small cell carcinomas from lung and bladder small cell carcinomas may be clinically useful. We examined the occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization in...

  9. Diagnostic pitfall in a case of ductal carcinoma-in situ with microinvasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin A Momin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast cytologically diagnosed as ductal carcinoma - in situ in an 80-year-old lady with a breast lump. Extensive sampling of mastectomy specimen showed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS. Many ducts showed stromal reaction - periductal sclerosis and lymphocytic infiltration-features suggestive of microinvasion. However, no definite invasion was noted histologically. Immunohistochemical study highlighted the microinvasive foci.

  10. Diagnostic pitfall in a case of ductal carcinoma-in situ with microinvasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Yasmin A; Kulkarni, Medha P; Deshmukh, Bhakti D; Sulhyan, Kalpana R

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast cytologically diagnosed as ductal carcinoma - in situ in an 80-year-old lady with a breast lump. Extensive sampling of mastectomy specimen showed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Many ducts showed stromal reaction - periductal sclerosis and lymphocytic infiltration-features suggestive of microinvasion. However, no definite invasion was noted histologically. Immunohistochemical study highlighted the microinvasive foci. PMID:27279686

  11. Screening for carcinoma in situ of the contralateral testis in patients with germinal testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, J G; Skakkebaek, N E; von der Maase, H;

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty biopsy specimens from the contralateral testis in patients with unilateral germinal testicular cancer were analysed by light microscopy for carcinoma-in-situ changes. Changes were found in 13 (5.2%) patients. One-third of patients with an atrophic contralateral testis (volume...... cryptorchidism or both had been screened. Since the natural course of carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testis of patients with germinal testicular cancer has not been established, the patients are being re-evaluated frequently. To date two patients with carcinoma in situ have developed a second cancer....

  12. Penurunan Imunoekspresi P63 Pada Mioepitel Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS Payudara Sebagai Prediktor Infiltrasi Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Liliana Wargasetia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of breast carcinoma is common in women. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast is breast carcinoma with tumor cells which exist in the breast glandular duct and have not infiltrated into stroma. Retrospective study has been made on 23 paraffin blocks of morphological breast DCIS variants, namely kribriform, solid, and komedo. One way to find out DCIS aggressiveness is by detecting myoepithelial cells surrounding the breast duct indicating the integrity of the basal membrane. Detection of myoepithelial cells by means of immunohistochemical technique is done by using a selective marker for breast myoepithelial cells, namely p63. The aim of this research was predict tumor infiltration through decrease of immunoexpression of p63 in myoepithelial cells of morphological variants: cibriform, solid, and komedo of breast DCIS. This research was performed at Pathology Anatomy Laboratory of Medical Faculty of Padjadjaran University/RSUP Hasan Sadikin Bandung from Juli 2005 to September 2006. The result of the research indicated that immunoexpression of p63 in myoepithelial cells of morphological breast DCIS variants - cibriform, solid and komedo - did not show any significant difference (p<: 0,05. This indicated that tumor infiltration can occur in every breast DCIS morphological variant being studied, namely cribriform, solid, and comedo. The conclusion of this research is that decrease of immunoexpression of p63 in myoepithelial cells of morphological variants: cibriform, solid, and comedo of breast DCIS predict the presence of tumor infiltration.

  13. Ductal carcinoma in situ: US findings and its usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic (US) findings of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and its usefulness. US and mammographic findings of 20 cases of pathologically proven DCIS were retrospectively evaluated. The presence of nodule, microcalcification and ductal dilatation were examined in US and compared with mammograms. In US, 17 (85%) of 20 cases showed single (n=14,82%) or multiple nodules (n=3,18%). Five of the 17 cases showed echogenic dots suggesting microcalcifications with mass. Three cases missed on US showed microcalcification only on mammogram. Other findings were heterogenous internal echo (n=16, 94%), irregular mass margin (n=14.82%),and ductal dilation (n=4, 24%). Mammogram showed abnormal findings in 15 cases (75%); nodule without microcalcification (n=7, 47%), micro calcifications only (n=5, 33%) and nodules with microcalcifications (n=3, 20%). Five cases missed on mammography showed single (n=3) or multiple nodules (n=2) without microcalcification on US. Ultrasonogram does not show specific findings of DCIS, but it is superior to mammogram in the detection and characterization of DCIS manifested as only nodules without microcalcification.

  14. Contrast enhanced MRI findings of ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to describe characteristic contrast enhanced MR mammographic findings of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and also DCIS with microinvasion. From January 2000 to July 2005, 32 women with 33 lesions affected by DCIS or DCIS with microinvasion underwent contrast enhanced MRI, and they were then retrospectively evaluated. All the patients had previously undergone mammography and ultrasonography. All the findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and MRI were analyzed by using an ACR BI-RADS lexicon. All 33 cases were enhanced on the enhanced MR images. A smooth margined homogeneous enhanced mass was seen in the two (2/33) cases, and nonmass enhancement was seen in 31 (31/33) cases. Among the non-mass enhancement, focal enhancement (7/31), ductal enhancement (5/31), segmental enhancement (9/31), and regional enhancement (10/31) were observed. On the kinetic study, a wash-out pattern (10/33), a plateau pattern (20/33), and a persistent pattern (3/33) were demonstrated. No significant differences were noted between the pure and microinvasive DCIS. There is no significant difference between pure and microinvasive DCIS. However, contrast enhanced MR images can demonstrate occult foci, multifocal lesion and the tumor extent of DCIS on mammogram or ultrasonogram

  15. Contrast enhanced MRI findings of ductal carcinoma in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bong Joo; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Suh, Young Jin; Choi, Hyun Joo [College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe characteristic contrast enhanced MR mammographic findings of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and also DCIS with microinvasion. From January 2000 to July 2005, 32 women with 33 lesions affected by DCIS or DCIS with microinvasion underwent contrast enhanced MRI, and they were then retrospectively evaluated. All the patients had previously undergone mammography and ultrasonography. All the findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and MRI were analyzed by using an ACR BI-RADS lexicon. All 33 cases were enhanced on the enhanced MR images. A smooth margined homogeneous enhanced mass was seen in the two (2/33) cases, and nonmass enhancement was seen in 31 (31/33) cases. Among the non-mass enhancement, focal enhancement (7/31), ductal enhancement (5/31), segmental enhancement (9/31), and regional enhancement (10/31) were observed. On the kinetic study, a wash-out pattern (10/33), a plateau pattern (20/33), and a persistent pattern (3/33) were demonstrated. No significant differences were noted between the pure and microinvasive DCIS. There is no significant difference between pure and microinvasive DCIS. However, contrast enhanced MR images can demonstrate occult foci, multifocal lesion and the tumor extent of DCIS on mammogram or ultrasonogram.

  16. Ductal carcinoma in situ: US findings and its usefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Tae; Hwang, Mi Soo; Lee, Jae Kyo [Yeungnam University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-15

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic (US) findings of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and its usefulness. US and mammographic findings of 20 cases of pathologically proven DCIS were retrospectively evaluated. The presence of nodule, microcalcification and ductal dilatation were examined in US and compared with mammograms. In US, 17 (85%) of 20 cases showed single (n=14,82%) or multiple nodules (n=3,18%). Five of the 17 cases showed echogenic dots suggesting microcalcifications with mass. Three cases missed on US showed microcalcification only on mammogram. Other findings were heterogenous internal echo (n=16, 94%), irregular mass margin (n=14.82%),and ductal dilation (n=4, 24%). Mammogram showed abnormal findings in 15 cases (75%); nodule without microcalcification (n=7, 47%), micro calcifications only (n=5, 33%) and nodules with microcalcifications (n=3, 20%). Five cases missed on mammography showed single (n=3) or multiple nodules (n=2) without microcalcification on US. Ultrasonogram does not show specific findings of DCIS, but it is superior to mammogram in the detection and characterization of DCIS manifested as only nodules without microcalcification.

  17. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  18. Amplification of CCND1 and expression of its protein product, cyclin D1, in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, J. F.; Quan, D. E.; O'Malley, F; Odom-Maryon, T.; Clarke, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a heterogeneous disease clinically and biologically. The few available studies of its natural history implicate DCIS as a non-obligate precursor for invasive carcinoma. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect gene amplification of the cell cycle regulator gene CCND1 in 88 examples of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded DCIS. Expression of its protein product cyclin D1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. CCND1 was amplif...

  19. Multi-focal lobular carcinoma in situ arising in benign phylodes tumor: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taeg Ki; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Coexistent breast malignancy arising in phyllodes tumor is extremely rare, and most of them are incidental reports after surgical excision. Coexistent malignancy in phyllodes tumor can vary from in-situ to invasive carcinoma. Lobular neoplasia is separated into atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). LCIS is known to have a higher risk of developing invasive cancer. We reported imaging findings of multifocal LCIS arising in benign phyllodes tumor.

  20. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS

  1. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  2. Human primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subtype-specific pathology is preserved in a mouse intraductal (MIND) xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Valdez, Kelli Elizabeth; Fang, Fan; Smith, William; Allred, D. Craig; Medina, Daniel; Behbod, Fariba

    2011-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. The current recognition that DCIS lesions exhibit inter- and intra-lesion diversity suggests that the process of evolution to invasive breast cancer is more complex than previously recognized. Here we demonstrate the reproducible growth of primary DCIS cells derived from patient’s surgical and biopsy samples by the mouse intraductal (MIND) model. MIND involves injection of cells into the NOD-SCID IL2Rgamman...

  3. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos;

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast can...

  4. Localization of keratin mRNA in human tracheobronchial epithelium and bronchogenic carcinomas by in situ hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Obara, T.; Baba, M; Yamaguchi, Y.; Fuchs, E.; Resau, J H; Trump, B. F.; Klein-Szanto, A J

    1988-01-01

    An in situ hybridization technique was applied to detect expression of keratin mRNAs in xenotransplanted human tracheobronchial epithelium and lung carcinomas. Tissues from eight tracheas repopulated with cells from five different noncancerous donors and 15 squamous cell carcinomas were used. Using a K6 (56 kd) human keratin cDNA (KA-1) and a K14 (50 kd) cDNA (KB-2) as probes, radiolabeled by nick-translation with 3H-dATP/TTP, the specificity and significant differences in the levels of silve...

  5. Gene expression in the urinary bladder: a common carcinoma in situ gene expression signature exists disregarding histopathological classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær;

    2004-01-01

    The presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions in the urinary bladder is associated with a high risk of disease progression to a muscle invasive stage. In this study, we used microarray expression profiling to examine the gene expression patterns in superficial transitional cell carcinoma (sTCC......) with surrounding CIS (13 patients), without surrounding CIS lesions (15 patients), and in muscle invasive carcinomas (mTCC; 13 patients). Hierarchical cluster analysis separated the sTCC samples according to the presence or absence of CIS in the surrounding urothelium. We identified a few gene clusters...... that contained genes with similar expression levels in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with surrounding CIS and invasive TCC. However, no close relationship between TCC with adjacent CIS and invasive TCC was observed using hierarchical cluster analysis. Expression profiling of a series of biopsies...

  6. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  7. MRI characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate and recognize the dynamic and morphological MRI characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and provide imaging information for the early detection and treatment planning. Methods: All MRI data in 71 patients with histologically proved DCIS were analyzed retrospectively. The 71 patients were divided into two groups, N1 (pure DCIS, 44 patients) and N2 (DCIS with microinvasion, 27 patients). According to the BI-RADS descriptors, all lesions were defined as a focus (smaller than 5 mm in diameter), mass and no-mass-like three enhancement types. The morphological features (M1 = focus, M2 =linear or linear-branched, M3 = branching-ductal, M4 = segmental, M5 = focal, M6 = regional, M7 = diffuse, M8 = mass) and the time-intensity curve (TIC) pattern [type Ⅰ (persistent enhancement curves), type Ⅱ (plateau), type Ⅲ (washout) and type Ⅳ (the same enhancement as glandular tissue)] were described. Chi-square test was used for the morphological characteristics of lesions. Results: The 73 DCIS lesions were found in 71 patients, and 5.5% (n=4) were stippled lesions, 87.7% (n=64) were no-mass like lesions, 6.8% (n=5) were mass-like lesions. In no-mass-like lesions (n= 64), M3 was found in 15 cases, M4 in 34 cases, M5 in 9 cases and M6 in 6 cases, respectively, M3 and M4 were the most common distribution patterns. In N1 group (n=45) and N2 group (n=28), M3, M4, M5, M6 were found in 7 and 8, 21 and 13, 7 and 2, 3 and 3 cases, respectively. There were no statistic differences between two groups (P>0.05). In 31 showed heterogeneous enhancement, both M3 and M4 were observed in 35.5% (11/31). In 26 clustered ring enhancement lesions, M4 was observed in 88.5% (23/26). Four lesions showed reticular enhancement, 2 lesions showed a clumped enhancement and 1 lesion showed homogeneous enhancement. In 5 mass-like lesions, N1 group had 3 cases, N2 group had 2 cases. Four lesions showed lobulated margin, 4 lesions showed speculated margin, 1

  8. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Pure Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report outcomes for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving therapy using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: From March 2001 to February 2009, 53 patients with Stage 0 breast cancer were treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI. Median age was 62 years. All patients underwent excision with margins negative by ≥1 mm before adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). A total of 39 MammoSite brachytherapy (MS) patients and 14 three-dimensional conformal external beam RT (3DCRT) patients were treated to the lumpectomy bed alone with 34 Gy and 38.5 Gy, respectively. Of the DCIS cases, 94% were mammographically detected. All patients with calcifications had either specimen radiography or postsurgical mammography confirmation of clearance. Median tumor size was 6 mm, and median margin distance was 5 mm. There were no statistically significant differences according to APBI method for race/ethnicity, tumor detection method, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, or use of tamoxifen (p = NS). Recurrence and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cosmesis was scored by the Harvard criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.4-6.3 years), the overall and cause-specific survival rates were 98% and 100%, respectively. Three-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 2%. One failure was observed at the resection bed 11 months post-RT. No other elsewhere breast failures, regional recurrences, or distant metastases were noted. Cosmesis was excellent or good in 92.4% of cases, with no statistically significant differences according to the APBI method (92.3% with MammoSite and 92.8% with 3DCRT; p = 0.649). Conclusions: APBI as part of breast-conserving therapy for pure DCIS was associated with excellent local control and survival rates, with the vast majority of patients having good to excellent cosmesis. This finding supports the recent analysis by the

  9. Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis with carcinoma in situ in the ureter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary epithelial tumor of the renal pelvis is rare and only 100 cases are reported in the literature [1]. Histological examination of the tumor showed glands, cysts, and papillae lined by pseudo stratified columnar epithelium with hyper chromatic nuclei. Scattered signet ring-type cells were also seen floating in large pools of extracellular mucin. Sections from the ureter showed a component of adenocarcinoma in situ. No invasive tumor was identified in ureteric tissue. One case was reported with carcinoma in situ of the ureter (2). Immunohistochemically: The tumor showed positivity for CK7, CK.20, CK.8/18, GATA-3, MSH-2, MSH-6, MLH-1, Ber-EP4, and S-100-P with focal positivity for CDX-2, weak positivity for PMS-2 and negativity in TTF-1 and Her-2. Molecular pathological analysis revealed microsatellite stability and without mutation in K-ras-gene. Thus, a diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis with in situ adenocarcinoma of the ureter was made.

  10. Optimizing Staining Protocols for Laser Microdissection of Specific Cell Types from the Testis Including Carcinoma In Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Si Brask Sonne; Dalgaard, Marlene D; John Erik Nielsen; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E.; Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts; Lise Mette Gjerdrum; Henrik Leffers

    2009-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: May 2009 Microarray and RT-PCR based methods are important tools for analysis of gene expression; however, in tissues containing many different cells types, such as the testis, characterization of gene expression in specific cell types can be severely hampered by noise from other cells. The laser microdissection technology allows for enrichment of specific cell types. However, when the cells are not morphologically distinguishable, it is necessary to use a specific staining...

  11. MR imaging evaluation of ductal carcinoma in situ and ductal carcinoma in situ with small invasive foci of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively assess diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative assessment of local extent of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and DCIS with small invasive foci, compared with the mammography and uhrasonography (US) imagings. Methods: Results of MRI, mammography, and US imaging from 17 consecutive women with known breast DCIS and DCIS with invasive foci were analyzed, and then compared with pathologic examination. Results: (1) Fourteen lesions showed enhancement on dynamic breast MRI, of which 11 lesions were no-mass-like enhancement. Six of 11 lesions appeared segmental enhancement, and 2 were regional enhancement. Ductal and multiple focal areas enhancement were 1 case respectively. Symmetric diffuse enhancement in bilateral breast was showed in 1 patient. Ductal dilation was visible in ipsilateral breast on pre-contrast MRI in 2 cases, which manifested bloody nipple discharge in clinical examination, and duct enhanced on post- contrast imaging in one of them. Two lesions appeared mass enhancement with irregular shape and homogeneous signal. Linear enhancement surrounding the oval homogeneous mass with smooth margin found in 1 case. (2) Thirteen of 17 patients underwent bilateral mammography. There were various findings in mammograms, including microcalcifications (6 cases), normal mammograms (2 cases), calcifications with other appearance (2 cases), and non-calcification ahnormity (3 cases). In 8 lesions with calcifications, 5 were noted higher' probability of malignancy calcifications and 3 intermediate concern calcifications. Calcifications distributed clustered (5 cases), regional (2 cases) and diffuse (1 case) shape. (3) Sixteen of 17 patients were performed breast US examination. Eleven lesions, which were correct diagnosed, appeared higher echo spots within irregular lower echo area. One lesion diagnosed benign and 4 were negative on US examination. (4) Regarded the size measured on pathologic examination

  12. Human papillomavirus infection and anal carcinoma. Retrospective analysis by in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, S R; Judd, R.; Coffield, L. M.; Greer, P; Rolston, F.; Evatt, B L

    1992-01-01

    To examine the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection with anal squamous cell carcinoma, the authors applied the highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques to detect HPV DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 18 patients. The presence of HPV types 16/18 in 3 (16.7%) of 18 patients with anal carcinoma was found, using a colorimetric ISH technique for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 35, and 51. Results from one of these t...

  13. Ductal carcinoma in situ. Correlation between FDG-PET/CT and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between tumor cell density and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for pure or predominant ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Subjects in this retrospective review comprised 11 patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT for DCIS. Pathological tumor cell density and FDG-PET/CT images were compared. A tumor background count density ratio of >1.5 was defined as the detectable range for DCIS. Pathological density of disease was high in eight patients, intermediate in one, and low in two. In all eight patients with a detectable intraductal component on PET/CT, the density of disease was classified as high. In three patients undetected by PET/CT, the density of disease was classified as intermediate or low. On statistical analysis, the correlation between the density of disease and tumor background count density ratio (TBCDR) on PET/CT was significant (20 mm in four patients and represented underestimation in four patients who showed low density of disease in the peripheral area. Tumor cell density of intraductal carcinoma appears strongly correlated to detection by FDG-PET/CT. (author)

  14. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: the importance of morphologic and molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardekian, Stacey K; Bombonati, Alessandro; Palazzo, Juan P

    2016-03-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a lesion characterized by significant heterogeneity, in terms of morphology, immunohistochemical staining, molecular signatures, and clinical expression. For some patients, surgical excision provides adequate treatment, but a subset of patients will experience recurrence of DCIS or progression to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Recent years have seen extensive research aimed at identifying the molecular events that characterize the transition from normal epithelium to DCIS and IDC. Tumor epithelial cells, myoepithelial cells, and stromal cells undergo alterations in gene expression, which are most important in the early stages of breast carcinogenesis. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, together with microRNA alterations, play a major role in these genetic events. In addition, tumor proliferation and invasion is facilitated by the lesional microenvironment, which includes stromal fibroblasts and macrophages that secrete growth factors and angiogenesis-promoting substances. Characterization of DCIS on a molecular level may better account for the heterogeneity of these lesions and how this manifests as differences in patient outcome and response to therapy. Molecular assays originally developed for assessing likelihood of recurrence in IDC are recently being applied to DCIS, with promising results. In the future, the classification of DCIS will likely incorporate molecular findings along with histologic and immunohistochemical features, allowing for personalized prognostic information and therapeutic options for patients with DCIS. This review summarizes current data regarding the molecular characterization of DCIS and discusses the potential clinical relevance. PMID:26826418

  15. Improved gene expression signature of testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Leffers, Henrik; Lothe, Ragnhild A;

    2007-01-01

    global gene expression in testicular CIS have been previously published. We have merged the two data sets on CIS samples (n = 6) and identified the shared gene expression signature in relation to expression in normal testis. Among the top-20 highest expressed genes, one-third was transcription factors...... 'embryonic development' were significantly altered and could collectively affect cellular pathways like the WNT signalling cascade, which thus may be disrupted in testicular CIS. The merged CIS data from two different microarray platforms, to our knowledge, provide the most precise CIS gene expression......The carcinoma in situ (CIS) stage is the common precursor of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) that arise in young adults. Within the past decade genome wide gene expression tools have been developed and have greatly advanced the insight into the biology of TGCTs. Two independent data sets on...

  16. Screening for carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testicle in patients with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, M G G; Lauritsen, Jakob; Almstrup, Kristian; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær; Meyts, Ewa Rajpert-De; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; von der Maase, Hans Rene Rostgaard; Agerbæk, Mads; Holm, N V; Andersen, K K; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Johansen, Christoffer; Daugaard, Gedske

    2015-01-01

    population-based screening programme for contralateral CIS in patients with testicular cancer showed no significant difference in the risk for metachronous GCC between a screened and an unscreened cohort. Single-site biopsy including modern immunohistochemistry does not identify all cases of CIS.......BACKGROUND: Screening programmes for contralateral carcinoma in situ (CIS) testis in patients with unilateral germ-cell cancer (GCC) have never been evaluated. We investigated the effect of screening for contralateral CIS in a large nation-wide, population-based study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A...... years was 1.9% in the screened cohort and 3.1% in the unscreened cohort (P = 0.097), hazard ratio (HR) for the unscreened cohort: 1.59 (P = 0.144). Expert revision with contemporary methodology of CIS-negative biopsy samples from patients with metachronous cancer revealed CIS in 17 out of 45 (38%) cases...

  17. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: correlation between histopathological features and age of patients

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Amanda Arantes; Balabram, Débora; Salles, Marcio de Almeida; Gobbi, Helenice

    2014-01-01

    Background The histopathological subtype, nuclear grade and presence or absence of comedonecrosis are established as critical elements in the reporting of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. The aims of this study were to determine the frequencies of morphological subtypes of DCIS, nuclear grade and comedonecrosis; to compare the age of patients with the histopathological characteristics of DCIS, and to assess the agreement of grade between in situ and invasive components in DCIS c...

  18. Vav2 protein overexpression marks and may predict the aggressive subtype of ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yunqing; Prabakaran, Indira; Wan, Fei; Mitra, Nandita; Furstenau, Dana K; Hung, Rupert K; Cao, Siyuan; Zhang, Paul J.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Guvakova, Marina A.

    2014-01-01

    Background A subset of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) will develop invasive breast cancer (IBC). To date, there are no effective predictive biomarkers for identifying this subset with worse prognosis whose lesions are essentially indistinguishable histologically from those with favorable outcomes. We hypothesized that measurable parameters that discriminate DCIS from DCIS with concurrent invasion may serve as diagnostic biomarkers (BM) of progressive cancer in situ (CIS). Resul...

  19. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary. PMID:26614547

  20. Racial disparities in risk of second breast tumors after ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Colditz, Graham A.; Gehlert, Sarah; Goodman, Melody

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of race/ethnicity on second breast tumors among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We identified 102,489 women diagnosed with primary DCIS between 1988 and 2009 from the 18 NCI-SEER Registries. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate race/ethnicity-associated relative risks (RRs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of ipsilateral breast tumors (IBT; defined as DCIS or invasive carcinoma in the ipsilateral breast)...

  1. Mammary Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Fresh Look at Architectural Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Scripcaru; Zardawi, Ibrahim M.

    2012-01-01

    Mammary ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), a malignant appearing lesion on cytological and histological grounds, is in fact a non-obligate precancer. DCIS is difficult to manage and is sometimes treated more aggressively than invasive carcinoma. Although most DCIS classifications take into account the architectural growth pattern, when it comes to architecture, the literature is full of contradictory information. We examined 289 breast cancers and found DCIS in 265 of the cases. The majority of...

  2. Treatment outcome and analysis of the prognostic factors of ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the survival rate, local failure rate and patterns of failure, and analyze the prognostic factors affecting local relapse of ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy. From June 1995 to December 2001, 96 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The operations were either local or wide excision in all patients, with an axillary lymph node dissection performed in some patients. Radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy, over 5 weeks, with 1.8 Gy daily fractions, with additional doses (10 ∼ 14 Gy) administered to the primary tumor bed in some patients with close (≤ 2 mm) or positive resection margin. The median follow-up period was 43 months (range 12 ∼ 102 months). The 5-year local relapse free survival and overall survival rates were 91 and 100% respectively. Local relapse occurred in 6 patients (6.3%). Of the 6 recurrences, one was invasive ductal cell carcinoma. With the exception of one, all patients recurred 2 years after surgery. There was no regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Five patients with local recurrence were salvaged with total mastectomy, and are alive with no evidence of disease. One patient with recurrent invasive ductal cell carcinoma will receive salvage treatment. On analysis of the prognostic factors affecting local relapse, none of the factors among the age, status of resection margin, comedo type and nuclear grade affected local relapse. Operation extent also did not affect local control (ρ = 0.30). In the patients with close resection margin, boost irradiation to the primary tumor bed did not affect local control (ρ = 1.0). The survival rate and local control of the patients with ductal carcinoma in situ treated with breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy were excellent. Close resection margin and boost irradiation to the primary tumor bed did not affect local relapse, but further

  3. Bilateral mucocele-like tumors of the breast associated with ductal carcinoma in situ and mucinous carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucocele-like tumor of the breast is a rare neoplasm and only a few cases of mucocele-like tumor have been reported on the Korea. These lesions were originally considered as being benign when they were first described, but now it is believed they can be both malignant and benign, and it is even possible that they are early lesions of mucinous carcinoma. We describe here both the mammographic and sonographic findings in a patient with bilateral mucocele-like tumors that were associated with ductal carcinoma in situ and mucinous carcinoma

  4. S100A7 (psoriasin) expression is associated with aggressive features and alteration of Jab1 in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Emberley, Ethan D; Alowami, Salem; Snell, Linda; Murphy, Leigh C; Watson, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The S100A7 (psoriasin) gene is highly expressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and can be downregulated in invasive carcinoma. Persistent S100A7 expression in invasive carcinoma is associated with a worse prognosis, and this effect may be mediated in part through interaction with the multifunctional cell signaling protein Jab1. Methods In order to investigate the relationship between S100A7 and progression from DCIS to invasive carcinoma, we studied S100A7 expre...

  5. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal cell carcinoma is a type of kidney cancer that starts in the lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney

  6. Automated reconstruction algorithm for identification of 3D architectures of cribriform ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri-Ann Norton

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS is a pre-invasive carcinoma of the breast that exhibits several distinct morphologies but the link between morphology and patient outcome is not clear. We hypothesize that different mechanisms of growth may still result in similar 2D morphologies, which may look different in 3D. To elucidate the connection between growth and 3D morphology, we reconstruct the 3D architecture of cribriform DCIS from resected patient material. We produce a fully automated algorithm that aligns, segments, and reconstructs 3D architectures from microscopy images of 2D serial sections from human specimens. The alignment algorithm is based on normalized cross correlation, the segmentation algorithm uses histogram equilization, Otsu's thresholding, and morphology techniques to segment the duct and cribra. The reconstruction method combines these images in 3D. We show that two distinct 3D architectures are indeed found in samples whose 2D histological sections are similarly identified as cribriform DCIS. These differences in architecture support the hypothesis that luminal spaces may form due to different mechanisms, either isolated cell death or merging fronds, leading to the different architectures. We find that out of 15 samples, 6 were found to have 'bubble-like' cribra, 6 were found to have 'tube-like' criba and 3 were 'unknown.' We propose that the 3D architectures found, 'bubbles' and 'tubes', account for some of the heterogeneity of the disease and may be prognostic indicators of different patient outcomes.

  7. Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil Akhtar; Ahmad Shamshad; Zaheer Sufian; Mansoor Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC) is an aggressive tumor variant thought to arise predominantly from differentiation of clear cell carcinoma. A few reports of SRCC asso-ciated with non-clear cell tumors led to the presumption that SRCC may arise from any renal cell carcinoma, although direct evidence of this is lacking. We report a case of a 70-year-old male patient, who presented with acute left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have SRCC after pathological examination...

  8. International variation in management of screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponti, Antonio; Lynge, Elsebeth; James, Ted; Májek, Ondřej; von Euler-Chelpin, My; Anttila, Ahti; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Mano, Maria Piera; Kawai, Masaaki; Scharpantgen, Astrid; Fracheboud, Jacques; Hofvind, Solveig; Vidal, Carmen; Ascunce, Nieves; Salas, Dolores; Bulliard, Jean-Luc; Segnan, Nereo; Kerlikowske, Karla; Taplin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) incidence has grown with the implementation of screening and its detection varies across International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) countries. The aim of this survey is to describe the management of screen-detected DCIS in ICSN countries and to...

  9. Variation in detection of ductal carcinoma in situ during screening mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Ponti, Antonio; James, Ted;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in screening mammography. DCIS accounts for a substantial proportion of screen-detected lesions but its effect on breast cancer mortality is debated. The International Cancer Screening Network conducted a comparative...

  10. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast arising in microglandular adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microglandular adenosis of the breast is a benign proliferative lesion, and is a rare subtype of adenosis. The pathologic findings and clinical symptoms can mimic those of breast cancer. Microglandular adenosis has been frequently associated with invasive carcinoma and in situ carcinoma of the breast. Many reports have described a spectrum of the lesions, ranging from microglandular adenosis to cancer arising from microglandular adenosis. However, most of them have focused on the pathology, and there are a few cases that report imaging findings. In the present case, we report the imaging and pathologic findings of a ductal carcinoma in situ arising in microglandular adenosis. A 57 year old woman detected a palpable mass in her left breast. Mammogram showed an ill defined irregular isodense mass, and sonogram showed hyperechoic irregular mass with indistinct margin. The patient underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

  11. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast arising in microglandular adenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Woo, Jeong Joo; Kim, Hyun Sook; An, Jin Kyung; Kang, Jae Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung [Eulji Hospital/Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Microglandular adenosis of the breast is a benign proliferative lesion, and is a rare subtype of adenosis. The pathologic findings and clinical symptoms can mimic those of breast cancer. Microglandular adenosis has been frequently associated with invasive carcinoma and in situ carcinoma of the breast. Many reports have described a spectrum of the lesions, ranging from microglandular adenosis to cancer arising from microglandular adenosis. However, most of them have focused on the pathology, and there are a few cases that report imaging findings. In the present case, we report the imaging and pathologic findings of a ductal carcinoma in situ arising in microglandular adenosis. A 57 year old woman detected a palpable mass in her left breast. Mammogram showed an ill defined irregular isodense mass, and sonogram showed hyperechoic irregular mass with indistinct margin. The patient underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

  12. Modeling ductal carcinoma in situ: a HER2-Notch3 collaboration enables luminal filling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pradeep, C-R

    2012-02-16

    A large fraction of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer, overexpresses the HER2\\/neu oncogene. The ducts of DCIS are abnormally filled with cells that evade apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We overexpressed HER2 in mammary epithelial cells and observed growth factor-independent proliferation. When grown in extracellular matrix as three-dimensional spheroids, control cells developed a hollow lumen, but HER2-overexpressing cells populated the lumen by evading apoptosis. We demonstrate that HER2 overexpression in this cellular model of DCIS drives transcriptional upregulation of multiple components of the Notch survival pathway. Importantly, luminal filling required upregulation of a signaling pathway comprising Notch3, its cleaved intracellular domain and the transcriptional regulator HES1, resulting in elevated levels of c-MYC and cyclin D1. In line with HER2-Notch3 collaboration, drugs intercepting either arm reverted the DCIS-like phenotype. In addition, we report upregulation of Notch3 in hyperplastic lesions of HER2 transgenic animals, as well as an association between HER2 levels and expression levels of components of the Notch pathway in tumor specimens of breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is conceivable that the integration of the Notch and HER2 signaling pathways contributes to the pathophysiology of DCIS.

  13. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  14. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Year Award Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Diversity Mentorship Program Eugene Van ... 300 PUVA treatments. What causes Merkel cell carcinoma? Scientists are still studying what causes this skin cancer. ...

  15. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  16. Different distribution of breast ductal carcinoma in situ, ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion, and invasion breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast ductal cancer in situ (DCIS can recur or progress to invasive ductal cancer (IDC, and the interim stage include DCIS with microinvasion (DCIS-Mi. In this article, we attempt to study the study the differences of clinicopathological features, imaging data, and immunohistochemical-based subtypes among DCIS, DCIS-Mi, and IDC. Methods In this retrospective study, we attempt to compare the clinicopathological features, immunohistochemical results and imaging data of 866 patients (included 73 DCIS, 72 DCIS-Mi, and 721 IDC. Results Patients with DCIS and DCIS-Mi were younger than those with IDC (P = 0.007. DCIS and DCIS-Mi often happened in premenopausal women while IDC was opposite (P P P P P Conclusions Different clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and imaging features among DCIS, DCIS-Mi, and IDC indicate that they are distinct entities. A larger sample size is needed for further study.

  17. A study of the molecular pathology of ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    OpenAIRE

    REHMAN, S

    2005-01-01

    The biological validity of the histopathological classification of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast was evaluated in this study by correlating the three histopathological grades of DCIS to immunohistochemical expression of Ki67, p53, cerbB-2, markers of poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and also to bcl2 and ER, markers of good prognosis in invasive breast cancer. DCIS grades correlated positively to Ki67, p53, cerbB-2 and negatively to bcl2 and ER, suggesting vali...

  18. RET-rearranged non-small-cell lung carcinoma: a clinicopathological and molecular analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuta, K; Kohno, T.; Yoshida, A.; Shimada, Y.; Asamura, H.; Furuta, K; Kushima, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: To elucidate clinicopathological characteristics of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cases carrying RET rearrangements causing oncogenic fusions to identify responders to therapy with RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Methods: We investigated 1874 patients with carcinomas, including 1620 adenocarcinomas (ADCs), 203 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 8 large cell carcinomas, and 43 sarcomatoid carcinomas (SACs). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and/or reverse transcriptio...

  19. Lapatinib inhibits stem/progenitor proliferation in preclinical in vitro models of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Farnie, Gillian; Johnson, Rachael L; Williams, Kathryn E; Clarke, Robert B; Bundred, Nigel J

    2013-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often combined with irradiation, reducing recurrence rates to 20% within 10 years; however, there is no change in overall survival. Evidence in the invasive breast indicates that breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) are radiotherapy-resistant and are capable of re-initiating a tumor recurrence; hence, targeting CSCs in high risk DCIS patient may improve survival. HER2 is overexpressed in 20% of DCIS and is known to be highly active i...

  20. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) of the breast: is long-term outcome similar to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? Analysis of 200 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobular carcinomas in situ (LCIS) represent 1-2% of all breast cancers. Both significance and treatment remain widely debated, as well as the possible similarities with DCIS. Two hundred patients with pure LCIS were retrospectively analyzed in seven centres from 1990 to 2008. Median age was 52 years; 176 patients underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 24 mastectomy. Seventeen patients received whole breast irradiation (WBRT) after BCS and 20 hormonal treatment (15 by tamoxifen). With a 144-month median follow-up (FU), there were no local recurrences (LR) among 24 patients treated by mastectomy. With the same FU, 3 late LR out of 17 (17%) occurred in patients treated by BCS and WBRT (with no LR at 10 years). Among 159 patients treated by BCS alone, 20 developed LR (13%), but with only a 72-month FU (17.5% at 10 years). No specific LR risk factors were identified. Three patients developed metastases, two after invasive LR; 22 patients (11%) developed contralateral BC (59% invasive) and another five had second cancer. LCIS is not always an indolent disease. The long-term outcome is quite similar to most ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). The main problems are the accuracy of pathological definition and a clear identification of more aggressive subtypes, in order to avoid further invasive LR. BCS + WBRT should be discussed in some selected cases, and the long-term results seem comparable to DCIS

  1. Molecular Differences between Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Adjacent Invasive Breast Carcinoma: A Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Study

    OpenAIRE

    Moelans, Cathy B.; de Weger, Roel A.; Hanneke N. Monsuur; Anoek H. J. Maes; Paul J. van Diest

    2010-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accounts for approximately 20% of mammographically detected breast cancers. Although DCIS is generally highly curable, some women with DCIS will develop life-threatening invasive breast cancer, but the determinants of progression to infiltrating ductal cancer (IDC) are largely unknown. In the current study, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), a multiplex PCR-based test, to compare copy numbers of 21 breast cancer related genes betwe...

  2. Molecular differences between ductal carcinoma in situ and adjacent invasive breast carcinoma: a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification study

    OpenAIRE

    Moelans, Cathy B.; de Wegers, Roel A.; Monsuurs, Hanneke N.; Maess, Anoek H. J.; Paul J. van Diest

    2011-01-01

    Background Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accounts for approximately 20% of mammographically detected breast cancers. Although DCIS is generally highly curable, some women with DCIS will develop life-threatening invasive breast cancer, but the determinants of progression to infiltrating ductal cancer (IDC) are largely unknown. Methods In the current study, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), a multiplex PCR-based test, to compare copy numbers of 21 breast cancer ...

  3. An Intraductal Human-in-mouse Transplantation Model Mimics the Subtypes of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Behbod, Fariba; Kittrell, Frances S; LaMarca, Heather; Kerbawy, Sofia; Heestand, Jessica C; Young, Evelin; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Allred, D. Craig; Medina, Daniel; Edwards, David; Hu, Min; Polyak, Kornelia; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Human models of noninvasive breast tumors are limited, and the existing in vivo models do not mimic inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the most common type (80%) of noninvasive breast lesions. The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo model whereby the natural progression of human DCIS might be reproduced and studied. To accomplish this goal, the intraductal human-in-mouse (HIM) transplantation model was developed. The resulting model...

  4. The role of breast magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Nadrljanski Mirjan; Milošević Zorica; Plešinac­Karapandžić Vesna; Goldner Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the noninvasive breast malignant tumor originates from the terminal ductal­lobular units (TDLU). The typical feature of DCSI is the formation of calcifications. Up to 90% of DCIS are diagnosed on mammographic examinations, as clinically asymptomatic. Between 10% and 20% of DCIS remain mammographically occult due to the lack of calcifications and/ or small tumor dimensions. Contrast­enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects mammographically...

  5. Reproductive and Hormonal Risk Factors for Ductal Carcinoma in situ of the Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Millikan, Robert C.; Schroeder, Jane C; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Levine, Beverly J.

    2009-01-01

    One-fifth of all newly diagnosed breast cancer cases are ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), but little is known about DCIS risk factors. Recent studies suggest that some subtypes of DCIS (high grade, or comedo) share histopathologic and epidemiologic characteristics with invasive disease, while others (medium or low grade, or non-comedo) show different patterns. To investigate whether reproductive and hormonal risk factors differ among comedo and non-comedo types of DCIS and invasive breast can...

  6. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Detected by Shear Wave Elastography within a Fibroadenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kılıç, Fahrettin; Ustabaşıoğlu, Fethi Emre; Samancı, Cesur; Baş, Ahmet; Velidedeoglu, Mehmet; Kılıçaslan, Tülin; Aydogan, Fatih; Yılmaz, Mehmet Halit

    2014-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common breast tumor in women. Malignant transformation occurs rarely within fibroadenoma at older ages. Clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists need to be aware of malignant transformation within fibroadenomas. Radiologic studies play an important role in the diagnosis of fibroadenoma; however, radiologic findings are often nonspecific for malignancy and may appear completely benign. We detected an occult ductal carcinoma in situ that originated inside a fibroadeno...

  7. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment of breast cancer: Progression of ductal carcinoma in situ: the pathological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, J Louise

    2006-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is encountered much more frequently in the screening population compared to the symptomatic setting. The behaviour of DCIS is highly variable and this presents difficulties in choosing appropriate treatment strategies for individual cases. This review discusses the current data on the frequency and rate of progression of DCIS, the value and limitations of clinicopathological and biological variables in predicting disease behaviour and suggests strategies to dev...

  8. The importance of complete excision in the prevention of local recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, P. A.; Gandhi, A; Knox, W F; Wilson, M; Baildam, A. D.; Bundred, N J

    1998-01-01

    Mastectomy probably represents over-treatment for the majority of women with screen detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and breast-conserving surgery is now widely advocated. In this study, biopsy cavity shavings were used to ensure complete excision in 129 women undergoing breast-conserving surgery for screen detected DCIS. A margin was considered clear if DCIS was > 1 mm from any margin of excision and shavings were clear. Patients with involved margins (DCIS at resection margin) under...

  9. Cytological and architectural heterogeneity in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, C M; Ostrowski, J L

    1997-01-01

    AIM: The traditional architecture based classification system of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has been criticised on the grounds that individual lesions often show more than one pattern resulting in a large mixed category. New DCIS classification systems have emphasised the importance of cytological grade, which is reputed to be more uniformly expressed throughout a lesion. This study investigates the hypothesis that cytological heterogeneity is less common than architectural heterogeneity...

  10. Opportunities for Molecular Epidemiological Research on Ductal Carcinoma In-situ and Breast Carcinogenesis: Interdisciplinary Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Mark E.; Mies, Carolyn; Gierach, Gretchen L

    2014-01-01

    Most invasive breast cancers arise from ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. Given that the natural history of individual DCIS lesions is unpredictable, many women with DCIS receive extensive treatments, which may include surgery, radiation and endocrine therapy, even though many of these lesions may have limited potential to progress to invasion and metastasize. In contrast to valid concerns about over-treatment, the fact that invasive breast c...

  11. Microfluidic model of ductal carcinoma in situ with 3D, organotypic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Bischel, Lauren L.; Beebe, David J.; Sung, Kyung E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer that is thought to be a precursor to most invasive and metastatic breast cancers. Understanding the mechanisms regulating the invasive transition of DCIS is critical in order to better understand how some types of DCIS become invasive. While significant insights have been gained using traditional in vivo and in vitro models, existing models do not adequately recapitulate key structure and functions of human DCI...

  12. Growth pattern of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): a retrospective analysis based on mammographic findings

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, J Z; Evans, A J; Pinder, S.E.; Burrell, H C; Wilson, A R M; Ellis, I O

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information concerning the direction and rates of growth of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The previous mammograms of 124 women diagnosed with DCIS were examined. If in retrospect calcifications were present on the previous examination, the exact size and position were recorded on both diagnostic and previous imaging. The rates of change and direction of change in extent of calcifications were calculated. 39 women with a diagnosis of DCIS in retrospect ha...

  13. Use of strontium-90 in the treatment of carcinoma in situ of the conjunctiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four patients with carcinoma in situ were treated with strontium-90 beta ray application. The dose used was 4500 rads after surgical removal or with small recurrent tumor and 7000 rads for primary treatment. All patients were disease-free at follow-up periods of 48 to 320 months after treatment. One patient required superficial x-ray treatment for recurrent disease. No serious complications developed with the treatment and no progessive cataracts have occurred

  14. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with breast ductal carcinoma in situ: Chinese experiences

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, Xiao; Li, Hao; LIU, YAN-BING; ZHOU, ZHENG-BO; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Tong; WANG, CHUN-JIAN; Zhang, Zhao-Peng; Qiu, Peng-Fei; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The axillary treatment of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the roles of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in patients with breast DCIS. A database containing the data from 262 patients diagnosed with breast DCIS and 100 patients diagnosed with DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) who received SLNB between January 2002 and July 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. Of the 262 patients with DCIS, 9 presented with SLN metas...

  15. Ductal carcinoma in situ. Correlations between high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine and correlate contrast-enhanced areas and multiple internal dark dots and lines on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) with findings in surgical specimens of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to evaluate the ability of HR-MRI to detect DCIS lesions and clarify HR-MRI features characteristic of DCIS. This study retrospectively reviewed 11 patients diagnosed with DCIS who had undergone HR-MRI. Pathological findings and results of HR-MRI were compared, and causes of periductal enhancements were analyzed. In all patients, HR-MRI using microscopic coils revealed ductally, segmentally, or regionally enhanced areas containing multiple dark dots and lines, representing local enhancement of stroma adjacent to the mammary duct containing DCIS. Neovascularization, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and focal edema occurred in enhanced periductal stroma. Poorly enhanced linear or dot-like structures correlated with dilated mammary ducts displaying necrosis and tumor impaction. DCIS was successfully depicted on HR-MRI using a microscopy coil in all 11 cases. Ductal, segmental, or regional areas of enhancement with multiple dark dots and lines on HR-MRI corresponded to mammary glands containing DCIS with periductal enhancement. (author)

  16. Mammographically non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ: sonographic features with pathological correlation in 35 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To present the sonographic findings of mammographically non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: The mammographic and ultrasonographic presentations of 47 radiographically non-calcified DCIS lesions in 35 patients were retrospectively analysed. Histological characteristics (architectural appearance, nuclear grade, percent of involved lobules, and presence of necrosis) were reviewed. Results: Seventeen lesions were not mammographically visible (17/47, 36%). Ultrasonographically, these lesions showed an irregular shape (28/47, 60%), microlobulated margins (34/47, 72%) and abrupt interfaces (42/47, 90%). Only 11% (5/47) displayed posterior shadowing. The echotexture of these lesions was most frequently complex (29/47, 62%); therefore, they were divided into two types: type I (24 cases), which were predominantly solid with cystic components, and type II (five cases), which were predominantly cystic with a solid intra-cystic component. A trend to have greater than 50% DCIS cells in cancerous lobules was observed in masses displaying type I echotexture (difference = 36%, 95% confidence interval 10.6-62.5) and microlobulated margins (difference = 32%, 95% confidence interval 5.1-58.7). Conclusion: Ultrasonographically detected radiographically non-calcified DCIS commonly displays an irregular shape, microlobulated margins, and complex echotexture, giving a 'pseudomicrocystic' appearance. Microlobulated margins and 'pseudomicrocystic' echotexture seem to be associated with a cancerization of the lobules.

  17. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  18. Mammographically non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ: sonographic features with pathological correlation in 35 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesurolle, B. [Department of Radiology, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada)], E-mail: bmesurolle@yahoo.fr; El-Khoury, M. [Department of Radiology, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Khetani, K. [Department of Pathology, Cedar Breast Clinic, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Abdullah, N. [Department of Radiology, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Joseph, L. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kao, E. [Department of Radiology, McGill University, and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    Aim: To present the sonographic findings of mammographically non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: The mammographic and ultrasonographic presentations of 47 radiographically non-calcified DCIS lesions in 35 patients were retrospectively analysed. Histological characteristics (architectural appearance, nuclear grade, percent of involved lobules, and presence of necrosis) were reviewed. Results: Seventeen lesions were not mammographically visible (17/47, 36%). Ultrasonographically, these lesions showed an irregular shape (28/47, 60%), microlobulated margins (34/47, 72%) and abrupt interfaces (42/47, 90%). Only 11% (5/47) displayed posterior shadowing. The echotexture of these lesions was most frequently complex (29/47, 62%); therefore, they were divided into two types: type I (24 cases), which were predominantly solid with cystic components, and type II (five cases), which were predominantly cystic with a solid intra-cystic component. A trend to have greater than 50% DCIS cells in cancerous lobules was observed in masses displaying type I echotexture (difference = 36%, 95% confidence interval 10.6-62.5) and microlobulated margins (difference = 32%, 95% confidence interval 5.1-58.7). Conclusion: Ultrasonographically detected radiographically non-calcified DCIS commonly displays an irregular shape, microlobulated margins, and complex echotexture, giving a 'pseudomicrocystic' appearance. Microlobulated margins and 'pseudomicrocystic' echotexture seem to be associated with a cancerization of the lobules.

  19. Expression of miR-21 and its targets (PTEN, PDCD4, TM1) in flat epithelial atypia of the breast in relation to ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Liqiang; Bart, Joost; Tan, Lu Ping; Platteel, Inge; van der Sluis, Tineke; Huitema, Sippie; Harms, Geert; Fu, Li; Hollema, Harry; van den Berg, Anke

    2009-01-01

    Background: Flat epithelial atypia (FEA) of the breast is characterised by a few layers of mildly atypical luminal epithelial cells. Genetic changes found in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal breast cancer (IDC) are also found in FEA, albeit at a lower concentration. So far, miRNA

  20. Current approaches for detection of carcinoma in situ testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Olesen, Inge A; Jørgensen, Niels;

    2007-01-01

    least one solid immunohistochemical marker, for example PLAP, OCT-3/4 or AP-2gamma. Determination of who should be offered testicular biopsies is based on clinical and ultrasonic examination along with the evaluation of risk factors. A surgical biopsy is an invasive procedure with potential......-malignant changes, especially in males with additional risk factors. Promising results have recently been obtained with a novel noninvasive detection method based on immunocytological AP-2gamma-staining of CIS cells in semen. This method could be a supporting method in andrology centres where careful follow-up is...... possible. In conclusion, one difficulty is to determine in which males CIS should be suspected; secondly, there does not as yet exist an optimal noninvasive method of diagnosis that is more acceptable than an open surgical biopsy....

  1. A Case Report: Lobular Carcinoma In Situ in a Male Patient with Subsequent Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Identified on Screening Breast MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kao, Yekaterina Bulkin, Susan Fineberg, Leslie Montgomery, Tova Koenigsberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobular carcinoma in situ is a form of in situ neoplasia that develops within the terminal lobules of the breast. It is an extremely rare finding in males due to the lack of lobular development in the male breast. The authors herein report an unusual case of incidentally discovered lobular carcinoma in situ in a male patient with recurrent bilateral gynecomastia who was subsequently diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. The pathology of lobular carcinoma in situ in a male as well as screening MRI surveillance of male patients at high risk for breast cancer are discussed, emphasizing the importance of screening and imaging follow up in men who are at high risk for breast cancer.

  2. Expression analysis of carbohydrate antigens in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast by lectin histochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieber-Emmons Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of breast cancer patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS continues to grow. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that DCIS can progress to invasive disease. Carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and tumor-stroma interaction play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior. Breast carcinogenesis may reflect quantitative as well as qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression, which may provide a useful tool for early detection of breast cancer. Because tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA are implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis, the purpose of this study was to assess the expression of selected TACA by lectin histochemistry on DCIS specimens from the archival breast cancer tissue array bank of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Methods For detection of TACA expression, specimens were stained with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-I (GS-I and Vicia vilosa agglutinin (VVA. We studied associations of lectin reactivity with established prognostic factors, such as tumor size, tumor nuclear grade, and expression of Her-2/neu, p53 mutant and estrogen and progesterone receptors. Results We observed that both lectins showed significant associations with nuclear grade of DCIS. DCIS specimens with nuclear grades II and III showed significantly more intense reactivity than DCIS cases with nuclear grade I to GS-1 (Mean-score chi-square = 17.60, DF = 2; P = 0.0002 and VVA (Mean-score chi-square = 15.72, DF = 2; P = 0.0004. Conclusion The results suggest that the expression of VVA- and GS-I-reactive carbohydrate antigens may contribute to forming higher grade DCIS and increase the recurrence risk.

  3. Expression analysis of carbohydrate antigens in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast by lectin histochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of breast cancer patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) continues to grow. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that DCIS can progress to invasive disease. Carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and tumor-stroma interaction play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior. Breast carcinogenesis may reflect quantitative as well as qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression, which may provide a useful tool for early detection of breast cancer. Because tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) are implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis, the purpose of this study was to assess the expression of selected TACA by lectin histochemistry on DCIS specimens from the archival breast cancer tissue array bank of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. For detection of TACA expression, specimens were stained with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-I (GS-I) and Vicia vilosa agglutinin (VVA). We studied associations of lectin reactivity with established prognostic factors, such as tumor size, tumor nuclear grade, and expression of Her-2/neu, p53 mutant and estrogen and progesterone receptors. We observed that both lectins showed significant associations with nuclear grade of DCIS. DCIS specimens with nuclear grades II and III showed significantly more intense reactivity than DCIS cases with nuclear grade I to GS-1 (Mean-score chi-square = 17.60, DF = 2; P = 0.0002) and VVA (Mean-score chi-square = 15.72, DF = 2; P = 0.0004). The results suggest that the expression of VVA- and GS-I-reactive carbohydrate antigens may contribute to forming higher grade DCIS and increase the recurrence risk

  4. Identification of biomarkers in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with microinvasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widespread use of mammography in breast cancer screening has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS of the breast with an area of focal invasion 1 mm or less in diameter is defined as DCIS with microinvasion, DCIS-Mi. Identification of biological differences between DCIS and DCIS-Mi may aid in understanding of the nature and causes of the progression of DCIS to invasiveness. In this study, using resected breast cancer tissues, we compared pure DCIS (52 cases) and DCIS-Mi (28 cases) with regard to pathological findings of intraductal lesions, biological factors, apoptosis-related protein expression, and proliferative capacity through the use of immunohistochemistry and the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. There were no differences in biological factors between DCIS and DCIS-Mi, with respect to levels of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2. The frequency of necrosis and positive expression ratio of survivin and Bax were significantly higher in DCIS-Mi than in DCIS. In addition, apoptotic index, Ki-67 index, and positive Bcl-2 immunolabeling tended to be higher in DCIS-Mi than in DCIS. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of necrosis and positive survivin expression were independent factors associated with invasion. Compared with DCIS, DCIS-Mi is characterized by a slightly elevated cell proliferation capacity and enhanced apoptosis within the intraductal lesion, both of which are thought to promote the formation of cell necrotic foci. Furthermore, the differential expression of survivin may serve in deciding the response to therapy and may have some prognostic significance

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  6. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  7. Confocal fluorescence microscopy to evaluate changes in adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment associated with invasive ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Jessica L; Shin, Dongsuk; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kuerer, Henry; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Adipose tissue is a dynamic organ that provides endocrine, inflammatory and angiogenic factors, which can assist breast carcinoma cells with invasion and metastasis. Previous studies have shown that adipocytes adjacent to carcinoma, known as cancer-associated adipocytes, undergo extensive changes that correspond to an "activated phenotype," such as reduced size relative to adipocytes in non-neoplastic breast tissue. Optical imaging provides a tool that can be used to characterize adipocyte morphology and other features of the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we used confocal fluorescence microscopy to acquire images of freshly excised breast tissue stained topically with proflavine. We developed a computerized algorithm to identify and quantitatively measure phenotypic properties of adipocytes located adjacent to and far from normal collagen, ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma. Adipocytes were measured in confocal fluorescence images of fresh breast tissue collected from 22 patients. Results show that adipocytes adjacent to neoplastic tissue margins have significantly smaller area compared to adipocytes far from the margins of neoplastic lesions and compared to adipocytes adjacent to non-neoplastic collagenous stroma. These findings suggest that confocal microscopic images can be utilized to evaluate phenotypic properties of adipocytes in breast stroma which may be useful in defining alterations in microenvironment that may aid in the development and progression of neoplastic lesions. PMID:27116366

  8. Detection of denitrification genes by in situ rolling circle amplification - fluorescence in situ hybridization (in situ RCA-FISH) to link metabolic potential with identity inside bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A target-primed in situ rolling circle amplification (in situ RCA) protocol was developed for detection of single-copy genes inside bacterial cells and optimized with Pseudomonas stutzeri, targeting nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes (nirS and nosZ). Two padlock probes were designed per gene...... identified as Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis by combining in situ RCA-FISH with 16S rRNA-targeted FISH. While not suitable for quantification because of its low detection frequency, in situ RCA-FISH will allow to link metabolic potential with 16S rRNA (gene)-based identification of single microbial...

  9. Image-guided core breast biopsy of ductal carcinoma in situ presenting as a non-calcified abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) typically presents as calcifications which are detected mammographically. Our aim was to evaluate the less common presentations of ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosed by image-guided core biopsy and correlate with histopathologic diagnoses. Methods and Material: Imaging and histopathologic findings were retrospectively reviewed in 11 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosed at core biopsy that presented as noncalcified radiographic abnormalities. Results: Mammography showed non-calcified, circumscribed nodules, ill-defined nodules and architectural distortion. In two patients, no mammographic abnormality was detected. Sonography showed circumscribed, round or oval, solid masses; irregular, heterogeneous masses; and a tubular structure. Histopathologic diagnoses included multiple architectural subtypes and ranged from low to high nuclear grade. Conclusion: Although image-guided core biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma is typically made when sampling calcifications, DCIS can be diagnosed following biopsy of non-calcified masses or distortion. There is no correlation between histopathologic subtype and radiologic appearance

  10. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: What Can We Learn from Clinical Trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Fortunato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductal Carcinoma in situ has been diagnosed more frequently in the last few years and now accounts for approximately one-fourth of all treated breast cancers. Traditionally, this disease has been treated with total mastectomy, but conservative surgery has become increasingly used in the absence of unfavourable clinical conditions, if a negative excision margin can be achieved. It is controversial whether subgroups of patients with favourable in situ tumors could be managed by conservative surgery alone, without radiation. As the disease is diagnosed more frequently in younger patients, these issues are very relevant, and much research has focused on this topic in the last two decades. We reviewed randomized trials regarding adjuvant radiation after breast-conservative surgery and compared data with available retrospective studies.

  11. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF MIB1 PROLIFERATIONMARKER EXPRESSION ON DUCTAL CARCINOMA IN SITU ANDINVASIVE DUCTAL CARCINOMA OF THE BREAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the prognostic significance of MIB1 proliferation marker expression on ductal carci noma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. Methods By means of histological and immunohis tochemical techniques, MIB1 labelling index (LI) was determined in 31 pathologic specimens (DICS 6, IDC 22 and 3 benign breast lesions as control). Results Significantly higher (P<0.05) MIB1 expression was noted in breast carcinomas in con trast with benign breast lesions. MIB1 LI increased with increasing tumor invasion from DCIS to IDC (P<0.05). Increased tendency of MIB1 LI had been also noted in according with the increased nuclear grading (NG) of IDC. Conclusion MIB1 ex pression can faithfully reflect the proliferative activity of the breast lesions, where the breast cancers with both high MIB1 LI and NG seem to have a poor prognosis.

  12. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Arising in a Benign Phyllodes Tumor: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Kim, Dae Bong; Roh, Ji Hyeon; Kwak, Beom Seok [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A 42-year-old woman was presented with an ovoid mass detected on a mammography. Her physical examination revealed a 2 cm ill-defined mass in the right upper outer breast. A sonogram demonstrated a 1.9 cm ovoid, partially microlobulated and partially well-circumscribed, and an isoechoic mass with increased vascularity on Doppler imaging. Surgical excision was performed and the pathology revealed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a phyllodes tumor. DCIS within a phyllodes tumor is a very rare event. Here, we report on a case of DCIS in a phyllodes tumor.

  13. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Arising in a Benign Phyllodes Tumor: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 42-year-old woman was presented with an ovoid mass detected on a mammography. Her physical examination revealed a 2 cm ill-defined mass in the right upper outer breast. A sonogram demonstrated a 1.9 cm ovoid, partially microlobulated and partially well-circumscribed, and an isoechoic mass with increased vascularity on Doppler imaging. Surgical excision was performed and the pathology revealed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a phyllodes tumor. DCIS within a phyllodes tumor is a very rare event. Here, we report on a case of DCIS in a phyllodes tumor.

  14. A rare case of male breast ductal carcinoma in-situ associated with prolactinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mallawaarachchi, Chandike Maithri; Ivanova, Snezana; Shorthouse, Alice; Shousha, Sami; Sinnett, Dudley

    2011-01-01

    A case of ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) associated with prolactinoma in a male patient is described. A 56-year-old gentleman presented with lethargy and loss of libido. His prolactin at presentation was 3680 mU/l and an MRI scan of the head revealed a pituitary tumour suggestive of prolactinoma. Following 18 months of treatment with cabergoline, the prolactin level reduced to 914 mU/l. However, 3 years later he presented with blood stained nipple discharge, the cytology of which was negativ...

  15. Incidence of invasive cancers following carcinoma in situ of the cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, F; Randimbison, L.; La Vecchia, C; Franceschi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Women with carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the cervix uteri, notified to the population-based Cancer Registry of the Swiss Canton of Vaud between 1974 and 1993, were actively followed up to 31 December 1993 for the occurrence of subsequent invasive neoplasms. Among 2190 incident cases of CIS, followed for a total of 22,225 person-years, 95 metachronous cancers were observed vs 77.9 expected, corresponding to a significant standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.2. Ten cases of invasive cervical ca...

  16. Expression patterns of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors in ductal breast carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Wülfing, P; Kersting, C; Buerger, H.; Mattsson, B; Mesters, R; Gustmann, C; Hinrichs, B; Tio, J; Böcker, W; L. Kiesel

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate expression of various growth factors associated with angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and of their receptors in ductal carcinomas in situ of the breast (DCIS). We studied protein expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, endothelin (ET)-1, and VEGF-C, and their receptors bFGF-R1, Flt-1, KDR, ETAR, ETBR, and Flt-4 immunohistochemically in 200 DCIS (pure DCIS: n=96; DCIS adjacent to an invas...

  17. Modern concepts of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and its diagnosis through percutaneous biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing and currently lies at about 15% of all breast cancers. Detection of DCIS reduces the subsequent incidence of invasive ductal carcinoma. Patients with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4 lesions are best served by minimally invasive biopsies to improve the precision of diagnosing DCIS lesions. Vacuum-assisted biopsies have the greatest sensitivity and specificity of the biopsy techniques and reduce tumor upgrading of DCIS lesions at operation by at least half compared with core-needle biopsy. Moreover, vacuum-assisted biopsies have proved to be safe and reduce health care costs. Since they provide a maximum of preoperative information, vacuum-assisted biopsies could improve outcomes in patients with DCIS. (orig.)

  18. A rare case of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with secretory features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Sugihara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a very rare case of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast with secretory features in a 30-year old Japanese woman. The patient presented with a nodule in the lower inner quadrant of the left breast measuring approximately 2-3 cm, accompanied by an irregular tumor shadow with segmental microcalcification on mammography. These findings suggested malignancy, and excisional biopsy was performed following core needle biopsy. Pathological diagnosis was that of DCIS with secretory features. A treatment plan of simple mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was chosen. Most previous reports have only described invasive secretory carcinoma of the breast. We have only been able to find 2 case reports of non-invasive secretory lesion in the English literature to date. Because the characteristics of this lesion are not widely known, we thought it important to share our findings.

  19. Modern concepts of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and its diagnosis through percutaneous biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettritz, Ute [HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    The incidence of ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing and currently lies at about 15% of all breast cancers. Detection of DCIS reduces the subsequent incidence of invasive ductal carcinoma. Patients with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4 lesions are best served by minimally invasive biopsies to improve the precision of diagnosing DCIS lesions. Vacuum-assisted biopsies have the greatest sensitivity and specificity of the biopsy techniques and reduce tumor upgrading of DCIS lesions at operation by at least half compared with core-needle biopsy. Moreover, vacuum-assisted biopsies have proved to be safe and reduce health care costs. Since they provide a maximum of preoperative information, vacuum-assisted biopsies could improve outcomes in patients with DCIS. (orig.)

  20. Papillary renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1976 and 1987, 395 patients with kidney tumors were studied with radiological techniques and sonography. In 37 cases (9.4%) histopathology diagnosed pure papillary renal cell carcinoma. Analyzing the radiographic patterns of these neoplasms, the authors observed constantly diminished vascularity (100%) frequent calcifications (35.1%) and necrotic areas (51.3%). Such X-ray features are not specific: nevertheless, their coexistence is strongly suggestive of papillary renal cell cancer. No consistent US pattern was found; however, necrotic areas were easily demonstrated in most cases. It must be stressed how patients with papillary carcinoma experienced a longer post-operative survival; it has not yet been established whether such favorable behavior is due to low biological aggressiveness or to earlier diagnosis

  1. Ipsilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, M. J.; Song, J H; Kim, J H; Kim, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) in the same kidney is unusual. We report a 53-year-old man with ipsilateral synchronous renal adenocarcinoma and renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma with severe hypercalcemia and a huge staghorn calculus in the opposite kidney. The patient was admitted to the hospital because of left flank pain and intermittent fever which he had had for 2 months. Computerized tomography revealed a huge stone in...

  2. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Hernández Piñero; José Luis Rodríguez López; María de Lourdes Menéndez Villa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagn...

  3. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  4. Getting the right balance in treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Stuart Fentiman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of mammographic detection, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS is an increasing problem in breast clinics. Both histopathology and molecular profiling can identify subtypes likely to progress to invasive disease, but there is no subgroup with a zero likelihood of subsequent invasion. In patients with low/intermediate grade DCIS, if breast irradiation is not being carried out after free margins have been achieved the patient should be aware of the risks of withholding and the benefits and morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy. Either tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be of value in those with low/intermediate ER+ve disease if radiotherapy is being withheld. For those patients with extensive or multicentric DCIS, mastectomy is the appropriate treatment. This is best combined with sentinel node biopsy and all such cases should be offered immediate reconstruction.----------------------------Cite this article as:Fentiman IS. Getting the right balance in treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013; 1(2:01029.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0102.9 

  5. Breast conserving therapy for early stage invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To discuss a number of clinical and treatment related issues in the management of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. Prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series have established the role of conservative surgery and radiation as an alternative equal to mastectomy in the patient selection, the importance of microscopic margins of research, radiotherapy technique including the role of the boost and regional node irradiation and the integration of systemic therapy (tamoxifen or chemotherapy) with radiation. A subgroup of patients with minimally invasive breast cancer for whom radiation may be omitted after conservative surgery will be identified. Factors predicting for an increased risk of recurrence in the treated breast will be reviewed. The diagnosis and treatment of a breast recurrence will be presented as well as the impact of a local recurrence on distant metastases. Treatment options for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) including observation, radiation and mastectomy will be reviewed. Results from prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series will be presented in an attempt to identify appropriate treatment strategies for the different clinical presentations and histologic subtypes of DCIS

  6. Breast conserving therapy for early stage invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To discuss a number of clinical, pathologic, and treatment related issues in the management of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. In the last 10 years, prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series have established the role of conservative surgery and radiation in the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer. This course will focus on some of the unresolved issues in breast conservation therapy including patient selection, the extent of surgery in the breast, and the importance of microscopic resection margins. The impact of adjuvant systemic therapy (chemotherapy or tamoxifen) on breast recurrence will be presented. Factors predicting for an increased risk of recurrence in the treated breast will be presented. Potential candidates for conservative surgery alone with minimally invasive breast cancer will be identified. The impact of improved local control on survival will be discussed. Treatment options for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) including observation, radiation and mastectomy. Results from prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series will be presented in an attempt to identify appropriate treatment strategies for the different clinical presentations and histologic subtypes of DCIS. As cost effective strategies are developed, the role of conservative surgery and radiation in minimally invasive breast cancer and DCIS must be defined

  7. Breast conserving therapy for early state invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To discuss a number of clinical, pathologic, and treatment related issues in the management of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. In the last 10 years, prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series have established the role of conservative surgery and radiation in the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer. This course will focus on some of the unresolved issues in breast conservation therapy including patient selection, the extent of surgery in the breast, and the importance of microscopic resection margins. The impact of adjuvant systemic therapy (chemotherapy or tamoxifen) on breast recurrence and complications will be presented. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy will be reviewed. Factors predicting for an increased risk of recurrence in the treated breast will be presented. The diagnosis and treatment of a breast recurrence will be discussed. Treatment options for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) including observation, radiation and mastectomy. Results from prospective randomized trials as well as retrospective series will be presented in an attempt to identify appropriate treatment strategies for the different clinical presentations and histologic subtypes of DCIS. As cost effective strategies are developed, the role of conservative surgery and radiation in minimally invasive breast cancer and DCIS must be defined

  8. In situ FTIR studies on mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wolkers, Willem F.; Oldenhof, Harriëtte

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we describe the application of FTIR spectroscopy to study lipids and proteins, in cellular systems during heating and cooling. Various spectral analysis methods are described to simultaneously study membrane phase behavior and heat-induced protein denaturation in cells. Membrane phase behavior was studied by following the temperature dependence of the CH2 stretching vibration bands. Protein denaturation was studied using the amide-I and -III bands. Both amide-I and amide-III ban...

  9. The prognostic role of HER2 expression in ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS); a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Borgquist, Signe; Zhou, Wenjing; Jirström, Karin; Amini, Rose-Marie; Sollie, Thomas; Sørlie, Therese; Blomqvist, Carl; Butt, Salma; Wärnberg, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background HER2 is a well-established prognostic and predictive factor in invasive breast cancer. The role of HER2 in ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is debated and recent data have suggested that HER2 is mainly related to in situ recurrences. Our aim was to study HER2 as a prognostic factor in a large population based cohort of DCIS with long-term follow-up. Methods ...

  10. S100A7 (psoriasin) expression is associated with aggressive features and alteration of Jab1 in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The S100A7 (psoriasin) gene is highly expressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and can be downregulated in invasive carcinoma. Persistent S100A7 expression in invasive carcinoma is associated with a worse prognosis, and this effect may be mediated in part through interaction with the multifunctional cell signaling protein Jab1. In order to investigate the relationship between S100A7 and progression from DCIS to invasive carcinoma, we studied S100A7 expression in 136 patients with DCIS (including 46 patients with associated invasive carcinoma) by immunohistochemistry. S100A7 expression was present in 63 out of 136 (46%) of DCIS lesions and was associated with estrogen receptor negative status (P = 0.0002), higher nuclear grade (P < 0.0001), necrosis (P < 0.0001) and inflammation (P < 0.0001). S100A7 status was no different between DCIS with and DCIS without an invasive component, but higher levels of S100A7 were present in DCIS associated with invasive carcinoma (P < 0.004). Analysis of a subset of cases showed that S100A7 expression was also associated with an increase in nuclear Jab1 (n = 43; P = 0.0019) and reduced p27kip1 (n = 47; P = 0.0168). In cases of DCIS associated with invasive carcinoma, there was also a significant reduction in S100A7 between in situ and invasive components (n = 46; P < 0.0001). In pure DCIS cases treated by local excision, there was no difference in frequency of S100A7 expression between patients with recurrence of DCIS (n = 9) and those without (n = 36). The findings reported here suggest that, although S100A7 may not be a marker for recurrence of DCIS, it is associated with poor prognostic markers in DCIS and may influence progression of breast carcinoma through its interaction with and influence on Jab1

  11. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in patients with breast lesion marked by the localized needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of a breast cancer is very important and challenging aspect in imaging the lesion in the breast. The small lesions visible in imaging exams, in majority of cases are not palpable in clinical testing. The aim of the work is to make a comparison between the clinical features and radiological image in patients with impalpable breast cancer in clinical testing. 338 operating procedures of the breast tumors removal were conducted after preliminary marking them by the localized needle. The lesion in the breast was shown in the mammography or ultrasonography exam. In histopathology exam the breast cancer was confirmed in 131 women. The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurred in 41 (31 %) women and the invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in 91 (69 %) women. Microcalcifications find out to be characteristic for the DCIS. The shape of the spicular lesion is characteristic for the invasive carcinoma. DCIS in mammography exam is bigger than invasive carcinoma. 1. The mammography exam is the basic method for the detection of the breast cancer and the best method for the detection of DCIS, which is often visible in the form of microcalcifications. 2. The average size of the DCIS in mammography exam is twice as large than in ultrasonography and three times larger than in histopathology exam. 3. Size of the lesion in microscopic and macroscopic exam is equal with size of the lesion in ultrasound exam and the diameter of the solid center in the mammography and because of that reason, presence of the processes around the malignant tumor, which is visible in mammography exam should not have influenced the qualification for the surgical treatment. (author)

  12. 63 Patients and cytokeratin 8/18 expression in breast, atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive Duct Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: The pattern and distribution of 63 Patients expression as a myoepithelia/basal stem cell marker can be different between atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and may denote basal phenotype of breast ductal carcinoma. CK8/18 is a luminal marker and may indicate a luminal phenotype of IDC and its expression in ADH and DCIS may refer to a possible precursor lesion to IDC. This work was designed to study and compare the expression of 63 Patients and cytokeratin 8/18 (CK8/l8) in some cases of ADH, DC IS and IDC. Materials and Methods: Histopathological evaluation and immunohistochemical study of anti- 63 Patients and anti-CK8/l8 was performed on selected archival cases of 7 ADH, 12 DCIS, 30 IDC of known clinico pathological data and previous estrogen receptor status (ER) for IDe. Confirmatory anti-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression for positive 63 Patients cases was performed. Results: 63 Patients was expressed in the peripheral rim of the myoepithelial cell layer in ADH and DCIS with occasional gabs in DCrS. It was positive and stained occasional malignant cells in 3/30 (10%) of IDC cases. Confirmatory ASMA staining decorated the same peripheral rim of cells in ADH and DCIS, but was negative in 63 Patients positive IDC cases. CK8/l8 was positive in 100% of ADH, 8/12 (66.7%) of DC IS and 22/30 (73%) of IDC cases. Combined 63 Patients and CK8/ 18 expression was noticed in 3/30 (10%) of IDe. Conclusion: It is concluded from this study that 63 Patients is specific and valuable in differentiating myoepithelial cells and is more specific and valuable than other myoepithelial markers, as ASMA and can differentiate between ADH, DCIS, IDC as it stains peripheral myoepithelial cells in ADH and DCIS with gabs in the latter and does not stain any neoplastic cells. In IDC, it is positive in malignant cells in a minority of cases which may indicate basal/stem cell/myoepithelial cell origin

  13. Mammographycally occult high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as second primary breast cancer, detected with MRI: a case report:

    OpenAIRE

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Podobnik, Gasper; Skof, Erik; Snoj, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Background Contralateral breast cancer (CLB) is the most common second primary breast cancer in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The majority of patients harbouring CLB tumours develop the invasive disease. Almost all invasive carcinomas are believed to begin as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions. The sensitivity of MRI for DCIS is much higher than that of mammography. Case report We report the case of a woman who was treated with breast conserving therapy 10 years ago. At that tim...

  14. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  15. In situ cell cycle phase determination using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Takenaka, Tatsuji; Sato, Hidetoshi; Furihata, Chie

    2010-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analysis of the chemical composition in living tissue and cells without destructive processes such as fixation, immunostaining, and fluorescence labeling. Raman microspectroscopic technique enables us to obtain a high quality spectrum from a single living cell. We demonstrated in situ cell cycle analysis with Raman microspectroscopy with the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Cell cycle phases, G0/G1 and G2/M were able to be identified in the present study. The result of in situ Raman analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Although the Raman spectra of living cells showed complex patterns during cell cycle, several Raman bands could be useful as markers for the cell cycle identification. A single cell analysis using Raman microspectroscopy predicted a possibility to observe directly molecular dynamics intracellular molecules of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Our current study focused on cytoplasm region and resonant Raman signals of cytochrome c in mitochondrion, and discussed how the Raman signals from cellular components contribute to the Raman spectral changes in cell cycle change in the human living cell (lung cancer cell).

  16. Incidental and Isolated Follicular Lymphoma In Situ and Mantle Cell Lymphoma In Situ Lack Clinical Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Glenda; González de Villambrosía, Sonia; Martínez-López, Azahara; Batlle, Ana; Revert-Arce, José B; Cereceda Company, Laura; Ortega Bezanilla, César; Piris, Miguel A; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    Follicular lymphoma in situ (FLIS) and mantle cell lymphoma in situ (MCLIS) are histopathologic findings of undetermined clinical significance. We studied a series of 341 consecutive lymph node resection specimens from patients diagnosed with colorectal (201 cases) and breast (140 cases) adenocarcinoma between 1998 and 2000. Incidental and isolated FLIS was identified in 11/341 patients (3.23%), whereas incidental and isolated MCLIS was found in 2/341 patients (0.59%). None of these cases developed overt lymphoma. A second series of 17 cases of FLIS (16 cases) and MCLIS (1 case) from consultation files was analyzed. Five cases with incidental and isolated FLIS were identified. None of these cases developed overt lymphoma. Overall, none of the 16 cases with incidental and isolated FLIS in both series developed overt FL after a median follow-up of 54 months (range, 7 to 187 mo). However, 12 of these cases with a clinical suspicion of lymphoproliferative disorder showed the association (in different lymph nodes) or combination (in the same sample) of FLIS or MCLIS with other lymphoid neoplasms (FL, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, nodal marginal zone lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, multiple myeloma). In conclusion, the clinical relevance of FLIS and MCLIS seems to strictly depend on the clinical context. Incidental FLIS or MCLIS seem to have a very low risk for transformation, which recommends careful clinical examination after histopathologic diagnosis and conservative management with follow-up for a limited period of time. PMID:26945339

  17. Microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ: Clinical presentation, imaging features, pathologic findings, and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical features, imaging characteristics, pathologic findings and outcome of microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM). Materials and methods: The records of 21 women diagnosed with microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM) from November 1993 to September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic features, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Results: The 21 lesions all occurred in women with a mean age of 56 years (range, 27-79 years). Clinical findings were present in ten (48%): 10 with palpable masses, four with associated nipple discharge. Mean lesion size was 21 mm (range, 9-65 mm). The lesion size in 62% was 15 mm or smaller. Mammographic findings were calcifications only in nine (43%) and an associated or other finding in nine (43%) [mass (n = 7), asymmetry (n = 1), architectural distortion (n = 1)]. Three lesions were mammographically occult. Sonographic findings available in 11 lesions showed a solid hypoechoic mass in 10 cases (eight irregular in shape, one round, one oval). One lesion was not seen on sonography. On histopathologic examination, all lesions were diagnosed as DCISM, with a focus of invasive carcinoma less than or equal to 1 mm in diameter within an area of DCIS. Sixteen (76%) lesions were high nuclear grade, four (19%) were intermediate and one was low grade (5%). Sixteen (76%) had the presence of necrosis. Positivity for ER and PR was noted in 75% and 38%. Nodal metastasis was present in one case with axillary lymph node dissection. Mean follow-up time for 16 women was 36 months without evidence of local or systemic recurrence. One patient developed a second primary in the contralateral breast 3 years later. Conclusion: The clinical presentation and radiologic appearance of a mass are commonly encountered in DCISM lesions (48% and 57%, respectively), irrespective of lesion size, mimicking findings seen in invasive carcinoma

  18. Microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ: Clinical presentation, imaging features, pathologic findings, and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Cristina C. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Mercado, Cecilia L. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States)], E-mail: Cecilia.mercado@nyumc.org; Cangiarella, Joan F. [Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Moy, Linda; Toth, Hildegard K. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Guth, Amber A. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical features, imaging characteristics, pathologic findings and outcome of microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM). Materials and methods: The records of 21 women diagnosed with microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM) from November 1993 to September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic features, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Results: The 21 lesions all occurred in women with a mean age of 56 years (range, 27-79 years). Clinical findings were present in ten (48%): 10 with palpable masses, four with associated nipple discharge. Mean lesion size was 21 mm (range, 9-65 mm). The lesion size in 62% was 15 mm or smaller. Mammographic findings were calcifications only in nine (43%) and an associated or other finding in nine (43%) [mass (n = 7), asymmetry (n = 1), architectural distortion (n = 1)]. Three lesions were mammographically occult. Sonographic findings available in 11 lesions showed a solid hypoechoic mass in 10 cases (eight irregular in shape, one round, one oval). One lesion was not seen on sonography. On histopathologic examination, all lesions were diagnosed as DCISM, with a focus of invasive carcinoma less than or equal to 1 mm in diameter within an area of DCIS. Sixteen (76%) lesions were high nuclear grade, four (19%) were intermediate and one was low grade (5%). Sixteen (76%) had the presence of necrosis. Positivity for ER and PR was noted in 75% and 38%. Nodal metastasis was present in one case with axillary lymph node dissection. Mean follow-up time for 16 women was 36 months without evidence of local or systemic recurrence. One patient developed a second primary in the contralateral breast 3 years later. Conclusion: The clinical presentation and radiologic appearance of a mass are commonly encountered in DCISM lesions (48% and 57%, respectively), irrespective of lesion size, mimicking findings seen in invasive carcinoma

  19. Perform on not Sentinel node in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) is defined as a neoplasmatic lesion of the breast, which does not invade the basement membrane. At present, due to mammographic screening preinvasive lesions of the breast are more common. Despite the theoretically noninvasive character of this lesion nodal metastases may be observed. Another clinical problem in the treatment of DCIS is the growing use of mammotonic core needle biopsy, and the underestimation of invasive cancer connected with this procedure. A question of the past is the issue of indications for ALND (axillary lymph node dissection). Currently, with the use of sentinel node biopsy the remaining problem is the selection of patients who would benefit from nodal staging in DCIS. In this review we will attempt to discuss the clinical value of sentinel node biopsy in DCIS patients. (authors)

  20. Morphological characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ examined by the detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential diagnosis of benign and malignant intraductal lesions is difficult. When mammography (MMG) and ultrasonography (US) screening are performed, the detection of masses requiring diagnosis by needle biopsy is predicted to markedly increase. The subjects of our study were 120 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in whom surgery was performed at our hospital. This study examined the morphological characteristics of DCIS by the detection method used to diagnose intraductal lesions. The lesions were detected by MMG calcification in 47% of the patients, mass in 29%, US in 12%, and nipple discharge in 10%. When histological subtypes were examined by detection method, those detected by mostly the comedo type was found for MMG calcification and the papillary type for mass, US or nipple discharge. Distribution of DCIS histological subtypes differed by detection method. Physicians should be aware of these data during the diagnostic process. (author)

  1. Extension of ductal carcinoma in situ. Histopathological association with MR imaging and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of breast MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and mammography in determining tumor extent and the detectability of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in association with histopathological features. Thirty women with breast cancer underwent 3D dynamic MRI. Twelve women had pure DCIS and 18 women had DCIS with microinvasion. We analyzed the results of preoperative MRI and mammography with histopathologic results, retrospectively. The mean lesion size was 55.1 mm from the histopathologic results. Twenty-six lesions were detected through the MRI (a sensitivity of 86.7%). MRI depicted eight lesions without mammographically detected microcalcification. In seven cases, MRI showed tumor extent accurately compared with mammography, and the combined diagnosis improved the accuracy of evaluating tumor extent. MRI can complement mammography in guiding surgical treatment of DCIS by providing better assessment of the extent of the lesion. (author)

  2. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  3. Mammography, pathology and BI-RADS categorization in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the mammographic features and value of breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) in ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS). Methods: The mammography, positive predictive value of BI-RADS categorization, and pathology of DCIS in 30 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Microcalcification was the dominant feature in DCIS and was sand-like, branching or pleomorphic (14 cases). Other features included mass (3) and architectural distortion (2). Mammography was normal in 11 patients. BI-RADS categories were 0 (8 cases), 2 (2 cases), 3 (2 cases), 4 (9 cases) and 5 (9 cases) with positive predictive value of 60.0%. Conclusion: The dominant mammogram feature of DCIS is microcalcification. The positive predictive value of BI-RADS categorization is low and should be complemented by other investigations. (authors)

  4. Ductal carcinoma In-Situ in turner syndrome patient undergoing hormone replacement therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Turner’s syndrome is a rare congenital disease which affects about 1 in every 2500-3000 live-born females. This happens due to chromosomal abnormalities in a phenotypic female, causing increased gonadotropin concentrations and low concentrations of estrogens from infancy. As a result, hormone replacement therapy is started in most adolescent Turner syndrome patients to initiate and sustain sexual maturation. Accordingly, most Turner’s syndrome patients undergo several decades of estrogen replacement therapy, from puberty to post-menopausal age. The highly publicized findings of the Women’s Health Initiative have called into question the appropriateness of hormone replacement therapy in adolescents with Turner’s syndrome. Those concerns were mostly theoretical extrapolations, as few prospective studies of cancer occurrence in women with Turner syndrome have been reported. Consequently, several recent publications have challenged those extrapolations, based on the assertion that the levels of hormone replacement in Turner syndrome patients are well below the physiologic levels observed in normal menstruating women, as well as the fact that these women are significantly younger than those studied by the Women’s Health Initiative. In discord to those reports, we present a case of ductal carcinoma in-situ in a 40-year-old Turner patient, who had undergone over two decades of combined hormone replacement therapy. The patient underwent an elective excisional biopsy for a palpable mass, with histopathology revealing a complex fibroadenoma with a nidus of ductal carcinoma in-situ. The lesion was noted to be estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor negative, with heavy staining for HER-2/Neu receptor. The patient was treated with tamoxifen. While a rare case, it is imperative for the astute clinician to keep in mind the consequences of long-term hormone replacement therapy in Turner’s syndrome patients in order to avoid missed

  5. High-resolution telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals intriguing anomalies in germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Barber, John R; Bezerra, Stephania M; Heaphy, Christopher M; Gonzalez Roibon, Nilda Diana; Taheri, Diana; Reis, Leonardo O; Guner, Gunes; Joshu, Corinne E; Netto, George J; Meeker, Alan K

    2016-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy of young men. Most patients are completely cured, which distinguishes these from most other malignancies. Orchiectomy specimens (n=76) were evaluated using high-resolution (single-cell discriminative) telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with simultaneous Oct4 immunofluorescence to describe telomere length phenotype in TGCT neoplastic cells. For the first time, the TGCT precursor lesion, germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) is also evaluated in depth. The intensity of the signals from cancerous cells was compared to the same patient's reference cells-namely, healthy germ cells (defined as "medium" length) and interstitial/somatic cells (defined as "short" telomere length). We observed short telomeres in most GCNIS and pure seminomas (P=.006 and P=.0005, respectively). In contrast, nonseminomas displayed longer telomeres. Lesion-specific telomere lengths were documented in mixed tumor cases. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) demonstrated the longest telomeres. A fraction of EC displays the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) phenotype (24% of cases). Loss of ATRX or DAXX nuclear expression was strongly associated with ALT; however, nuclear expression of both proteins was retained in half of ALT-positive ECs. The particular distribution of telomere lengths among TGCT and GCNIS precursors implicate telomeres anomalies in pathogenesis. These results may advise management decisions as well. PMID:27085557

  6. Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity predicts invasive components in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated whether texture-based imaging parameters could identify invasive components of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We enrolled 65 biopsy-confirmed DCIS patients (62 unilateral, 3 bilateral) who underwent 18F-FDG PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), or breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI). We measured SUVmax and intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity by the area under the curve (AUC) of cumulative SUV histograms (CSH) on PET, tumour-to-normal ratio (TNR) and coefficient of variation (COV) as an index of heterogeneity on BSGI, minimum ADC (ADCmin) and ADC difference (ADCdiff) as an index of heterogeneity on DWI. After surgery, final pathology was categorized as pure-DCIS (DCIS-P), DCIS with microinvasion (DCIS-MI), or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Clinicopathologic features of DCIS were correlated with final classification. Final pathology confirmed 44 DCIS-P, 14 DCIS-MI, and 10 IDC. The invasive component of DCIS was significantly correlated with higher SUVmax (p = 0.017) and lower AUC-CSH (p < 0.001) on PET, higher TNR (p = 0.008) and COV (p = 0.035) on BSGI, lower ADCmin (p = 0.016) and higher ADCdiff (p = 0.009) on DWI, and larger pathologic size (p = 0.018). On multiple regression analysis, AUC-CSH was the only significant predictor of invasive components (p = 0.044). The intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity of 18F-FDG PET was the most important predictor of invasive components of DCIS. (orig.)

  7. The ductal carcinoma in situ in contrast enhanced dynamic MR mammography: Morphology and signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The detectability with magnetic resonance mammography (MR-M) of non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), its morphology, and patterns of contrast enhancement were studied. Material and methods: A total of 849 MR-M examinations were performed in 741 patients using a dynamic, contrast-enhanced FLASH 3D sequence at 1.0 T. Surgical breast biopsies were obtained in 332 cases. Histological work-up confirmed 164 carcinomas, including 20 DCIS. Results: Of 20 DCIS, 14 were correctly diagnosed by MR-M on the basis of focal increase of signal intensity. In two cases (10%), no increase of signal intensity was observed. In another three cases (15%), multifocal enhancement lead to a false-negative diagnosis. In one case (5%), DCIS was a random finding in a patient diagnosed and treated for adjacent phylloides tumour. The sensitivity of MR-M was 70%. 4 (20%) of the DCIS did not show microcalcifications at conventional mammography and were only detected at MR-M. The sensitivity of conventional mammography also amounted to 70%. However, the combination of both imaging methods increased sensitivity to 90%. (orig./AJ)

  8. Carcinoma in situ in a 7 mm gallbladder polyp: Time tochange current practice?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Detection of polypoid lesions of the gallbladder isincreasing in conjunction with better imaging modalities.Accepted management of these lesions depends on theirsize and symptomatology. Polyps that are symptomaticand/or greater than 10 mm are generally removed,while smaller, asymptomatic polyps simply monitored.Here, a case of carcinoma-in-situ is presented in a 7mm gallbladder polyp. A 25-year-old woman, who hadundergone a routine cholecystectomy, was found tohave an incidental 7 mm polyp containing carcinomain situ . She had few to no risk factors to alert to hercondition. There are few reported cases of cancertransformation in gallbladder polyps smaller than 10 mmreported in the literature. The overwhelming consensus,barring significant risk factors for cancer being present,is that such lesions should be monitored until theybecome symptomatic or develop signs suspicious formalignancy. In our patient's case this could have ledto the possibility of missing a neoplastic lesion, whichcould then have gone on to develop invasive cancer. Asgallbladder carcinoma is an aggressive cancer, this mayhave led to a tragic outcome.

  9. Apocrine Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast Presented Mass with Morphological Change on Follow-Up Ultrasound: A Report of Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Gi Young; Kim Soo Jin; Park, Sung Hee; Lee, Sun Jin; Ryu, Han Suk; Jung, Yoon Yang [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Apocrine carcinoma in situ of breast is a rare, unique, and morphologically distinct type of breast carcinoma. Low-grade apocrine ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and apocrine metaplasia with atypia are the pathologic spectrum of apocrine breast lesions. Differentiating these two lesions is difficult due to partial microscopic overlap. We describe a case of apocrine DCIS which presented an asymptomatic hypoechoic mass with morphological change on a follow up ultrasonography.

  10. Apocrine Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast Presented Mass with Morphological Change on Follow-Up Ultrasound: A Report of Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apocrine carcinoma in situ of breast is a rare, unique, and morphologically distinct type of breast carcinoma. Low-grade apocrine ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and apocrine metaplasia with atypia are the pathologic spectrum of apocrine breast lesions. Differentiating these two lesions is difficult due to partial microscopic overlap. We describe a case of apocrine DCIS which presented an asymptomatic hypoechoic mass with morphological change on a follow up ultrasonography.

  11. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Matarise, Giuseppina; Pardeo, Francesca;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be...... used to study the interaction between cell membrane and biomolecules. Moreover they allow to perform analysis with high processing speed, small quantity of reagents and samples, short reaction times and low production costs. In this work the developed protocols were used in microfluidic devices for the...... isolation of cancer cells in heterogeneous blood samples by exploiting the binding of specific antibody to an adhesion protein (EpCAM), overexpressed on the tumor cell membranes. The presented biofunctionalization protocols can be performed right before running the experiment: this allows to have a flexible...

  12. Lattice-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ suggests rules for breast cancer progression to an invasive state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Boghaert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS is a heterogeneous group of non-invasive lesions of the breast that result from abnormal proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Pathologists characterize DCIS by four tissue morphologies (micropapillary, cribriform, solid, and comedo, but the underlying mechanisms that distinguish the development and progression of these morphologies are not well understood. Here we explored the conditions leading to the emergence of the different morphologies of DCIS using a two-dimensional multi-cell lattice-based model that incorporates cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, adhesion, and contractility. We found that the relative rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis governed which of the four morphologies emerged. High proliferation and low apoptosis favored the emergence of solid and comedo morphologies. In contrast, low proliferation and high apoptosis led to the micropapillary morphology, whereas high proliferation and high apoptosis led to the cribriform morphology. The natural progression between morphologies cannot be investigated in vivo since lesions are usually surgically removed upon detection; however, our model suggests probable transitions between these morphologies during breast cancer progression. Importantly, cribriform and comedo appear to be the ultimate morphologies of DCIS. Motivated by previous experimental studies demonstrating that tumor cells behave differently depending on where they are located within the mammary duct in vivo or in engineered tissues, we examined the effects of tissue geometry on the progression of DCIS. In agreement with our previous experimental work, we found that cells are more likely to invade from the end of ducts and that this preferential invasion is regulated by cell adhesion and contractility. This model provides additional insight into tumor cell behavior and allows the exploration of phenotypic transitions not easily monitored in vivo.

  13. Rationalization and regionalization of treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast, conservative surgery plus radiotherapy (CS+RT) decreases risk of recurrence compared with CS alone. Although nearly one third of patients are reported as treated with CS alone, it is unclear whether this potentially 'undertreated' group represents high- or low-risk patients. We evaluated national patterns of DCIS treatment from 1996 to 2001 by patient risk profile. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort of DCIS patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, patients were risk stratified on the basis of age at diagnosis, tumor grade, tumor size, and comedo histology. Treatment included CS alone, CS+RT, or mastectomy. Patients were followed for the development of ipsilateral invasive or in situ event. Results: Of 14,202 patients, 19% were low-risk, 46% moderate-risk, and 35% high-risk. A total of 28% received CS alone, 40% CS+RT, and 31% mastectomy. Overall, only 17% of high-risk patients but 44% of low-risk patients received CS alone (p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, older age, smaller tumor size, and treatment in San Francisco/Los Angeles predicted treatment with CS alone (p < 0.01). Yet despite the tendency to receive CS alone, patients in San Francisco/Los Angeles did not experience an increased risk of ipsilateral event (hazard ratio = 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.12). Conclusion: Patient risk profiles rationally affect treatment choice in DCIS patients, and the vast majority of high-risk patients do not receive CS alone. Additional follow up is needed to determine whether geographic variation in care influences long-term outcomes

  14. Renal cell carcinoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present five cases of renal cell carcinoma in children, describing its aspects on excretory urography, ultra-sonography and computerized tomography. The clinical, pathological and radiological features are compared with those of the literature. (author)

  15. Positive enhancement integral values in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma in situ vs. invasive ductal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to contribute to the standardization of the numeric positive enhancement integral (PEI) values in breast parenchyma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to evaluate the significance of the difference in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma, DCIS and parenchyma and IDC and DCIS. Materials and Methods: In the prospective trial, we analyzed the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of 60 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed unilateral DCIS (n = 30) and IDC (n = 30) and defined the PEI values (range; mean ± SD) for the lesions and the breast parenchyma. Tumor-to-non-tumor (T/NT) ratios were calculated for DCIS and IDC and compared. PEI color maps (PEICM) were created. The differences in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma and between DCIS and parenchyma were tested according to t-test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the differences between the mean PEI values of parenchyma, DCIS and IDC. Results: IDC showed highly statistically different PEI numeric values compared to breast parenchyma (748.7 ± 32.2 vs. 74.6 ± 17.0; p < 0.0001). The same applied to the differences in the group of patients with DCIS (428.0 ± 25.0 vs. 66.0 ± 10.6; p < 0.0001). The difference between IDC, DCIS and parenchyma were also considered highly statistically significant (p < 0.0001) and so were the T/NT ratios for IDC and DCIS (10.1 ± 2.4 vs. 6.6 ± 1.4; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: PEI numeric values may contribute to differentiation between invasive and in situ breast carcinoma

  16. Positive enhancement integral values in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma in situ vs. invasive ductal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadrljanski, Mirjan, E-mail: dr.m.nadrljanski@gmail.com [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Maksimović, Ružica [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Plešinac-Karapandžić, Vesna; Nikitović, Marina [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Marković-Vasiljković, Biljana [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Milošević, Zorica [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to contribute to the standardization of the numeric positive enhancement integral (PEI) values in breast parenchyma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to evaluate the significance of the difference in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma, DCIS and parenchyma and IDC and DCIS. Materials and Methods: In the prospective trial, we analyzed the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of 60 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed unilateral DCIS (n = 30) and IDC (n = 30) and defined the PEI values (range; mean ± SD) for the lesions and the breast parenchyma. Tumor-to-non-tumor (T/NT) ratios were calculated for DCIS and IDC and compared. PEI color maps (PEICM) were created. The differences in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma and between DCIS and parenchyma were tested according to t-test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the differences between the mean PEI values of parenchyma, DCIS and IDC. Results: IDC showed highly statistically different PEI numeric values compared to breast parenchyma (748.7 ± 32.2 vs. 74.6 ± 17.0; p < 0.0001). The same applied to the differences in the group of patients with DCIS (428.0 ± 25.0 vs. 66.0 ± 10.6; p < 0.0001). The difference between IDC, DCIS and parenchyma were also considered highly statistically significant (p < 0.0001) and so were the T/NT ratios for IDC and DCIS (10.1 ± 2.4 vs. 6.6 ± 1.4; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: PEI numeric values may contribute to differentiation between invasive and in situ breast carcinoma.

  17. Breast MRI of ductal carcinoma in situ. Is there MRI role?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The purpose of this study is to report our personal experience of 22 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and methods. From September 1995 to December 2001, 22 women diagnosed with DCIS lesions underwent contrast enhanced MRI within 7 days after mammographic examination. Dynamic MRI was performed with a 1 T system, using a three dimensional fast low angle shot (FLASH) pulse sequence before and after contrast media administration. We evaluated the morphologic features of the enhancement, the enhancement rate and the signal time intensity curve. Pathology was obtained in all cases. Results. The results of histopatological examination included: 15 DCIS and 7 DCIS with associated microinvasive component or microfoci of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). On MRI, 21 of 22 (95%) DCIS lesions showed contrast enhancement. Fourteen out of 15 pure DCIS lesions demonstrated respectively a low (3), undeterminate (5), and strong (6) enhancement. Morphologically, the enhancing lesion was focal in 7, segmental in 4, and with linear branching in 3 cases. Wash out was found in 4 cases, plateau curve in 8 and Type I curve in 2 cases. Multifocality was present in 5 cases. All DCIS with associated microinvasion demonstrated contrast enhancement: 1/7 cases showed a low enhancement, 2/7 showed an indeterminate enhancement and 4/7 showed a strong enhancement. Morphologically, the enhancing lesion was focal in 3/9, segmental in 5 and with linear branching in 1 case. The wash out was demonstrated in 3/7 cases, plateau curve in 3 and Type 1 curve in 1 case. Multifocality was present in 3 cases. Conclusions. In conclusion, the sensitivity of MRI for DCIS detection is lower than that achieved for invasive breast cancer; however, contrast-enhanced MRI can depict foci of DCIS that are mammographically occult. The MRI technique is of complementary value for a better description of tumor size and detection of additional

  18. Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity predicts invasive components in breast ductal carcinoma in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Yangchun-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yemi [Ewha Womans University, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bom Sahn [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Yangchun-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated whether texture-based imaging parameters could identify invasive components of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We enrolled 65 biopsy-confirmed DCIS patients (62 unilateral, 3 bilateral) who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), or breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI). We measured SUV{sub max} and intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity by the area under the curve (AUC) of cumulative SUV histograms (CSH) on PET, tumour-to-normal ratio (TNR) and coefficient of variation (COV) as an index of heterogeneity on BSGI, minimum ADC (ADC{sub min}) and ADC difference (ADC{sub diff}) as an index of heterogeneity on DWI. After surgery, final pathology was categorized as pure-DCIS (DCIS-P), DCIS with microinvasion (DCIS-MI), or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Clinicopathologic features of DCIS were correlated with final classification. Final pathology confirmed 44 DCIS-P, 14 DCIS-MI, and 10 IDC. The invasive component of DCIS was significantly correlated with higher SUV{sub max} (p = 0.017) and lower AUC-CSH (p < 0.001) on PET, higher TNR (p = 0.008) and COV (p = 0.035) on BSGI, lower ADC{sub min} (p = 0.016) and higher ADC{sub diff} (p = 0.009) on DWI, and larger pathologic size (p = 0.018). On multiple regression analysis, AUC-CSH was the only significant predictor of invasive components (p = 0.044). The intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET was the most important predictor of invasive components of DCIS. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of Chromogenic In Situ Hybridisation with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation and Immunohistochemistry for the Assessment of Her-2/neu Oncogene in Archival Material of Breast Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful treatment of breast cancer is dependent upon a number of complex factors. Her-2/neu gene amplification is known to be one of the most common genetic alterations associated with breast cancer and its accurate determination has become necessary for the selection of patients for trastuzumab therapy. The aim of this study was to prove the consistency of chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) technique after analyzing the overexpression of the Her-2/neu proto-oncogene in 100 invasive breast carcinomas and by comparing CISH results with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Moreover, it was done to evaluate the possible correlation of estrogen (ERs) and progesterone receptors (PRs), the proliferation marker Ki67 and the tumour suppressor gene p53 with HER-2/neu status of these breast carcinomas. Of the 100 breast carcinomas that were analysed, 22 cases showed HER-2/neu amplification, 66 cases showed no amplification, whereas 12 cases were non-interpretable in both assays (FISH and CISH). Consequently, the overall concordance between FISH and CISH was 100%. Additionally, it was observed that when HER-2/neu gene was overexpressed, there was an association with negative PRs and ERs status, negative p53 protein expression and high Ki67 labelling index. It is concluded that patients with tumours scoring 2+ with the CBE356 antibody (borderline immunohistochemistry-tested cases) would also benefit from CISH as it is shown to be highly accurate, practical and can be easily integrated into routine testing in any histopathology laboratory. Finally, CISH represents an important addition to the HER2 testing algorithm

  20. RNA-Seq of Human Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Models Reveals Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Isoform 5A1 as a Novel Potential Target

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Hitchintan; Mao, Shihong; Li, Quanwen; Sameni, Mansoureh; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is being found in great numbers of women due to the widespread use of mammography. To increase knowledge of DCIS, we determined the expression changes that are common among three DCIS models (MCF10.DCIS, SUM102 and SUM225) compared to the MCF10A model of non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells in three dimensional (3D) overlay culture with reconstituted basement membrane (rBM). Extracted mRNA was subjected to 76 cycles of deep sequencing (RNA-Seq) using...

  1. Infrared analyser with in-situ optical fiber cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents studies and research carried out to build a performing analyzer with in-situ cell for measuring heavy water concentration in isotopic distillation columns under vacuum. The operation principle is based on the infrared absorption measurement of two-wavelengths: a 1300 nm ray represents the control standard while the 1450 nm corresponds to the liaison vibration of OH in the H2O and HDO molecule, present in heavy water as trace quantities. The infrared radiation is generated by two diodes emitting on the two wavelengths, electronically modulated and transferred to the multimode optical fiber cell. The measuring cell consists of two optical quartz prisms assembled in a system allowing the set up and dismantling under vacuum or pressure. The electronic circuitry ensures obtaining and processing the data, as well as the interface with a PC, what results in a highly performing device for in-process measuring the heavy water concentration

  2. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  3. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Sawyer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+ and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18, P = 6.0 × 10(-10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4. Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03; and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04. In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365 and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7. In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  4. Treatment outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients who underwent surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed 106 DCIS patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative RT between 1994 and 2006. Ninety-four patients underwent breast-conserving surgery, and mastectomy was performed in 12 patients due to extensive DCIS. Postoperative RT was delivered to whole breast with 50.4 Gy/28 fx. Tumor bed boost was offered to 7 patients (6.6%). Patients with hormonal receptor-positive tumors were treated with hormonal therapy. The median follow-up duration was 83.4 months (range, 33.4 to 191.5 months) and the median age was 47.8 years. Ten patients (9.4%) had resection margin <1 mm and high-grade and estrogen receptor-negative tumors were observed in 39 (36.8%) and 20 (18.9%) patients, respectively. The 7-year ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free survival rate was 95.3%. Resection margin (<1 or ≥1 mm) was the significant prognostic factor for IBTR in univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively). Postoperative RT for DCIS can achieve favorable treatment outcome. Resection margin was the important prognostic factor for IBTR in the DCIS patients who underwent postoperative RT.

  5. The ductal carcinoma in situ in contrast enhanced dynamic MR mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define the value of contrast-enhanced MR mammography in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). In a group of 35 patients with DCIS, the results of MR imaging were compared to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a retrospective study. In 35 patients with DCIS, a signal enhancement was found in 25 cases (72%). In 15 of these cases, the signal time curve was typical for malignancy. The other 10 patients had non-specific signal curves. Six of 35 patients (11%) had no enhancement within the tumour region. Four of 35 patients (11%) had bilateral diffuse signal increase, and regions of DCIS could not be identified clearly. Three DCIS were visualised exclusively by MR mammography. The configuration of signal enhancement was sharp (32%), unsharp (48%) or dendritic (20%). DCIS of the comedo type showed a significantly higher enhancement than the non-comedo type. A significant correlation between the grade of vascularisation in immunohistochemistry and signal enhancement in MR mammography could not be demonstrated. Dynamic MR mammography does not reliably visualise DCIS. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma in situ: Role of Additional Breast Sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sae Rom; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To verify the role of additional sonography on routine mammograms in the diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Between 2005 and 2008, a total of 105 breasts belonging to 102 patients were diagnosed with DCIS by surgery. Preoperative ultrasound and mammographic findings and reports using BI-RADS were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. In both mammogram and ultrasound, BI-RADS categories 1, 2, and 3 were regarded as negative results and categories 4 and 5 as positive results. We analyzed the frequency in which additional ultrasound examinations aided in the diagnosis in each mammographic finding. Out of the 105 cases, 96 showed positive results on a mammogram and 9 cases showed negative results. Clustered microcalcifications, positive mammographic findings, were found most often (64/96, 66.67%). In those cases, ultrasound examinations gave no additional information, but did enablesonographically-guided biopsies in 38. In the 32 cases with other positive mammographic findings, ultrasound examinations were helpful in 15 cases. Of the 9 cases showing negative results on a mammogram, 8 cases were correctly diagnosed with DCIS because of the additionally-performed ultrasound examination, but 1 case returned a false negative on both the mammogram and ultrasound examination. Additional sonography contributes to a diagnosis of DCIS in patients with negative mammographic findings, nonspecific mammographic findings, or multifocal lesions

  7. Ductal carcinoma in situ and sentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makita Masujiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of sentinel lymph node biopsy on breast cancer mimicking ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS is a matter of debate. Methods We studied the rate of occurrence of sentinel lymph node metastasis in 255 breast cancer patients with pure DCIS showing no invasive components on routine pathological examination. We compared this to the rate of occurrence in 177 patients with predominant intraductal-component (IDC breast cancers containing invasive foci equal to or less than 0.5 cm in size. Results Most of the clinical and pathological baseline characteristics were the same between the two groups. However, peritumoral lymphatic permeation occurred less often in the pure DCIS group than in the IDC-predominant invasive-lesion group (1.2% vs. 6.8%, p = 0.002. One patient (0.39% with pure DCIS had two sentinel lymph nodes positive for metastasis. This rate was significantly lower than that in patients with IDC-predominant invasive lesions (6.2%; p Conclusions Because the rate of sentinel lymph node metastasis in pure DCIS is very low, sentinel lymph node biopsy can safely be omitted.

  8. Classification of ductal carcinoma in-situ by image analysis of calcifications from mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jon; Dance, David R.; Davies, David H.; Yeoman, L. J.; Michell, M. J.; Humphreys, S.

    1993-07-01

    Image analysis methods have been developed to characterize calcifications associated with Ductal Carcinoma in-Situ (DCIS), and to differentiate between those having comedo or non- comedo histology. Cases were selected from the U.K. breast screening program, and in each case the histology and a magnified mammographic view were obtained. The films were digitized at 25 micron sampling size and 8 bit grey level resolution. Calcifications were manually segmented from the normal breast background, and a radiologist, experienced in breast screening, checked the labelling of a calcifications. An algorithm was developed to classify firstly the individual objects within a film, and secondly the film itself. The algorithm automatically selected the combination of features giving the least estimated Bayes error for a set of object-oriented features evaluated for each calcification. The k-nearest neighbors statistical approach was then used to classify individual objects giving a ratio of comedo to non-comedo objects for a set of training films. Films were classified by applying a threshold to this ratio. In the classification of typical comedo from typical non-comedo the success rate of the algorithm was 100% for a training set of 4 cases and test set of 16 cases.

  9. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using dynamic MR mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between functional parameters derived from dynamic MR imaging and the histological findings of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and DCIS with invasive foci, and to evaluate whether these parameters might predict DCIS patient outcome. Two parameters, amplitude Aand k21, were determined from multicompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses of dynamic MR mammography in 39 patients with needle biopsy-proven primary DCIS. After surgery, the histological tumor characteristics, including microvessel density (MVD) (anti-CD-34), vascular permeability (anti-VEGF antigen) and histological grade, were evaluated. Histology revealed 27 pure DCIS and 12 DCIS with invasive foci. In pure DCIS, positive correlations between MVD and amplitude A(r=0.56, P21 (r=0.43, P=0.02) were found. As for histological grade, the differences in both functional parameters of grade 1 versus grade 2 and grade 1 versus grades 2 and 3 combined were significant (P<0.05). No significance was found in the analysis of DCIS with invasive foci. Our results indicated that functional MRI-based parameters might possess the potential to predict the outcome of patients with DCIS. Further study will be needed with larger series over longer periods. (orig.)

  10. Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma in situ: Role of Additional Breast Sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To verify the role of additional sonography on routine mammograms in the diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Between 2005 and 2008, a total of 105 breasts belonging to 102 patients were diagnosed with DCIS by surgery. Preoperative ultrasound and mammographic findings and reports using BI-RADS were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. In both mammogram and ultrasound, BI-RADS categories 1, 2, and 3 were regarded as negative results and categories 4 and 5 as positive results. We analyzed the frequency in which additional ultrasound examinations aided in the diagnosis in each mammographic finding. Out of the 105 cases, 96 showed positive results on a mammogram and 9 cases showed negative results. Clustered microcalcifications, positive mammographic findings, were found most often (64/96, 66.67%). In those cases, ultrasound examinations gave no additional information, but did enablesonographically-guided biopsies in 38. In the 32 cases with other positive mammographic findings, ultrasound examinations were helpful in 15 cases. Of the 9 cases showing negative results on a mammogram, 8 cases were correctly diagnosed with DCIS because of the additionally-performed ultrasound examination, but 1 case returned a false negative on both the mammogram and ultrasound examination. Additional sonography contributes to a diagnosis of DCIS in patients with negative mammographic findings, nonspecific mammographic findings, or multifocal lesions

  11. Is Radiation Indicated in Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ and Close or Positive Mastectomy Margins?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Resection margin status is one of the most significant factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery with or without radiation. However, its impact on chest wall recurrence in patients treated with mastectomy is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine chest wall recurrence rates in women with DCIS and close (5 cm or diffuse disease. Median width of the close final margin was 2 mm. Nineteen patients had margins of <1 mm. One of these 59 patients experienced a chest wall recurrence with regional adenopathy, followed by distant metastases 2 years following skin-sparing mastectomy. The DCIS was high-grade, 4 cm, with a 5-mm deep margin. A second patient developed an invasive cancer in the chest wall 20 years after her mastectomy for DCIS. This cancer was considered a new primary site arising in residual breast tissue. Conclusions: The risk of chest wall recurrence in this series of patients is 1.7% for all patients and 3.3% for high-grade DCIS. One out of 20 (5%) patients undergoing skin sparing or total skin-sparing mastectomy experienced a chest wall recurrence. This risk of a chest wall recurrence appears sufficiently low not to warrant a recommendation for postmastectomy radiation therapy for patients with margins of <5 mm. There were too few patients with positive margins to draw any firm conclusions.

  12. Treatment outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Kyu Bo; Choi, Eui Kyu; Han, Won Shik; Noh, Dong Young; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate the outcome of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients who underwent surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed 106 DCIS patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative RT between 1994 and 2006. Ninety-four patients underwent breast-conserving surgery, and mastectomy was performed in 12 patients due to extensive DCIS. Postoperative RT was delivered to whole breast with 50.4 Gy/28 fx. Tumor bed boost was offered to 7 patients (6.6%). Patients with hormonal receptor-positive tumors were treated with hormonal therapy. The median follow-up duration was 83.4 months (range, 33.4 to 191.5 months) and the median age was 47.8 years. Ten patients (9.4%) had resection margin <1 mm and high-grade and estrogen receptor-negative tumors were observed in 39 (36.8%) and 20 (18.9%) patients, respectively. The 7-year ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free survival rate was 95.3%. Resection margin (<1 or ≥1 mm) was the significant prognostic factor for IBTR in univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively). Postoperative RT for DCIS can achieve favorable treatment outcome. Resection margin was the important prognostic factor for IBTR in the DCIS patients who underwent postoperative RT.

  13. Correlation between imaging and pathology in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Jaap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is helpful in planning treatment for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS if the size and grade could be reliably predicted from the mammography. The aims of this study were to determine if the type of calcification can be best used to predict histopathological grade from the mammograms, to examine the association of mammographic appearance of DCIS with grade and to assess the correlation between mammographic size and pathological size. Methods Mammographic films and pathological slides of 115 patients treated for DCIS between 1986 and 2000 were reviewed and reclassified by a single radiologist and a single pathologist respectively. Prediction models for the European Pathologist Working Group (EPWG and Van Nuys classifications were generated by ordinal regression. The association between mammographic appearance and grade was tested with the χ2-test. Relation of mammographic size with pathological size was established using linear regression. The relation was expressed by the correlation coefficient (r. Results The EPWG classification was correctly predicted in 68%, and the Van Nuys classification in 70% if DCIS was presented as microcalcifications. High grade was associated with presence of linear calcifications (p Conclusions Prediction of histopathological grade of DCIS presenting as microcalcifications is comparable using the Van Nuys and EPWG classification. There is no strict association of mammographic appearance with histopathological grade. There is a better linear relation between mammographic- and pathological size of DCIS presented as microcalcifications than as a density, although both relations are statistically significant.

  14. [Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS) under 40: a specific management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunon de Lara, C

    2008-05-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS) is rare in younger women, accounting for about 4% of all cases of DCIS in France, and tends to be diagnosed by clinical findings or casually, after plastic surgery. After breast conserving treatment, young age ( less than 40) is a predictive factor of relapses in patients with DCIS. Age may serve as one more parameter that should be considered in the complex decision-making process necessary to create a treatment plan for a woman with DCIS. Breast conservative treatment (BCT) could be used if: margins are free and more than 10 mm; if DCIS size is less than 11 mm and DCIS is free of necrosis and comedocarcinoma. Mastectomy ought to be proposed in case of: multifocal DCIS, or DCIS size more than 30 mm; invaded margins after re-excision; radiotherapy contraindicated; small breasts and patient choice. Immediate breast reconstruction should be proposed for patients with all the poor predictive factors. In other cases, treatment procedure will be explained to the patient and the treatment will be chosen by the patient in consultation with the medical team (radiologist, surgeon, pathologist and oncologist). Radiotherapy with boost or hormonotherapy with tamoxifen should not be used routinely but may be proposed individually. PMID:18467151

  15. MRI morphological classification of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) correlating with different biological behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate morphological appearance of ductal carcinoma in situ of breast on MRI and to correlate the appearances with some factors. Methods and materials: MRI feature of 41 DCISs were analyzed retrospectively according to ACR BI-RADS, twenty-three of the 41 were pure DCIS and 18 were DCIS with microinvasion (DCIS-MI). The shape was categorized as mass lesion and non-mass-like lesion. The shape was correlated with histological grade, ER status and expression of e-erbB2 as well as pure DCIS or DCIS-MI. Results: Percentage of high grade in non-mass-like lesion was higher than that in mass type group, Average size of tumor in group of high grade, negative ER status and positive c-erbB2 expression were larger than that in non-high grade, positive ER status and negative c-erbB2 expression. Comparing pure DCIS and DCIS-MI, high grade in DCIS-MI was significantly higher than that in pure DCIS, Average size of DCIS-MI was larger than that in pure DCIS. Percentage of non-mass-like lesion was higher in DCIS-IM than that in pure DCIS, the difference was marginally significant. Conclusion: DCIS can be classified as mass type and non-mass-like type morphologically on MRI. The two types reflect different biological behavior.

  16. Reporting the greatest linear extent of ductal carcinoma in situ on needle core biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenbichler, Emily S; Hameed, Omar

    2016-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is staged as pTis regardless of size; however, extent of DCIS correlates with local recurrence rates and likelihood of close or positive margins. As a result, DCIS extent influences patient management and is an important element in the College of American Pathologists tumor summary checklist for excision specimens. There are no recommendations regarding routine reporting of DCIS extent on needle core biopsy material, and to our knowledge, no systematic studies have evaluated the impact of reporting this in biopsy material. Consecutive cases of DCIS performed or reviewed at our institution were identified by pathology report search over a 7-year period. The greatest linear extent of DCIS on core biopsy was compared with the estimated extent in the excision. Of 241 total cases, there were 157 (65%) cases in which the DCIS extent on biopsy was smaller, 13 (5%) cases in which the sizes were equal, and 70 (29%) cases in which the biopsy size was greater, including 30 (12%) with no residual tumor on excision. Mean extent was greater on excision than on core biopsy (16.0 versus 5.7 mm; P DCIS extent should be reported for needle biopsy material, particularly in the setting of small tumors. PMID:26997448

  17. DETECTION OF t(14; 18) CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN PARAFFIN-EMBEDDED HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA TISSUE BY IN SITU PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lin-lang; XIAO Sha; GUO Ying

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To understand the relationship between (14; 18) chromosomal translocation and hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Semi-nested in situ PCR (SNISPCR) technique was used to detected bcl-2/JH fusion gene in 40 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results: Bcl-2/JH fusion gene was detected in 10 of 40 HCC. There were no significant differences in bcl-2/JH fusion formation between histopathological grades and metastases (P>0.05). Conclusion: By detecting bcl-2 fusion gene in HCC, we think that t(14;18) chromosomal translocation is not a specific change in lymphoma, t(14; 18) chromosomal translocation may not an important cause in pathologensis of HCC.

  18. Management of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast--experiences from National Naval Medical Center during last 10 years.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S. T.; Hamilton, M.; Ghosh, B. C.

    1997-01-01

    Seventy-one ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients were reported to the tumor registry at the National Naval Medical Center between 1986 and 1995. This number represents 6.5% of all breast cancer patients. We did not include the patients with microinvasion or infiltrating ductal carcinoma with extensive DCIS in this study. After excluding 16 cases because of inaccessable clinical records, 55 cases of pure DCIS were analyzed. The mean age at presentation was 52.0 years (32 year-old to 74 yea...

  19. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Pathology of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term lobular neoplasia refers to a spectrum of lesions featuring atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). The histopathological characteristics of these lesions are well documented. What is less well understood is the management implications of a patient diagnosed with LCIS; treatment regimes vary and are somewhat controversial. LCIS is now considered a risk factor and a non-obligate precursor for the subsequent development of invasive cancer

  20. Identification of biomarkers in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with microinvasion

    OpenAIRE

    Iyama Ken-ichi; Honda Yumi; Ibusuki Mutsuko; Kawasoe Teru; Toyama Tatsuya; Zhang Zhenhuan; Yamamoto Yutaka; Okumura Yasuhiro; Yamashita Hiroko; Iwase Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Widespread use of mammography in breast cancer screening has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS of the breast with an area of focal invasion 1 mm or less in diameter is defined as DCIS with microinvasion, DCIS-Mi. Identification of biological differences between DCIS and DCIS-Mi may aid in understanding of the nature and causes of the progression of DCIS to invasiveness. Methods In this study, using resect...

  1. Pathological and biological differences between screen-detected and interval ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    de Roos, M.A.; van der Vegt, Bert; De Vries, J.; Wesseling, J.; Bock, G.H. de

    2007-01-01

    Background: The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has risen dramatically with the introduction of screening mammography. The aim was to evaluate differences in pathological and biological characteristics between patients with screen-detected and interval DCIS. Methods: From January 1992 to December 2001, 128 consecutive patients had been treated for pure DCIS at our institute. From these, 102 had been attending the Dutch breast cancer screening program. Sufficient paraffin-embedded...

  2. Borderline Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia/Low-grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ on Breast Needle Core Biopsy Should Be Managed Conservatively

    OpenAIRE

    VandenBussche, Christopher J.; Khouri, Nagi; Sbaity, Eman; Tsangaris, Theodore N.; Vang, Russell; Tatsas, Armanda; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Argani, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of low–nuclear grade intraductal epithelial proliferations of the breast includes atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). This distinction can be difficult on core needle biopsy (CNB) but can have significant clinical ramifications. We examined the clinical course of patients diagnosed on CNB with borderline ADH/DCIS lesions [marked ADH (MADH)] at our institution. A total of 74 patients were diagnosed with MADH on CNB and underwent an ...

  3. Intratumoral concentration of estrogens and clinicopathological changes in ductal carcinoma in situ following aromatase inhibitor letrozole treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, K.; Ishida, T; Miki, Y; Hirakawa, H; Kakugawa, Y; Amano, G.; Ebata, A.; Mori, N; Nakamura, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Amari, M; Ohuchi, N.; Sasano, H; Suzuki, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Estrogens have important roles in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. However, the significance of presurgical aromatase inhibitor treatment remains unclear. Therefore, we examined intratumoral concentration of estrogens and changes of clinicopathological factors in DCIS after letrozole treatment. Methods: Ten cases of postmenopausal oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive DCIS were examined. They received oral letrozole before the surgery, and the tumour size was evaluated by...

  4. Ductal carcinoma in situ: knowledge of associated risks and prognosis among Latina and non-Latina white women

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, Aparna R.; Kaplan, Celia Patricia; Burke, Nancy J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Hwang, E. Shelley; Karliner, Leah S.

    2013-01-01

    While not itself life-threatening, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) can progress to invasive disease if untreated, and confers an increased risk of future breast cancer. We investigated knowledge of DCIS among a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking Latina and English-speaking non-Latina white women previously treated for DCIS. We examined knowledge of DCIS with four true/false statements about risk of invasive disease, breast cancer recurrence, and prognosis. For each knowledge statement, w...

  5. Biomimetic spinning of silk fibers and in situ cell encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Park, DoYeun; Jun, Yesl; Lee, JaeSeo; Hyun, Jinho; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    In situ embedding of sensitive materials (e.g., cells and proteins) in silk fibers without damage presents a significant challenge due to the lack of mild and efficient methods. Here, we report the development of a microfluidic chip-based method for preparation of meter-long silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel fibers by mimicking the silkworm-spinning process. For the spinning of SF fibers, alginate was used as a sericin-like material to induce SF phase separation and entrap liquid SFs, making it possible to shape the outline of SF-based fibers under mild physicochemical conditions. L929 fibroblasts were encapsulated in the fibric hydrogel and displayed excellent viability. Cell-laden SF fibric hydrogels prepared using our method offer a new type of SF-based biomedical device with potential utility in biomedicine. PMID:27296229

  6. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  7. Improved Outcomes of Breast-Conserving Therapy for Patients With Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Sreedhara, Meera [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brock, Jane E., E-mail: jebrock@partners.org [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2{sup +} DCIS. Methods and Materials: We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40-52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8-18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. Results: With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup -}, 27 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup +}, 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup +}, and 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup -}. On univariable analysis, HER-2{sup +}was significantly associated with Grade III, ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}, central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2{sup +}. Conclusions: In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated

  8. Improved Outcomes of Breast-Conserving Therapy for Patients With Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2+ DCIS. Methods and Materials: We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40–52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8–18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. Results: With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR+HER-2−, 27 were ER/PR+HER-2+, 6 were ER−/PR−HER-2+, and 6 were ER−/PR−HER-2−. On univariable analysis, HER-2+was significantly associated with Grade III, ER−/PR−, central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2+. Conclusions: In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated with HER-2+DCIS included more extensive DCIS, Grade III, ER

  9. Simultaneous Development of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Multifocal Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Keng Chuang; Heng-Chang Chuang; Kwai-Fong Ng

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of multifocal urothelial carcinoma (UC) and ipsilateral renalcell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. We report a 67-year-old woman with multifocal, infiltratingurothelial carcinoma and unilateral renal cell carcinoma. She was referred to our departmentbecause of painless gross hematuria. Cystoscopy, computed tomography and retrogradepyelography studies revealed bladder, bilateral renal and ureter UC. She was treated withtransurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by bi...

  10. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the j...

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Prediction Model for Underestimated Invasive Breast Cancer in Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ at Stereotactic Large Core Needle Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne C E Diepstraten; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; Helena M Verkooijen; Elias, Sjoerd G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. METHODS: From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic lar...

  12. Out of the darkness and into the light: bright field in situ hybridisation for delineation of ERBB2 (HER2) status in breast carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gruver, Aaron M; Peerwani, Ziad; Tubbs, Raymond R.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of ERBB2 (HER2) status in breast carcinomas has become critical in determining response to the humanised monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. The current joint College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines for the evaluation of HER2 status in breast carcinoma involve testing by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, neither of these modalities is without limitations. Novel bright field in situ hybridisati...

  13. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  14. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Ren, Junling; Li, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fifteen lipids (i.e., PE 18:0_18:1, PI 18:0_20:4, SM 42:2, PE 16:0_20:4, PE 36:2, PC 36:2, SM 34:1, PA 38:3,C18:0, C22:4, PA 34:2, C20:5, C20:2, C18:2, and CerP 36:2) with variable importance in the projection (VIP) value of > 1.0 could be used to differentiate six cancer cell lines with the Predicted Residual Sum of Square (PRESS) score of 0.1974. Positive correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., C20:4, C22:4, C22:5, and C22:6) and polyunsaturated phospholipids (PE 16:0_20:4, PE 38:4, and PI 18:0_20:4) was observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells, especially for H1975 cells. Three adenocarcinoma cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, and H1975) could be differentiated from other lung cancer cell lines based on the expression of C18:1, C20:1, C20:2, C20:5, and C22:6.

  15. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  16. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically detected ductal carcinoma in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ameer, Ahmed Yahia; Al Nefaie, Sahar; Al Johani, Badria; Anwar, Ihab; Al Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Alshabanah, Mohmmed; Al Malik, Osama

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the indications for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in clinically-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (CD-DCIS). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 20 patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS by an image-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) between June 2006 and June 2012 was conducted at King Faisal Specialist Hospital. The accuracy of performing SLNB in CD-DCIS, the rate of sentinel and non-sentinel nodal metastasis, and the histologic underestimation rate of invasive cancer at initial diagnosis were analyzed. The inclusion criteria were a preoperative diagnosis of pure DCIS with no evidence of invasion. We excluded any patient with evidence of microinvasion or invasion. There were two cases of mammographically detected DCIS and 18 cases of CD-DCIS. All our patients were diagnosed by an image-guided CNB except two patients who were diagnosed by fine needle aspiration (FNA). All patients underwent breast surgery, SLNB, and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) if the SLN was positive. RESULTS: Twenty patients with an initial diagnosis of pure DCIS underwent SLNB, 2 of whom had an ALND. The mean age of the patients was 49.7 years (range, 35-70). Twelve patients (60%) were premenopausal and 8 (40%) were postmenopausal. CNB was the diagnostic procedure for 18 patients, and 2 who were diagnosed by FNA were excluded from the calculation of the underestimation rate. Two out of 20 had a positive SLNB and underwent an ALND and neither had additional non sentinel lymph node metastasis. Both the sentinel visualization rate and the intraoperative sentinel identification rate were 100%. The false negative rate was 0%. Only 2 patients had a positive SLNB (10%) and neither had additional metastasis following an ALND. After definitive surgery, 3 patients were upstaged to invasive ductal carcinoma (3/18 = 16.6%) and 3 other patients were upstaged to DCIS with microinvasion (3/18 = 16.6%). Therefore the histologic underestimation rate of invasive disease was 33

  17. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  18. Comparison of nuclear grade and immunohistochemical features in situ and invasive components of ductal carcinoma of breast Comparação do grau nuclear e perfil imunoistoquímico nos componentes in situ e invasivo de carcinoma mamário

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Nalesso Aguiar; Henrique Nogueira Mendes; Bacchi, Carlos E.; Filomena Marino Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:To compare the prognostic and predictive features between in situ and invasive components of ductal breast carcinomas. METHODS:We selected 146 consecutive breast samples with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) associated with adjacent invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). We evaluated nuclear grade and immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and epidermal growth factor recep...

  19. Isolation of cancer cells by "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a microfluidic immunosensor for the immobilization of cancer cells and their separation from healthy cells by using "in situ" microfluidic biofunctionalization protocols. These protocols allow to link antibodies on microfluidic device surfaces and can be used to study the interaction between cell membrane and biomolecules. Moreover they allow to perform analysis with high processing speed, small quantity of reagents and samples, short reaction times and low production costs. In this work the developed protocols were used in microfluidic devices for the isolation of cancer cells in heterogeneous blood samples by exploiting the binding of specific antibody to an adhesion protein (EpCAM), overexpressed on the tumor cell membranes. The presented biofunctionalization protocols can be performed right before running the experiment: this allows to have a flexible platform where biomolecules of interest can be linked on the device surface according to the user\\'s needs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mammographycally occult high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as second primary breast cancer, detected with MRI: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contralateral breast cancer (CLB) is the most common second primary breast cancer in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The majority of patients harbouring CLB tumours develop the invasive disease. Almost all invasive carcinomas are believed to begin as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions. The sensitivity of MRI for DCIS is much higher than that of mammography. We report the case of a woman who was treated with breast conserving therapy 10 years ago. At that time the invasive medullary carcinoma was diagnosed in the left breast. Ten years later mammographically occult DCIS was diagnosed with MRI-guided core biopsy in contralateral breast. There might be a potential role of MRI screening as part of an annual follow-up for patients diagnosed with breast cancer

  1. Re-resection rates and risk characteristics following breast conserving surgery for breast cancer and carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryh, C G; Pietersen, C A; Rahr, Hans;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the frequency of re-resections and describe risk characteristics: invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ (CIS), palpability of the lesion, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. RESULTS: 1703 breast conserving surgeries were performed: 1575 primary breast conserving surgeries (BCS......), and 128 diagnostic excisions (DE). 176 BCS (11.2% [9.6; 12.7]) and 100 DE had inadequate margins indicating re-resection. The overall re-resection rate was 16.2% [14.5; 18.0]. 10.3% of invasive carcinoma BCS patients, and 28.6% CIS patients underwent re-resection (relative risk (RR) 2.8 [1.9; 4.......3%). Ilc had an RR of re-resection of 2.5 compared to idc. Palpability and neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of re-resection....

  2. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duggan, Margaret M. [Department of Surgery, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Golshan, Mehra [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pochebit, Stephen [Department of Pathology, Faulkner Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bellon, Jennifer R., E-mail: jbellon@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  3. Characterization of ductal carcinoma in situ on diffusion weighted breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and its subtypes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We retrospectively reviewed 74 pure DCIS lesions in 69 women who underwent DWI at 1.5 T (b = 0 and 600 s/mm2). Each lesion was characterized by qualitative DWI intensity, quantitative DWI lesion-to-normal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The detection rate was calculated with predetermined thresholds for each parameter. The effects of lesion size, grade, morphology, and necrosis were assessed. Ninety-six percent (71/74) of DCIS lesions demonstrated greater qualitative DWI intensity than normal breast tissue. Quantitatively, DCIS lesions demonstrated on average 56% greater signal than normal tissue (mean CNR = 1.83 ± 2.7) and lower ADC values (1.50 ± 0.28 x 10-3 mm2/s) than normal tissue (2.01 ± 0.37 x 10-3 mm2/s, p -3 mm2/s). Non-high-grade DCIS exhibited greater qualitative DWI intensity (p = 0.02) and quantitative CNR (p = 0.01) than high-grade DCIS but no difference in ADC (p = 0.40). Lesion size, morphology, and necrosis did not affect qualitative or quantitative DWI parameters of DCIS lesions (p > 0.05). DCIS lesions have higher DWI signal intensity and lower ADC values than normal breast tissue. DWI warrants further investigation as a potential non-contrast MRI tool for early breast cancer detection. (orig.)

  4. Retrospective analysis of 108 ductal carcinomas in situ of the breast treated by radiosurgery association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To evaluate survival and prognostic factors of 108 patients with clinically or mammo-graphically detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), treated from 1980 to 1996 by complete local excision followed by external irradiation. Patients and methods. - The median age was 51 (range 37-80). All the patients underwent surgery consisting of a wide resection of the mammary gland harboring the tumour. The surgical specimens were sent to the pathologists to get information on histology and margin clearance; all the slides were reviewed by one of us to assess the tumoral diameter. External beam therapy was delivered within 8 weeks after surgery. The prescribed irradiation dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions to be given in 5 weeks. The median duration of follow-up was 93 months (range 40-173). Results. - There were nine patients with local recurrence (8.3%); three patients had local recurrence of DCIS and six patients developed invasive breast cancer. The treatment of local recurrence consisted of mastectomy with or without axillary dissection (eight cases) and quadrant-ectomy (one case). The 5-year and 10-year ipsilateral recurrence-free rate was respectively 92 and 89%. The 10-year cause specific survival was 100%. In univariate analysis, size ≥ 10 mm, age < 45 years old and margin status were significant P = 0,02. P 0,03, P = 0,005; margin status was significant in multivariate analysis (P < 0,02). Conclusion. - These results are in keeping with those of the literature. They could be improved by the mass screening campaign, which is going on since January 1990 among women aged 50 - 74 years. (authors)

  5. Rates of Second Malignancies After Definitive Local Treatment for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye Hong; Nandalur, Sirisha; Huang Jiayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We analyzed the risk of second malignancies developing in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) undergoing surgery and radiotherapy (S+RT) vs. surgery alone. Methods and Materials: The S+RT cohort consisted of 256 women treated with breast-conserving therapy at William Beaumont Hospital. The surgery alone cohort consisted of 2,788 women with DCIS in the regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database treated during the same time period. A matched-pair analysis was performed in which each S+RT patient was randomly matched with 8 surgery alone patients (total of 2,048 patients). Matching criteria included age {+-} 2 years. The rates of second malignancies were analyzed overall and as contralateral breast vs. non-breast cancers and by organ system. Results: Median follow-up was 13.7 years for the S+RT cohort and 13.3 years for the surgery alone cohort. The overall 10-/15-year rates of second malignancies among the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts were 14.2%/24.2% and 16.4%/22.6%, respectively (p = 0.668). The 15-year second contralateral breast cancer rate was 14.2% in the S+RT cohort and 10.3% in the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.439). The 15-year risk of a second non-breast malignancy was 14.2% for the S+RT cohort and 13.4% for the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.660). When analyzed by organ system, the 10- and 15-year rates of second malignancies did not differ between the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts for pulmonary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, gynecologic, genitourinary, lymphoid, sarcomatoid, head and neck, or unknown primary tumors. Conclusions: Compared with surgery alone, S+RT is not associated with an overall increased risk of second malignancies in women with DCIS.

  6. Sonographic findings of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast : comparison with mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the sonographic findings and detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to compare the results with mammographic findings. Of 134 patients with pathologically proven DCIS, 47 patients (48 breasts) who underwent sonography before surgery were included. Twenty-seven patients were asymptomatic, while 20 experienced symptoms. Whether a lesion was present, and the nature of the related sonographic finding were analyzed retrospectively. When a mass was identified by means of sonography, it was evaluated in terms of its shape, margin, echogenicity, associated microcalcifications, and intervening echogenic lines. Sonography detected 39/48 cases of DCIS (81%). In 24 cases, detection was based only on the presence of the mass, while in nine cases this depended on additional findings alone [periductal thickening (n=6);micronodules (n=3)]. In three cases the presence of microcalcifications alone was sufficient for detecton and in the other three cases, detection was based on the presence of microcalcifications as well as on additional findings [periductal thickening (n=2); micronodules (n=1)]. Thirteen lesions (54%) were irregular in shape, while 11 (46%) were o val or lobulated. The margins of 17 lesions (71%) were ill-defined, and in 18 (75%), echogenicity was slightly hypoechoic. Sonography showed that for masses identified as DCIS, the most common findings were an ill-de-fined margin, irregular shape, and mild hypoechogenicity. Microcalcifications were identified in 13 of 48 breasts (27%), while in some cases intervening echogenic lines and microcalcifications were the only finding. For early detection of DCIS, mammography together with sonography may be helpful

  7. Outcomes in Patients Treated With Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Dawn [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline; Nichol, Alan; Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit of the British Columbia Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To examine, in a large, population-based cohort of women, the risk factors for recurrence after mastectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to identify which patients may benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 637 subjects with pure DCIS, diagnosed between January 1990 and December 1999, treated initially with mastectomy. Locoregional relapse (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were described using the Kaplan-Meier method. Reported risk factors for LRR (age, margins, size, Van Nuys Prognostic Index, grade, necrosis, and histologic subtype) were analyzed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox modeling) methods. Results: Median follow-up was 12.0 years. Characteristics of the cohort were median age 55 years, 8.6% aged ≤40 years, 30.5% tumors >4 cm, 42.5% grade 3 histology, 37.7% multifocal disease, and 4.9% positive margins. At 10 years, LRR was 1.0%, breast cancer-specific survival was 98.0%, and overall survival was 90.3%. All recurrences (n=12) involved ipsilateral chest wall disease, with the majority being invasive disease (11 of 12). None of the 12 patients with recurrence died of breast cancer; all were successfully salvaged (median follow-up of 4.4 years). Ten-year LRR was higher with age ≤40 years (7.5% vs 1.5%; P=.003). Conclusion: Mastectomy provides excellent locoregional control for DCIS. Routine use of postmastectomy radiation therapy is not justified. Young age (≤40 years) predicts slightly higher LRR, but possibly owing to the small number of cases with multiple risk factors for relapse, a subgroup with a high risk of LRR (ie, approximately 15%) was not identified.

  8. Underestimation of Ductal Carcinoma In situ on Sonographically Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Jung, Se Hee; Seon, Hyun Ju; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Jin Woong; Yoon, Jung Han; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the underestimation rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of the breast and to investigate the factors associated with this underestimation. We retrospectively reviewed 2990 consecutive lesions that underwent sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy between January 2005 and December 2008. Among them, 61 lesions were pathologically proven to be DCIS (2.04%). A total of 50 DCIS lesions (mean patient age: 50.7 years old, age range: 36-79 years old) that underwent surgical resection were included in this study. After surgery, the lesion proven to be invasive was defined as being in the underestimated group and the lesion proven to DCIS was defined as being in the correctly diagnosed group. We determined the underestimation rate of DCIS and we retrospectively reviewed and compared the clinical, pathologic and radiologic features of the two groups. The underestimation rate of DCIS was found to be 28% (14 of 50 lesions). The underestimation of DCIS was significantly frequent for a clinically palpable lesion (78.6% (11/14) vs. 30.5% (11/36), respectively, p = 0.002). The sonographically maximal diameter of a lesion was significantly larger in the underestimated group than that in the accurately diagnosed group (28.4 {+-}14.0 mm vs. 17.6 {+-}10.3 mm, respectively, p = 0.017) and underestimation was significantly frequent when the sonographic lesion size was > 20 mm (p = 0.012). There was no significant difference in terms of age, the lesion type, the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category or the pathologic features between the two groups. The underestimation rate of DCIS was 28% for sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of the breast. Clinical symptoms such as a palpable lesion and a sonographic lesion size > 20 mm were the factors related with the underestimation of DCIS

  9. Underestimation of Ductal Carcinoma In situ on Sonographically Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the underestimation rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of the breast and to investigate the factors associated with this underestimation. We retrospectively reviewed 2990 consecutive lesions that underwent sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy between January 2005 and December 2008. Among them, 61 lesions were pathologically proven to be DCIS (2.04%). A total of 50 DCIS lesions (mean patient age: 50.7 years old, age range: 36-79 years old) that underwent surgical resection were included in this study. After surgery, the lesion proven to be invasive was defined as being in the underestimated group and the lesion proven to DCIS was defined as being in the correctly diagnosed group. We determined the underestimation rate of DCIS and we retrospectively reviewed and compared the clinical, pathologic and radiologic features of the two groups. The underestimation rate of DCIS was found to be 28% (14 of 50 lesions). The underestimation of DCIS was significantly frequent for a clinically palpable lesion (78.6% (11/14) vs. 30.5% (11/36), respectively, p = 0.002). The sonographically maximal diameter of a lesion was significantly larger in the underestimated group than that in the accurately diagnosed group (28.4 ±14.0 mm vs. 17.6 ±10.3 mm, respectively, p = 0.017) and underestimation was significantly frequent when the sonographic lesion size was > 20 mm (p = 0.012). There was no significant difference in terms of age, the lesion type, the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category or the pathologic features between the two groups. The underestimation rate of DCIS was 28% for sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of the breast. Clinical symptoms such as a palpable lesion and a sonographic lesion size > 20 mm were the factors related with the underestimation of DCIS

  10. The comparison of mammographic and pathologic features in ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the mammographic features of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast and the correlation between the mammographic and pathologic findings, and try to provide clinical criteria for selecting patients for appropriate local treatment. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to analyze the mammographic features and to correlate the mammographic and pathologic findings in 29 consecutive cases of DCIS including 8 cases of DCIS associated with small invasive foci. Results: (1) There were various features in mammograms of DCIS, including cluster microcalcifications (20 cases), ill-defined mass with calcifications (3 cases), mass (4 cases), nipple retraction associated with big ductal dilatation (1 case), and normal mammogram (1 case). (2) The shape of the calcification cluster distributed as V-shaped in 7 cases, round in 8 cases, irregular in 5 cases, and scattered as many small areas in one quadrant in 3 cases. (3) 1 lesion appeared as strip from the deep aspect of the breast to the nipple, and 3 masses were round. (4) The comedo subtype (7/9) and the high grade nuclei of DCIS (6/9), correlating with poor prognosis, were more likely to be accompanied by linear and branching calcification. Non comedo DCIS (11/12) and low grade nuclei (11/12) were more likely to be associated with granular and punctate calcification when micro-calcification were seen on mammogram. There was statistically significant difference between the two groups with P = 0.002 and P = 0.009 respectively (Chi-square test, Fisher's exact method). Conclusion: The mammographic findings of DCIS were characteristic. They were closely associated with the pathologic features that were correlated with the bio-molecular findings. To some extent, the choice of treatment could be based on these mammographic findings

  11. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ-The Influence of the Radiotherapy Boost on Local Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Philip [Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lambert, Christine, E-mail: christine.lambert@muhc.mcgill.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Agnihotram, Ramanakumar V. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Freeman, Carolyn R. [Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence (LR) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is reduced by whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). However, the benefit of adding a radiotherapy boost to the surgical cavity for DCIS is unclear. We sought to determine the impact of the boost on LR in patients with DCIS treated at the McGill University Health Centre. Methods and Materials: A total of 220 consecutive cases of DCIS treated with BCS and radiotherapy between January 2000 and December 2006 were reviewed. Of the patients, 36% received a radiotherapy boost to the surgical cavity. Median follow-up was 46 months for the boost and no-boost groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and Cox regression analyses were performed. Results: Compared with the no-boost group, patients in the boost group more frequently had positive and <0.1-cm margins (48% vs. 8%) (p < 0.0001) and more frequently were in higher-risk categories as defined by the Van Nuys Prognostic (VNP) index (p = 0.006). Despite being at higher risk for LR, none (0/79) of the patients who received a boost experienced LR, whereas 8 of 141 patients who did not receive a boost experienced an in-breast LR (log-rank p = 0.03). Univariate analysis of prognostic factors (age, tumor size, margin status, histological grade, necrosis, and VNP risk category) revealed only the presence of necrosis to significantly correlate with LR (log-rank p = 0.003). The whole-breast irradiation dose and fractionation schedule did not affect LR rate. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the use of a radiotherapy boost improves local control in DCIS and may outweigh the poor prognostic effect of necrosis.

  12. Mammographic bi-dimensional product: a powerful predictor of successful excision of ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of this analysis was to ascertain whether uni-dimensional measurement of mammographic microcalcification, the product of bi-dimensional measurement, calcification morphology, and pathological grade are helpful in predicting successful single therapeutic wide local excision (WLE) of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Methods: The study group comprised 505 patients whose mammograms showed the DCIS as calcification, and in whom a non-operative diagnosis had been obtained and WLE attempted. The extents of mammographic calcifications was measured in two planes at 90o on the oblique view, the appearances classified as comedo, granular, or punctate. DCIS was graded using cyto-nuclear characteristics. Results: Three hundred and forty-two patients had a successful first WLE and 163 patients had further surgery. A uni-dimensional measurement of 2 were associated with successful excision (69 versus 54%, p = 0.02 and 70 versus 27%, p = 0.0001, respectively). Mammographic calcification morphology and histological grade did not influence the likelihood of a successful first WLE. For high-grade DCIS, the upper limit of the bi-dimensional product associated with successful WLE was 800 mm2 (69 versus 24%, p = 0.0003). In contrast, for non-high-grade DCIS, the cut-off was 400 mm2 (73 versus 33%, p = 0.01). Analyses based on mammographic calcification morphology gave similar findings. Conclusion: The mammographic bi-dimensional product is a powerful predictor of successful WLE of DCIS when combined with histological grade and/or calcification morphology

  13. Rates of Second Malignancies After Definitive Local Treatment for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We analyzed the risk of second malignancies developing in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) undergoing surgery and radiotherapy (S+RT) vs. surgery alone. Methods and Materials: The S+RT cohort consisted of 256 women treated with breast-conserving therapy at William Beaumont Hospital. The surgery alone cohort consisted of 2,788 women with DCIS in the regional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database treated during the same time period. A matched-pair analysis was performed in which each S+RT patient was randomly matched with 8 surgery alone patients (total of 2,048 patients). Matching criteria included age ± 2 years. The rates of second malignancies were analyzed overall and as contralateral breast vs. non-breast cancers and by organ system. Results: Median follow-up was 13.7 years for the S+RT cohort and 13.3 years for the surgery alone cohort. The overall 10-/15-year rates of second malignancies among the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts were 14.2%/24.2% and 16.4%/22.6%, respectively (p = 0.668). The 15-year second contralateral breast cancer rate was 14.2% in the S+RT cohort and 10.3% in the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.439). The 15-year risk of a second non-breast malignancy was 14.2% for the S+RT cohort and 13.4% for the surgery alone cohort (p = 0.660). When analyzed by organ system, the 10- and 15-year rates of second malignancies did not differ between the S+RT and surgery alone cohorts for pulmonary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, gynecologic, genitourinary, lymphoid, sarcomatoid, head and neck, or unknown primary tumors. Conclusions: Compared with surgery alone, S+RT is not associated with an overall increased risk of second malignancies in women with DCIS.

  14. Characterization of ductal carcinoma in situ on diffusion weighted breast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C.; Eby, Peter R.; DeMartini, Wendy B.; Gutierrez, Robert L.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D. [University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To characterize ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and its subtypes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We retrospectively reviewed 74 pure DCIS lesions in 69 women who underwent DWI at 1.5 T (b = 0 and 600 s/mm{sup 2}). Each lesion was characterized by qualitative DWI intensity, quantitative DWI lesion-to-normal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The detection rate was calculated with predetermined thresholds for each parameter. The effects of lesion size, grade, morphology, and necrosis were assessed. Ninety-six percent (71/74) of DCIS lesions demonstrated greater qualitative DWI intensity than normal breast tissue. Quantitatively, DCIS lesions demonstrated on average 56% greater signal than normal tissue (mean CNR = 1.83 {+-} 2.7) and lower ADC values (1.50 {+-} 0.28 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) than normal tissue (2.01 {+-} 0.37 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.0001). A 91% detection rate was achieved utilizing an ADC threshold (<1.81 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). Non-high-grade DCIS exhibited greater qualitative DWI intensity (p = 0.02) and quantitative CNR (p = 0.01) than high-grade DCIS but no difference in ADC (p = 0.40). Lesion size, morphology, and necrosis did not affect qualitative or quantitative DWI parameters of DCIS lesions (p > 0.05). DCIS lesions have higher DWI signal intensity and lower ADC values than normal breast tissue. DWI warrants further investigation as a potential non-contrast MRI tool for early breast cancer detection. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Metformin on Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCensi, Andrea; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Serrano, Davide; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Vingiani, Andrea; Gentilini, Oreste; Petrera, Marilena; Viale, Giuseppe; Cuzick, Jack; Bonanni, Bernardo; Pruneri, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    Metformin is associated with lower breast cancer risk in epidemiologic studies and showed decreased proliferation in HER2-positive breast cancer in a presurgical trial. To provide insight into its preventive potential, we measured proliferation by Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of intraepithelial lesions surrounding breast cancer. We randomly assigned 200 nondiabetic patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in core biopsies to metformin, 1,700 mg or placebo once daily for 28 days before surgery. Upon surgery, five to seven specimens of cancer adjacent (≤1 cm) and distant (>1 cm) tissue were screened for LCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and ductal hyperplasia (DH). The prevalence of LCIS, DCIS, and DH was 4.5% (9/200), 67% (133/200), and 35% (69/200), respectively. Overall, metformin did not affect Ki-67 LI in premalignant disorders. The median posttreatment Ki-67 LI (IQR) in the metformin and placebo arm was, respectively, 15% (5-15) versus 5% (4-6) in LCIS (P = 0.1), 12% (8-20) versus 10% (7-24) in DCIS (P = 0.9), and 3% (1-4) versus 3% (1-4) in DH (P = 0.5). However, posttreatment Ki-67 in HER2-positive DCIS lesions was significantly lower in women randomized to metformin especially when ER was coexpressed: 22% (11-32) versus 35% (30-40) in HER2-positive DCIS (n = 22, P = .06); 12% (7-18) versus 32% (27-42) in ER-positive/HER2-positive DCIS (n = 15, P = .004). Eight of 22 (36%) HER2-positive DCIS were adjacent to HER2-negative invasive breast cancer. In tissue samples obtained following 4 weeks of study drug, proliferation was lower in HER2-positive DCIS for women randomized to metformin versus placebo. An adjuvant trial incorporating metformin in HER2-positive DCIS is warranted. PMID:26276754

  16. Axillary evaluation and lymphedema in women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coromilas, Ellie J; Wright, Jason D; Huang, Yongmei; Feldman, Sheldon; Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Chen, Ling; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    Axillary evaluation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing; however, this may introduce additional morbidity with unclear benefit. Our objective was to examine the morbidity and mortality associated with axillary evaluation in DCIS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,504 women aged 65-90 years with DCIS who underwent breast conserving surgery between 2002 and 2012 using SEER-Medicare database. Patients were categorized by receipt of axillary evaluation with either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary node dissection (ALND). We determined the incidence of lymphedema treatment as defined by diagnostic and procedural codes, as well as 10-year breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. 18.3 % of those treated with BCS and 69.4 % of those treated with mastectomy had an axillary evaluation. One year after treatment, 8.2 % of women who had an axillary evaluation developed lymphedema, compared to 5.9 % of those who did not. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the incidence of lymphedema was higher among those who underwent axillary evaluation (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.04-1.45). Overall 10-year breast cancer-specific survival was similar between both groups (HR 0.83, 95 % CI 0.40-1.74). Only 44 (0.40 %) women died of breast cancer; receipt of axillary evaluation did not alter overall survival. Axillary evaluation is commonly performed in women with DCIS, especially those undergoing mastectomy. However, women who receive an axillary evaluation have higher rates of lymphedema, without breast cancer-specific or overall survival benefit. Efforts should be made to determine the population of women with DCIS who benefit from this procedure. PMID:27365080

  17. Outcomes in Patients Treated With Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine, in a large, population-based cohort of women, the risk factors for recurrence after mastectomy for pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to identify which patients may benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed for 637 subjects with pure DCIS, diagnosed between January 1990 and December 1999, treated initially with mastectomy. Locoregional relapse (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival were described using the Kaplan-Meier method. Reported risk factors for LRR (age, margins, size, Van Nuys Prognostic Index, grade, necrosis, and histologic subtype) were analyzed by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox modeling) methods. Results: Median follow-up was 12.0 years. Characteristics of the cohort were median age 55 years, 8.6% aged ≤40 years, 30.5% tumors >4 cm, 42.5% grade 3 histology, 37.7% multifocal disease, and 4.9% positive margins. At 10 years, LRR was 1.0%, breast cancer-specific survival was 98.0%, and overall survival was 90.3%. All recurrences (n=12) involved ipsilateral chest wall disease, with the majority being invasive disease (11 of 12). None of the 12 patients with recurrence died of breast cancer; all were successfully salvaged (median follow-up of 4.4 years). Ten-year LRR was higher with age ≤40 years (7.5% vs 1.5%; P=.003). Conclusion: Mastectomy provides excellent locoregional control for DCIS. Routine use of postmastectomy radiation therapy is not justified. Young age (≤40 years) predicts slightly higher LRR, but possibly owing to the small number of cases with multiple risk factors for relapse, a subgroup with a high risk of LRR (ie, approximately 15%) was not identified

  18. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended

  19. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Lee, Chung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Le, Chap T. [Division of Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Han, Linda K. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Washington, Tara [Vantage Oncology, Redhawk and Wildomar Centers California, Wildomar, California (United States); Kinney, Michael [Center for Advanced Breast Care, Arlington Heights, Illinois (United States); Bretzke, Margit [Surgical Specialists of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Tuttle, Todd M., E-mail: tuttl006@umn.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  20. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  1. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  2. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Penis: An HPV-related Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Report of 3 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Diego F; Rodriguez, Ingrid M; Piris, Adriano; Cañete, Sofía; Lezcano, Cecilia; Velazquez, Elsa F; Fernandez-Nestosa, Maria J; Mendez-Pena, Javier E; Hoang, Mai P; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2016-07-01

    Penile clear cell carcinoma originating in skin adnexal glands has been previously reported. Here, we present 3 morphologically distinctive penile tumors with prominent clear cell features originating not in the penile skin but in the mucosal tissues of the glans surface squamous epithelium. Clinical and pathologic features were evaluated. Immunohistochemical stains were GATA3 and p16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) detection by in situ hybridization was performed in 3 cases, and whole-tissue section-polymerase chain reaction was performed in 1 case. Patients' ages were 52, 88, and 95 years. Tumors were large and involved the glans and coronal sulcus in all cases. Microscopically, nonkeratinizing clear cells predominated. Growth was in solid nests with comedo-like or geographic necrosis. Focal areas of invasive warty or basaloid carcinomas showing in addition warty or basaloid penile intraepithelial neoplasia were present in 2 cases. There was invasion of corpora cavernosa, lymphatic vessels, veins, and perineural spaces in all cases. p16 was positive, and GATA3 stain was negative in the 3 cases. HPV was detected in 3 cases by in situ hybridization and in 1 case by polymerase chain reaction. Differential diagnoses included other HPV-related penile carcinomas, skin adnexal tumors, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Features that support primary penile carcinoma were tumor location, concomitant warty and/or basaloid penile intraepithelial neoplasia, and HPV positivity. Clinical groin metastases were present in all cases, pathologically confirmed in 1. Two patients died from tumor dissemination at 9 and 12 months after penectomy. Clear cell carcinoma, another morphologic variant related to HPV, originates in the penile mucosal surface and is probably related to warty carcinomas. PMID:26848799

  3. Different distribution of breast ductal carcinoma in situ, ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion, and invasion breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhang; Er-li Gao; Yi-li Zhou; Qi Zhai; Zhang-yong Zou; Gui-long Guo; Guo-rong Chen; Hua-min Zheng; Guan-li Huang; Xiao-hua Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Breast ductal cancer in situ (DCIS) can recur or progress to invasive ductal cancer (IDC), and the interim stage include DCIS with microinvasion (DCIS-Mi). In this article, we attempt to study the study the differences of clinicopathological features, imaging data, and immunohistochemical-based subtypes among DCIS, DCIS-Mi, and IDC. Methods In this retrospective study, we attempt to compare the clinicopathological features, immunohistochemical results and imaging data of 8...

  4. Germ Cell Neoplasia In Situ (GCNIS). Evolution of the Current Nomenclature for Testicular Pre-invasive Germ Cell Malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berney, D M; Looijenga, Lhj; Idrees, M;

    2016-01-01

    The pre-invasive lesion associated with post pubertal malignant germ cell tumours of the testis was first recognised in the early 1970s and proven by a number of observational and follow up studies. Until this year, this scientific story has been confused by resistance to the entity, and disagree......The pre-invasive lesion associated with post pubertal malignant germ cell tumours of the testis was first recognised in the early 1970s and proven by a number of observational and follow up studies. Until this year, this scientific story has been confused by resistance to the entity, and...... disagreement on its name. Initially termed 'carcinoma in situ' (CIS), it has also been known as 'Intra-tubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified' (IGCNU) and 'testicular intra-epithelial neoplasia' (TIN). We wish here, to review the history of discovery and controversy on these names, and introduce the...

  5. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  6. Identity of M2A (D2-40) antigen and gp36 (Aggrus, T1A-2, podoplanin) in human developing testis, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ-cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Si Brask; Herlihy, Amy S; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E;

    2006-01-01

    , human gp36, T1A-2), a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in lymphatic endothelium and various solid tumours. To examine a potential role for PDPN in testicular neoplasms and during testicular development, we investigated its expression pattern during the development of human testis and in a series of...... function in developing testis, most likely at the level of cell-cell interactions among pre-meiotic germ cells and immature Sertoli cells....

  7. Mast cells dysregulate apoptotic and cell cycle genes in mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Paul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a disease of high mortality and morbidity. Interactions between the squamous cell carcinoma and the host's local immunity, and how the latter contributes to the biological behavior of the tumor are unclear. In vivo studies have demonstrated sequential mast cell infiltration and degranulation during squamous cell carcinogenesis. The degree of mast cell activation correlates closely with distinct phases of hyperkeratosis, dysplasia, carcinoma in-situ and invasive carcinoma. However, the role of mast cells in carcinogenesis is unclear. Aim This study explores the effects of mast cells on the proliferation and gene expression profile of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma using human mast cell line (HMC-1 and human glossal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC25. Methods HMC-1 and SCC25 were co-cultured in a two-compartment chamber, separated by a polycarbonate membrane. HMC-1 was stimulated to degranulate with calcium ionophore A23187. The experiments were done in quadruplicate. Negative controls were established where SCC25 were cultured alone without HMC-1. At 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours, proliferation and viability of SCC25 were assessed with MTT colorimetric assay. cDNA microarray was employed to study differential gene expression between co-cultured and control SCC25. Results HMC-1/SCC25 co-culture resulted in suppression of growth rate for SCC-25 (34% compared with 110% for the control by 72 hours, p Conclusion We show that mast cells have a direct inhibitory effect on the proliferation of mucosal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro by dysregulating key genes in apoptosis and cell cycle control.

  8. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with a needle core biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: is it justified?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has increased markedly with the introduction of population-based mammographic screening. DCIS is usually diagnosed non-operatively. Although sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) has become the standard of care for patients with invasive breast carcinoma, its use in patients with DCIS is controversial. AIM: To examine the justification for offering SNB at the time of primary surgery to patients with a needle core biopsy (NCB) diagnosis of DCIS. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of 145 patients with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS who had SNB performed at the time of primary surgery. The study focused on rates of SNB positivity and underestimation of invasive carcinoma by NCB, and sought to identify factors that might predict the presence of invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. RESULTS: 7\\/145 patients (4.8%) had a positive sentinel lymph node, four macrometastases and three micrometastases. 6\\/7 patients had invasive carcinoma in the final excision specimen. 55\\/145 patients (37.9%) with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS had invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. The median invasive tumour size was 6 mm. A radiological mass and areas of invasion <1 mm, amounting to "at least microinvasion" on NCB were predictive of invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. CONCLUSIONS: SNB positivity in pure DCIS is rare. In view of the high rate of underestimation of invasive carcinoma in patients with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS in this study, SNB appears justified in this group of patients.

  9. The detection of Felis catus papillomavirus 3 DNA in a feline bowenoid in situ carcinoma with novel histologic features and benign clinical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, John S; Fairley, Rob; Atkinson, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Bowenoid in situ carcinoma (BISC; papillomavirus-associated squamous cell carcinoma in situ) is an uncommon skin neoplasm of cats that can result in euthanasia because of the development of multiple lesions or because of progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. BISCs are currently thought to be caused by Felis catus papillomavirus 2 (FcaPV-2). The presently described cat developed a single 0.5 cm in diameter interscapular mass. Over the following 18 months, the mass doubled in size; no additional lesions developed. The mass was surgically excised and histologically diagnosed as a BISC. However, in contrast to previously reported BISCs, neither prominent thickening of the deep aspects of the follicular infundibula nor marked cell dysplasia were present. Furthermore, ~50% of the keratinocytes in the affected epidermis had prominent PV cytopathic changes that included shrunken angular nuclei and elongated basophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. As the histopathology was not typical for FcaPV-2 infection, polymerase chain reaction was performed and revealed only DNA sequences from Felis catus papillomavirus 3 (FcaPV-3). No further BISCs developed in this cat 6 months postremoval, hence surgical excision appeared to be curative. Results from this case suggest that, although FcaPV-2 appears to be the predominant cause of BISCs in cats, infection by FcaPV-3 can also cause these neoplasms. BISCs caused by FcaPV-3 appear to have unique histologic features that allow the causative PV type to be predicted. Results from this single case suggest that BISCs caused by FcaPV-3 may have a more benign clinical course than those caused by FcaPV-2. PMID:27423734

  10. Carcinoma ductal in situ associado a carcinoma invasivo na mesma mama: análise do grau nuclear e da expressão das proteínas p53 e C-erbB-2 e dos receptores de estrógeno Ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma in the same breast: evaluation of the nuclear grade and the expressions of proteins p53 and C-erbB-2 and estrogen receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José de Almeida

    2004-07-01

    chosen at 10% or more of positive cells for p53 and c-erbB-2 proteins and for ER. The analysis of the concordance between the expressions of proteins and the nuclear grade was done by the kappa coefficient, according to Landis and Koch's criteria. MacNemar's test was used to assess the differences between the two groups. RESULTS: there was a perfect concordance in the expression of p53 proteins (kappa coefficient = 1.00 and almost a perfect concordance for c-erbB-2 proteins, ER and nuclear grade (kappa coefficients = 0.84, 0.89 and 0.89 between in situ and invasive elements of the same tumor. CONCLUSION: there was no difference between the expressions of p53 and c-erbB-2 proteins, ER and nuclear grade in the DCIS and invasive carcinoma of the same breast.

  11. Pathologic and biologic response to preoperative endocrine therapy in patients with ER-positive ductal carcinoma in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine therapy is commonly recommended in the adjuvant setting for patients as treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). However, it is unknown whether a neoadjuvant (preoperative) anti-estrogen approach to DCIS results in any biological change. This study was undertaken to investigate the pathologic and biomarker changes in DCIS following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy compared to a group of patients who did not undergo preoperative anti-estrogenic treatment to determine whether such treatment results in detectable histologic alterations. Patients (n = 23) diagnosed with ER-positive pure DCIS by stereotactic core biopsy were enrolled in a trial of neoadjuvant anti-estrogen therapy followed by definitive excision. Patients on hormone replacement therapy, with palpable masses, or with histologic or clinical suspicion of invasion were excluded. Premenopausal women were treated with tamoxifen and postmenopausal women were treated with letrozole. Pathologic markers of proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis were evaluated at baseline and at three months. Biomarker changes were compared to a cohort of patients who had not received preoperative treatment. Median age of the cohort was 53 years (range 38–78); 14 were premenopausal. Following treatment, predominant morphologic changes included increased multinucleated histiocytes and degenerated cells, decreased duct extension, and prominent periductal fibrosis. Two postmenopausal patients had ADH only with no residual DCIS at excision. Postmenopausal women on letrozole had significant reduction of PR, and Ki67 as well as increase in CD68-positive cells. For premenopausal women on tamoxifen treatment, the only significant change was increase in CD68. No change in cleaved caspase 3 was found. Two patients had invasive cancer at surgery. Preoperative therapy for DCIS is associated with significant pathologic alterations. These changes may be clinically significant. Further work is needed to identify which women

  12. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  13. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  14. Comparison of nuclear grade and immunohistochemical features in situ and invasive components of ductal carcinoma of breast Comparação do grau nuclear e perfil imunoistoquímico nos componentes in situ e invasivo de carcinoma mamário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nalesso Aguiar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE:To compare the prognostic and predictive features between in situ and invasive components of ductal breast carcinomas. METHODS:We selected 146 consecutive breast samples with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS associated with adjacent invasive breast carcinoma (IBC. We evaluated nuclear grade and immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in both components, in situ and invasive, and the Ki-67 percentage of cells in the invasive part. The DCIS and IBC were classified in molecular surrogate types determined by the immunohistochemical profile as luminal (RE/PR-positive/ HER2-negative, triple-positive (RE/RP/HER2-positive, HER2-enriched (ER/PR-negative/HER2-positive, and triple-negative (RE/RP/HER2-negative. Discrimination between luminal A and luminal B was not performed due to statistical purposes. Correlations between the categories in the two groups were made using the Spearman correlation method. RESULTS:There was a significant correlation between nuclear grade (pOBJETIVO: Comparar características prognósticas e preditivas entre os componentes in situ e invasivo de carcinomas ductais da mama. MÉTODOS: Selecionamos 146 amostras mamárias consecutivas com carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS associado com carcinoma invasivo (CI adjacente. Avaliamos grau nuclear e a expressão imunoistoquímica de receptor de estrogênio (RE, receptor de progesterona (RP, receptor do fator de crescimento epidérmico humano 2 (HER2, citoqueratina 5/6 (CK5/6 e o receptor do fator de crescimento epidérmico (EGFR em ambos componentes, in situ e invasor, e a porcentagem de células marcadas pelo Ki-67 no componente invasivo. CDIS e CI foram classificados nos tipos moleculares, determinados pelo perfil imunoistoquímico, como luminal (RE/RP-positivo/HER2-negativo, triplo-positivo (RE/RP/HER2-positivo, HER2-puro

  15. Clinical importance of histologic grading of lobular carcinoma in situ in breast core needle biopsy specimens: current issues and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Faye; Carter, Gloria; Tseng, George; Chivukula, Mamatha

    2010-05-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is considered a risk factor for development of invasive carcinoma (IC). Many variants of LCIS have been described based on pathologic features such as nuclear grade, pleomorphism, and necrosis, but little is known about the biology of these variants. The proposed 3-tier grading system for LCIS has not been validated or endorsed across laboratories. We found significant upstaging of pure pleomorphic LCIS (LCIS with nuclear grade [NG] 3), up to 25% in core needle biopsy (CNB) specimens, in an earlier study. The aim of the current study was to address the importance of pure classical LCIS (NGs 1 and 2) in CNB specimens along with clinicopathologic follow-up. In follow-up resection specimens, IC or ductal carcinoma in situ was seen in 18% (7/39), a high incidence of residual LCIS was seen in 69% (27/39), and other high-risk lesions, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia, were seen in 36% (14/39) of LCIS NG 2 cases. Our study illustrates the importance of grading LCIS; we recommend follow-up excision in LCIS NG 2 cases owing to a high incidence of residual LCIS and the likelihood of identifying other high-risk lesions. PMID:20395524

  16. In vivo and in situ monitoring of the nitric oxide stimulus response of single cancer cells by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectroscopy is capable of studying time-resolved information of selected biomolecular distributions inside individual cells without labeling. In this study, Raman spectroscopy was for the first time utilized to in vivo and in situ monitor the cellular response to nitric oxide (NO) in single oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells over a period of 24 h. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was chosen as a NO donor to be incubated with the OSCC cell line (TCA8113) for certain time intervals. In vivo and in situ Raman analysis revealed that the degradation and conformational changes of nucleic acids, lipids and proteins could be directly observed by changes in the characteristic Raman bands. In comparison with conventional flow cytometric analysis, Raman spectroscopy not only detected more subtle NO-induced chemical changes of cells, where the SNP concentration could be even less than 1 mM, but also provided a full view of the whole chemical components of single cells. Raman spectroscopy therefore is an important candidate for label-free, nondestructive and in situ monitoring of cellular changes in response to chemotherapeutic agents, which could potentially be used in rapid screening of novel drugs. (letter)

  17. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  18. Results of conservative surgery and radiation for mammographically detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of conservative surgery and radiation for mammographically detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is controversial. In particular, there is little data for outcome with radiation in a group of patients comparable to those treated with local excision and surveillance (mammographic calcifications ≤2.5cm, negative resection margins, negative post biopsy mammogram). This study reports outcome of conservative surgery and radiation for mammographically detected DCIS with an emphasis on results in patients considered candidates for excision alone. Methods and Materials: >From 1983 to 1992, 110 women with mammographically detected DCIS (77% calcifications ± mass) and no prior history of breast cancer underwent needle localization and biopsy with (55%) or without a re excision and radiation. Final margins of resection were negative in 62%, positive 7%, close 11%, and unknown 20%. The median patient age was 56 years. The most common histologic subtype was comedo (54%), followed by cribriform (22%). The median pathologic tumor size was 8 mm (range 2 mm to 5 cm). Forty-seven percent of patients with calcifications only had a negative post biopsy mammogram prior to radiation. Radiation consisted of treatment to the entire breast (median 50.00 Gy) and a boost to the primary site (97%) for a median total dose of 60.40 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, three patients developed a recurrence in the treated breast. The median interval to recurrence was 8.8 years and all were invasive cancers. Two (67%) occurred outside the initial quadrant. The 5- and 10-year actuarial rates of recurrence were 1 and 15%. Cause-specific survival was 100% at 5 and 10 years. Contralateral breast cancer developed in two patients. There were too few failures for statistical significance to be achieved with any of the following factors: patient age, family history, race, mammographic findings, location primary, pathologic size, histologic subtype, re excision, or

  19. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  20. Combined Inhibition of ErbB1/2 and Notch Receptors Effectively Targets Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) Stem/Progenitor Cell Activity Regardless of ErbB2 Status

    OpenAIRE

    Farnie, Gillian; Willan, Pamela M; Clarke, Robert B; Bundred, Nigel J

    2013-01-01

    Pathways involved in DCIS stem and progenitor signalling are poorly understood yet are critical to understand DCIS biology and to develop new therapies. Notch and ErbB1/2 receptor signalling cross talk has been demonstrated in invasive breast cancer, but their role in DCIS stem and progenitor cells has not been investigated. We have utilised 2 DCIS cell lines, MCF10DCIS.com (ErbB2-normal) and SUM225 (ErbB2-overexpressing) and 7 human primary DCIS samples were cultured in 3D matrigel and as ma...

  1. MRI analysis of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze MRI manifestation and enhancement of renal cell carcinoma, and to improve the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: 48 cases of renal cell carcinoma proven by surgery and pathology were reviewed. MRI scans including T1WI, T2WI, TRUFI and contrast enhancement were carried out in all cases and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed in 15. Results: Of the 48 cases, there were clear cell carcinoma in 41, chromophobe cell carcinoma in 4 and papillary cell carcinoma in 3. The tumors were homogeneously T1 iso- or hypointense in 33 and heterogeneous in 15; homogeneously T2 hyperintense in 14, isointense in 6 and heterogeneous in 28 patients. Pseudocapsule was found in 10 cases. Contrast enhancement was homogeneous in 6, heterogeneous in 34, irregularly peripheral within the wall in 5, and homogeneously circular in 3. Conclusion: MRI can accurately diagnose renal cell carcinoma and help to determine the cell subsets. (authors)

  2. Combined inhibition of ErbB1/2 and Notch receptors effectively targets breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS stem/progenitor cell activity regardless of ErbB2 status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Farnie

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in DCIS stem and progenitor signalling are poorly understood yet are critical to understand DCIS biology and to develop new therapies. Notch and ErbB1/2 receptor signalling cross talk has been demonstrated in invasive breast cancer, but their role in DCIS stem and progenitor cells has not been investigated. We have utilised 2 DCIS cell lines, MCF10DCIS.com (ErbB2-normal and SUM225 (ErbB2-overexpressing and 7 human primary DCIS samples were cultured in 3D matrigel and as mammospheres in the presence, absence or combination of the Notch inhibitor, DAPT, and ErbB1/2 inhibitors, lapatinib or gefitinib. Western blotting was applied to assess downstream signalling. In this study we demonstrate that DAPT reduced acini size and mammosphere formation in MCF10DCIS.com whereas there was no effect in SUM225. Lapatinb reduced acini size and mammosphere formation in SUM225, whereas mammosphere formation and Notch1 activity were increased in MCF10DCIS.com. Combined DAPT/lapatinib treatment was more effective at reducing acini size in both DCIS cell lines. Mammosphere formation in cell lines and human primary DCIS was reduced further by DAPT/lapatinib or DAPT/gefitinib regardless of ErbB2 receptor status. Our pre-clinical human models of DCIS demonstrate that Notch and ErbB1/2 both play a role in DCIS acini growth and stem cell activity. We report for the first time that cross talk between the two pathways in DCIS occurs regardless of ErbB2 receptor status and inhibition of Notch and ErbB1/2 was more efficacious than either alone. These data provide further understanding of DCIS biology and suggest treatment strategies combining Notch and ErbB1/2 inhibitors should be investigated regardless of ErbB2 receptor status.

  3. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  4. Ten-year results comparing mastectomy to excision and radiation therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10-year results of 300 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) without microinvasion are reported; 167 treated with mastectomy and 133 treated with excision and radiation therapy. There was a significant difference in disease-free survival at 10 years, in favour of those treated with mastectomy, 98% versus 81% (P = 0.0004). Multivariate analysis confirmed nuclear grade as the only significant predictor of local recurrence (P = 0.02) or invasive local recurrence (P = 0.03) in patients with DCIS treated with excision and radiation therapy. There was no difference in breast cancer-specific survival or overall survival between the two treatment groups. (author)

  5. Interstitial pneumonitis secondary to intravesical bacillus calmette-guerin for carcinoma in-situ of the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Diner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an 81-year-old male who developed severe interstitial pneumonitis on maintenance intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG for in-situ carcinoma of the bladder. The patient was treated with steroids and anti-tuberculin therapy with complete response. While there is no established standard of care for the treatment of interstitial pneumonitis, recent reports describe success with combination of corticosteroids and anti-tuberculin medications. We elected to follow this precedent and treated our patient with corticosteroids and anti-tuberculin therapy with good outcome.

  6. A Rare Case of Primary Insitu Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Endometrium with Extensive Icthyosis Uteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pailoor K

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium is exceedingly rare. We report a case of 52 years old postmenopausal woman who presented with pelvic pain of four months duration. Gynecologic examination revealed a normal cervix. A possibility of pyometra was considered through pelvic ultrasound. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed and histopathologically, it was diagnosed as a case of primary in situ squamous cell carcinoma of the endometrium.

  7. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  8. In situ spectroscopy and characterisation of organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holch, F.; Pernpeintner, J.; Schoell, A.; Umbach, E. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Electronic devices based on organic semiconductors belong to a field of growing interest in fundamental and application related research. The different experimental methods and preparation techniques often complicate a comprehensive understanding of fundamental properties and their impact on device performance. We present first results from a new project focussing on organic solar cells using relatively small organic molecules. For a better understanding of the limiting parameters basic questions such as the determination of energy levels in the active layer as well as the bandoffsets/-alignment at the organic hetero-interface and contacts will be addressed using photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES). In situ electrical measurements (IV) help to associate fundamental results with device characteristics such as efficiency and fill factor. In order to avoid uncontrolled contamination, the complete fabrication (active layer and contacts) and characterisation is performed under clean and well defined conditions in UHV. As a benefit of this approach the influence of contamination occurring, e.g., during the fabrication process or device operation can be analysed systematically. Moreover, metal deposition methods are optimised in order to reduce damage to the sensitive organic layer.

  9. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  10. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  11. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma breast with central necrosis closely mimicking ductal carcinoma in situ (comedo type: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervez Shahid

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we present a series of infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cases (infiltrative ductal carcinoma with central necrosis so closely mimicking 'DCIS with central comedo necrosis' that on initial morphological analysis these foci of tumors were labeled as DCIS (high grade, comedo. However on further histological work up and by using immunohistochemistry (IHC for myoepithelial markers it was later confirmed that these were foci of infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast with central necrosis. This case series gives the realization that a breast carcinoma may be partly or entirely DCIS like yet invasive. In such a dilemma IHC especially for assessment of myoepithelial lining is very useful to differentiate DCIS comedo from invasive carcinoma with central necrosis.

  12. In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeru Deguchi; Kaoru Tsujii; Koki Horikoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatur...

  13. Carcinoma in situ arising in a tubulovillous adenoma of the distal common bile duct: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bum-Soo Kim; Sun-Hyung Joo; Kwang-Ro Joo

    2008-01-01

    Tubulovillous adenomas are common in the colon and rectum, but are rare in the common bile duct. Biliary adenomas may produce obstructive jaundice, which can be easily confused with a malignant neoplasm or stone. We report a case of a carcinoma in situ arising in a tubulovillous adenoma of the distal common bile duct causing obstructive jaundice. A 55-year-old male presented with a 10-d history of pruritus and progressive jaundice. Abdominal sonography and computed tomography showed a mass in the distal common bile duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed luminal narrowing of the bile duct due to a polypoid mass. Positron emission tomography demonstrated no abnormal uptake. It was thoughtthat this mass was a malignant tumor, thus a pylorus-preserving panceaticoduodenectomy was performed.The final pathology showed a tubulovillous adenoma with carcinoma in situ of the distal common bile duct. At follow-up 8 mo later, endoscopy showed multiple polypsin the rectum, colon and stomach. The polyps were removed by endoscopic mucosal resection and shown to be tubular adenomas with high grade dysplasia. Biliary adenomas require careful follow-up for early detection of recurrence and malignant transformation.

  14. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  15. Presence of ductal carcinoma in situ confers an improved prognosis for patients with T1N0M0 invasive breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Logullo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We have retrospectively analyzed a series of 155 sequential cases of T1N0M0 ductal carcinomas of which 51 tumors had a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS component for correlation between the presence of DCIS and clinicopathological variables, recurrence and patient survival. No correlations between the presence of DCIS and age, menopausal status, size, estrogen or progesterone receptors were found. High-grade infiltrative tumors tended not to present a DCIS component (P = 0.08. Patients with tumors associated with DCIS form a subgroup with few recurrences (P = 0.003 and good survival (P = 0.008. When tumors were classified by size, an association between large tumors (>1.0 cm and increased recurrence and shortened overall survival was found. The presence of DCIS in this subgroup significantly reduced the relative risk of death.

  16. Neoadjuvant in situ gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy improves postoperative outcomes in novel syngeneic esophageal carcinoma models

    OpenAIRE

    Predina, J D; Judy, B; Aliperti, L A; Fridlender, Z G; Blouin, A; Kapoor, V; Laguna, B; Nakagawa, H; Rustgi, A K; Aguilar, L.; Aguilar-Cordova, E.; Albelda, S M; Singhal, S

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is the most rapidly increasing tumor in the United States and has a dismal 15% 5-year survival. Immunotherapy has been proposed to improve patient outcomes; however, no immunocompetent esophageal carcinoma model exists to date to test this approach. We developed two mouse models of esophageal cancer by inoculating immunocompetent mice with syngeneic esophageal cell lines transformed by cyclin-D1 or mutant HRASG12V and loss of p53. Similar to humans, surgery and adjuvant c...

  17. Spindle Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx: A Confusing Diagnosis for the Pathologist and Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Asli; Ozbilim, Gulay; Turhan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC) is an uncommon subtype of squamous cell carcinoma which represents 0.5% of all laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. It is a biphasic tumor consisting of the combination of a malignant mesenchymal spindle cell component and a squamous cell component that includes dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, or invasive carcinoma. Although it has aggressive biological features, the probability of making a diagnosis in the early stages is high as it often leads to obstructive symptoms in the early period. Due to its low incidence, there is no clear consensus on prognostic factors and optimal treatment strategies yet. In this paper, a 60-year-old laryngeal SpCC case that was effectively treated with wide local excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy was presented with the literature. PMID:26788392

  18. Spindle Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx: A Confusing Diagnosis for the Pathologist and Clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Bostanci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC is an uncommon subtype of squamous cell carcinoma which represents 0.5% of all laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. It is a biphasic tumor consisting of the combination of a malignant mesenchymal spindle cell component and a squamous cell component that includes dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, or invasive carcinoma. Although it has aggressive biological features, the probability of making a diagnosis in the early stages is high as it often leads to obstructive symptoms in the early period. Due to its low incidence, there is no clear consensus on prognostic factors and optimal treatment strategies yet. In this paper, a 60-year-old laryngeal SpCC case that was effectively treated with wide local excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy was presented with the literature.

  19. Warthin-like Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: A Combined Study of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Whole-slide Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kenichiro; Ito, Yohei; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Kana; Beppu, Shintaro; Sakakibara, Takeo; Takino, Hisashi; Takase, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Kei; Shimozato, Kazuo; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    There has been some debate as to whether a subset of metaplastic Warthin tumors (mWTs) harbor the mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC)-associated CRTC1-MAML2 fusion. We analyzed 15 tumors originally diagnosed as mWT (mWT-like tumors), 2 of which had concurrent MECs. We looked for the CRTC1/3-MAML2 fusion transcripts and performed immunohistochemistry for p63 and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the MAML2 split. To localize MAML2 split-positive cells at the cellular level, whole tumor tissue sections were digitalized (whole-slide imaging [WSI]). The CRTC1-MAML2, but not CRTC3-MAML2 was detected in 5/15 mWT-like tumors. FISH-WSI results showed that all epithelial cells harbored the MAML2 split in fusion-positive mWT-like tumors and were totally negative in fusion-negative mWT-like tumors. A review of the hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides showed that morphology of the "metaplastic" epithelium was virtually indistinguishable between fusion-positive and fusion-negative tumors. However, oncocytic bilayered tumor epithelium, characteristic to typical WT, was always found somewhere in the fusion-negative tumors but not in the fusion-positive tumors. This distinguishing histologic finding enabled 5 pathologists to easily differentiate the 2 tumor groups with 100% accuracy. The age and sex distribution of fusion-positive mWT-like tumor cases was similar to that of fusion-positive MEC cases and significantly different from those of fusion-negative mWT-like tumor and typical WT cases. In addition, only fusion-positive mWT-like tumors possessed concurrent low-grade MECs. In conclusion, a subset of mWT-like tumors were positive for the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion and had many features that are more in accord with MEC than with WT. The term Warthin-like MEC should be considered for fusion-positive mWT-like tumors. PMID:26457352

  20. A case of lobular carcinoma in situ presenting as a solid mass

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.; Hanamura, N; Yamasita, M; Kashikura, Y; Ogawa, T.; Taizo, S

    2011-01-01

    A patient presented with a 2 cm lump in the lower outer quadrant of the left breast. Mammogram and ultrasonography showed a solid mass with a microlobulated contour, partially irregular border and microcalcifications. MRI showed an irregular mass with early enhancement and high signal intensity, and the late-phase image demonstrated a partial washout pattern. These findings suggest that the tumour was a malignant invasive carcinoma. Non-invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed after a fine nee...

  1. A subset of prostatic basal cell carcinomas harbor the MYB rearrangement of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Epstein, Jonathan I; Westra, William H

    2015-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a basaloid tumor consisting of myoepithelial and ductal cells typically arranged in a cribriform pattern. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is generally regarded as a form of salivary gland carcinoma, but it can arise from sites unassociated with salivary tissue. A rare form of prostate carcinoma exhibits ACC-like features; it is no longer regarded as a true ACC but rather as prostatic basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) and within the spectrum of basaloid prostatic proliferations. True ACCs often harbor MYB translocations resulting in the MYB-NFIB fusion protein. MYB analysis could clarify the true nature of prostatic carcinomas that exhibit ACC features and thus help refine the classification of prostatic basaloid proliferations. Twelve PBCCs were identified from the pathology consultation files of Johns Hopkins Hospital. The histopathologic features were reviewed, and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed. All 12 cases exhibited prominent basaloid histology. Four were purely solid, 7 exhibited a cribriform pattern reminiscent of salivary ACC, and 1 had a mixed pattern. The MYB rearrangement was detected in 2 (29%) of 7 ACC-like carcinomas but in none (0%) of the 5 PBCCs with a prominent solid pattern. True ACCs can arise in the prostate as is evidenced by the presence of the characteristic MYB rearrangement. When dealing with malignant basaloid proliferations in the prostate, recommendations to consolidate ACCs with other tumor types may need to be reassessed, particularly in light of the rapidly advancing field of biologic therapy where the identification of tumor-specific genetic alterations presents novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26089205

  2. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  3. Genomic and mutational profiling of ductal carcinomas in situ and matched adjacent invasive breast cancers reveals intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity and clonal selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambros, Maryou B; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Gauthier, Arnaud; Cabral, Cecilia; Pawar, Vidya; Mackay, Alan; A’Hern, Roger; Marchiò, Caterina; Palacios, Jose; Natrajan, Rachael; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast are yet to be fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the progression from DCIS to IDC, including the selection of a subpopulation of cancer cells with specific genetic aberrations, the acquisition of new genetic aberrations or non-genetic mechanisms mediated by the tumour microenvironment. To determine whether synchronously diagnosed ipsilateral DCIS and IDCs have modal populations with distinct repertoires of gene copy number aberrations and mutations in common oncogenes, matched frozen samples of DCIS and IDCs were retrieved from 13 patients and subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH), and Sequenom MassARRAY (Oncocarta v1.0 panel). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and Sanger sequencing were employed to validate the aCGH and Sequenom findings, respectively. Although the genomic profiles of matched DCIS and IDCs were similar, in three of 13 matched pairs amplification of distinct loci (i.e. 1q41, 2q24.2, 6q22.31, 7q11.21, 8q21.2 and 9p13.3) was either restricted to, or more prevalent in, the modal population of cancer cells of one of the components. Sequenom MassARRAY identified PIK3CA mutations restricted to the DCIS component in two cases, and in a third case, the frequency of the PIK3CA mutant allele reduced from 49% in the DCIS to 25% in the IDC component. Despite the genomic similarities between synchronous DCIS and IDC, our data provide strong circumstantial evidence to suggest that in some cases the progression from DCIS to IDC is driven by the selection of non-modal clones that harbour a specific repertoire of genetic aberrations. PMID:22252965

  4. Ciclooxigenase-2 nos carcinomas ductais de mama invasivos com componente ductal in situ e no epitélio adjacente Cyclooxygenase-2 in invasive ductal carcinoma with ductal component in situ and in adjacent epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmar Marques de Oliveira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a presença da ciclooxigenase-2 (COX-2 nos carcinomas de mama ductal in situ (CDIS e ductal invasivo (CDI, no estroma adjacente normal e no epitélio. A correlação entre os níveis de expressão com os graus nuclear e histológico, tamanho do tumor e idade da paciente foi também analisada. MÉTODOS: foram incluídos 47 espécimes cirúrgicos provenientes de mastectomias e quadrantectomias com CDI e CDIS concomitantes, estádios clínicos I e II. Foram utilizados anticorpos policlonais anti-COX-2 para determinar a expressão da enzima. As amostras foram categorizadas em escores de zero a três, de acordo com a intensidade e o número de células coradas. RESULTADOS: COX-2 foi positivamente expressa em CDI, CDIS e epitélio normal em 86,7, 84,4 e 73,3% dos casos, respectivamente. Quanto ao grau nuclear (GN, a expressão da COX-2 foi positiva em 80% dos casos de GN-I; 81,5 e 78,9% de GN-II; e 88,5 e 96,1% de GN-III no CDIS e CDI, respectivamente. A expressão da COX-2 ocorreu em 78,9% dos CDIS com comedonecrose e em 89,3% sem comedonecrose. Quanto ao grau histológico (GH do CDI, a COX-2 foi positiva em 83,3% de GH-I; 89,9% de GH-II e 80% de GH-III. Em relação ao diâmetro tumoral, COX-2 esteve presente em 86,1% de CDI e 83,3% de CDIS em tumores com >2 cm de diâmetro e 11% em CDI; e CDIS em tumores ≤ 2 cm. A faixa etária ≥ 50 anos apresentou 90% de expressão para CDI e 86,7% para CDIS, e 92,5% de COX-2 para ambos CDI e CDIS em pacientes com idade PURPOSE: to evaluate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, adjacent normal stroma, and epithelium. The correlation of expression levels with nuclear grade, histological grade, presence or absence of comedonecrosis, tumor size, and patient age was also analyzed. METHODS: forty-seven surgical samples obtained from mastectomy and quadrantectomy with simultaneous DCIS and IDC, stages I and II were included

  5. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Jeong Won

    2015-04-01

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery. PMID:26060554

  6. Radiologic Findings of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Arising Within a Juvenile Fibroadenoma: Mammographic, Sonographic and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile fibroadenoma is an uncommon histologic variant of fibroadenoma that frequently shows a remarkable and rapid growth. The development of a carcinoma within a fibroadenoma, either in situ or invasive, is a rare condition. We encountered a 36-year-old woman with a palpable mass in the right breast. The radiologic findings were indicative of a fibroadenoma in the breast. Sonographic guided biopsy using a 14G core needle revealed the presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the juvenile fibroadenoma. Focal excision was performed and the patient underwent radiation therapy in the right breast after surgery

  7. Scalp squamous cell carcinoma in xeroderma pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Basim A; Hanadi Alzanbagi; Osama A Samargandi; Hossam Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that appears in early childhood. Squamous cell carcinoma is not uncommon in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and mostly involving the face, head, neck, and scalp. However, squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp may exhibit an aggressive course. Case Report: Here, we present a huge squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp in a three-years-old child with xeroderma pigmentosum. In addition, we illustrate the challenges of a child...

  8. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dario Marcotullio; Giannicola Iannella; Gian Franco Macri; Caterina Marinelli; Melissa Zelli; Giuseppe Magliulo

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy....

  9. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is...

  10. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, Tufan; Coşkunoğlu, Esra Zeynep; Duran, Berkan; Çiftci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder a...

  11. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan Cicek; Esra Zeynep Coskunoglu; Berkan Duran; Egemen Ciftci

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder ...

  12. Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Sabra; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modal...

  13. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Concurrent with Bowen's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Chul; Kang, Ho Song; Park, Kyoung Tae; Oh, Young Ha; Yu, Hee Joon; Kim, Joung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy of the elderly and immunocompromised patients. It is occasionally found coexisting with other diseases, such as squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, miscellaneous adnexal tumors, and rarely Bowen disease. A 75-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of an irregularly shaped erythematous patch on the left mandibular angle. Three months later, a 1.5×1.0 cm sized painless and rapidly growi...

  14. Case of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sadaf; Jadidi, Nima; Faraj, Sheila F.; Rodriquez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal malignancy and it originates from the renal tubular epithelium. Due to the diversity in the histopathological and molecular characteristics, it is typically subclassified into five different categories. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is one subclassification and it includes two variants: sporadic and hereditary. Although the hereditary form comprises a smaller number of cases of papillary renal cell carcinoma, an understanding of the molec...

  15. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  16. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma presenting with dysphagia is rare. We report a case who presented with dysphagia as the only manifestations of renal malignancy. Biopsy from the pyriform fossa nodules revealed a clear cell neoplasm. Immuno-histochemical analysis of tissue confirmed metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

  17. Immunhistochemische Untersuchung des Neoangiogenesemarkers CD105 in ausgewählten Stadien der Mammakarzinogenese unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Ductalen Carcinoma In Situ der Mamma

    OpenAIRE

    Röhrich, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims of the study: Purpose of the study was to verify the use of CD105 as a molecular target for an in vivo optical molecular imaging of the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. DCIS represents an early, pre-invasive stage in the development of invasive breast carcinoma. Although increasingly diagnosed since the introduction of high-quality mammography screening, DCIS-detection is still limited and presumably high numbers of DCIS remain undetected. Prognosis of ...

  18. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis. PMID:27398205

  19. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne – case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment‐resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.

  20. Renal cell carcinoma: Evolving and emerging subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Suzanne M; Divatia, Mukul; Truong, Luan; Shen, Steven; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-12-16

    Our knowledge of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rapidly expanding. For those who diagnose and treat RCC, it is important to understand the new developments. In recent years, many new renal tumors have been described and defined, and our understanding of the biology and clinical correlates of these tumors is changing. Evolving concepts in Xp11 translocation carcinoma, mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic clear cell RCC, and carcinoma associated with neuroblastoma are addressed within this review. Tubulocystic carcinoma, thyroid-like follicular carcinoma of kidney, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC are also described. Finally, candidate entities, including RCC with t(6;11) translocation, hybrid oncocytoma/chromophobe RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, and renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor are reviewed. Knowledge of these new entities is important for diagnosis, treatment and subsequent prognosis. This review provides a targeted summary of new developments in RCC. PMID:24364021

  1. The results of a questionnaire survey for current diagnosis and treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, detection rate of DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma In Situ) has gradually increased because mammography screening has been prevailed among 40's in Japan and stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for nonpalpable lesion had been approved under Government Health Insurance since April, 2004. We performed nationwide survey for DCIS. It showed detection rate of DCIS in 2005 was 10.9%. Breast conserving surgery was performed 65% among DCIS cases. Lymphnode dissection was done for 27.2% of total cases. Sentinel node biopsy is one of the key procedures to avoid unnecessary axillary dissection. The indication of postoperative radiation and hormone therapy should be clarified based on clinical trials in the near future. (author)

  2. Adenomyoepithelioma of the breast coexisting with ductal carcinoma in situ: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Mirei; Daa, Tsutomu; Miyawaki, Michiyo; Suehiro, Shuji; Sugio, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We herein report a case of adenomyoepithelioma (AME) of the breast with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) involving a 71-year-old Japanese woman. She presented with bloody discharge from the left nipple. Mammography and ultrasonography showed a well-defined polygonal tumor. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mass and stamp cytology of the bloody nipple discharge showed malignancy. Mastectomy and a sentinel lymph node biopsy were performed. The final diagnosis was AME of the breast with DCIS. There are no reports of AME of the breast presenting with bloody nipple discharge; upon a diagnosis of AME of the breast with bloody nipple discharge, the possibility of the coexistence of breast cancer should thus be considered when encountering such cases. PMID:26380805

  3. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF MIBl PROLIFERATION MARKER EXPRESSION ON DUCTAL CARCINOMA IN SITU AND INVASIVE DUCTAL CARCINOMA OF THE BREAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 于颖彦

    2000-01-01

    feSUm6 Objectif Pour dsterminer la signification Prormtique de i' exprendon de Proliferation refor MIBI sur carcinome canaliculaire in situ (DCIS) et corcinome conaliculaire inwisif (IDC) du akin. met~ A l' aids de techniques histologique et immunohistochimique, l' indice etiquettaire MIBI (MIBI LI), a ate ddtennirk sur 31 tissus potholedques (DCIS 6et lie 22 et des 3 mastopothies benignes comma control). Anultats L' expression dlevde (P< 0. 05) a ate trouvde dans destissus canCdreux dont MIBI LI a eu un ra...

  4. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously published our and Johns Hopkins data titled: "Platinum-based therapy in adenosquamous pancreatic cancer: experience at two institutions” [1]. We will here like to submit a related case report as a letter to the editor to JOP in reference to the above paper. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various reported incidence rates, ranging from 0.5% to as high as 5% of pancreatic ductal carcinomas [2, 3]. Of the 1300 cases of pancreatic cancers observed at autopsy in a survey in Japan in 1992, 0.7% were squamous cell carcinoma [4]. A Mayo clinic review of very rare exocrine tumors showed an even rarer incidence of squamous cell carcinoma when compared to acinar and small cell carcinoma of the pancreas [5]. This discrepancy in the reported incidence rates related to the fact that some of the cases represent adenosquamous carcinoma rather than pure squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas. In an analysis of 25 patients, mean age at diagnosis of pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma was 62 years (range: 33–80 years and there was no gender difference [6]. There is no study about the molecular profile of squamous carcinoma of the pancreas. There are no retrospective or prospective studies about the best therapy for these tumors

  5. Local recurrences after different treatment strategies for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a population-based study in the East Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten van de Velden, A.P.; Vugt, R. van; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Leer, J.W.H.; Wobbes, Th.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Outcomes after different treatment strategies for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast were analyzed for a geographically defined population in the East Netherlands. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 798 patients with a first diagnosis of DCIS between January 1989 and December 2003

  6. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN; Selda SEÇKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostainin...

  7. Current Aspects on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial neoplasm affecting the oral cavity. This article overviews the essential points of oral squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting its risk and genomic factors, the potential malignant disorders and the therapeutic approaches. It also emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis.

  8. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Qiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which is defined as a carcinoma that exhibits pancreatic enzyme production by neoplastic cells. This review includes re-cent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ACC, imaging and pathological diagnosis and ap-proaches to treatment with reference to the literature.

  9. Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Walsh, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), also known as kidney cancer, renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is a global burden. This article aims to provide a brief overview of RCC. It outlines epidemiology and presentation; invesitgation and staging; treatments and prognosis. The article also includes a focus on currently available drug treatments, and serves as an introduction to the topic.

  10. Renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites

    OpenAIRE

    Jennison, Erica; Wathuge, Gayathri W; Gorard, David A

    2015-01-01

    Lesson It is rare for renal cell carcinoma to involve the peritoneum and cause malignant ascites. Furthermore, it is uncommon for malignant ascites to be a presenting feature of this cancer. An unusual case of renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites is reported, and its response to sunitinib described.

  11. Renal Cell Carcinoma in Transplanted Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    M. Naroienejad; Salouti, R

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are prescribed routinely to kidney transplant recipients to prevent rejection. These medications are associated wi th an increased risk of secondary malignancies,including renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney itself. We present a case of renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney.

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  13. MRI of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Patterns of findings and evaluation of disease extent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or DCIS with microinvasion were reviewed in order to evaluate the characteristic findings of DCIS and to evaluate the extent of disease on MRI. A 1.5 Tesla Signa or Horizon (GE Medical Systems) unit was used with a dedicated receive-only breast coil. The pulse sequence based on RARE was used with the fat suppression technique. After examining both breasts with a large FOV (30 cm), the affected breast alone was examined with a smaller FOV (18 cm) and larger matrix (512 x 384) with and without Gd-enhancement. DCIS showed several types of findings on MRI: linear, spotty enhancement; gathering of linear enhancement; enhanced area or mass without distortion of the surrounding tissue; and well-circumscribed mass mimicking intraductal papilloma. Compared with typical findings of invasive carcinoma, DCIS tended to be enhanced slowly. After performing MR examination in addition to mammography and ultrasonography, a more accurate diagnosis of disease extent was possible in 6 of 10 patients. MRI was useful in providing more precise information on the disease extent of DCIS, and it is considered useful in planning the type of surgery. Further study using larger series and precise pathological correlations are necessary. (author)

  14. MRI of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Patterns of findings and evaluation of disease extent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Hideko; Ikeda, Tadashi; Mukai, Makio; Masamura, Shigeru; Hiramatsu, Kyoichi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-01

    Ten cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or DCIS with microinvasion were reviewed in order to evaluate the characteristic findings of DCIS and to evaluate the extent of disease on MRI. A 1.5 Tesla Signa or Horizon (GE Medical Systems) unit was used with a dedicated receive-only breast coil. The pulse sequence based on RARE was used with the fat suppression technique. After examining both breasts with a large FOV (30 cm), the affected breast alone was examined with a smaller FOV (18 cm) and larger matrix (512 x 384) with and without Gd-enhancement. DCIS showed several types of findings on MRI: linear, spotty enhancement; gathering of linear enhancement; enhanced area or mass without distortion of the surrounding tissue; and well-circumscribed mass mimicking intraductal papilloma. Compared with typical findings of invasive carcinoma, DCIS tended to be enhanced slowly. After performing MR examination in addition to mammography and ultrasonography, a more accurate diagnosis of disease extent was possible in 6 of 10 patients. MRI was useful in providing more precise information on the disease extent of DCIS, and it is considered useful in planning the type of surgery. Further study using larger series and precise pathological correlations are necessary. (author)

  15. Multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease of the genitalia associated with carcinoma in situ of the cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    King, C. M.; Yates, V. M.; Dave, V K

    1984-01-01

    A case of multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease in a 45 year old woman with a previous history of carcinoma of the cervix is described. The two conditions may have a common pathogenesis, and a preceding viral infection with herpes simplex or human papillomavirus could be of aetiological relevance. Patients with multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease may be at risk of developing other tumours of the genital tract. Treatment with carbon dioxide laser proved effective.

  16. Unusual mammography findings of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ismail

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The early detection of carcinoma is the highlight of mammography. We present two patients with pathological diagnosis of DCIS with unusual mammographic findings for which one needs to have a higher index of suspicion. The first patient presented with multifocal disease requiring biopsy of all visible lesions and the second patient (twenty four years old presented with segmental distribution of calcifications, which may have been missed had a single-view baseline mammogram not been done.

  17. Clear Cell Carcinoma and Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma: a Comparative Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth A.; Hoschar, Aaron P.; Barnes, E. Leon; Hunt, Jennifer L.; Seethala, Raja R.

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma or hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) are rare, low-grade and typically indolent malignancies that can be diagnostically challenging. In this study the clinicopathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of 17 CCCs and 12 CCOCs are examined. The differential diagnosis of clear cell malignancies in the head and neck is discussed. The relationship of CCCs and CCOCs to other clear cell tumors on the basis of their i...

  18. 14-3-3ζ Cooperates with ErbB2 to Promote Progression of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer by Inducing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    OpenAIRE

    LU, JING; Guo, Hua; Treekitkarnmongkol, Warapen; Ping LI; Zhang, Jian; Shi, Bin; Ling, Chen; ZHOU, XIAOYAN; Chen, Tongzhen; Chiao, Paul J.; Feng, XinHua; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Muller, William J; Sahin, Aysegul; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2009-01-01

    ErbB2, a metastasis-promoting oncoprotein, is overexpressed in ~25% of invasive/metastatic breast cancers, but in 50–60% of non-invasive ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It has been puzzling how a subset of ErbB2-overexpressing DCIS develops into invasive breast cancer (IBC). We found that co-overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in ErbB2-overexpressing DCIS conferred a higher risk of progression to IBC. ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ overexpression, respectively, increased cell migration and decreased cell adhesion...

  19. Synchronous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Dafashy, Tamer J.; Cameron K. Ghaffary; Keyes, Kyle T.; Joseph Sonstein

    2016-01-01

    While renal cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm of the kidney, its simultaneous diagnosis with a gastrointestinal malignancy is a rare, but well reported phenomenon. This discussion focuses on three independent cases in which each patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma and a unique synchronous gastrointestinal malignancy. Case 1 explores the diagnosis and surgical intervention of a 66-year-old male patient synchronously diagnosed with clear cell renal cell carcinom...

  20. Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Potential Mimic of Conventional Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma on Core Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Heath Liddell; Anton Mare; Sean Heywood; Genevieve Bennett; Hin Fan Chan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunoh...

  1. Variação interobservador no diagnóstico histopatológico do carcinoma ductal in situ da mama Interobserver variation of the histopathologic diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio de Almeida Salles

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: fazer avaliação crítica do diagnóstico histopatológico do carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS da mama empregando a variação interobservador quanto ao diagnóstico, padrão arquitetural predominante, grau nuclear e grau histológico. MÉTODOS: oitenta e cinco casos com diagnóstico inicial de CDIS foram revisados por um mesmo patologista, especialista em patologia mamária, que selecionou 15 casos para análise interobservador. A análise foi realizada por cinco patologistas e um especialista internacional em patologia mamária, que receberam as mesmas lâminas e um protocolo para classificar as lesões em hiperplasia ductal atípica (HDA, CDIS e CDIS com microinvasão (CDIS-MIC. Caso o diagnóstico fosse de CDIS, os patologistas deveriam também classificá-lo quanto ao padrão arquitetural, grau nuclear e grau histológico. Os resultados foram analisados usando-se concordância percentual e o teste kappa. RESULTADOS: houve grande variação diagnóstica interobservador. Em um caso tivemos todos os diagnósticos, desde HDA, CDIS até CDIS-MIC. Usando o teste kappa para a comparação entre os diagnósticos dos cinco observadores e o especialista internacional obtivemos concordância interobservador mínima (PURPOSE: to perform a critical evaluation of the histopathological diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast, through the analysis of interobserver variation related to diagnosis, architectural pattern, nuclear grade, and histological grade. METHODS: eighty-five cases with an initial diagnosis of DCIS were reviewed by the same pathologist, specialist in breast pathology, who selected 15 cases for interobserver analysis. The analysis was carried out by five pathologists and an international expert in breast pathology, who received the same slides and a protocol for classifying the lesions as atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, DCIS, or ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion (DCIS-MIC. If the diagnosis was DCIS

  2. The mechanism of Epstein-Barr virus infection in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, C T; Lin, C. R.; Tan, G. K.; Chen, W.; Dee, A. N.; Chan, W Y

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, we examined the pathway of EBV infection in NPC cell lines. We used immunolocalization to investigate the EBV receptor (C3d-R) and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor [secretory component (SC) protein]. We incubated IgA anti-EBV and EBV particles with NPC cells and observed the EBV DNA signal by in situ polymerase chain reaction hybridization and polymerase chain reaction plus Southern blo...

  3. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felthaus, O. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Brockhoff, G. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reck, A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Zeitler, K. [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Hautmann, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, T.E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, G. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, C., E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  4. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). → Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. → Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. → In situ CD133+ cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. → CD133+ and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133+ cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  5. Evaluation of radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal cancer cells by in situ nick translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosensitivity of two nasopharyngeal cell lines was evaluated, which had been treated with γ-rays by in situ nick translation (ISNT). The results indicated that the incorporation rate of dNTP of the two cell lines increased with the radiation dose. Good correlations were found between the radiosensitivity determined by the in situ nick translation assay and confirmed by the colony-forming assay in CNE and CNE-2Z cell lines. Although this report deals with cultured cells, the described technique of detecting DNA nick in situ without destruction of morphology seems to be applicable to tissue section. It may be possible to use it as a tool for predicting radiosensitivity of cancerous tissues treated with γ-rays

  6. Breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Botticelli, A.; De Francesco, G. P.; D. Di Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In Western countries, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, whereas metastases to the breast from extramammary malignancies are extremely rare. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman, who underwent surgery in 2007 for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and who 4 years later presented with a breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  7. Electrochemical cell for in situ x-ray diffraction under ultrapure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koop, T.; Schindler, W.; Kazimirov, A.;

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical cell has been developed for in situ x-ray diffraction from a working electrode under clean conditions equivalent to ultrahigh vacuum conditions of 5 x 10(-10) mbar. The substrate crystals can be prepared ex situ and transferred into the cell under protection of ultrapure water...... of the crystal using a Luggin capillary and a standard reference electrode. We demonstrate the performance of our cell by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on ultrathin Co layers electrodeposited on Cu(001) in an aqueous H(2)SO(4)/CoSO(4) solution. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Comparison of three thermotherapy modalities for the ablation of mamma carcinoma in situ using thermal imaging and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; van Esser, Stijn; Shmatukha, Andriy; de Boorder, Tjeerd; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2007-02-01

    A larger percentage of small tumors in the breast are being detected due to effective screening programs and improved radiological diagnostic methods. For treatment, less invasive methods are preferred which are still radical but also provide a better aesthetic result. Recently, several ablation techniques have become available to locally ablate tumors in situ. In this study, the effectiveness of three ablation techniques was compared by imaging the thermal distribution and temperature mapping in vitro. The first system (KLS Martin, Trumpf, Germany) uses Nd:YAG laser light delivered through a single diffusing fiber tip which is positioned direct into the tissue or in a water-cooled needle. The second system (Olympus-Celon, Germany) uses bipolar Radio Frequency currents between electrodes in a water-cooled needle. The RF system has a temperature feedback based on tissue impedance to prevent tissue charring. The third system is a focused ultrasound system developed in the Hospital. For all three the techniques, the dynamics of temperature gradients around the probe or focus point are visualized using color Schlieren techniques in a transparent tissue model and recorded using thermocouples. The effective lesion size and tissue temperatures were determined in in vitro bovine mamma tissue. All systems were capable to heat tissue volumes up to 3 cm in diameter. The lesion growth dependent on the power input, temperature gradient around the initial power source and treatment time. Although the three systems are capable to ablate small mamma carcinoma in situ, they differ in precision, MR compatibility, invasiveness, practical use and treatment time. The real clinical effectiveness has to be proven in large patient studies with long term follow up.

  9. Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    OpenAIRE

    P Venkat Baghirath; J Vijay Kumar; B Hari Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is an uncommon malignant salivary gland tumor accounting for about 1% of all intra-oral salivary gland tumors. Microscopic diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma may be challenging because of the spectrum of features which frequently overlaps with the other salivary gland tumors that contain clear cells, and thus it may be a diagnosis of exclusion. Here we, report a case of HCCC in a 36 years old female with detailed histological, histochemical and immunohis...

  10. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare; only several studies have been reported in the English literature. A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Bladder endoscopy revealed a large polypoid tumor at the bladder base. Transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. Many TUR-BT specimens were obtained. Histologically, the bladder tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positi...

  11. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  12. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual variant of squamous cell carcinoma invading deeper anatomic structures and is associated with a higher incidence of regional metastasis and mortality.

  13. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder arising in an unusual localization. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 604-608

  14. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  15. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  16. Relationship of family history and outcome after breast conservation therapy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between a family history of breast or ovarian cancer and outcome after breast-conserving surgery and radiation in women presenting with an initial diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Methods and Materials: A total of 146 consecutive women with a pathologic diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ as their first diagnosis of any breast cancer were identified; 28 (19%) had a positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative, 27 (19%) had a positive family history in a second-degree relative, and 91 (62%) had no family history. Pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors, and clinical outcomes for each family history group were compared. Cosmesis and complications were recorded at each follow-up. Patients were treated between 1978 and 1995, and the median follow-up was 7.1 years. Results: Patients with a positive family history in a first- or second-degree relative each had an 8% incidence of local failure at 10 years, while the negative family history group demonstrated a 16% local failure rate (p = 0.33). Overall survival at 10 years for patients with a positive family history in a first- or second-degree relative was 100% and for those with a negative family history was 91% (p = 0.08). The negative family history group had a higher median age that may account for the difference in overall survival. Cause-specific survival (CSS) was 97%, 100%, and 99%, respectively, at 10 years (p = 0.25). There were no differences in the cosmetic results or complication rates between women with a positive or negative family history. Conclusion: We have shown that a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer is not associated with an adverse outcome for women treated with breast conservation therapy for DCIS. Local recurrence, cause-specific survival, overall survival, cosmesis, and complication rates were comparable to that of similarly treated women with

  17. Development and evaluation of a prediction model for underestimated invasive breast cancer in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C E Diepstraten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. METHODS: From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, drawn from the prospective COBRA (Core Biopsy after RAdiological localization and COBRA2000 cohort studies, were used to fit the multivariable model and assess its overall performance, discrimination, and calibration. RESULTS: 348 women with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ were available for analysis. In 100 (28.7% patients invasive carcinoma was found at subsequent surgery. Nine predictors were included in the model. In the multivariable analysis, the predictors with the strongest association were lesion size (OR 1.12 per cm, 95% CI 0.98-1.28, number of cores retrieved at biopsy (OR per core 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, presence of lobular cancerization (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.25-26.77, and microinvasion (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.42-9.87. The overall performance of the multivariable model was poor with an explained variation of 9% (Nagelkerke's R(2, mediocre discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73, and fairly good calibration. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of our multivariable prediction model in a large, clinically representative study population proves that routine clinical and pathological variables are not suitable to select patients with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ for sentinel node biopsy during primary surgery.

  18. Fine mapping of the 1q21 breakpoint of the papillary venal cell carcinoma-associated (X;1) translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, MAJ; Dijkhuizen, T; vandenBerg, E; vanKessel, AG

    1996-01-01

    A combination of Southern blot analysis on a panel of tumor-derived somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques was used to map a series of DNA markers relative to the 1q21 breakpoint of the renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-associated (X;1)-(p11;q21) translocation. This b

  19. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS with heterogeneity of nuclear grade: prognostic effects of quantitative nuclear assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuejiao

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, 50% of patients with breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS had more than one nuclear grade, and neither worst nor predominant nuclear grade was significantly associated with development of invasive carcinoma. Here, we used image analysis in addition to histologic evaluation to determine if quantification of nuclear features could provide additional prognostic information and hence impact prognostic assessments. Methods Nuclear image features were extracted from about 200 nuclei of each of 80 patients with DCIS who underwent lumpectomy alone, and received no adjuvant systemic therapy. Nuclear images were obtained from 20 representative nuclei per duct, from each of a group of 5 ducts, in two separate fields, for 10 ducts. Reproducibility of image analysis features was determined, as was the ability of features to discriminate between nuclear grades. Patient information was available about clinical factors (age and method of DCIS detection, pathologic factors (DCIS size, nuclear grade, margin size, and amount of parenchymal involvement, and 39 image features (morphology, densitometry, and texture. The prognostic effects of these factors and features on the development of invasive breast cancer were examined with Cox step-wise multivariate regression. Results Duplicate measurements were similar for 89.7% to 97.4% of assessed image features. For the pooled assessment with ~200 nuclei per patient, a discriminant function with one densitometric and two texture features was significantly (p Conclusion Image analysis provided reproducible assessments of nuclear features which quantitated differences in nuclear grading for patients. Quantitative nuclear image features indicated prognostically significant differences in DCIS, and may contribute additional information to prognostic assessments of which patients are likely to develop invasive disease.

  20. Extent of ductal carcinoma in situ according to breast cancer subtypes: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebar, Shusma C; van den Broek, Esther C; Koppert, Linetta B; Jager, Agnes; Baaijens, Margreet H A; Obdeijn, Inge-Marie A M; van Deurzen, Carolien H M

    2016-07-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a precursor of invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The DCIS component is often more extensive than the invasive component, which affects local control. The aim of our study was to analyze features of DCIS within different IBC subtypes, which may contribute to the optimization of personalized approaches for patients with IBC. Patients with IBC reported according to the synoptic reporting module in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2015 were included. Data extraction included characteristics of the invasive component and, if present, several features of the DCIS component. Resection margin status analyses were restricted to patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Differences between subtypes were tested by a Chi-square test, spearman's Rho test or a one-way ANOVA test. Overall, 36.937 cases of IBC were included. About half of the IBCs (n = 16.014; 43.4 %) were associated with DCIS. Her2+ IBC (irrespective of ER status) was associated with a higher prevalence of adjacent DCIS, a larger extent of DCIS and a higher rate of irradicality of the DCIS component as compared to ER+/Her2- and triple-negative subtypes (P IBC on the other hand was lowest. In this large population-based cohort study, we showed significant differences between the prevalence and extent of DCIS according to IBC subtypes, which is also reflected in the resection margin status in patients treated with BCS. Our data provide important information regarding the optimization of local therapy according to IBC subtypes. PMID:27318854

  1. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  2. A chip assisted immunomagnetic separation system for the efficient capture and in situ identification of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Man; Wen, Cong-Ying; Wu, Ling-Ling; Hong, Shao-Li; Hu, Jiao; Xu, Chun-Miao; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2016-03-23

    The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), a kind of "liquid biopsy", represents a potential alternative to noninvasive detection, characterization and monitoring of carcinoma. Many previous studies have shown that the number of CTCs has a significant relationship with the stage of cancer. However, CTC enrichment and detection remain notoriously difficult because they are extremely rare in the bloodstream. Herein, aided by a microfluidic device, an immunomagnetic separation system was applied to efficiently capture and in situ identify circulating tumor cells. Magnetic nanospheres (MNs) were modified with an anti-epithelial-cell-adhesion-molecule (anti-EpCAM) antibody to fabricate immunomagnetic nanospheres (IMNs). IMNs were then loaded into the magnetic field controllable microfluidic chip to form uniform IMN patterns. The IMN patterns maintained good stability during the whole processes including enrichment, washing and identification. Apart from its simple manufacture process, the obtained microfluidic device was capable of capturing CTCs from the bloodstream with an efficiency higher than 94%. The captured cells could be directly visualized with an inverted fluorescence microscope in situ by immunocytochemistry (ICC) identification, which decreased cell loss effectively. Besides that, the CTCs could be recovered completely just by PBS washing after removal of the permanent magnets. It was observed that all the processes showed negligible influence on cell viability (viability up to 93%) and that the captured cells could be re-cultured for more than 5 passages after release without disassociating IMNs. In addition, the device was applied to clinical samples and almost all the samples from patients showed positive results, which suggests it could serve as a valuable tool for CTC enrichment and detection in the clinic. PMID:26928405

  3. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  4. The Effect of Nano-apatite on the Expression of Telomerase Gene of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of nano- apatite on the expression of the telomerase gene of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and further explore the mechanism of the nano-apatite inhibiting cancer cells. Using the hybridization in situ method to detect the expression of the telomerase gene of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells treated with the nano- apatite for 4 h at 37 ℃. The hybridization in situ showed that the cytoplasm of the positive cells was stained in nigger-brown. The positive cell rate of the control group was 88.49% , the cisplatin group was 25.6% , the nano-apatite group was 63.6% . The activity oftelomerase gene was both obviously declined comparing with the control group and the difference had significance (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 ). The nanoapatite obviously inhabit the expression of the telomerase gene of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  5. Primary clear cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    OpenAIRE

    G.Pesavento; Ferlito, A; Recher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings in three patients with clear cell carcinoma of the larynx are described. This type of neoplasm in the larynx is extremely rare. The aggressiveness of the tumour and its high biological malignancy are stressed.

  6. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is an extremely rare tumor that exhibits aggressive behavior and accounts for approximately less than 1% of all primary bladder tumors. Small cell carcinoma generally occurs in the lung, accounting for 25% of all pulmonary malignancies. SCCUB exhibits a similar microscopic and immunohistochemical appearance to that of small cell carcinoma of the lung. There is no consensus about the standard therapy, owing to its rarity. Surgical resection seems to be the mainstay of treatment for patients with limited stage, together with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Radiation therapy has same small effect for palliative purposes, as well as being an alternative to radical cystectomy. Patients with advanced stage, although given platinum-based chemotherapy, have a poor prognosis. We herein review epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pathological features, and current management of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (author)

  7. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of residual ductal carcinoma in situ following preoperative chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate the ability of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in helping to distinguish between lesions with and without residual ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in patients showing no residual invasive cancer after preoperative chemotherapy. Methods: DCE-MR images of 46 consecutive breast cancer patients (mean age, 47 years; range, 30–69 years) with no residual invasive cancer (15 had residual DCIS and 31 had no residual DCIS) following preoperative chemotherapy and surgery were blindly reviewed and categorized by two radiologists in consensus. Thereafter, DCE-MRI findings that could be helpful in distinguishing lesions with and without residual DCIS were analyzed. Results: When any enhancement was present, 93% (14 of 15) sensitivity and 35% (11 of 31) specificity for the detection of residual DCIS on post-chemotherapy MRI were achieved. Although 65% (20 of 31) of lesions without residual cancer had some enhancing findings, the lesion to fibroglandular signal intensity ratio showed 86.7% (13 of 15) sensitivity and 83.9% (26 of 31) specificity with an Az value of 0.854 (95% confidence interval: 0.718, 0.940) when a cut-off point of a ratio of 1.34 was used. Conclusion: DCE-MRI has the potential in distinguishing between lesions with and without residual DCIS in patients showing no invasive cancer after preoperative chemotherapy.

  9. Impact of Boost Radiation in the Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovitch, Eileen, E-mail: Eileen.rakovitch@sunnybrook.ca [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Narod, Steven A. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Women’s College Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Nofech-Moses, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thiruchelvam, Deva; Saskin, Refik; Taylor, Carole [Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tuck, Alan [London Health Sciences Center, London, Ontario (Canada); Youngson, Bruce; Miller, Naomi; Done, Susan J. [University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sengupta, Sandip [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Elavathil, Leela [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Henderson General Hospital, 711 Concession Street, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jani, Prashant A. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Bonin, Michel [Sudbury Regional Hospital, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Metcalfe, Stephanie [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Paszat, Lawrence [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of a population of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation and to evaluate the independent effect of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence. Methods and Materials: All women diagnosed with DCIS and treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy in Ontario from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatments and outcomes were identified through administrative databases and validated by chart review. The impact of boost radiation on the development of local recurrence was determined using survival analyses. Results: We identified 1895 cases of DCIS that were treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy; 561 patients received boost radiation. The cumulative 10-year rate of local recurrence was 13% for women who received boost radiation and 12% for those who did not (P=.3). The 10-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate among women who did and who did not receive boost radiation was 88% and 87%, respectively (P=.27), 94% and 93% for invasive LRFS (P=.58), and was 95% and 93% for DCIS LRFS (P=.31). On multivariable analyses, boost radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.15) (P=.25). Conclusions: Among a population of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation for DCIS, additional (boost) radiation was not associated with a lower risk of local or invasive recurrence.

  10. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging and contralateral breast cancer occurrence among older women with ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Long, Jessica B; Killelea, Brigid K; Evans, Suzanne B; Roberts, Kenneth B; Silber, Andrea; Gross, Cary P

    2016-07-01

    Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect mammographically occult contralateral breast cancers (CBCs) among women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the impact of MRI on the incidence of subsequent CBC events is unclear. We examined whether MRI use decreases CBC occurrences and detection of invasive disease among women who develop a CBC. Utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare dataset, we assessed overall, synchronous (cancer diagnosis), and subsequent (≥6 months after diagnosis, i.e., metachronous) CBC occurrence in women aged 67-94 years diagnosed with DCIS during 2004-2009, with follow-up through 2011. We applied a matched propensity score approach to compare the stage-specific incidence rate of CBC according to MRI use. Our sample consisted of 9166 beneficiaries, 1258 (13.7 %) of whom received preoperative MRI. After propensity score matching, preoperative MRI use was significantly associated with a higher synchronous CBC detection rate (108.6 vs. 29.7 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.65; p lesions may not become clinically evident. PMID:27287780

  11. A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey of UK Breast Surgeons’ Views on the Management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep S. Mannu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is wide variation in the management of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS nationwide. We aimed to investigate whether the attitudes of surgeons towards different aspects of DCIS treatment varied by seniority of surgeon or by geographical region within the UK. Materials and Methods. A nationwide online survey targeted at UK breast surgeons was undertaken. The anonymous survey contained questions regarding demographics of respondents and specific questions regarding DCIS management that were identified as areas of uncertainty during a systematic search of the literature. Results. Responses from 80 surgeons were obtained. Approximately 57% were male and the majority were consultant or specialist registrar. Approximately 63% of participants were based in district general hospitals with all training deaneries represented. Surgeons’ views on the prognosis and management of DCIS varied geographically across the UK and terminology for DCIS varied with surgeon seniority. Surgeons’ views particularly differed from national guidance on indications for SLNB, tamoxifen, and follow-up practice. Conclusion. Our survey reaffirms that, irrespective of national guidelines and attempts at uniformity, there continues to be a wide variety of views amongst breast surgeons regarding the ideal management of DCIS. However, by quantifying this variation, it may be possible to take it into account when examining long-term trends in nationwide treatment data.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  13. Dysregulation of the mitosis-meiosis switch in testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    TGCT, except in spermatocytic seminoma (not derived from CIS). In conclusion, this study indicates that meiosis signalling is dysregulated in CIS cells and that a key regulator of the mitosis-meiosis switch, DMRT1, is expressed in 'early-stage' CIS cells but is down-regulated with further invasive...

  14. Identification of genes differentially expressed in testes containing carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Nielsen, J E; Almstrup, K; Hansen, Martin Asser; Skakkebaek, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Leffers, H

    2004-01-01

    Wnt signalling and IGFBP6, which is of importance for fetal growth and inhibits cell growth through insulin-like growth factor-II. ISH analysis showed that both mRNA were localized to CIS cells. The results of our search for differentially expressed genes in CIS demonstrated a number of genes linked...

  15. In situ depletion of CD4(+) T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, L.S.; Skov, L.; Dam, T.N.;

    2007-01-01

    -driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis......CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease...... xenograft mouse model. Zanolimumab treatment was shown to induce a significant reduction in the numbers of inflammatory mononuclear cells in upper dermis. This reduction in inflammatory mononuclear cells in situ was primarily due to a significant reduction in the numbers of skin-infiltrating CD4(+), but not...

  16. In situ Characterisation of Living Cells by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Notingher, I.; S Verrier; Romanska, H.; Bishop, A E; Polak, J M; Hench, L. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report the first Raman spectra of individual living and dead cells (MLE-12 line) cultured on bioinert standard poly-L-lysine coated fused silica and on bioactive 45S5 Bioglass® measured at 785 nm laser excitation. At this excitation wavelength no damage was induced to the cells even after 40 minutes irradiation at 115 mW power, as indicated by cell morphology observation and trypan blue viability test. We show that shorter wavelength lasers, 488 nm and 514 nm, cannot be used because they i...

  17. Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony S; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    A 63-year-old man consulted for a non-toxic thyroid nodule of 2 years’ duration. Fine needle aspiration revealed cell findings consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma. He eventually underwent total thyroidectomy. Microscopic examination revealed histologic features of Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid. He received radioactive iodine therapy and suppressive levothyroxine treatment. Post-therapy whole body iodine-131 scan revealed thyroid tissue remnants limited to the anterior neck. Fo...

  18. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    OpenAIRE

    Mamina; Sarvesh; Viswanathan; Rehana

    2014-01-01

    An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual...

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is rather rare and amounts to 3.5% of all rectal neoplasms. Though it has a clear-cut clinical picture, 29.5% of patients admitted for specialized treatment suffer from stage 4 due to inadequate diagnosis. Surgery is the most effective method of management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Radiation therapy may be an adjuvant procedure to surgery

  20. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  1. Renal vein thrombosis in transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A rare case of renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) associated with bland thrombus of the renal vein extending into the inferior vena cava is described. Tumour thrombus in renal cell carcinoma is frequently encountered, but only very rarely occurs with TCC. Bland renal vein thrombosis occurring with renal TCC has not been described before. Contrast enhanced computed tomography assisted in distinguishing between bland and tumour thrombosis and aided in surgical management

  2. Results of conservative treatment with surgery and radiation therapy of 132 non-palpable ductal carcinomas in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospective analysis of results of treatment of 132 subclinical ductal carcinomas in situ, non-palpable. Patients were treated with limited surgery and 70 Gy radiation therapy (70 Gy). With a median follow-up of 7 years, the total recurrence rate was 6 % and the actuarial rate at 5 years 4 % and at 10 years 13 % at. These have no influence on recurrence on the specific actuarial survival rate which was 100 % at 10 years. In spite of five infiltrating recurrences of seven, no metastasis appeared 48 months after the salvage surgery. The global rate of breast. The global rate of breast preservation was 92 % at 7 years. Therapeutic indications were developed taking into account the present analysis and a literature review (2,338 in situ ductal carcinomas, palpable or not, treated with conservative surgery, with or without adjuvant radio-therapy). (author)

  3. Cell surface hydrophobicity of dental plaque microorganisms in situ.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, M.; Judes, H; Weiss, E

    1983-01-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria obtained directly from human tooth surfaces was assayed by measuring their adherence to liquid hydrocarbons. Fresh samples of supragingival dental plaque were washed and dispersed in buffer. Adherence of the plaque microorganisms to hexadecane, octane, and xylene was tested turbidimetrically and by direct microscopic observation. The results clearly show that the vast majority of bacteria comprising dental plaque exhibit pronounced cell surface hydr...

  4. Expression of C4.4A in precursor lesions of pulmonary adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Benedikte; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Illemann, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    in precursor lesions of lung squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma was investigated by stainings with a specific anti-C4.4A antibody. In the transformation from normal bronchial epithelium to squamous cell carcinoma, C4.4A was weakly expressed in basal cell hyperplasia but dramatically increased...... in squamous metaplasia. This was confined to the cell membrane and sustained in dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and the invasive carcinoma. The induction of C4.4A already at the stage of hyperplasia could indicate that it is a marker of very early squamous differentiation, which aligns well with our...... earlier finding that C4.4A expression levels do not provide prognostic information on the survival of squamous cell carcinoma patients. In the progression from normal alveolar epithelium to peripheral adenocarcinoma, we observed an unexpected, distinct cytoplasmic staining for C4.4A in a fraction of...

  5. Development and Validation of Web-Based Nomograms to Predict Postoperative Invasive Component in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ at Needle Breast Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seong Cheol; Chang, Myung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although sonography-guided core needle biopsy is a highly targeted method, there is a possibility of an invasive component after surgical excision of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. This study was performed to develop and validate nomograms to predict the postoperative invasive component in DCIS at core needle biopsy. Methods Two nomograms were developed using the data of previous meta-analysis and multivariate analysis. Nomograms were validated externally using the ...

  6. Most lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical lobular hyperplasia diagnosed on core needle biopsy can be managed clinically with radiologic follow-up in a multidisciplinary setting

    OpenAIRE

    Middleton, Lavinia P.; Sneige, Nour; Coyne, Robin; Shen, Yu; Dong, Wenli; Dempsey, Peter; Bevers, Therese B.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of using standard radiologic and histologic criteria to guide the follow-up of patients with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), lobular neoplasia (LN), or atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH). Patients with high-risk benign lesions diagnosed on biopsy were presented and reviewed in a multidisciplinary clinical management conference from 1 November 2003 through September 2011. Associations between patient characteristics and rates of upgrade were determined by univariate...

  7. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) – current definitions and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraductal epithelial proliferations of the breast are at present classified into three groups; distinction is made histologically and clinically between usual epithelial hyperplasia and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and between ADH and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Although evidence indicates that these boundaries are not ideal on a morphological, immunohistochemical, or genetic basis, this three-tier system is accepted and used at present. The current definitions, histological features, and system of classification of ADH and DCIS are described in this manuscript

  8. Genetic alterations on chromosome 16 and 17 are important features of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and are associated with histologic type

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, C B J; Haar, N.T. ter; Rosenberg, C; Peterse, J L; Cleton-Jansen, A-M; Cornelisse, C. J.; Vijver, M J van de

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the involvement of known and putative tumour suppressor- and oncogene loci in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by microsatellite analysis (LOH), Southern blotting and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). A total of 78 pure DCIS cases, classified histologically as well, intermediately and poorly differentiated, were examined for LOH with 76 markers dispersed along all chromosome arms. LOH on chromosome 17 was more frequent in poorly differentiated DCIS (70%) compared to well-dif...

  9. Screen detection of ductal carcinoma in situ and subsequent incidence of invasive interval breast cancers: a retrospective population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Stephen W; Dibden, Amanda; Michalopoulos, Dimitrios; Offman, Judith; Parmar, Dharmishta; Jenkins, Jacquie; Collins, Beverley; Robson, Tony; Scorfield, Suzanne; Green, Kathryn; Hall, Clare; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Ryan, Michael; Johnson, Fiona; Stevens, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The value of screen detection and treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a matter of controversy. At present, the extent to which the diagnosis and treatment of DCIS could prevent the occurrence of invasive breast cancer in the future is not clear. We sought to estimate the association between detection of DCIS at screening and invasive interval cancers subsequent to the relevant screen. Methods We obtained aggregate data for screen-detected cancers from 84 local s...

  10. The distribution of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) grade in 4232 women and its impact on overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    van Luijt, P. A.; Heijnsdijk, E.A.M.; Fracheboud, J; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Broeders, M J M; Wesseling, J.; den Heeten, G J; Koning, H.J. de

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has rapidly increased over time. The malignant potential of DCIS is dependent on its differentiation grade. Methods Our aim is to determine the distribution of different grades of DCIS among women screened in the mass screening programme, and women not screened in the mass screening programme, and to estimate the amount of overdiagnosis by grade of DCIS. We retrospectively included a population-based sample of 4232 women with a diagn...

  11. Histological type and marker expression of the primary tumour compared with its local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Bijker, N; Peterse, J L; Duchateau, L.; Robanus-Maandag, E. C.; Bosch, C A J; Duval, C.; Pilotti, S.; Vijver, M J van de

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated primary ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) of the breast and their local recurrences after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for histological characteristics and marker expression. Patients who were randomized in the EORTC trial 10853 (wide local excision versus excision plus radiotherapy) and who developed a local recurrence were identified. Histology was reviewed for 116 cases; oestrogen and progesterone receptor status, and HER2/ neu and p53 overexpression were assessed fo...

  12. Incidence and possible pathogenesis of sentinel node micrometastases in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast detected using molecular whole lymph node assay

    OpenAIRE

    Osako, T; Iwase, T; Kimura, K.; Masumura, K; Horii, R; Akiyama, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of lymph node metastases in preinvasive breast cancer – ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – remains controversial. The one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) assay is a novel molecular method that can assess a whole node and detect clinically relevant metastases. In this retrospective cohort study, we determined the performance of the OSNA assay in DCIS and the pathogenesis of node-positive DCIS. Methods: The subjects consisted of 623 patients with DCIS who unde...

  13. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... earliest form of squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type ... cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin Images Bowen's disease on the hand Keratoacanthoma Keratoacanthoma Skin cancer, squamous ...

  14. Planoepitheliale cell carcinoma arising from ampullopancreatic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: We report a case of planoepitheliale cell carcinoma located in the ampulla of Vater. We report the surgical results and pathological findings of a patient with an ampullary planoepitheliale cell carcinoma. From what we know it is the first case with successful surgical treatment. Case Report: A 58-year-old woman who presented with jaundice and preoperative endoscopic and radiological procedures could not show whether the tumour was carcinoma planoepitheliale. The clinical presentation, biochemical, radiographic and endoscopic investigation pronounced advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results: We performed pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intention. Histological examination revealed: planoepitheliale cell carcinoma of the ampullo-pancreatic unit. Conclusions: In conclusion, preoperative endoscopic and radiological evaluations can all prove insufficient to distinguish between benign and malignant tumour. Thus, for malignant tumours surgeons may be forced to perform extensive surgery. (authors)

  15. A non-invasive method for in situ quantification of subpopulation behaviour in mixed cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Ben D; Tare, Rahul S; Please, Colin P; Prescott, Philip; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2006-02-22

    Ongoing advances in quantitative molecular- and cellular-biology highlight the need for correspondingly quantitative methods in tissue-biology, in which the presence and activity of specific cell-subpopulations can be assessed in situ. However, many experimental techniques disturb the natural tissue balance, making it difficult to draw realistic conclusions concerning in situ cell behaviour. In this study, we present a widely applicable and minimally invasive method which combines fluorescence cell labelling, retrospective image analysis and mathematical data processing to detect the presence and activity of cell subpopulations, using adhesion patterns in STRO-1 immunoselected human mesenchymal populations and the homogeneous osteoblast-like MG63 continuous cell line as an illustration. Adhesion is considered on tissue culture plastic and fibronectin surfaces, using cell area as a readily obtainable and individual cell specific measure of spreading. The underlying statistical distributions of cell areas are investigated and mappings between distributions are examined using a combination of graphical and non-parametric statistical methods. We show that activity can be quantified in subpopulations as small as 1% by cell number, and outline behaviour of significant subpopulations in both STRO-1+/- fractions. This method has considerable potential to understand in situ cell behaviour and thus has wide applicability, for example in developmental biology and tissue engineering. PMID:16849218

  16. Production of biopesticides in an in situ cell retention bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Gunjan; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2008-12-01

    The seeds of Azadirachta indica contain azadirachtin and other limonoids, which can be used as a biopesticide for crop protection. Significant variability and availability of seed only in arid zones has triggered biotechnological production of biopesticides to cope up with its huge requirement. Batch cultivation of A. indica suspension culture was carried out in statistically optimized media (25.0 g/l glucose, 5.7 g/l nitrate, 0.094 g/l phosphate and 5 g/l inoculum) in 3 l stirred tank bioreactor. This resulted in 15.5 g/l biomass and 0.05 g/l azadirachtin production in 10 days leading to productivity of 5 mg l(-1) day(-1). Possible inhibition by the limiting substrates (C, N, P) were also studied and maximum inhibitory concentrations identified. The batch kinetic/inhibitory data were then used to develop and identify an unstructured mathematical model. The batch model was extrapolated to simulate continuous cultivation with and without cell retention in the bioreactor. Several offline computer simulations were done to identify right nutrient feeding strategies (with respect to key limiting substrates; carbon, nitrate and phosphate) to maintain non-limiting and non-inhibitory substrate concentrations in bioreactor. One such continuous culture (with cell retention) simulation was experimentally implemented. In this cultivation, the cells were propagated batch-wise for 8 days. It was then converted to continuous cultivation by feeding MS salts with glucose (75 g/l), nitrate (10 g/l), and phosphate (0.5 g/l) at a feed rate of 500 ml/day and withdrawing the spent medium at the same rate. The above continuous cultivation (with cell retention) demonstrated an improvement in cell growth to 95.8 g/l and intracellular accumulation of 0.38 g/l azadirachtin in 40 days leading to an overall productivity of 9.5 mg l(-1) day(-1). PMID:18392561

  17. LOCAL IN-SITU ANALYSIS OF PEM FUEL CELLS BY IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY AND RAMAN MEASUREMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Gülzow, Erich; Schulze, Mathias; Friedrich, Andreas; Fischer, Peter; Bettermann, Hans

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the processes inside of low temperature fuel cells on a local scale is required for an effective improvement strategy. For this purpose in situ Raman spectroscopy and local impedance spectroscopy is being developed. The contribution describes the modifications to the cell, and installations of additional devices and the experimental detection systems for integrating both methods into a single cell set up. First results to verify the combined results were carried out and ar...

  18. A portable load cell for in-situ ore impact breakage testing

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgeois, Florent; Banini, George

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and characterisation of a short, and hence portable impact load cell for in-situ quantification of ore breakage properties under impact loading conditions. Much literature has been published in the past two decades about impact load cells for ore breakage testing. It has been conclusively shown that such machines yield significant quantitative energy-fragmentation information about industrial ores. However, documented load cells are all laboratory systems that ...

  19. In vivo bioluminescence imaging for viable human neural stem cells incorporated within in situ gelatin hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Do Won; Park, Kyung Min; Shim, Hye-kyung; Jin, Yeona; Oh, Hyun Jeong; Oh, So Won; Lee, Song; Youn, Hyewon; Joung, Yoon Ki; Lee, Hong J.; Kim, Seung U.; Park, Ki Dong; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel-based stem cell therapies contribute to enhanced therapeutic efficacy in treating diseases, and determining the optimal mechanical strength of the hydrogel in vivo is important for therapeutic success. We evaluated the proliferation of human neural stem cells incorporated within in situ-forming hydrogels and compared the effect of hydrogels with different elastic properties in cell/hydrogel-xenografted mice. Methods The gelatin-polyethylene glycol-ty...

  20. Heterogeneity of expression of immunohistochemical tumour markers in testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Kvist, Majbrit; Skakkebaek, N E

    1996-01-01

    directly to either seminoma or nonseminoma; according to the other, seminoma is the intermediate stage between CIS and nonseminoma. CIS cells express several tumour antigens, such as placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), TRA-1-60, or the c-kit proto-oncogene protein product (Kit), which are present...

  1. In situ XANES cell used for the study of lanthanum strontium cuprate deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke

    2011-01-01

    The potential NOx-reduction electro catalyst lanthanum strontium cuprate has been characterized with an in situ X-ray spectrochemical gas reaction cell. In a series of samples with increasing substitution of trivalent lanthanum by divalent strontium ions, the oxidation state of copper increased...

  2. Comparative genomic and in situ hybridization of germ cell tumors of the infantile testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, M; Rosenberg, C; Stoop, H; Schuyer, M; Timmer, A; Oosterhuis, W; Looijenga, L

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal information on germ cell tumors of the infantile testis, ie, teratomas and yolk sac tumors, is limited and controversial. We studied two teratomas and four yolk sac tumors using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and in situ hybridization. No chromosomal anomalies were found in the

  3. Low grade Ductal Carcinoma in situ (DCIS): how best to describe it?

    OpenAIRE

    Fallowfield, Lesley; Matthews, Lucy; Francis, Adele; Jenkins, Valerie; Rea, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the absence of definitive data about the natural history of DCIS the appropriateness of describing DCIS as cancer is controversial. METHODS: We conducted a survey amongst British Breast Group (BBG) members, to determine which descriptions of DCIS were deemed most accurate and appropriate. RESULTS: 54/73 (74%) attendees completed the survey: A majority (34/54; 63%) said they would be comfortable using the description that explained DCIS as abnormal cells in the milk ducts that h...

  4. Analysis of stromal signatures in the tumor microenvironment of ductal carcinoma in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, M.; Beck, A. H.; Webster, J A; Espinosa, I.; Montgomery, K.; Varma, S.; M. van Rijn; K. C. Jensen; West, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of the tumor microenvironment have revealed significant interaction between tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in model systems. We have previously shown that two distinct stromal signatures derived from a macrophage (CSF1) response and a fibroblastic (DTF-like) response are present in subsets of invasive breast cancers and show a correlation with clinical outcome [1–3]. In the present study we explore whether these signatures also exist in the stroma of duc...

  5. Note: High-pressure in situ x-ray laminography using diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuichi; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    A high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique was developed using a newly designed, laterally open diamond anvil cell. A low X-ray beam of 8 keV energy was used, aiming at future application to dual energy X-ray chemical imaging techniques. The effects of the inclination angle and the imaging angle range were evaluated at ambient pressure using the apparatus. Sectional images of ruby ball samples were successfully reconstructed at high pressures, up to approximately 50 GPa. The high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique is expected to provide new insights into the deep Earth sciences.

  6. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS) with heterogeneity of nuclear grade: prognostic effects of quantitative nuclear assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, 50% of patients with breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) had more than one nuclear grade, and neither worst nor predominant nuclear grade was significantly associated with development of invasive carcinoma. Here, we used image analysis in addition to histologic evaluation to determine if quantification of nuclear features could provide additional prognostic information and hence impact prognostic assessments. Nuclear image features were extracted from about 200 nuclei of each of 80 patients with DCIS who underwent lumpectomy alone, and received no adjuvant systemic therapy. Nuclear images were obtained from 20 representative nuclei per duct, from each of a group of 5 ducts, in two separate fields, for 10 ducts. Reproducibility of image analysis features was determined, as was the ability of features to discriminate between nuclear grades. Patient information was available about clinical factors (age and method of DCIS detection), pathologic factors (DCIS size, nuclear grade, margin size, and amount of parenchymal involvement), and 39 image features (morphology, densitometry, and texture). The prognostic effects of these factors and features on the development of invasive breast cancer were examined with Cox step-wise multivariate regression. Duplicate measurements were similar for 89.7% to 97.4% of assessed image features. For the pooled assessment with ~200 nuclei per patient, a discriminant function with one densitometric and two texture features was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with nuclear grading, and provided 78.8% correct jackknifed classification of a patient's nuclear grade. In multivariate assessments, image analysis nuclear features had significant prognostic associations (p ≤ 0.05) with the development of invasive breast cancer. Texture (difference entropy, p < 0.001; contrast, p < 0.001; peak transition probability, p = 0.01), densitometry (range density, p = 0.004), and measured margin (p = 0.05) were associated with

  7. Breast-conserving therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: the French Cancer Centers' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcome for women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated in current clinical practice by conservative surgery with or without definitive breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 705 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ treated between 1985 and 1995 in nine French regional cancer centers; 515 underwent conservative surgery and radiotherapy (CS+RT) and 190 CS alone. The median follow-up was 7 years. Results: The 7-year crude local recurrence (LR) rate was 12.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.4-15.8) and 32.4% (95% CI 25-39.7) for the CS+RT and CS groups, respectively (p<0.0001). The respective 10-year results were 18.2% (95% CI 13.3-23) and 43.8% (95% CI 30-57.7). A total of 125 LRs occurred, 66 and 59 in the CS+RT and CS groups, respectively. Invasive or microinvasive LRs occurred in 60.6% and 52% of the cases in the same respective groups. The median time to LR development was 55 and 41 months. Nine (1.7%) and 6 (3.1%) nodal recurrences occurred in the CS+RT and CS groups, respectively. Distant metastases occurred in 1.4% and 3% of the respective groups. Patient age and excision quality (final margin status) were both significantly associated with LR risk in the CS+RT group: the LR rate was 29%, 13%, and 8% among women aged ≤40, 41-60, and ≥61 years (p<0.001). Even in the case of complete excision, we observed a 24% rate of LR (6 of 25) in women <40 years. Patients with negative, positive, or uncertain margins had a 7-year crude LR rate of 9.7%, 25.2%, and 12.2%, respectively (p=0.008). RT reduced the LR rate in all subgroups, especially in those with comedocarcinoma (17% vs. 59% in the CS+RT and CS groups, respectively, p<0.0001) and mixed cribriform/papillary tumors (9% vs. 31%, p<0.0001). In the multivariate Cox regression model, young age and positive margins remained significant in the CS+RT group (p=0.00012 and p=0.016). Finally, the relative LR risk in the CS+RT group compared with the CS group

  8. Predictors for local invasive recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xining; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Ben; Song, Fengju

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of mammographic screening has considerably increased the detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has a high probability of recurrence. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive factors including biomarkers, tumor characteristics, and modes of detection on the risk of local invasive recurrence (LIR) following DCIS. Searches were performed in PubMed and EMBASE up to 8 July 2014. Risk estimates (hazard ratios, odds ratios, and relative risks) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted to calculate the strength of the associations between predictive factors and the risk of LIR after treatment of DCIS. STATA 12.0 was used to combine results in this meta-analysis. A total of 18 articles were included in the analysis. Pooled risk estimates and 95% CIs were 1.36 (1.04–1.69) for the positive margin, 1.38 (1.12–1.63) for the nonscreening detection method, 1.04 (0.84–1.24) for high nuclear grade 1, 1.32 (0.98–1.66) for intermediate nuclear grade 2, 1.18 (0.98–1.37) for comedonecrosis, 1.00 (0.92–1.08) for large tumor size, 1.34 (0.82–1.87) for multifocality, 0.74 (0.36–1.12) for estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 0.89 (0.47–1.31) for progesterone receptor-positive tumors, and 1.25 (0.7–1.81) for HER2/neu-positive tumors. Positive margin and non-screening-detected cancers were associated with a higher risk of LIR following DCIS. These predictive factors, after further validation, could be considered to tailor treatment for individual patients. PMID:25714649

  9. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation

  10. Cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy following conservative surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and materials: A Markov model was constructed for a theoretical cohort of 55-year-old women with DCIS over a life-time horizon. Probability estimates for local noninvasive (N-INV), local invasive (INV), and distant recurrences were obtained from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-17. Utilities for eight nonmetastatic health states were collected from both healthy women and DCIS patients. Direct medical (2002 Medicare fee schedule) and nonmedical costs (time and transportation) of RT were ascertained. Results: For BCS + RT vs. BCS alone, the estimated N-INV and INV rates at 12 years were 9% and 8% vs. 16% and 18%, respectively. The incremental cost of adding RT was $3300 despite an initial RT cost of $8700 due to higher local recurrence-related salvage costs incurred with the BCS alone strategy. An increase of 0.09 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) primarily reflected the lower risk of INV with RT, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $36,700/QALY. Sensitivity analyses revealed the ICER to be affected by baseline probability of a local recurrence, relative efficacy of RT in preventing INV, negative impact of an INV on quality of life, and cost of initial RT. Cost of salvage BCS + RT and source of utilities (healthy women vs. DCIS patients) influenced the ICER albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions: Addition of RT following BCS for patients with DCIS should not be withheld because of concerns regarding its cost-effectiveness

  11. Local control with conventional and hypofractionated adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) improves local control, however an optimal dose fractionation remains undefined. WBRT following breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer demonstrates equivalent efficacy and morbidity for conventional and hypofractionated treatment. Our group policy allowed for the use of both schedules, therefore we compared local control in women with DCIS following breast-conserving surgery. Patients and methods: Two hundred and sixty-six patients treated between January 1999 and December 2004 with conventional (50 Gy in 25 fractions) or hypofractionated (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions or 40 Gy/16 + 12.5 Gy boost) WBRT after breast-conserving surgery for DCIS were retrospectively reviewed. Median follow-up was 3.76 years (range 0.1-8.9 years). Results: One hundred and four patients (39%) were treated with conventional and 162 (61%) with hypofractionated WBRT. The median age was 56.7 years (range 32.2-83.8 years), and prognostic features were well matched in both groups, apart from a small increase in tumour size in the conventional arm (1.75 vs. 2.12 cm, p = 0.05). Actuarial risk of recurrence at 4 years was 7% with hypofractionated WBRT and 6% with the conventional schedule (p = 0.9). Univariate analysis showed an increased risk of recurrence with high nuclear grade tumours (11% at 4 years for grade 3 vs. 4% for grade 1/2, p = 0.029). Conclusions: Hypofractionated adjuvant WBRT following breast-conserving surgery for DCIS has comparable local control to a conventional radiation schedule. Hypofractionated WBRT is more convenient for patients, has equivalent morbidity and should be considered in this patient group.

  12. Role of axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capitanio Giovanni

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy is an effective tool for axillary staging in patients with invasive breast cancer. This procedure has been recently proposed as part of the treatment for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, because cases of undetected invasive foci and nodal metastases occasionally occur. However, the indications for SLN biopsy in DCIS patients are controversial. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the incidence of SLN metastases in a series of patients with a diagnosis of pure DCIS. Methods A retrospective evaluation was made of a series of 102 patients who underwent SLN biopsy, and had a final histologic diagnosis of pure DCIS. Patients with microinvasion were excluded from the analysis. The patients were operated on in five Institutions between 1999 and 2004. Subdermal or subareolar injection of 30–50 MBq of 99 m-Tc colloidal albumin was used for SLN identification. All sentinel nodes were evaluated with serial sectioning, haematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunohistochemical analysis for cytocheratin. Results Only one patient (0.98% was SLN positive. The primary tumour was a small micropapillary intermediate-grade DCIS and the SLN harboured a micrometastasis. At pathologic revision of the specimen, no detectable focus of microinvasion was found. Conclusion Our findings indicate that SLN metastases in pure DCIS are a very rare occurrence. SLN biopsy should not therefore be routinely performed in patients who undergo resection for DCIS. SLN mapping can be performed, as a second operation, in cases in which an invasive component is identified in the specimen. Only DCIS patients who require a mastectomy should have SLN biopsy performed at the time of breast operation, since in these cases subsequent node mapping is not feasible.

  13. Lesion size is a major determinant of the mammographic features of ductal carcinoma in situ: findings from the Sloane project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the radiological features of calcific ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a large, multicentre dataset according to grade and size, and to investigate the possibility that DCIS has different mammographic features when small. Materials and methods: The dataset consisted of all Sloane Project DCIS cases where calcification was present mammographically and histological grade and size were available. The radiology data form classifies calcific DCIS as casting/linear, granular/irregular, or punctate. The pathology dataset includes cytonuclear grade and microscopic tumour size. Correlations were sought between the radiological findings and DCIS grade and size. The significance of differences was assessed using the chi-square test and chi-square test for trend. Results: One thousand, seven hundred and eighty-three cases were included in the study. Of these, 1128, 485, and 170 had high, intermediate, and low-grade DCIS, respectively. Casting calcification was more frequently seen the higher the grade of DCIS, occurring in 58% of high grade, 38% of intermediate grade, and 26% of low-grade cases, respectively (p 30 mm) low-grade lesions (46%). Conclusion: Lesion size has a strong influence on the radiological features of calcific DCIS; small, high-grade lesions often show no casting calcifications, whereas casting calcifications are seen in nearly half of large, low-grade lesions. As small clusters of punctate or granular calcifications may represent high-grade DCIS, an aggressive clinical approach to the diagnosis of such lesions is recommended as the adequate treatment of high-grade DCIS will prevent the occurrence of potentially life-threatening high-grade invasive disease.

  14. Screening-detected calcified and non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ: Differences in the imaging and histopathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare the imaging and histopathological features of screening-detected calcified and non-calcified ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Materials and methods: The study involved 217 DCIS cases in 212 asymptomatic patients admitted between May 2007 and December 2010. All lesions were divided into calcified and non-calcified DCIS according to the presence of calcifications on mammography. Two radiologists reviewed the findings from mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in consensus according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The histopathological features of the lesions were obtained from medical records. Statistical comparisons were performed using the chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analyses. Results: On mammography, most non-calcified DCIS presented as either a false-negative finding (49%) or mass lesion (30%), whereas most calcified DCIS (68.5%) presented as calcification alone (p < 0.001). At ultrasound, all of the non-calcified DCIS appeared as a mass, whereas 62% of the calcified DCIS appeared as a mass (p < 0.001). At histopathology, high nuclear grade (p = 0.017), necrosis (p < 0.001), positive progesterone receptor (p = 0.027), and presence of the HER-2/neu oncogene (p < 0.001) were more common in the calcified DCIS than in the non-calcified DCIS. There were no significant differences in the MRI features between the two groups. The ICC values of the non-calcified and calcified DCIS between predicted tumour size and pathologic size were 0.625 versus 0.705 for mammography, 0.801 versus 0.552 for ultrasound, and 0.760 versus 0.767 for MRI. Conclusions: Screening-detected calcified and non-calcified DCIS have different mammographic and sonographic features. Ultrasound could be helpful to predict the pathological size of the non-calcified DCIS.

  15. MRI of the Breast for the Detection and Assessment of the Size of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammography for the detection and assessment of the size of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI and mammography were analyzed in respect of the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS in 72 patients (age range: 30 67 years, mean age: 47 years). The MRI and mammographic measurements were compared with the histopathologic size with using the Pearson's correlation coefficients and the Mann-Whitney u test. We evaluated whether the breast density, the tumor nuclear grade, the presence of comedo necrosis and microinvasion influenced the MRI and mammographic size estimates by using the chi-square test. Of the 72 DCIS lesions, 68 (94%) were detected by MRI and 62 (86%) were detected by mammography. Overall, the Pearson's correlation of the size between MRI and histopathology was 0.786 versus 0.633 between mammography and histopathology (p < 0.001). MRI underestimated the size by more than 1 cm (including false negative examination) in 12 patients (17%), was accurate in 52 patients (72%) and overestimated the size by more than 1 cm in eight patients (11%) whereas mammography underestimated the size in 25 patients (35%), was accurate in 31 patients (43%) and overestimated the size in 16 patients (22%). The MRI, but not the mammography, showed significant correlation for the assessment of the size of tumor in noncomedo DCIS (p < 0.001 vs p = 0.060). The assessment of tumor size by MRI was affected by the nuclear grade (p = 0.008) and the presence of comedo necrosis (p = 0.029), but not by the breast density (p 0.747) or microinvasion (p = 0.093). MRI was more accurate for the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS than mammography

  16. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Fuh Yong, E-mail: fuhyong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Fuqiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Chen, John Ju [Department of Cancer Informatics, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Tan, Chiew Har [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Tan, Puay Hoon [Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  17. COX-2 and PPARγ expression are potential markers of recurrence risk in mammary duct carcinoma in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In women with duct carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) receiving breast conservation therapy (BCT), in-breast recurrences are seen in approximately 10%, but cannot be accurately predicted using clinical and histological criteria. We performed a case-control study to identify protein markers of local recurrence risk in DCIS. Women treated for DCIS with BCT, who later developed in-breast recurrence (cases) were matched by age and year of treatment to women who remained free of recurrence (controls). A total of 69 women were included in the study, 31 cases and 38 controls. Immunohistochemical evaluation of DCIS tissue arrays was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2/neu, cyclin D1, p53, p21, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Two markers were significantly different between cases and controls on univariate analysis: strong COX-2 expression was associated with increased risk of recurrence, with 67% vs. 24% positivity in cases and controls p = 0.006; and nuclear expression of PPARγ was associated with protection from recurrence with 4% vs. 27% positivity in cases and controls, p = 0.024. In a multivariate model which included size, grade, COX-2 and PPARγ positivity, we found COX-2 positivity to be a strong independent risk factor for recurrence (OR 7.90, 95% CI 1.72–36.23)., whereas size and grade were of borderline significance. PPARγ expression continued to demonstrate a protective trend, (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06–1.84). Our findings suggest that COX-2 and PPARγ should be investigated further as biologic markers to predict DCIS recurrence, particularly since they are also potential therapeutic targets

  18. COX-2 and PPARγ expression are potential markers of recurrence risk in mammary duct carcinoma in-situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiley Elizabeth L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In women with duct carcinoma in-situ (DCIS receiving breast conservation therapy (BCT, in-breast recurrences are seen in approximately 10%, but cannot be accurately predicted using clinical and histological criteria. We performed a case-control study to identify protein markers of local recurrence risk in DCIS. Methods Women treated for DCIS with BCT, who later developed in-breast recurrence (cases were matched by age and year of treatment to women who remained free of recurrence (controls. Results A total of 69 women were included in the study, 31 cases and 38 controls. Immunohistochemical evaluation of DCIS tissue arrays was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2/neu, cyclin D1, p53, p21, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ. Two markers were significantly different between cases and controls on univariate analysis: strong COX-2 expression was associated with increased risk of recurrence, with 67% vs. 24% positivity in cases and controls p = 0.006; and nuclear expression of PPARγ was associated with protection from recurrence with 4% vs. 27% positivity in cases and controls, p = 0.024. In a multivariate model which included size, grade, COX-2 and PPARγ positivity, we found COX-2 positivity to be a strong independent risk factor for recurrence (OR 7.90, 95% CI 1.72–36.23., whereas size and grade were of borderline significance. PPARγ expression continued to demonstrate a protective trend, (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.06–1.84. Conclusion Our findings suggest that COX-2 and PPARγ should be investigated further as biologic markers to predict DCIS recurrence, particularly since they are also potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Role of axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is an effective tool for axillary staging in patients with invasive breast cancer. This procedure has been recently proposed as part of the treatment for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), because cases of undetected invasive foci and nodal metastases occasionally occur. However, the indications for SLN biopsy in DCIS patients are controversial. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the incidence of SLN metastases in a series of patients with a diagnosis of pure DCIS. A retrospective evaluation was made of a series of 102 patients who underwent SLN biopsy, and had a final histologic diagnosis of pure DCIS. Patients with microinvasion were excluded from the analysis. The patients were operated on in five Institutions between 1999 and 2004. Subdermal or subareolar injection of 30–50 MBq of 99 m-Tc colloidal albumin was used for SLN identification. All sentinel nodes were evaluated with serial sectioning, haematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunohistochemical analysis for cytocheratin. Only one patient (0.98%) was SLN positive. The primary tumour was a small micropapillary intermediate-grade DCIS and the SLN harboured a micrometastasis. At pathologic revision of the specimen, no detectable focus of microinvasion was found. Our findings indicate that SLN metastases in pure DCIS are a very rare occurrence. SLN biopsy should not therefore be routinely performed in patients who undergo resection for DCIS. SLN mapping can be performed, as a second operation, in cases in which an invasive component is identified in the specimen. Only DCIS patients who require a mastectomy should have SLN biopsy performed at the time of breast operation, since in these cases subsequent node mapping is not feasible

  20. Lesion size is a major determinant of the mammographic features of ductal carcinoma in situ: findings from the Sloane project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A., E-mail: a.z.evans@dundee.ac.u [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Mailbox 4, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Clements, K. [West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Maxwell, A.; Bishop, H. [Breast Unit, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton (United Kingdom); Hanby, A. [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Lawrence, G. [West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Pinder, S.E. [Kings College London, Guys and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: To assess the radiological features of calcific ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a large, multicentre dataset according to grade and size, and to investigate the possibility that DCIS has different mammographic features when small. Materials and methods: The dataset consisted of all Sloane Project DCIS cases where calcification was present mammographically and histological grade and size were available. The radiology data form classifies calcific DCIS as casting/linear, granular/irregular, or punctate. The pathology dataset includes cytonuclear grade and microscopic tumour size. Correlations were sought between the radiological findings and DCIS grade and size. The significance of differences was assessed using the chi-square test and chi-square test for trend. Results: One thousand, seven hundred and eighty-three cases were included in the study. Of these, 1128, 485, and 170 had high, intermediate, and low-grade DCIS, respectively. Casting calcification was more frequently seen the higher the grade of DCIS, occurring in 58% of high grade, 38% of intermediate grade, and 26% of low-grade cases, respectively (p < 0.001). Casting calcification was also increasingly common with increasing lesion size, irrespective of the histological grade (p < 0.001). Thus casting calcifications in small (<10 mm) high-grade DCIS lesions were seen with a similar frequency (50%) to those in moderate-sized (21-30 mm) intermediate-grade lesions (48%), and to those in large (>30 mm) low-grade lesions (46%). Conclusion: Lesion size has a strong influence on the radiological features of calcific DCIS; small, high-grade lesions often show no casting calcifications, whereas casting calcifications are seen in nearly half of large, low-grade lesions. As small clusters of punctate or granular calcifications may represent high-grade DCIS, an aggressive clinical approach to the diagnosis of such lesions is recommended as the adequate treatment of high-grade DCIS will prevent the occurrence

  1. Why the term 'low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ' should be changed to 'borderline breast disease': diagnostic and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Shahla

    2012-01-01

    During the last several years, increased public awareness, advances in breast imaging and enhanced screening programs have led to early breast cancer detection and attention to cancer prevention. The number of image-detected biopsies has increased, and pathologists are expected to provide more information with smaller tissue samples. These biopsies have resulted in detection of increasing numbers of high-risk proliferative breast disease and in situ cancers. The general hypothesis is that some forms of breast cancers may arise from established forms of ductal carcinoma in situ and atypical ductal hyperplasia, and possibly from more common forms of ductal hyperplasia. However, this is an oversimplification of a very complex process given the fact that the majority of breast cancers appear to arise de novo or from a yet unknown precursor lesion. Currently, atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ are considered as morphologic risk factors and precursor lesions for breast cancer. However, morphologic distinction between these two entities has remained a real issue that continues to lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Aside from morphologic similarities between atypical ductal hyperplasia and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ, biomarker studies and molecular genetic testing have shown that morphologic overlaps are reflected at the molecular level and raise questions about the validity of separating these two entities. It is hoped that as we better understand the genetic basis of these entities in relation to ultimate patient outcome, the suggested use of the term 'borderline breast disease' can minimize the number of patients who are subject to overtreatment. PMID:22171775

  2. In situ micro-spectroscopic investigation of lignin in poplar cell walls pretreated by maleic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi-You

    2015-01-01

    Background In higher plant cells, lignin provides necessary physical support for plant growth and resistance to attack by microorganisms. For the same reason, lignin is considered to be a major impediment to the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by hydrolytic enzymes. The in situ variation of lignin in plant cell walls is important for better understanding of the roles lignin play in biomass recalcitrance. Results A micro-spectroscopic approach combining stimulated Raman scat...

  3. Characterization of the Merkel Cell Carcinoma miRNome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Ning

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have been implicated in various skin cancers, including melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma; however, the expression of microRNAs and their role in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC have yet to be explored in depth. To identify microRNAs specific to MCC (MCC-miRs, next-generation sequencing (NGS of small RNA libraries was performed on different tissue samples including MCCs, other cutaneous tumors, and normal skin. Comparison of the profiles identified several microRNAs upregulated and downregulated in MCC. For validation, their expression was measured via qRT-PCR in a larger group of MCC and in a comparison group of non-MCC cutaneous tumors and normal skin. Eight microRNAs were upregulated in MCC: miR-502-3p, miR-9, miR-7, miR-340, miR-182, miR-190b, miR-873, and miR-183. Three microRNAs were downregulated: miR-3170, miR-125b, and miR-374c. Many of these MCC-miRs, the miR-183/182/96a cistron in particular, have connections to tumorigenic pathways implicated in MCC pathogenesis. In situ hybridization confirmed that the highly expressed MCC-miR, miR-182, is localized within tumor cells. Furthermore, NGS and qRT-PCR reveal that several of these MCC-miRs are highly expressed in the patient-derived MCC cell line, MS-1. These data indicate that we have identified a set of MCC-miRs with important implications for MCC research.

  4. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A;

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... of the isolated cells were subjected to in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes for the Y chromosome and chromosome 21 to confirm the fetal origin. RESULTS: After MiniMACS the enrichment factors for the CD71/GPA- and CD36/GPA-positive cells from maternal blood were similar, and the percentages of fetal...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti-GPA...

  5. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  6. p53 signature and serous tubal in-situ carcinoma in cases of primary tubal and peritoneal carcinomas and serous borderline tumors of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Karoline; Einenkel, Jens; Sohr, Sindy; Engeland, Kurt; Horn, Lars-Christian

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the fimbriated end and nonfimbriated epithelium of fallopian tubes with regard to p53 signature, tubal intraepithelial lesions in transition (TILT), and serous tubal in-situ carcinoma (STIC) in cases of different kinds of serous pelvic cancer. This study immunohistochemically evaluated (by Ki-67 and p53 staining) the presence of p53 signature, TILT lesions, and STIC in 14 consecutive cases of prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy in women with BRCA-1/2 mutation (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy), 11 cases of macroscopically inconspicuous adnexae of patients with primary contralateral tubal cancer (TC), 9 cases of primary peritoneal cancer (PPC), and 10 cases of serous ovarian borderline tumors, evaluating the fallopian tubes (using the Sectioning and Extensively Examining the FIMbria protocol), ovarian surface epithelium, and ovarian cortical inclusion cysts. The frequencies of p53 signature, TILT, and STIC were 35.7%, 7.1%, and 0% in cases of prophylactic surgery, 18.2%, 9.1%, and 18.2% in TC, and 11.1%, 0%, and 33.3% in PPC. These precursor lesions were missed during the initial routine screening and were found in the fimbriated end of the fallopian tubes in 94%. In 1 case of PPC, staining for p53 was negative in STIC. The studied adnexal tissue of serous ovarian borderline tumor and ovarian cortical inclusion cysts of all cases showed no alterations according to p53 signature, TILT, or STIC. STIC and p53 signature as precursor lesions of pelvic serous cancer were seen in macroscopically inconspicuous contralateral fallopian tubes in unilateral TC, in patients with elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and in patients affected by PPC. Therefore, we propose the complete processing of adnexal tissue and the use of step sectioning to establish the correct diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry for p53 and ki-67 may aid in the diagnosis, but is not necessary for routine investigation. PMID:21804388

  7. A New cell design for Potentiostatically Controlled In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Lithen; Friis, Esben P.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Ulstrup, Jens

    We describe the design and construction of a new type of AFM cell for in situ imaging under potentiostatic control. The cell is specifically designed for a Rasterscope 4000TM AFM instrument with no need for instrumental modification, but can easily be adapted to other commercial instruments. The...... cell is a closed system with insignificant sample evaporation. It is a chemically and mechanically robust two-component system which enables fast assembly and testing prior to insertion and minimizes leakage problems. The cell is also laterally flexible, facilitating scanning of large areas, holds...

  8. Detection of colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in single T cells by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, D J; Owens, T; Pearse, M

    1989-01-01

    In situ hybridization has been used to study the accumulation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) mRNA in single cells of a T lymphocyte clone (E9.D4) following antibody-mediated (F23.1) activation via the Ti-T3 complex in filler-independent bulk cultures. The specificity of hybridization for...... the accumulation of CSF mRNA within individual cells of the clone following stimulation with F23.1. This could account for the corresponding heterogeneity in CSF production by single cells. Under optimal conditions at least 25% of cells contained both transcripts. The method has been used to examine...

  9. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma arising in acquired cystic disease of the kidney: an immunohistochemical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Shiotsu, Tomoyuki; Kawada, Chiaki; Shuin, Taro; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Ohe, Chisato; Mikami, Shuji; Pan, Chin-Chen

    2011-08-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently established disease entity. However, there are few reports on genetic study of this entity. We report such a case with focus on genetic study. A 57-year-old Japanese man was found to have 3 renal tumors. Histologically, two tumors showed findings of clear cell RCC; and the other tumor showed findings of clear cell papillary RCC that was characterized by papillary growth pattern of neoplastic cells in cystic space with purely clear cell cytology. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells of clear cell papillary RCC were diffusely positive for PAX2 and cytokeratin 7, but negative for CD10, RCC Ma, and AMACR. In fluorescence in situ hybridization study for one clear cell papillary RCC, we detected polysomy for chromosome 7 and monosomy for chromosomes 17, 16, and 20. In addition, we detected mutation of VHL gene in clear cell RCC, but found no VHL gene mutation in clear cell papillary RCC. Finally, our results provide further evidence that clear cell papillary RCC may be both morphologically and genetically distinct entity from clear cell RCC and papillary RCC. PMID:20952286

  10. Tamoxifen added to radiotherapy and surgery for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: A meta-analysis of 2 randomized trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Surgical excision with adequate margins is the treatment of choice for ductal, in situ carcinoma of the breast (DCIS). The addition of radiotherapy (RT) halved local in situ and invasive recurrence. The purpose of our meta-analysis is to evaluate the reduction in recurrence (in situ or invasive) with the addition of tamoxifen (T), in particular in patients with DCIS treated with surgery + RT. Patients and methods: The eligible studies (NSABP-B24 and UK ANZ DCIS trials) included prospective, randomized, controlled trials in which the addition of T had been compared with surgery + RT without T in women with DCIS of the breast. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for both in situ and invasive recurrence (local and controlateral). Results: Tamoxifen does not reduce breast cancer-specific or overall mortality when added to loco-regional therapy for DCIS of the breast (surgery plus or minus RT). Tamoxifen reduces overall breast cancer recurrence by 29% in all patients and by 33% in those treated with both surgery and RT. Only ipsilateral invasive (RR 0.61 [95% CI 0.41, 0.92]; p = 0.02) and controlateral in situ relapses (RR 0.40 [95% CI 0.16, 0.96]; p = 0.04) are significantly lowered when T is added to RT. Tamoxifen seems to exert a local synergistic effect with RT. Both young and older women (50 years) achieve some benefit from the addition of T (RR 0.6 and 0.74, respectively). Conclusion: The addition of T to surgery and RT for DCIS of the breast reduces the risk of local invasive and controlateral in situ relapses, but not the survival. The benefit is independent of age. In conclusion, surgery associated with RT and T is the treatment of choice for patients with (estrogen-receptor positive) DCIS of the breast.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  12. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  13. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  14. Diagnosis of Thymic Clear Cell Carcinoma by Cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Seema A.; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia G.; Mohamed Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the thymus is a rare tumor. Few cases of clear-cell carcinoma of thymus have been documented (Truong et al., 1990 and Wolfe III et al., 1983). All these cases were diagnosed by histopathological examination of the tissue. Diagnosis of thymic clear cell carcinoma on cytology is extremely challenging. Here we report the first case of thymic clear cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytological examination of the pericardial fluid with the help of immunocytochemistry. Differentia...

  15. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotnikov, Yuri, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Karp, Jason, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Knobloch, Aaron, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Kapusta, Chris, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Lin, David, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com [GE Global Research, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2015-03-31

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  16. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  17. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Weikang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2015-09-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia.

  18. An integrated on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation poses a threat to genome integrity by introducing DNA damages, particularly DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Understanding how cells react to DSB and maintain genome integrity is of major importance, since increasing evidences indicate the links of DSB with genome instability and cancer predispositions. However, tracking the dynamics of DNA damages and repair response to ionizing radiation in individual cell is difficult. Here we describe the development of an on-line irradiation and in situ live cell imaging system based on isotopic sources at Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The system was designed to irradiate cells and in situ observe the cellular responses to ionizing radiation in real time. On-line irradiation was achieved by mounting a metal framework that hold an isotopic γ source above the cell culture dish for γ irradiation; or by integrating an isotopic α source to an objective lens under the specialized cell culture dish for α irradiation. Live cell imaging was performed on a confocal microscope with an environmental chamber installed on the microscope stage. Culture conditions in the environment chamber such as CO2, O2 concentration as well as temperature are adjustable, which further extends the capacity of the system and allows more flexible experimental design. We demonstrate the use of this system by tracking the DSB foci formation and disappearance in individual cells after exposure to irradiation. On-line irradiation together with in situ live cell imaging in adjustable culture conditions, the system overall provides a powerful tool for investigation of cellular and subcellular response to ionizing radiation under different physiological conditions such as hyperthermia or hypoxia

  19. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation

  20. Resident Stem Cells and Renal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetta Bussolati; Alessia Brossa; Giovanni Camussi

    2011-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis tumors are maintained by a cancer stem cell population which is able to initiate and maintain tumors. Tumor-initiating stem cells display stem or progenitor cell properties such as self-renewal and capacity to re-establish tumors that recapitulate the tumor of origin. In this paper, we discuss data relative to the presence of cancer stem cells in human renal carcinoma and their possible origin from normal resident stem cells. The cancer stem cells ...

  1. Do Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinomas Have Malignant Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Cheng, Liang; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2015-12-01

    There have been no recurrences or metastases of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) in 268 reported cases with follow-up in the English-language literature. We identified all our cases of CCPRCC (1990 to 2013), reviewing all cases that preceded the formal designation of the entity. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 32 cases during their initial workup. In addition, stains for carbonic anhydrase IX and cytokeratin 7 were performed on 2 cases, one with atypical follow-up and the other with a more compact morphology, although not performed initially. An extended panel with AMACR, CD10, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was added to the case with atypical follow-up. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 3p, 7, and 17 was performed on the latter case and on another clinically presumed metastatic tumor. In classic cases, immunohistochemical staining was not performed. Fifty-eight patients (31 women; 27 men) with follow-up data were included in our study; 39 cases were from our consult service. The patients' ages ranged from 36 to 83 years. Thirty-five patients had cystic or partially cystic lesions; 6 tumors were multifocal, 3 of which were bilateral. The majority (53 patients; 91.4%) presented with stage pT1 disease (size range, 0.2 to 8 cm), 2 patients presented with pT2 disease (8.5 and 10.3 cm), 1 patient presented with pT3 disease (6.5 cm sarcomatoid RCC focally extending out of the kidney), and pathologic stage was unavailable in 2 cases. Treatment consisted of 29 partial nephrectomies, 26 radical nephrectomies, 2 cryoablations, and 1 cyst ablation. The resection margins were negative in all but one case, with this case disease free after a 26-month period. Two patients had intraoperative tumor disruption and were disease free at 9 and 34 months. Five patients had synchronous ipsilateral renal cell carcinomas (non-CCPRCC). Mean follow-up time was 21 months (range, 1 to 175 mo), with all but 3 patients having no evidence of

  2. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaglo, Brandon G; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Meyer, Joshua E; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M

    2015-12-22

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  3. Glycogen Rich Clear Cell Breast Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Çınkır, Havva Yeşil; Dilek, Gülay Bilir; Demirci, Ayşe; Başal, Fatma Buğdaycı; Aydın, Kübra; Demirci, Umut; Öksüzoğlu, Berna; Alkış, Necati

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare type of breast carcinoma. Tumoral tissue is consist of intracytoplasmic glycogen-rich clear cells. We presented in here a 44-year old woman diagnosed with glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma.

  4. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving floor of the mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sah Kunal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basaloid squamous cell carcinomas of oral mucosa are uncommon. Majority of them can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinoma by their aggressive clinical course and their histopathological features. This case report presents a case of 70-year-old male with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving the floor of the mouth.

  5. MRI for the size assessment of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): A prospective study of 33 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine whether MRI assesses the size of ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) more accurately than mammography, using the histopathological dimension of the surgical specimen as the reference measurement. Materials and methods: This single-center prospective study conducted from March 2007 to July 2008 at the Antoine-Lacassagne Cancer Treatment Center (Nice, France) included 33 patients with a histologically proven DCIS by needle biopsy, who all underwent clinical examination, mammography, and MRI interpreted by an experienced radiologist. All patients underwent surgery at our institution. The greatest dimensions of the DCIS determined by the two imaging modalities were compared with the histopathological dimension ascertained on the surgical specimen. The study was approved by the local Ethical Research Committee and was authorized by the French National Health Agency (AFSSAPS). Results: The mean age of the 33 patients was 59.7 years (±10.3). Three patients had a palpable mass at clinical breast examination; 82% underwent conservative surgical therapy rather than radical breast surgery (mastectomy); 6% required repeat surgery. MRI detected 97% of the lesions. Non-mass-like enhancement was noted for 78% of the patients. In over 50% of the cases, distribution of the DCIS was ductal or segmental and the kinetic enhancement curve was persistent. Lesion size was correctly estimated (±5 mm), under-estimated (5 mm), respectively, by MRI in 60%, 19% and 21% of cases and by mammography in 38%, 31% and 31% (p = 0.05). Mean lesion size was 25.6 mm at histopathology, 28.1 mm at MRI, and 27.2 mm on mammography (nonsignificant difference). The correlation coefficient between histopathological measurement and MRI was 0.831 versus 0.674 between histopathology and mammography. The correlation coefficient increased with the nuclear grade of the DCIS on mammography; this coefficient also increased as the mammographic breast density decreased. Conclusion: MRI appears to

  6. Kinetic characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in dynamic breast MRI using computer-assisted analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vag, Tibor; Baltzer, Pascal A.T.; Dietzel, Matthias; Benndorf, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A. (Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena, Jena (Germany)), e-mail: Tibor.Vag@med.uni-jena.de; Gajda, Mieczyslaw (Inst. of Pathology, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena, Jena (Germany)); Camara, Oumar (Clinic of Gynecology, Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena, Jena (Germany))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Enhancement characteristics of breast lesions are regarded as a major criterion for their differential diagnosis in dynamic breast MRI (bMRI). However, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) exhibits a highly heterogeneous enhancement pattern when kinetic analysis is performed conventionally by manual placement of region of interest (ROI) and therefore its diagnosis remains challenging. Purpose: To compare enhancement characteristics of DCIS lesions on dynamic bMRI using manual ROI placement with computer-aided analysis and to evaluate whether the latter might increase the detection rate of kinetic features suspicious for malignancy. Material and Methods: The enhancement patterns of 47 histopathologically verified pure DCIS lesions were evaluated on bMRI images using manual ROI placement as well as a commercially available computer analysis software. The latter is able to automatically assess enhancement characteristics of a whole lesion pixelwise. Kinetic features evaluated included classification of lesion enhancement pattern into washout, plateau or persistent curve type. A washout and plateau enhancement pattern are regarded as suggestive for malignancy. Results: Morphological classification revealed focus-like enhancement in 2 lesions, mass enhancement in 11, and non-mass enhancement in 34. Manual placement of ROI demonstrated a suspicious enhancement pattern in 51.1% of the DCIS lesions, which could not be significantly increased using computer-aided analysis. Of the mass and non-mass-enhancing DCIS lesions, 90.9% and 38.3%, respectively, demonstrated suspicious kinetic curves. After application of the automated analysis software, the detection rate of suspicious enhancement patterns was unchanged in mass DCIS lesions and increased to 52.9% in non-mass DCIS lesions (P=0.33). However, the increase in the detection of washout curves alone was significant (P=0.02). In all, 40% of G1, 41.1% of G2, and 60% of G3 lesions demonstrated a suspicious curve type

  7. Kinetic characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in dynamic breast MRI using computer-assisted analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Enhancement characteristics of breast lesions are regarded as a major criterion for their differential diagnosis in dynamic breast MRI (bMRI). However, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) exhibits a highly heterogeneous enhancement pattern when kinetic analysis is performed conventionally by manual placement of region of interest (ROI) and therefore its diagnosis remains challenging. Purpose: To compare enhancement characteristics of DCIS lesions on dynamic bMRI using manual ROI placement with computer-aided analysis and to evaluate whether the latter might increase the detection rate of kinetic features suspicious for malignancy. Material and Methods: The enhancement patterns of 47 histopathologically verified pure DCIS lesions were evaluated on bMRI images using manual ROI placement as well as a commercially available computer analysis software. The latter is able to automatically assess enhancement characteristics of a whole lesion pixelwise. Kinetic features evaluated included classification of lesion enhancement pattern into washout, plateau or persistent curve type. A washout and plateau enhancement pattern are regarded as suggestive for malignancy. Results: Morphological classification revealed focus-like enhancement in 2 lesions, mass enhancement in 11, and non-mass enhancement in 34. Manual placement of ROI demonstrated a suspicious enhancement pattern in 51.1% of the DCIS lesions, which could not be significantly increased using computer-aided analysis. Of the mass and non-mass-enhancing DCIS lesions, 90.9% and 38.3%, respectively, demonstrated suspicious kinetic curves. After application of the automated analysis software, the detection rate of suspicious enhancement patterns was unchanged in mass DCIS lesions and increased to 52.9% in non-mass DCIS lesions (P=0.33). However, the increase in the detection of washout curves alone was significant (P=0.02). In all, 40% of G1, 41.1% of G2, and 60% of G3 lesions demonstrated a suspicious curve type

  8. Risk prediction for local versus regional/metastatic tumors after initial ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosis treated by lumpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Annette M; Sison, Jennette D; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Tlsty, Thea D; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2016-06-01

    Among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), we identified factors associated with local invasive cancer (LIC) and regional/metastatic invasive cancer (RMIC) and provide 10-year risks based on clinically relevant factors. We created a retrospective, population-based cohort of 1492 women with an initial diagnosis of DCIS (1983-1996) treated by lumpectomy alone. Histological and molecular markers (Ki67, ER, PR, COX-2, p16, ERBB2) were collected on DCIS cases with a subsequent tumor (DCIS, LIC, or RMIC) and a subsample of frequency-matched controls without subsequent tumors. Competing risks methods were used to identify factors associated with LIC and RMIC and cumulative incidence methods to estimate 10-year risks for combinations of factors. Median follow-up time was 12.6 years (range 0.5-29.5 years). The overall 10-year risk of LIC (11.9 %) was higher than for RMIC (3.8 %). About half of women with initial DCIS lesions are detected by mammography and p16 negative and have a 10-year risk of LIC of 6.2 % (95 % CI 5.8-6.8 %) and RMIC of 1.2 % (95 % CI 1.1-1.3 %). Premenopausal women whose DCIS lesion was p16 positive or p16 negative and detected by palpation had high 10-year risk of LIC of 23.0 % (95 % CI 19.3-27.4 %). Ten-year risk of RMIC was highest at 22.5 % (95 % CI 13.8-48.1 %) for those positive for p16, COX-2, and ERRB2, and negative for ER, but prevalence of this group is low at 3 %. Ten-year risk of LIC and RMIC is low for the majority diagnosed with DCIS. Combinations of molecular markers and method of detection of initial DCIS lesion can differentiate women at low and high risk of LIC and RMIC. PMID:27146587

  9. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ With Microinvasion: Prognostic Implications, Long-Term Outcomes, and Role of Axillary Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lannin, Donald [Department of Surgical Oncology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT), to assess the impact of microinvasion. Patients and Methods: A total of 393 patients with DCIS/DCISM from our database were analyzed to assess differences in clinical-pathologic features and outcomes for the two cohorts. Results: The median follow-up was 8.94 years, and the mean age was 55.8 years for the entire group. The DCISM cohort was comprised of 72 of 393 patients (18.3%). Surgical evaluation of the axilla was performed in 58.3% (n = 42) of DCISM vs. 18.1% (n = 58) of DCIS, with only 1 of 42 DCISM (2.3%) vs. 0 of 58 DCIS with axillary metastasis. Surgical axillary evaluation was not an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR), distant relapse-free survival (DRFS), or overall survival (OS) in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p > 0.05). For the DCIS vs. DCISM groups, respectively, the 10-year breast relapse-free survival was 89.0% vs. 90.7% (p = 0.36), DRFS was 98.5% vs. 97.9% (p = 0.78), and OS was 93.2% vs. 95.7% (p = 0.95). The presence of microinvasion did not correlate with LRR, age, presentation, race, family history, margin status, and use of adjuvant hormonal therapy (all p > 0.05). In univariate analysis, pathology (DCIS vs. DCISM) was not an independent predictor of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-4.30; p = 0.36), DRFS (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.07-6.95; p = 0.77), or OS (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.28-3.82; p = 0.95). Conclusions: Our data imply that the natural history of DCISM closely resembles that of DCIS, with a low incidence of local-regional and distant failures. On the basis of our large dataset, the incidence of axillary metastasis in DCISM appears to be small and not appear to correlate to outcomes, and thus, microinvasion alone should not be the sole criterion for more aggressive treatment.

  10. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ With Microinvasion: Prognostic Implications, Long-Term Outcomes, and Role of Axillary Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT), to assess the impact of microinvasion. Patients and Methods: A total of 393 patients with DCIS/DCISM from our database were analyzed to assess differences in clinical-pathologic features and outcomes for the two cohorts. Results: The median follow-up was 8.94 years, and the mean age was 55.8 years for the entire group. The DCISM cohort was comprised of 72 of 393 patients (18.3%). Surgical evaluation of the axilla was performed in 58.3% (n = 42) of DCISM vs. 18.1% (n = 58) of DCIS, with only 1 of 42 DCISM (2.3%) vs. 0 of 58 DCIS with axillary metastasis. Surgical axillary evaluation was not an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR), distant relapse-free survival (DRFS), or overall survival (OS) in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p > 0.05). For the DCIS vs. DCISM groups, respectively, the 10-year breast relapse-free survival was 89.0% vs. 90.7% (p = 0.36), DRFS was 98.5% vs. 97.9% (p = 0.78), and OS was 93.2% vs. 95.7% (p = 0.95). The presence of microinvasion did not correlate with LRR, age, presentation, race, family history, margin status, and use of adjuvant hormonal therapy (all p > 0.05). In univariate analysis, pathology (DCIS vs. DCISM) was not an independent predictor of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58–4.30; p = 0.36), DRFS (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.07–6.95; p = 0.77), or OS (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.28–3.82; p = 0.95). Conclusions: Our data imply that the natural history of DCISM closely resembles that of DCIS, with a low incidence of local-regional and distant failures. On the basis of our large dataset, the incidence of axillary metastasis in DCISM appears to be small and not appear to correlate to outcomes, and thus, microinvasion alone should not be the sole criterion for more aggressive treatment.

  11. Ductal carcinoma in situ: knowledge of associated risks and prognosis among Latina and non-Latina white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Aparna R; Kaplan, Celia Patricia; Burke, Nancy J; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Hwang, E Shelley; Karliner, Leah S

    2013-09-01

    While not itself life-threatening, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) can progress to invasive disease if untreated, and confers an increased risk of future breast cancer. We investigated knowledge of DCIS among a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking Latina and English-speaking non-Latina white women previously treated for DCIS. We examined knowledge of DCIS with four true/false statements about risk of invasive disease, breast cancer recurrence, and prognosis. For each knowledge statement, we modeled the odds of a correct answer by language-ethnicity (English-speaking Latinas, Spanish-speaking Latinas, and English-speaking whites) adjusting for demographics, health history, and treatment factors. Of 710 participants, 52 % were English-speaking whites, 21 % English-speaking Latinas, and 27 % Spanish-speaking Latinas. Less than half (41 %) of participants were aware that DCIS is not life-threatening and only 32 % knew that surgical treatment choice does not impact mortality; whereas two-thirds (67 %) understood that DCIS confers increased risk of future breast cancer, and almost all (92 %) knew that DCIS, if untreated, could become invasive. Only three Spanish-speakers used professional interpreters during discussions with their physicians. In adjusted analyses, compared to English-speaking whites, both English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas had significantly lower odds of knowing that DCIS was not life-threatening (OR, 95 % CI 0.6, 0.4-0.9 and 0.5, 0.3-0.9, respectively). In contrast, Spanish-speaking Latinas had a twofold higher odds of knowing that DCIS increases risk of future breast cancer (OR, 95 % CI 2.6, 1.6-4.4), but English-speaking Latinas were no different from English-speaking whites. Our data suggest that physicians are more successful at conveying the risks conferred by DCIS than the nuances of DCIS as a non-life-threatening diagnosis. This uneven communication is most marked for Spanish-speaking Latinas. In addition to the use of professional

  12. Conservative treatment of breast ductal carcinoma in situ: results of an Italian multi-institutional retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidali Cristiana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS has increased markedly in recent decades. In the past, mastectomy was the primary treatment for patients with DCIS, but as with invasive cancer, breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT has become the standard approach. We present the final results of a multi-institutional retrospective study of an Italian Radiation Oncology Group for the study of conservative treatment of DCIS, characterized by a very long period of accrual, from February 1985 to March 2000, and a median follow-up longer than 11 years. Methods A collaborative multi-institutional study was conducted in Italy in 10 Radiation Oncology Departments. A consecutive series of 586 women with DCIS histologically confirmed, treated between February 1985 and March 2000, was retrospectively evaluated. Median age at diagnosis was 55 years (range: 29–84; 32 patients were 40 years old or younger. All women underwent conservative surgery followed by whole breast RT. Irradiation was delivered to the entire breast, for a median total dose of 50 Gy; the tumour bed was boosted in 295 cases (50% at a median dose of 10 Gy. Results After a median follow-up of 136 months (range: 16–292 months, 59/586 patients (10% experienced a local recurrence: invasive in 37 cases, intraductal in 20 and not specified in two. Salvage mastectomy was the treatment of choice in 46 recurrent patients; conservative surgery in 10 and it was unknown in three patients. The incidence of local recurrence was significantly higher in women younger than 40 years (31.3% (p= 0.0009. Five patients developed distant metastases. Furthermore 40 patients developed a contralateral breast cancer and 31 a second primary tumour in a different site. The 10-year actuarial overall survival (OS was 95.5% and the 10-year actuarial disease-specific survival (DSS was 99%. Conclusions Our results are consistent with those reported in the literature. In

  13. MRI for the size assessment of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): A prospective study of 33 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcotte-Bloch, C., E-mail: marcotte.c@free.fr [Department of Medical Imaging, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Balu-Maestro, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Chamorey, E. [Department of Medical Statistics, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Ettore, F. [Department of Pathology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Raoust, I.; Flipo, B. [Department of Surgery, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France); Chapellier, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 route de Valombrose, 06100 Nice (France)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To determine whether MRI assesses the size of ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) more accurately than mammography, using the histopathological dimension of the surgical specimen as the reference measurement. Materials and methods: This single-center prospective study conducted from March 2007 to July 2008 at the Antoine-Lacassagne Cancer Treatment Center (Nice, France) included 33 patients with a histologically proven DCIS by needle biopsy, who all underwent clinical examination, mammography, and MRI interpreted by an experienced radiologist. All patients underwent surgery at our institution. The greatest dimensions of the DCIS determined by the two imaging modalities were compared with the histopathological dimension ascertained on the surgical specimen. The study was approved by the local Ethical Research Committee and was authorized by the French National Health Agency (AFSSAPS). Results: The mean age of the 33 patients was 59.7 years ({+-}10.3). Three patients had a palpable mass at clinical breast examination; 82% underwent conservative surgical therapy rather than radical breast surgery (mastectomy); 6% required repeat surgery. MRI detected 97% of the lesions. Non-mass-like enhancement was noted for 78% of the patients. In over 50% of the cases, distribution of the DCIS was ductal or segmental and the kinetic enhancement curve was persistent. Lesion size was correctly estimated ({+-}5 mm), under-estimated (<5 mm), or over-estimated (>5 mm), respectively, by MRI in 60%, 19% and 21% of cases and by mammography in 38%, 31% and 31% (p = 0.05). Mean lesion size was 25.6 mm at histopathology, 28.1 mm at MRI, and 27.2 mm on mammography (nonsignificant difference). The correlation coefficient between histopathological measurement and MRI was 0.831 versus 0.674 between histopathology and mammography. The correlation coefficient increased with the nuclear grade of the DCIS on mammography; this coefficient also increased as the mammographic breast density

  14. Preservation of cosmesis with low complication risk after conservative surgery and radiotherapy for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although the clinical outcome after treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) using breast-conservation surgery and radiation therapy has been well documented, little data has been reported on cosmetic outcome or treatment complications. Therefore, the present study was performed to evaluate cosmesis and complications after breast-conservation treatment for DCIS and to analyze various factors that might affect cosmesis and predispose to complications. Methods and Materials: The records of 90 patients who were alive without evidence of disease with a 3-year minimum follow-up were evaluated for cosmetic results and treatment complications following breast-conservation surgery and radiation therapy for DCIS. Complete gross excision of the primary tumor had been performed in all patients. Additionally, 24 patients had undergone an axillary lymph node dissection in the earlier years of the study. The majority of the patients had received 50-50.4 Gy to the whole breast followed by an electron boost for a total dose of 60-66 Gy. Results: The cosmetic results of 90 evaluable patients at 3 years were: excellent in 69 (77%), good in 19 (21%), and fair in 2 (2%). The cosmetic results of 64 evaluable patients at 5 years were: excellent in 46 (72%), good in 16 (25%), and fair in 2 (3%). Factors associated with worse cosmetic results were an increased volume of tissue excised (>70 cm3) and a negative ipsilateral breast biopsy after radiotherapy. Complications in the 24 patients with an axillary dissection were: arm edema (n = 6), cellulitis of the arm (n = 5), and axillary vein thrombosis (n = 1). Complications in the 66 patients without an axillary dissection were: cellulitis of the arm (n = 1) and cellulitis of the breast (n = 1). Discussion: Breast-conservation surgery followed by radiation therapy achieved excellent or good cosmetic results in 98 and 97% of patients at 3 years and 5 years, respectively. Complications were associated primarily with axillary

  15. Digital Mammography Screening: Does Age Influence the Detection Rates of Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Grade Ductal Carcinoma in Situ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Stefanie; Hense, Hans W; Heidrich, Jan; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Heindel, Walter; Heidinger, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between age at screening and detection rates for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) separately for different nuclear grades after introduction of a population-based digital mammography screening program. Materials and Methods The retrospective study was approved by the ethics board and did not require informed consent. In 733 905 women aged 50-69 years who participated in a screening program for the first time in 2005-2008 (baseline examinations were performed with digital mammography), DCIS detection rates were determined for 5-year age groups (detection rates per 1000 women screened) to distinguish high-, intermediate-, and low-grade DCIS. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare detection rates between age groups by adjusting for screening units (P DCIS diagnoses among 733 905 women (detection rate, 1.35‰): 419 diagnoses of high-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.57‰), 388 diagnoses of intermediate-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.53‰), and 182 diagnoses of low-grade DCIS (detection rate, 0.25‰). Detection rate for types of DCIS combined increased significantly across age groups (50-54 years, detection rate of 1.15‰ [254 of 220 985 women]; 55-59 years, detection rate of 1.23‰ [218 of 177 782 women]; 60-64 years, detection rate of 1.34‰ [201 of 150 415 women]; and 65-69 years, detection rate of 1.71‰ [316 of 184 723 women]; P DCIS showed a significant increase with age (odds ratio, 1.18 per 5-year age group; P DCIS (odds ratio, 1.11; P = .016) and not significant for low-grade DCIS (P = .10). Conclusion Total DCIS detection rates increase with age, mostly because of an increase in high- and intermediate-grade DCIS, which are precursor lesions that carry a higher risk for transition to more aggressive invasive breast cancer than low-grade DCIS. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26505802

  16. Conservative treatment of breast ductal carcinoma in situ: results of an Italian multi-institutional retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has increased markedly in recent decades. In the past, mastectomy was the primary treatment for patients with DCIS, but as with invasive cancer, breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT) has become the standard approach. We present the final results of a multi-institutional retrospective study of an Italian Radiation Oncology Group for the study of conservative treatment of DCIS, characterized by a very long period of accrual, from February 1985 to March 2000, and a median follow-up longer than 11 years. A collaborative multi-institutional study was conducted in Italy in 10 Radiation Oncology Departments. A consecutive series of 586 women with DCIS histologically confirmed, treated between February 1985 and March 2000, was retrospectively evaluated. Median age at diagnosis was 55 years (range: 29–84); 32 patients were 40 years old or younger. All women underwent conservative surgery followed by whole breast RT. Irradiation was delivered to the entire breast, for a median total dose of 50 Gy; the tumour bed was boosted in 295 cases (50%) at a median dose of 10 Gy. After a median follow-up of 136 months (range: 16–292 months), 59/586 patients (10%) experienced a local recurrence: invasive in 37 cases, intraductal in 20 and not specified in two. Salvage mastectomy was the treatment of choice in 46 recurrent patients; conservative surgery in 10 and it was unknown in three patients. The incidence of local recurrence was significantly higher in women younger than 40 years (31.3%) (p= 0.0009). Five patients developed distant metastases. Furthermore 40 patients developed a contralateral breast cancer and 31 a second primary tumour in a different site. The 10-year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 95.5% and the 10-year actuarial disease-specific survival (DSS) was 99%. Our results are consistent with those reported in the literature. In particular it has been defined the importance of young age (40

  17. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: Macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    OpenAIRE

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Voorhuis, T.A.M.; Tol, H.H.M. van; Ivell, R

    1987-01-01

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded 35S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nu...

  18. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  19. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of early-stage minimally invasive adenocarcinoma or adenocarcnioma in situ (formerly bronchioloalveolar carcinoma): a patterns of failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongoing prospective trials exploring stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often exclude minimally invasive adenocarcinoma or adenocarcnioma in situ, formerly bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), due to concerns for accurate target delineation on CT. We performed a patterns of failure analysis to compare outcomes between BAC and other NSCLC subtypes. One hundred twenty patients with early stage NSCLC were treated with SBRT from 2004–2009. Pathologic confirmation of NSCLC was obtained in 97 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered according to RTOG guidelines. The log-rank test was used to compare outcomes between BAC and other NSCLC. Median follow-up was 29 months. The median SBRT dose was 5400 cGy. Thirteen patients had radiographically diagnosed BAC and five patients had biopsy confirmed BAC, of which two had both. The three-year local control was 100% for biopsy-proven or radiographically diagnosed BAC (n = 18) and 86% for all other NSCLC subtypes (n = 102) (p = 0.13). Likewise, no significant difference was detected between BAC and other NSCLC for 3-year regional failure (12% vs. 20%, p = 0.45), progression-free survival (57.6% vs. 53.5%, p = 0.84) or overall survival (35% vs. 47%, p = 0.66). There was a trend towards lower three-year rates of freedom from distant failure in patients with any diagnosis of BAC compared to those without (26% vs. 38%, p = 0.053). Compared to other NSCLC subtypes, BAC appears to have similar patterns of failure and survival after treatment with SBRT, however there may be an increased risk of distant metastases with BAC. RTOG guideline-based target delineation provides encouraging local control rates for patients with BAC

  1. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Molecular Imaging of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ with CD44v6-Specific Antibodies in Mice: A Preclinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; van Brussel, Aram S. A.; Adams, Arthur; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a molecular imaging technique using tracers specific for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to improve visualization and localization of DCIS during surgery. As CD44v6 is frequently expressed in DCIS, we used near-infrared fluorescently labeled CD44v6-targeting antibodies for detection of DCIS. Procedure Mice bearing orthotopically transplanted CD44v6-positive MCF10DCIS DCIS-like tumors and CD44v6-negative MDA-MB-231 control tumors were intravenou...

  2. Long-term survival of women with basal-like ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wenjing; Jirström, Karin; Johansson, Christine; Amini, Rose-Marie; Blomqvist, Carl; Agbaje, Olorunsola; Wärnberg, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarray gene-profiling of invasive breast cancer has identified different subtypes including luminal A, luminal B, HER2-overexpressing and basal-like groups. Basal-like invasive breast cancer is associated with a worse prognosis. However, the prognosis of basal-like ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is still unknown. Our aim was to study the prognosis of basal-like DCIS in a large population-based cohort. Methods All 458 women with a primary DCIS diagnosed between 1986 and 2004, i...

  3. Sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma component of the urinary bladder: a case report with review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an uncommon neoplasm characterized histopathologically by the presence of malignant spindle cell and epithelial components. Albeit extremely rare, sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma has been reported. Herein, we describe an additional case of sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and review the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. An 82-year-old Japanese mal...

  4. CONVENTIONAL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH GRANULOMATOUS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Granulomatous inflammation is a distinctive pattern of chronic inflammatory reaction characterized by microscopic aggregation of activated macrophages which often develop epithelioid appearance and multinucleate giant cells. Granulomas are encountered in limited number of infectious and some non-infectious conditions. Granulomas have been described within the stroma of malignancies like carcinomas of the breast and colon, seminoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, where they represent T-cell-mediated reaction of the tumor stroma to antigens expressed by the tumor. Granulomatous reaction in association with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is uncommon, with only few published reports in the literature. We describe a case of conventional (clear cell RCC associated with epithelioid cell granulomas within the tumor parenchyma.

  5. Choroidal metastasis from tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Elghissassi, Ibrahim; Inrhaoun, Hanane; Ismaili, Nabil; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal metastases from renal carcinoma are rare. Most reported cases describe a clear cell carcinoma histologic subtype. Metastatic tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma to the choroid plexus is very exceptional. We report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma who presented two years later with metastatic disease to lungs and presternal soft tissue and three months after with choroidal metastasis revealed on ophtalmoscopic examination and magne...

  6. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  7. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  8. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of feline oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma are described. In both cases, diagnosis was achieved by radiography, endoscopy and cytology, and later confirmed by histology. One cat underwent oesophagectomy followed by end-to-end anastomosis, but died three days postsurgery; the second cat was euthanased after diagnosis

  9. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  10. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to...

  11. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast - a review of diagnosis, treatment and outcome in a hospital-based Norwegian series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1980 and 1994, 71 women with histologically proven ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were diagnosed at Ullevaal Hospital; bilateral tumours were found in two patients. Surgical treatment was mastectomy (42 lesions) or local excision (31 lesions). Median follow-up time was 7.2 years. Ten patients experienced a local recurrence, seven of which were invasive carcinomas. The actuarial 5-year local recurrence rate was 22% after local excision. A multivariate analysis found that tumour size was the only factor that predicted local recurrence after local excision. An analysis of relative survival in a nation-wide material of 832 DCIS patients in the period 1980 to 1994 demonstrates that relative survival after a DCIS diagnosis is almost 100%, irrespective of surgical treatment of the initial lesion

  12. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast - a review of diagnosis, treatment and outcome in a hospital-based Norwegian series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Jebsen, P.W.; Kaaresen, R.; Thoresen, S.O. [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway)

    2000-07-01

    Between 1980 and 1994, 71 women with histologically proven ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were diagnosed at Ullevaal Hospital; bilateral tumours were found in two patients. Surgical treatment was mastectomy (42 lesions) or local excision (31 lesions). Median follow-up time was 7.2 years. Ten patients experienced a local recurrence, seven of which were invasive carcinomas. The actuarial 5-year local recurrence rate was 22% after local excision. A multivariate analysis found that tumour size was the only factor that predicted local recurrence after local excision. An analysis of relative survival in a nation-wide material of 832 DCIS patients in the period 1980 to 1994 demonstrates that relative survival after a DCIS diagnosis is almost 100%, irrespective of surgical treatment of the initial lesion.

  13. Injectable in situ forming xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels for cell encapsulation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Shivaram; Pithapuram, Madhav V; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-02-01

    Injectable in situ crosslinking hydrogels offer unique advantages over conventional prefabricated hydrogel methodologies. Herein, we synthesize poly(xylitol-co-maleate-co-PEG) (pXMP) macromers and evaluate their performance as injectable cell carriers for tissue engineering applications. The designed pXMP elastomers were non-toxic and water-soluble with viscosity values permissible for subcutaneous injectable systems. pXMP-based hydrogels prepared via free radical polymerization with acrylic acid as crosslinker possessed high crosslink density and exhibited a broad range of compressive moduli that could match the natural mechanical environment of various native tissues. The hydrogels displayed controlled degradability and exhibited gradual increase in matrix porosity upon degradation. The hydrophobic hydrogel surfaces preferentially adsorbed albumin and promoted cell adhesion and growth in vitro. Actin staining on cells cultured on thin hydrogel films revealed subconfluent cell monolayers composed of strong, adherent cells. Furthermore, fabricated 3D pXMP cell-hydrogel constructs promoted cell survival and proliferation in vitro. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that injectable xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels possess excellent physical characteristics and exhibit exceptional cytocompatibility in vitro. Consequently, they show great promise as injectable hydrogel systems for in situ tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:25543981

  14. In Situ Degradation of Chitosan-Polygalacturonic Acid/Hydroxyapatite Nano composites in Cell Culture Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular and mechanical characteristics of in situ degradation behavior of chitosan-polygalacturonic acid/hydroxyapatite (Chi-PgA-HAP) nano composite films is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and modulus mapping techniques for up to 48 days of soaking in cell culture media. The surface molecular structure of media-soaked samples changes over the course of 48 days of soaking, as indicated by significant changes in phosphate vibrations (1200-900cm-1) indicating apatite formation. Chitosan-Polygalacturonic acid polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) govern structural integrity of Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites and FTIR spectra indicate that PECs remain intact until 48 days of soaking. In situ AFM experiments on media-soaked samples indicate that soaking results in a change in topography and swelling proceeds differently at the initial soaking periods of about 8 days than for longer soaking. In situ modulus mapping experiments are done on soaked samples by probing 13 nm of surface indicating elastic moduli of 4 GPa resulting from proteins adsorbed on Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites. The elastic modulus decreases by 2 GPa over a long exposure to cell culture media (48 days). Thus, as water enters the Chi-PgA-HAP sample, surface molecular interactions in Chi-PgA-HAP structure occur that result in swelling, causing small changes in nano scale mechanical properties.

  15. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  16. In Situ Synchrotron XRD on a Capillary Li-O2 Battery Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Younesi, Reza; Norby, Poul

    In situ studies give an opportunity to explore systems with a minimum of external interference. As Li-air batteries hold the promise for a future battery technology the investigation of the discharge and charge components of the cathode and anode is of importance, as these components may hold the...... key to making a large capacity rechargeable battery[1]. Different design for in situ XRD studies of Li-O2 batteries has been published, based on coin cell like configuration[2] [3] or Swagelok designs [4]. Capillary batteries have been investigated for the Li-ion system since its development[5], but...... no capillary batteries of Li-air has yet been designed. Some of the advantage of the capillary battery design lies in its ability to separate the cathode and anode and avoid the use of glass fiber or separators, which may enable ex situ analysis of battery components. The battery design consist of a...

  17. Plasmacytoid Transitional Cell Carcinoma of Bladder: A Clinico-pathological Study and Review of Literatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiaoli; ZHANG Hongtu; SUN Yuntian; LIU Xiuyun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathologic features of plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, and to analyze the diagnostic features, criteria for differential diagnosis and the clinical significance of the tumor. Methods: Two cases of bladder plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma were studied. Routine paraffin sections with HE staining, Pap smear and immunohistochemistry by S-P method were observed under a light microscope. Pathological and clinical data were analyzed by comparison with early reported cases in literatures. Results: A characteristic feature of this tumor was of deep invasion in the lamina propria and/or muscularis propria, in addition to the component of carcinoma in situ in the mucosa, when tumors were diagnosed. The histological pattern and cytological features showed similarity to a plasmacytoid tumor. The tumor cells were strongly positive for AE1/AE3, CEA and CK18. The prognosis appeared to be worse than ordinary transitional cell carcinoma. Conclusion: The plasmacytoid transitional cell carcinoma of bladder is rare but has typical pathological, immunohistological and clinical features. Pathologists should be aware of this kind of primary tumor of bladder.

  18. Vertical nanopillars for in situ probing of nuclear mechanics in adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Lindsey; Zhao, Wenting; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Lee, Seok Woo; Chowdary, Praveen; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical stability and deformability of the cell nucleus are crucial to many biological processes, including migration, proliferation and polarization. In vivo, the cell nucleus is frequently subjected to deformation on a variety of length and time scales, but current techniques for studying nuclear mechanics do not provide access to subnuclear deformation in live functioning cells. Here we introduce arrays of vertical nanopillars as a new method for the in situ study of nuclear deformability and the mechanical coupling between the cell membrane and the nucleus in live cells. Our measurements show that nanopillar-induced nuclear deformation is determined by nuclear stiffness, as well as opposing effects from actin and intermediate filaments. Furthermore, the depth, width and curvature of nuclear deformation can be controlled by varying the geometry of the nanopillar array. Overall, vertical nanopillar arrays constitute a novel approach for non-invasive, subcellular perturbation of nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction in live cells.

  19. Configuration of nucleolarDNA in situ in nucleolus ofAllium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The location and configuration of nucleolar DNA have not beendetermined for a long time. In this paper, we have observed the nucleolar ultrastructure and the character of nucleolar DNA in Allium cepa cells by conventional electron microscopy and the cytochemical NAMA-Ur DNA specific staining method. Furthermore, we have properly improved the NAMA-Ur method so as to analyze the location and configuration of nucleolar DNA in situ. Our results indicated that the nucleolar DNA in Allium cepa cells is mainly located at the border between fibrillar centers and dense fibrillar component, especially distributed in the configuration of encircling the fibrillar centers.

  20. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L3-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl3·6H2O in 1 M H2SO4. The europium L3-edge resonances reported here for the EuIII and EuII ions demonstrate that their 2p3/2 → 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same