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Sample records for cell cancer treatment

  1. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  2. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  4. Cancer Stem Cells – New Approach to Cancerogenensis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Mačingová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increasing evidence supporting the theory of cancer stem cells not only in leukemia but also in solid cancer. To date, the existence of cancer stem cells has been proven in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia, in breast cancer, in brain tumors, in lung cancer and gastrointestinal tumors. This review is focusing on the recent discovery of stem cells in leukemia, human brain tumors and breast cancer. A small population of cells in the tumor (less than 1 % shows the potential to give rise to the tumor and its growth. These cells have a substantial characteristic of stem cells – ability for self-renewal without loss of proliferation capacity with each cell division. Furthermore they are immortal, rather resistant to treatment and express typical markers of stem cells. The origin of these resident cancer stem cells is not clear. Whether the cancer stem cells originate from normal stem cells in consequence of genetic and epigenetic changes and/or redifferentiation from somatic tumor cells to the stem-like cells remains to be investigated. We propose the idea of the relation between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells and their populations – progenitor cells. Based on this we highlight one of the major characteristic of stem cell – plasticity, which is equally important in the physiological regeneration process as well as carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we consider the microenvironment as a limiting factor for tumor genesis in AML, breast cancer and brain tumors. Thus the biological properties of cancer stem cells are just beginning to be revealed, the continuation of these studies should lead to the development of cancer stem cells target therapies for cancer treatment.

  5. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  6. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  7. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  8. Gold nanoparticle incorporation in the cancer cells : imaging and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Jung, Sung Yong; Seo, Eun Seok; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-11-01

    Surface modified gold nanoparticles (~ 20 nm) are selectively incorporated in the various cancer cells. Depending on the attached molecules on the gold nanoparticle surface, incorporation efficiency of the gold nanoparticles in the cancer cells are differentiated. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and second ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) are utilized to quantify the gold nanoparticles incorporated in the cancer cells. Static images of the cancer cell are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zone-plate X-ray nanoscopy. On the other hand, dynamic flow images are captured by dynamic X-ray imaging. To enhance the selective incorporation into the cancer cells, specially designed aptamer is introduced on the gold nanoparticles, which changes the mechanisms of gold nanoparticle incorporation through the cancer cell membrane. Anti-cancer drugs are also incorporated, by which sustained drug delivery mechanisms are investigated. This study would contribute to the basic understanding on the nanoparticle- mediated disease treatment and advanced imaging technology.

  9. Impact of Methadone on Cisplatin Treatment of Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Marta; Schultze-Seemann, Susanne; Kuckuck, Irina; Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for advanced bladder cancer. Since many tumor cells show inherent or acquired cisplatin resistance, research is needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Since the analgesic methadone is discussed as being a sensitizer for chemotherapy, we tested its effects on the cisplatin treatment of bladder cancer cells. T24 and HT-1376 bladder cancer cells were incubated with cisplatin in combination with methadone. Cytotoxicity was examined using the WST-1 viability assay and induction of apoptosis was analyzed via phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. Methadone was shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on T24 cells based on the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, HT-1376 cells were identified as non-responders to methadone. Methadone could act as a chemosensitizer in the future treatment of advanced bladder cancer. Further research is needed to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  11. Re-Emergence of Dendritic Cell Vaccines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Mansi; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2018-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in immunity owing to their role in activating T cells, thereby promoting antitumor responses. Tumor cells, however, hijack the immune system, causing T cell exhaustion and DC dysfunction. Tumor-induced T cell exhaustion may be reversed through immune checkpoint blockade (ICB); however, this treatment fails to show clinical benefit in many patients. While ICB serves to reverse T cell exhaustion, DCs are still necessary to prime, activate, and direct the T cells to target tumor cells. In this review we provide a brief overview of DC function, describe mechanisms by which DC functions are disrupted by the tumor microenvironment, and highlight recent developments in DC cancer vaccines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment of Inflammation-Induced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Monica D; Miller, Sarah; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-11-01

    Cancer development is often associated with chronic inflammation. To date, research into inflammation-induced cancer has largely focused on chemokines, cytokines, and their downstream targets. These inflammatory mediators may promote tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and facilitate angiogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms by which inflammation promotes neoplasia remain unclear. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by recurrent, idiopathic intestinal inflammation, the complications of which are potentially fatal. IBD incidence in Australia is 24.2 per 100,000 and its peak onset is in people aged 15 to 24 years. Symptoms include abdominal pain, cramps, bloody stool, and persistent diarrhoea or constipation and so seriously compromise quality of life. However, due to its unknown etiology, current treatment strategies combat the symptoms rather than the disease and are limited by inefficacy, toxicity, and adverse side-effects. IBD is also associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, for which treatment options are similarly limited. In recent years, there has been much interest in the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, whether MSCs suppress or promote tumor development is still contentious within the literature. Many studies indicate that MSCs exert anti-tumor effects and suppress tumor growth, whereas other studies report pro-tumor effects. Studies using MSCs as treatment for IBD have shown promising results in both animal models and human trials. However, as MSC treatment is still novel, the long-term risks remain unknown. This review aims to summarize the current literature on MSC treatment of inflammation-induced cancer, with a focus on colorectal cancer resulting from IBD.

  13. Gemcitabine for the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Toschi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Luca Toschi1, Federico Cappuzzo21Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Medical Oncology, Boston, MA, USA; 2Istituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, Department of Onco-Hematology, Rozzano, ItalyAbstract: Gemcitabine is a pyrimidine nucleoside antimetabolite agent which is active in several human malignancies, including nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Because of its acceptable toxicity profile, with myelosuppression being the most common adverse event, gemcitabine can be safely combined with a number of cytotoxic agents, including platinum derivatives and new-generation anticancer compounds. In fact, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is a first-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC, pharmacoeconomic data indicating that it represents the most cost-effective regimen among platinum-based combinations with thirdgeneration cytotoxic drugs. The drug has been investigated in the context of nonplatinum-based regimens in a number of prospective clinical trials, and might provide a suitable alternative for patients with contraindications to platinum. Recently, gemcitabine-based doublets have been successfully tested in association with novel targeted agents with encouraging results, providing further evidence for the role of the drug in the treatment of NSCLC. In the last few years several attempts have been pursued in order to identify molecular predictors of gemcitabine activity, and recent data support the feasibility of genomic-based approaches to customize treatment with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcome.Keywords: gemcitabine, chemotherapy, pharmacoeconomics, nonsmall cell lung cancer

  14. Indigenous Australians with non-small cell lung cancer or cervical cancer receive suboptimal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whop, Lisa J; Bernardes, Christina M; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Darshan, Deepak; Chetty, Naven; Moore, Suzanne P; Garvey, Gail; Walpole, Euan; Baade, Peter; Valery, Patricia C

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer and cervical cancer are higher in incidence for Indigenous Australians and survival is worse compared with non-Indigenous Australians. Here we aim to determine if being Indigenous and/or other factors are associated with patients receiving "suboptimal treatment" compared to "optimal treatment" according to clinical guidelines for two cancer types. Data were collected from hospital medical records for Indigenous adults diagnosed with cervical cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a frequency-matched comparison group of non-Indigenous patients in the Queensland Cancer Registry between January 1998 and December 2004. The two cancer types were analyzed separately. A total of 105 women with cervical cancer were included in the study, 56 of whom were Indigenous. Indigenous women had higher odds of not receiving optimal treatment according to clinical guidelines (unadjusted OR 7.1; 95% CI, 1.5-33.3), even after adjusting for stage (OR 5.7; 95% CI, 1.2-27.3). Of 225 patients with NSCLC, 198 patients (56% Indigenous) had sufficient information available to be analyzed. The odds of receiving suboptimal treatment were significantly higher for Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous NSCLC patients (unadjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.6) and remained significant after adjusting for stage, comorbidity and age (adjusted OR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.1). The monitoring of treatment patterns and appraisal against guidelines can provide valuable evidence of inequity in cancer treatment. We found that Indigenous people with lung cancer or cervical cancer received suboptimal treatment, reinforcing the need for urgent action to reduce the impact of these two cancer types on Indigenous people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Cancer stem cell as therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamodi, Abdulhadi A; Eshaq, Abdulaziz M; Hassan, Sofie-Yasmin; Al Hmada, Youssef; El Jamal, Siraj M; Fothan, Ahmed M; Arain, Omair M; Hassan, Sarah-Lilly; Haikel, Youssef; Megahed, Mosaad; Hassan, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Human malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive skin tumor that is characterized by its extraordinary heterogeneity, propensity for dissemination to distant organs and resistance to cytotoxic agents. Although chemo- and immune-based therapies have been evaluated in clinical trials, most of these therapeutics do not show significant benefit for patients with advanced disease. Treatment failure in melanoma patients is attributed mainly to the development of tumor heterogeneity resulting from the formation of genetically divergent subpopulations. These subpopulations are composed of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) as a small fraction and non-cancer stem cells that form the majority of the tumor mass. In recent years, CSCs gained more attention and suggested as valuable experimental model system for tumor study. In melanoma, intratumoral heterogeneity, progression and drug resistance result from the unique characteristics of melanoma stem cells (MSCs). These MSCs are characterized by their distinct protein signature and tumor growth-driving pathways, whose activation is mediated by driver mutation-dependent signal. The molecular features of MSCs are either in a causal or consequential relationship to melanoma progression, drug resistance and relapse. Here, we review the current scientific evidence that supports CSC hypothesis and the validity of MSCs-dependent pathways and their key molecules as potential therapeutic target for melanoma treatment.

  16. Basal cell carcinoma-treatments for the commonest skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Carola; Hauschild, Axel; Kölbl, Oliver; Mast, Gerson; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2014-05-30

    With an incidence of 70 to over 800 new cases per 100 000 persons per year, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a very common disease, accounting for about 80% of all cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. It very rarely metastasizes. A variety of treatments are available for the different subtypes and stages of BCC. This review is based on pertinent literature retrieved by a selective search in the Medline database, as well as the American Cancer Society guidelines on BCC and the German guidelines on BCC and skin cancer prevention. The gold standard of treatment is surgical excision with histological control of excision margins, which has a 5-year recurrence rate of less than 3% on the face. For superficial BCC, approved medications such as imiquimod (total remission rate, 82-90%) and topical 5-fluorouracil (80%) are available, as is photodynamic therapy (71-87%). Other ablative methods (laser, cryosurgery) are applicable in some cases. Radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for invasive, inoperable BCC, with 5-year tumor control rates of 89-96%. Recently, drugs that inhibit an intracellular signaling pathway have become available for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BCC. Phase I and II clinical trials revealed that vismodegib was associated with objective response rates of 30-55% and tumor control rates of 80-90%. This drug was approved on the basis of a non-randomized trial with no control arm. It has side effects ranging from muscle cramps (71%) and hair loss (65%) to taste disturbances (55%) and birth defects. The established, standard treatments are generally highly effective. Vismodegib is a newly approved treatment option for locally advanced BCC that is not amenable to either surgery or radiotherapy.

  17. Vismodegib for the treatment of basal cell skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Laura; Kolesar, Jill M

    2013-06-15

    The pharmacology, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, cost, and place in therapy of vismodegib are reviewed. Vismodegib, the first oral treatment for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), was recently approved for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC whose cancer is refractory to standard treatments or who are not candidates for surgery or radiation. Vismodegib is a small molecule that potently inhibits signal transduction in the hedgehog signaling pathway, demonstrates nonlinear pharmacokinetics, and has a half-life of 13 days. Agents that increase gastrointestinal pH may reduce the solubility and bioavailability of vismodegib. It is effective in both locally advanced and metastatic BCCs, with response rates ranging from 30% to 60% in two clinical trials. Vismodegib is available as a 150-mg capsule, and the approved dosage is 150 mg orally once daily. The most common adverse effects of vismodegib include mild-to-moderate hair loss, muscle cramps, taste disturbance, and weight loss. The estimated cost of one month of treatment with vismodegib is $7500. Vismodegib was recently approved for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BCC that is refractory to standard treatments or if patients are not candidates for surgery or radiation. Vismodegib may have little effect on the treatment of BCC, given its high cost, the high cure rates achieved with standard therapies, and its unacceptable toxicity profile in patients with a non-life-threatening disease. However, vismodegib's novel mechanism of action, oral dosage form, preliminary efficacy, and tolerability compared with cytotoxic chemotherapy may make it an attractive candidate for the treatment of other cancers.

  18. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  19. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  20. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohutek, F.; Bystricky, B.; Tamasova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  1. Treatment of Prostate Cancer Cells (DU145) with Gamma-Ray Radiation and Silver Nano Particles

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Shams; S. Ebrahimi; A. Shamusi; Sh. Pahlevan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in America which causing great harm and waste cost. Furthermore almost more prostate cancer treatments are ineffective.  Purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapy and the rate of increase of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation with silver nano particles in treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: DU145 cell line originating from Human prostate cancer was purchased from Pasteur Institute. Afte...

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanson, David L; Bendzick, Laura; Pribyl, Lee; McCullar, Valarie; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Miller, Jeff S; Geller, Melissa A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can provide effective immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Here, we evaluated the ability of NK cells isolated from peripheral blood (PB) and NK cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) to mediate killing of ovarian cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. A mouse xenograft model was used to evaluate the intraperitoneal delivery of three different NK cell populations: iPSC-derived NK cells, PB-NK cells that had been activated and expanded in long-term culture, and overnight activated PB-NK cells that were isolated through CD3/CD19 depletion of PB B and T cells. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor tumor burden of luciferase expressing tumor lines. Tumors were allowed to establish prior to administering NK cells via intraperitoneal injection. These studies demonstrate a single dose of any of the three NK cell populations significantly reduced tumor burden. When mice were given three doses of either iPSC-NK cells or expanded PB-NK cells, the median survival improved from 73 days in mice untreated to 98 and 97 days for treated mice, respectively. From these studies, we conclude iPSC-derived NK cells mediate antiovarian cancer killing at least as well as PB-NK cells, making these cells a viable resource for immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Due to their ability to be easily differentiated into NK cells and their long-term expansion potential, iPSCs can be used to produce large numbers of well-defined NK cells that can be banked and used to treat a large number of patients including treatment with multiple doses if necessary. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migra...

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors for the treatment of cancer stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, Marcela; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2016), s. 2217-2231 ISSN 2040-2503 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14128 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : acute myeloid-leukemia * epithelial-mesenchymal transition * acute myelogenous leukemia * tumor-initiating cells * human aml cells * breast- cancer * hdac inhibitors * sirtuin inhibitors * colorectal - cancer * anticancer agents Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.608, year: 2016

  5. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D'Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica; Bocco, Jose L.; Koritschoner, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p 50 concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  6. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  7. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44 + /CD24 −/low and/or CD133 + expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 + ), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways

  8. Targeted photodynamic therapy as potential treatment modality for the eradication of colon cancer and colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Natasha; Kruger, Cherie A; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly treated by tumour resection, as chemotherapy and radiation have proven to be less effective, especially if the tumour has metastasized. Resistance to therapies occurs in almost all patients with colorectal cancer, especially in those with metastatic tumours. Cancer stem cells have the ability to self-renew, and their slow rate of cycling enhances resistance to treatment and increases the likelihood of tumour recurrence. Most metastatic tumours are unable to be surgically removed, thus creating a need for treatment modalities that target cancers directly and destroy cancer stem cells. Photodynamic therapy involves a photosensitizer that when exposed to a light source of a particular wavelength becomes excited and produces a form of oxygen that kills cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy is currently being investigated as a treatment modality for colorectal cancer, and new studies are exploring enhancing photodynamic therapy efficacy with the aid of drug carriers and immune conjugates. These modifications could prove effective in targeting cancer stem cells that are thought to be resistant to photodynamic therapy. In order for photodynamic therapy to be an effective treatment in colorectal cancer, it requires treatment of both primary tumours and the metastatic secondary disease that is caused by colon cancer stem cells. This review focuses on current photodynamic therapy treatments available for colorectal cancer and highlights proposed actively targeted photosynthetic drug uptake mechanisms specifically mediated towards colon cancer stem cells, as well as identify the gaps in research which need to be investigated in order to develop a combinative targeted photodynamic therapy regime that can effectively control colorectal cancer primary and metastatic tumour growth by eliminating colon cancer stem cells.

  9. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ...

  10. Hyperthermia in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  11. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  12. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gallery Cancer Terms: Cancer Basics Cancer Terms: Research Statistics Cancer Terms: Treatment Cancer Terms: After Treatment Online Medical Dictionaries Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How ...

  13. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth or into a blood vessel (IV). Different types of drugs may be given together at the same time or one after the other. Radiation Radiation therapy uses x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. Cancer cells grow and ...

  14. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  15. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  16. Treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer in a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Shaun; Persad, Kamleish; Qiao, Xian; Guarino, Michael; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients diagnosed at stage IIIA have been analyzed in many studies, which generally involve patients younger and healthier than the average patient with this disease. To analyze demographics and treatment outcomes in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC at a community cancer center. We reviewed charts of 226 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC from January 2003 to December 2008 treated at our community cancer center. Results Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Study design was retrospective and some medical records were not available. However, this population is likely representative of patients treated in similar settings. In our population, advanced age and male gender were associated with lower median survival. Responses to concurrent and sequential chemoradiation seemed to differ based on age group, which may be useful as a prognostic guideline for similar populations. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  17. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancer Mechanism by Periplocin Treatment in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zejun Lu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periplocin is used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, reinforcement of bones and tendons, palpitations or shortness of breath and lower extremity edema in traditional medicine. Our previous findings suggested that periplocin could inhibit the growth of lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. But the biological processes and molecular pathways by which periplocin induces these beneficial effects remain largely undefined. Methods: To explore the molecular mechanisms of periplocin involved in anti-cancer activity, in the present study the protein profile changes of human lung cancer cell lines A549 in response to periplocin treatment were investigated using the proteomics approaches (2-DE combined with MS/MS. Western blot was employed to verify the changed proteins. Interactions between changed proteins were analyzed by STRING. Results: 29 down-regulated protein species named GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN, Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-1 (EIF5A and Profilin-1(PFN1, and 10 up-regulated protein species named Heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein (HSPA8,10 kDa heat shock protein (HSPE1, and Cofilin-1(CFL-1 were identified. Among them, GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA were the most significantly changed (over tenfold. The proteasome subunit beta type-6 (PSMB6, ATP synthase ecto-α-subunit (ATP5A1, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and EIF5A were verified by immunoblot assays to be dramatically down-regulated. By STRING bioinformatics analysis revealing interactions and signaling networks it became apparent that the proteins changed they are primarily involved in transcription and proteolysis. Conclusion: Periplocin inhibited growth of lung cancer by down-regulating proteins, such as ATP5A1, EIF5A, ALDH1 and PSMB6. These findings may improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of

  18. Treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer: What's trending?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Timothy L; Shah, Puja M; Samson, Pamela; Robinson, Clifford G; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2017-09-01

    Stage I non-small cell lung cancer traditionally is treated with lobectomy. Sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy provide alternative treatments for higher-risk groups. The purpose of this study was to determine the national treatment trends for stage I lung cancer. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer between 1998 and 2012. Patients were compared across treatment groups, and trends in treatment and disease were evaluated over the 15-year time period. The National Cancer Database contained 369,931 patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. After removing patients who received chemotherapy as a first course of treatment and patients with pathologic stage IV, 357,490 patients were analyzed. The first recorded cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy are in 2003 and rapidly increased to 6.6% (2063) of all patients treated in 2012. The number of diagnoses of stage I non-small cell lung cancer steadily increased over the 15-year period, whereas the rate of lobectomy decreased from 55% in 1998 to 50% in 2012 (P lung cancer cases continues to increase, lobectomy rates are decreasing while sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy rates are increasing. Although the increasing popularity of alternative therapies to lobectomy for treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer should allow more patients to undergo treatment, we did not observe this trend in the data. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Paclitaxel and trastuzumab treatment affects insulin growth factor I expression in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xian Qian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancers and second primary cause of death among women. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a vital role in cancer cell survival, proliferation, chemotaxis and angiogenesis. In this study, the effect of combination of two drugs, paclitaxel and trastuzumab on IGF signaling and cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and Hs0578T were explored. The interaction of paclitaxel and trastuzumab on IGF-1 signaling pathway was studied with IGF-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002. The protein expression of IGF signaling molecules were reduced in the drug treated cancer cells. LY294002 and IGF-1 with paclitaxel and trastuzumab treatment inhibited phosphorylated Akt. During G0/G1 phase, cell cycle arrest and accumulation of apoptotic cells were observed in drug treated cancer cells. The synergistic effect of paclitaxel and trastuzumab decreased the multiplication of breast cancer cells by altering the expression of IGF-I signaling molecules. This combination proves to be one of the useful methods to treat breast cancer.

  20. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Chul; Sohn, Seung Chang; Suh, Hyun Suk; Jaun, Woo Ki; Kim, Dong Soon; Sohn, Kwang Hyun

    1986-01-01

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  1. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Corrêa Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%, with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71% patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2% patients. In 50 patients (86%, sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%, hypothyroidism (43%, mucositis (33% and diarrhea (29%. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%, hypertension (12%, thrombocytopenia (7%, neutropenia (5% and hand-foot syndrome (5%. Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS.

  2. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  3. Stem Cell Therapy and Breast Cancer Treatment: review of stem cell research and potential therapeutic impact against cardiotoxicities due to breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Sharp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new problem has emerged with the ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. While early screening and advances in treatment have allowed these patients to overcome their cancer, these treatments often have adverse cardiovascular side effects that can produce abnormal cardiovascular function. Chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy have both been linked to cardiotoxicity; these therapeutics can cause a loss of cardiac muscle and deterioration of vascular structure that can eventually lead to heart failure (HF. This cardiomyocyte toxicity can leave the breast cancer survivor with a probable diagnosis of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy (DCM or RCM. While current HF standard of care can alleviate symptoms, other than heart transplantation, there is no therapy that replaces cardiac myocytes that are killed during cancer therapies. There is a need to develop novel therapeutics that can either prevent or reverse the cardiac injury caused by cancer therapeutics. These new therapeutics should promote the regeneration of lost or deteriorating myocardium. Over the last several decades the therapeutic potential of cell-based therapy has been investigated for HF patients. In this review we discuss the progress of preclinical and clinical stem cell research for the diseased heart and discuss the possibility of utilizing these novel therapies to combat cardiotoxicity observed in breast cancer survivors.

  4. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  5. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF SQUAMOUS-CELL RECTAL CANCER: А CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term results of conservative squamous-cell rectal cancer treatment (12 cm above anal verge are presented in the article. Squamous-cell rectal cancer is a rare disease with only 73 cases described in the literature. Patient received a novel chemoradiotherapy scheme. Complete response was achieved and no surgery performed. Patient is disease-free and has good quality of life with 4 years followup.

  6. MLN4924 and 2DG combined treatment enhances the efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladghaffari, Maryam; Shabestani Monfared, Ali; Farajollahi, Alireza; Baradaran, Behzad; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Asghari Jafar Abadi, Mohammad; Pirayesh Islamian, Jalil

    2017-06-01

    Two-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) causes cytotoxicity in the cancer cells by disrupting the thiol metabolism, and MLN4924 inactivates the SCF E3 ligase and so causes the accumulation of its substrates which trigger apoptosis and hence might enhance the efficiency of radiotherapy and overcame on the radioresistance of the cancer cells. SKBR3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with 500 μM 2DG and/or MLN4924 (30, 100, 200 and 300 nM), and in combination in the presence and absence of 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy gamma irradiation. The effects of the treatments - 2DG, MLN4924, irradiation alone and combined - on MCF-7 and SKBR3 cell lines were evaluated by MTT assay, TUNEL assay, cell death detection, Q-PCR for caspase-3 and Bcl-2 expression analysis, and finally clonogenic survival assay. The treatments enhanced the further radio cytotoxicity via inducing the apoptosis cell signaling gene, caspase-3. The 2DG and MLN4924 treatments could act as a radiosensitizer, especially on the SKBR3 cells, and further sensitized the cells with a sensitivity enhancement ratio (SER) of 1.41 and 1.27 in SKBR3 and MCF-7 cells, respectively. The combined chemo-radiotherapy might improve the breast cancer treatment outcome.

  7. The role of radiation therapy in multimodality treatment for renal-cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semikoz, N.G.; Kudryashov, O.G.; Ponomar'ov, V.V.; Osipenkov, R.A.; Anyishchenko, A.O.; Kudryashova, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the results of multimodality treatment for renal-cell cancer (pT any, N any, M0) using pre- operative large-fraction irradiation. Our findings demonstrate that radiation therapy does not aggravate the conditions for surgery and improves long-term results. The data about efficacy of multimodality treatment (palliative nephrectomy with radiation therapy) in patients with primary metastatic kidney cancer T any, N any, M1) are also reported.

  8. Evaluation of Irinotecan as a Third- or Fourth-line Treatment for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keener, James

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. There are two major types of lung cancer: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises approximately 85% of all lung cancers, and small cell lung cancer. Currently, the most prevalent third- and fourth- line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer is cisplatin-based therapy. This form of therapy has been long established as the chief treatment for advanced NSCLC; however, cisplatin-based therapy also impai...

  9. IDENTIFYING AND TARGETING TUMOR-INITIATING CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (exclusive of skin cancer), and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although conventional and targeted therapies have improved survival rates, there are still considerable challenges in treating breast cancer, including treatment resistance, disease recurrence, and metastasis. Treatment resistance can be either de novo - due to traits that tumor cells possess prior to treatment, or acquired, - due to traits that tumor cells gain in response to treatment. A recently proposed mechanism of de novo resistance invokes existence of a specialized subset of cancer cells defined as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells (CSC). TICs have the capacity to self-renew and regenerate new tumors that consist of all clonally-derived cell types present in the parental tumor. There are data to suggest that TICs are resistant to many conventional cancer therapies, and survive treatment in spite of dramatic shrinkage of the tumor. Residual TICs can then eventually regrow resulting in disease relapse. It is also hypothesized that TIC may be responsible for metastatic disease. If these hypotheses are correct, targeting TICs may be imperative to achieve cure. In this review, we discuss evidence for breast TICs and their apparent resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as to various targeted therapies. We also address the potential impact of breast TIC plasticity and metastatic potential on therapeutic strategies. Finally, we describe several genes and signaling pathways that appear important for TIC function that may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25876646

  10. Consensus for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment: basal cell carcinoma, including a cost analysis of treatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B; Cronin, Terrence; Roenigk, Randall; Hruza, George; Bennett, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US population affecting approximately 2.8 million people per year. Basal cell carcinomas are usually slow-growing and rarely metastasize, but they do cause localized tissue destruction, compromised function, and cosmetic disfigurement. To provide clinicians with guidelines for the management of BCC based on evidence from a comprehensive literature review, and consensus among the authors. An extensive review of the medical literature was conducted to evaluate the optimal treatment methods for cutaneous BCC, taking into consideration cure rates, recurrence rates, aesthetic and functional outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of the procedures. Surgical approaches provide the best outcomes for BCCs. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the highest cure rates while maximizing tissue preservation, maintenance of function, and cosmesis. Mohs micrographic surgery is an efficient and cost-effective procedure and remains the treatment of choice for high-risk BCCs and for those in cosmetically sensitive locations. Nonsurgical modalities may be used for low-risk BCCs when surgery is contraindicated or impractical, but the cure rates are lower.

  11. Breast cancer stem cells rely on fermentative glycolysis and are sensitive to 2-deoxyglucose treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavardelli, D; Rossi, C; Barcaroli, D; Volpe, S; Consalvo, A; Zucchelli, M; De Cola, A; Scavo, E; Carollo, R; D'Agostino, D; Forlì, F; D'Aguanno, S; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V; Urbani, A

    2014-07-17

    A number of studies suggest that cancer stem cells are essential for tumour growth, and failure to target these cells can result in tumour relapse. As this population of cells has been shown to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, it is essential to understand their biology and identify new therapeutic approaches. Targeting cancer metabolism is a potential alternative strategy to counteract tumour growth and recurrence. Here we applied a proteomic and targeted metabolomic analysis in order to point out the main metabolic differences between breast cancer cells grown as spheres and thus enriched in cancer stem cells were compared with the same cells grown in adherent differentiating conditions. This integrated approach allowed us to identify a metabolic phenotype associated with the stem-like condition and shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation towards fermentative glycolysis. Functional validation of proteomic and metabolic data provide evidences for increased activities of key enzymes of anaerobic glucose fate such as pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, lactate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phopshate dehydrogenase in cancer stem cells as well as different redox status. Moreover, we show that treatment with 2-deoxyglucose, a well known inhibitor of glycolysis, inhibits BCSC proliferation when used alone and shows a synergic effect when used in combination with doxorubicin. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of glycolysis may be a potentially effective strategy to target BCSCs.

  12. The application of natural killer (NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayne H Rouce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are essential components of the innate immune system and play a critical role in host immunity against cancer. Recent progress in our understanding of NK cell immunobiology has paved the way for novel NK cell-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of NK cell immunotherapy, including augmentation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, manipulation of receptor-mediated activation, and adoptive immunotherapy with ex vivo expanded, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR engineered or engager-modified NK cells. In contrast to T lymphocytes, donor NK cells do not attack non-hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that an NK-mediated anti-tumor effect can be achieved in the absence of graft-versus-host disease. Despite reports of clinical efficacy, a number of factors limit the application of NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer such as the failure of infused NK cells to expand and persist in vivo. Therefore efforts to enhance the therapeutic benefit of NK cell-based immunotherapy by developing strategies to manipulate the NK cell product, host factors and tumor targets are the subject of intense research. In the preclinical setting, genetic engineering of NK cells to express CARs to redirect their antitumor specificity has shown significant promise. Given the short lifespan and potent cytolytic function of mature NK cells, they are attractive candidate effector cells to express CARs for adoptive immunotherapies. Another innovative approach to redirect NK cytotoxicity towards tumor cells is to create either bispecific or trispecific antibodies, thus augmenting cytotoxicity against tumor-associated antigens. These are exciting times for the study of NK cells; with recent advances in the field of NK cell biology and translational research, it is likely that NK cell immunotherapy will move to the forefront of cancer immunotherapy over the next

  13. Inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation in repeated and non-repeated treatment with zoledronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Toni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoledronic acid is used to treat bone metastases and has been shown to reduce skeletal-related events and exert antitumor activity. The present in vitro study investigates the mechanism of action of Zoledronic Acid on breast cancer cell lines with different hormonal and HER2 patterns. Furthermore, we investigated the efficacy of repeated versus non-repeated treatments. Methods The study was performed on 4 breast cancer cell lines (BRC-230, SkBr3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Non-repeated treatment (single exposure of 168 hrs’ duration with zoledronic acid was compared with repeated treatment (separate exposures, each of 48 hrs’ duration, for a total of 168 hrs at different dosages. A dose–response profile was generated using sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assay and biomolecular characteristics were analyzed by western blot. Results Zoledronic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in all cell lines. Anti-proliferative activity was enhanced with the repeated treatment, proving to be statistically significant in the triple-negative lines. In these lines repeated treatment showed a cytocidal effect, with apoptotic cell death caused by caspase 3, 8 and 9 activation and decreased RAS and pMAPK expression. Apoptosis was not observed in estrogen receptor-positive line: p21 overexpression suggested a slowing down of cell cycle. A decrease in RAS and pMAPK expression was seen in HER2-overexpressing line after treatment. Conclusions The study suggests that zoledronic acid has an antitumor activity in breast cancer cell lines. Its mechanism of action involves the decrease of RAS and RHO, as in osteoclasts. Repeated treatment enhances antitumor activity compared to non-repeated treatment. Repeated treatment has a killing effect on triple-negative lines due to apoptosis activation. Further research is warranted especially in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

  14. SU-F-T-683: Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis and Radiation Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor control probability in radiation therapy allows comparing different radiation treatments to each other by means of calculating the probability that a prescribed dose of radiation eradicates or controls the tumor. In the conventional approach, all cancer cells can divide unlimited number of times and the tumor control often means eradicating every malignant cell by the radiation. In recent years however, there is a mounting consensus that in a given tumor volume there is a sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumor initiation and growth. Other or progenitor cancer cells can only divide limited number of times. This entails that only cancer stem cells may nned to be eliminated in order to control the tumor. Thus one may define TCP as the probability of eliminating CSCs for the given dose of radiation. Methods: Using stochastic methods, specifically the birth-and-death Markov processes, an infinite system of equations is set for probabilities of having m cancer stem cells at time t after the start of radiation. The TCP is calculated as the probability of no cancer stem cells surviving the radiation. Two scenarios are studied. In the first situation, the TCP is calculated for a unidirectional case when CSC gives birth to another CSC or a progenitor cell. In the second scenario, a bidirectional model is studied where the progenitor cell gives rise to CSC. Results: The proposed calculations show that the calculated TCP for CSC depends on whether one adopts unidirectional or bidirectional conversion models. The bidirectional model shows significantly lower TCP values for the given dose delivered to the tumor. Conclusion: Incorporating CSC hypothesis into the TCP modeling may notably influence the dose prescription as well as the concept of the expected TCP after the radiation treatments.

  15. SU-F-T-683: Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis and Radiation Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E [Pinnacle Health Cancer Center, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The tumor control probability in radiation therapy allows comparing different radiation treatments to each other by means of calculating the probability that a prescribed dose of radiation eradicates or controls the tumor. In the conventional approach, all cancer cells can divide unlimited number of times and the tumor control often means eradicating every malignant cell by the radiation. In recent years however, there is a mounting consensus that in a given tumor volume there is a sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumor initiation and growth. Other or progenitor cancer cells can only divide limited number of times. This entails that only cancer stem cells may nned to be eliminated in order to control the tumor. Thus one may define TCP as the probability of eliminating CSCs for the given dose of radiation. Methods: Using stochastic methods, specifically the birth-and-death Markov processes, an infinite system of equations is set for probabilities of having m cancer stem cells at time t after the start of radiation. The TCP is calculated as the probability of no cancer stem cells surviving the radiation. Two scenarios are studied. In the first situation, the TCP is calculated for a unidirectional case when CSC gives birth to another CSC or a progenitor cell. In the second scenario, a bidirectional model is studied where the progenitor cell gives rise to CSC. Results: The proposed calculations show that the calculated TCP for CSC depends on whether one adopts unidirectional or bidirectional conversion models. The bidirectional model shows significantly lower TCP values for the given dose delivered to the tumor. Conclusion: Incorporating CSC hypothesis into the TCP modeling may notably influence the dose prescription as well as the concept of the expected TCP after the radiation treatments.

  16. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    , are subjected to toxicities, which individually, and synergistically, can cause physiological impairments leading to sub-clinical or clinical cardiovascular disorders (i.e. the 'multiple-hit hypothesis'). Furthermore, we discuss the efficacy and utility of structured exercise training to ameliorate treatment......-induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate....... However, the excellent cancer-specific survival comes at considerable costs, as individuals with a history of germ cell cancer experience serious long-term complications, including markedly increased risk of cardiovascular morbidities and premature cardiovascular death. The factors responsible, as well...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atomic bomb radiation. Living where there is air pollution. Having a family history of lung cancer. Being ... the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) off internal tissues or organs and ...

  19. Molecular regulation of MICA expression after HDAC inhibitor treatment of cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle

    pathways that lead to MICA expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of cancer cells. Chelating Calcium with Bapta-AM or EGTA potently inhibited HDAC-inhibitor and CMV mediated MICA/B expression. It was further observed that ER Calcium stores were depleted after HDAC-inhibitor treatment. NF-kB activity can...... be induced by HDAC-inhibitor treatment. However, nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 was not observed after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells and even though we could effectively inhibit p65 expression by siRNA, it did not modify MICA/B expression. To identify important elements in MICA regulation...

  20. Treatment of Prostate Cancer Cells (DU145 with Gamma-Ray Radiation and Silver Nano Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Shams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in America which causing great harm and waste cost. Furthermore almost more prostate cancer treatments are ineffective.  Purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapy and the rate of increase of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation with silver nano particles in treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: DU145 cell line originating from Human prostate cancer was purchased from Pasteur Institute. After thawing of defreezed samples, cells were incubated with DMEM medium and 15% FBS Confluency FBS serum was added. For preventing contamination amphotericin B in 25 μM/ml was added. Cells were incubated over a period of 3 to 5 days to reach a good Confluency Then cells divided into 4 groups . Tentatively assigned to the control group, the second experimental group treated with gamma irradiation at a doses of 2, 6 and 10 Gy, the third group treated with 53 μg/ml م g/mlµ 53 silver nano particles. The fourth group includes simultaneous treatment with gamma doses and silver nano particle.انکوبه و Cell groups studied by staining with trypan blue as well as by MTT assay (ELISA reader. Results: The results showed the use of gamma rays and silver nano particles caused a significant reduction in the number of cancer cells in the treated groups compared to the other treatment groups and a control group. Using of silver nano particles as a radio sensitizer and radiation therapy in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 resulted in the increase of the gamma-ray photon energies of 6 and 10 Gy. Discussion: The gamma photon radiation to the tumor cells were incubated nano particle probability Photoelectric process as a process when handling the extremely high energy gamma photons hitting the silver nano particles to cancer cells, photoelectron and Auger electrons (Auger Electrons and secondary electrons produced by secondary particles can be. It will not be very effective

  1. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 colon carcinoma cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. Methods: Phase-contrast microscopy was used for the examination of morphological changes while flow cytometry was employed for the analysis of cell cycle distribution, ...

  2. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta HE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system and tumor microenvironment has identified immune checkpoint inhibitors as new avenue of immunotherapy. Rather than acting directly on the tumor, these therapies work by removing the inhibition exerted by tumor cell or other immune cells on the immune system, promoting antitumoral immune response. To date, two programmed death-1 inhibitors, namely nivolumab and pembrolizumab, have received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that failed platinum-based chemotherapy. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the pathophysiology of cancer immune evasion, summarizes pertinent data on completed and ongoing clinical trials involving checkpoint inhibitors, discusses the different strategies to optimize their function, and outlines various challenges that are faced in this promising yet evolving field. Keywords: checkpoint inhibitors, immunotherapy, nivolumab, non-small-cell lung cancer, pembrolizumab, programmed death-1, programmed death ligand-1

  3. Concomitant radiochemotherapy for larynx preservation treatment in patents with locoregionally advanced squamous cell hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiprian, D.; Kawecki, A.; Jarzabski, A.; Michalski, W.

    2011-01-01

    Laryngopharygectomy followed by radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy has been a standard treatment for patients with advanced hypopharyngeal cancer These treatment modalities lead to permanent tracheostomy, which has a negative influence on the quality of life. For this reason new treatment methods have been investigated for a number of years. The aim of the study. To evaluate the results and the toxicity of larynx preservation treatment for locally advanced squamous cell hypopharyngeal cancer. Material and methods. Between December 2004 and January 2007 56 patients with confirmed squamous cell hypopharyngeal cancer (stage III and IVa ) were treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy with an intention to preserve the larynx. Conformal 3D radiotherapy was applied in all cases. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 per die administered twice during irradiation (day 1 and 22, day 43 of treatment) or once a week (35 mg/m 2) . Results. Median follow-up is 32 months. 5-year OS is 72%, DFS - 57%c, 3-year laryngectomy-free survival - LFS is 72%, 5-year LFS - 68% of patients (alive with larynx preservation). 11 patients have been diagnosed with local recurrence, 3 patients with nodal failure and one with locoregional failure. No severe life-threatening early and late complications were observed. Only 2 patients required temporary tracheostomy because of dyspnea due to laryngeal edema. Conclusion. We conclude that organ-preservation treatment is a valuable alternative to surgical treatment in patients diagnosed with stage III and IVa laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. (authors)

  4. Redox biology in normal cells and cancer: restoring function of the redox/Fyn/c-Cbl pathway in cancer cells offers new approaches to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Mark; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Li, Zaibo; Dong, Tiefei; Cui, Wanchang; Pröschel, Christoph; Ambeskovic, Ibro; Dietrich, Joerg; Han, Ruolan; Yang, Yin Miranda; Folts, Christopher; Stripay, Jennifer; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Stevens, Brett M

    2015-02-01

    This review discusses a unique discovery path starting with novel findings on redox regulation of precursor cell and signaling pathway function and identification of a new mechanism by which relatively small changes in redox status can control entire signaling networks that regulate self-renewal, differentiation, and survival. The pathway central to this work, the redox/Fyn/c-Cbl (RFC) pathway, converts small increases in oxidative status to pan-activation of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase, which controls multiple receptors and other proteins of central importance in precursor cell and cancer cell function. Integration of work on the RFC pathway with attempts to understand how treatment with systemic chemotherapy causes neurological problems led to the discovery that glioblastomas (GBMs) and basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) inhibit c-Cbl function through altered utilization of the cytoskeletal regulators Cool-1/βpix and Cdc42, respectively. Inhibition of these proteins to restore normal c-Cbl function suppresses cancer cell division, increases sensitivity to chemotherapy, disrupts tumor-initiating cell (TIC) activity in GBMs and BLBCs, controls multiple critical TIC regulators, and also allows targeting of non-TICs. Moreover, these manipulations do not increase chemosensitivity or suppress division of nontransformed cells. Restoration of normal c-Cbl function also allows more effective harnessing of estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-independent activities of tamoxifen to activate the RFC pathway and target ERα-negative cancer cells. Our work thus provides a discovery strategy that reveals mechanisms and therapeutic targets that cannot be deduced by standard genetics analyses, which fail to reveal the metabolic information, isoform shifts, protein activation, protein complexes, and protein degradation critical to our discoveries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Targeting the Adipocyte Tumor Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    performed in task 4.1. Task 7. 3D Organotypic cultures to study the adipocyte-PCa cell interaction in vitro (Months 30-36; Diaz-Meco & Moscat). This...Targeting Metabolic Reprograming in Cancer” Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Madrid, Spain, 2015. Speaker (Moscat) “Cell Death and Survival Networks...PCa, we profited from a recently devel- oped technology for creating 3D prostate organoid cultures (Gao et al., 2014; Karthaus et al., 2014). Murine

  6. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0487 TITLE: Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer... Borras -Cuesta, F., and Lasarte, J. J. CD4+/CD25+ regulatory cells inhibit activation of tumor-primed CD4+ T cells with IFN- gamma-dependent

  7. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Sung-Chen; Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Zou, Hui-Ming; Lian, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes ( ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells.

  8. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2018-01-02

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  9. Cetuximab Enhanced the Cytotoxic Activity of Immune Cells during Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cetuximab is a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody which targets the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor. This antibody is widely used for colorectal cancer (CRC treatment but its influence on the immune system is incompletely understood. Methods: The immune influence of cetuximab therapy in CRC patients was investigated by analyzing peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. We undertook in vitro cytotoxicity and cytokine-profile assays to ascertain the immunomodulatory effect of cetuximab treatment. Results: The number of CD3+ T, CD8+ T, and natural killer (NK cells was increased significantly and T-regulatory cells reduced gradually after cetuximab treatment. Percentage of CD4+ T, natural killer T (NKT-like, invariant NKT, and dendritic cells was similar between baseline patients and cetuximab patients. Expression of CD137 on NK and CD8+ T cells was increased significantly after 4 weeks of cetuximab therapy. In vitro cetuximab treatment markedly increased expression of CD137 and CD107a on NK and CD8+ T cells. Cetuximab treatment promoted the cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8+ T cells against tumor cells. Conclusion: Cetuximab treatment promotes activation of the immune response but alleviates immunosuppression: this might be the underlying anti-CRC effect of cetuximab.

  10. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  11. Prognosis and Treatment Decision Making in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mokhles (Sahar)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and it is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses (12% of total new cancer cases) and to death from cancer (18% of total cancer deaths). There are two major groups of lung cancer that arise from the cells of the

  12. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iodide, Triton X-100, Tris-HCl and trypan blue were supplied by Sigma Chemical Co (St Louis,. MO, USA). ... achieved on 6-15 % SDS-PAGE and the proteins were subsequently transferred onto PVDF membranes. ... permeabilized by treatment with Triton-X 100. (0.3 %) in PBS for 1 h. The non-specific sites blocked with 2 ...

  13. Prognosis and Treatment Decision Making in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhles, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and it is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses (12% of total new cancer cases) and to death from cancer (18% of total cancer deaths). There are two major groups of lung cancer that arise from the cells of the respiratory epithelium: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer, accounting for approximately 85% and 15% of lung cancer cases, respectively. The 5 year survival rate is 70-85% for l...

  14. Circulating regulatory T cells of cancer patients receiving radiochemotherapy may be useful to individualize cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Manuel A.; Förtsch, Claudia; Schmidt, Manfred; Rau, Tilman T.; Fietkau, Rainer; Distel, Luitpold V.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells (Treg) play a major role in anti-tumor immune response of cancer patients. We investigated the effect of radiochemotherapy on patients’ blood immune cells and their predictive value for tumor response. Materials and methods: DCs and Treg of colorectal cancer (CRC) or breast cancer (BC) patients were examined through multicolor flow cytometry before the beginning and after the first week of radiochemotherapy (RCT). DCs were stained for BDCA1 and BDCA2, Treg were stained for CD4, CD25, CD127 and FoxP3. IL-2, IL-10 and TNF-α plasma levels of CRC patients were also determined. We examined the interrelationship between immune cell count alterations, applied dose values, cytokine plasma levels as well as histopathological parameters. Results: DCs were increased in BC and CRC patients compared to healthy control individuals (HC). CRC patients had higher levels of Treg (59.0%) compared to BC patients (31.3%) and HC (27.0%). Treg of CRC (58.7% vs. 41.3% p < 0.001) but not BC patients (31.3% vs. 38.8%, p = 0.164) decreased distinctly after the first week of radiation therapy. Applied dose values and decrease of Treg correlated positively (r = 0.216, p = 0.054). We also found a positive correlation of IL-10 plasma levels and Treg levels (r = 0.748, p = 0.021). CRC patients with favorable tumor stage (< ypT3a) have higher levels of Treg after 5 days of RCT (49.4% vs. 34.0%, p = 0.043). Conclusion: Higher Treg levels are associated with favorable tumor stage. We hypothesize that a dramatic decrease of Treg after in vivo irradiation may be a good indicator for necessary dose adjustments in radiation therapy of CRC patients.

  15. Prognostic Factors and Treatment Results After Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin in Germ Cell Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Maria G; Lauritsen, Jakob; Mortensen, Mette S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: First-line treatment for patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) is bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). A prognostic classification of patients receiving chemotherapy was published by the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) in 1997, but only...... a small proportion of the patients received BEP. OBJECTIVE: To estimate survival probabilities after BEP, evaluate the IGCCCG prognostic classification, and propose new prognostic factors for outcome. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Of a Danish population-based cohort of GCC patients (1984-2007), 1889...... received first-line BEP, with median follow-up of 15 yr. Covariates evaluated as prognostic factors were age, year of treatment, primary site, non-pulmonary visceral metastases, pulmonary metastases, and tumor markers. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Outcomes measured were 5-yr progression...

  16. Treatment and outcomes of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with high comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Rios,1 Rahul Gosain,1 Bernardo HL Goulart,2 Bin Huang,3 Margaret N Oechsli,1 Jaclyn K McDowell,4 Quan Chen,4 Thomas Tucker,4 Goetz H Kloecker1 1James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 4Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA Background: The life expectancy of untreated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is dismal, while treatment for NSCLC improves survival. The presence of comorbidities is thought to play a significant role in the decision to treat or not treat a given patient. We aim to evaluate the association of comorbidities with the survival of patients treated for NSCLC.Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients aged ≥66 years with invasive NSCLC between the years 2007 and 2011 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Kentucky Cancer Registry. Comorbidity was measured using the Klabunde Comorbidity Index (KCI, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure association between receiving treatment and comorbidity. Kaplan–Meier plots were constructed to estimate time-to-event outcomes.Results: A total of 4014 patients were identified; of this, 94.9% were white and 55.7% were male. The proportion of patients who did not receive any treatment was 8.7%, 3.9%, 19.1%, and 23.5% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.0001. In multivariate analysis, older age, higher stage, and higher comorbidity (KCI ≥3 were associated with a lower likelihood of receiving any treatment. The median overall survival (OS for untreated and KCI=0 was 17.7 months for stages I and II, 2.3 months for stage III, and 1.3 months for stage IV. The median OS for treated and KCI=0 was 58.9 months for stages I and II, 16.8 months for stage III, and 5.8 months for stage

  17. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  18. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives Cancer Moonshot Genomic Data Commons National Clinical Trials ...

  19. Treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema with adipose-derived regenerative cells and fat grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a debilitating late complication with a lack of treatment opportunities. Recent studies have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells can alleviate lymphedema. Herein, we report the results from the first human pilot study with freshly isolated adipose-derived...... regenerative cells (ADRC) for treating lymphedema with 6 months follow-up. Ten BCRL patients were included. ADRC was injected directly into the axillary region, which was combined with a scar-releasing fat graft procedure. Primary endpoints were change in arm volume. Secondary endpoints were change in patient...

  20. Soluble CD40 ligands sensitize the epithelial ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lijun; Qiu, Hongbing; Zhang, Minjie; Zhang, Fenghua; Yang, Hongfang; Yang, Liu; Jia, Li; Qin, Kaiyun; Jia, Ling; Dou, Xiaomeng; Cheng, Lili; Sang, Meixiang; Zhang, Chao; Shan, Baoen; Zhang, Zhengmao

    2016-04-01

    CD154 (CD40L) is a protein that is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is a member of the TNF superfamily of molecules. It binds to CD40 on antigen-presenting cells (APC), which leads to many effects depending on the target cell type. Being an activator of immune cells, CD40L has also been shown to directly induce apoptosis in tumor cells by multiple mechanisms. To understand the role of sCD40L in regulating the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cancer cells treated or untreated with cisplatin. Epithelial ovarian cancer cells: SKOV3 and its cisplatin-resistant strain SKOV3/DDP cells were used to test the effect of sCD40L and cisplatin. The proliferation of SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells were measured by MTT. Cell cycle was assessed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expressions of targeted genes were detected by qRT-PCR. The protein expressions were detected by Western blotting. sCD40L showed a significant dose-dependence inhibitory effect on the proliferation of ovarian cancer cell lines. sCD40L in combination with cisplatin could sensitized SKOV3/DDP cells to cisplatin treatment and reversed the drug resistance of SKOV3/DDP cells. The reversal ratios of 1 μg/ml sCD40L combined with cisplatin in SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells were 2.11, 2.71, while the reversal ratios of 2 μg/ml sCD40L combined with cisplatin in SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells were 3.78, 5.20, respectively. sCD40L or sCD40L combined cisplatin increased tumor cells in G0/G1 phase. sCD40L in combination with cisplatin decreased the expression levels of GST-π, LRP, Survivin, p53 and Bcl-2 in both epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. The protein expression level of GST-π, LRP and P53 protein was also decreased upon sCD40L in combination with cisplatin although the expression level of Bcl-2 and survivin protein had no significant difference. sCD40L inhibits the proliferation of SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells. The combined application of sCD40L and cisplatin can strength the inhibitory effect of cisplatin, and to a

  1. First-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shipra Gandhi,1 Hongbin Chen,2 Yujie Zhao,2 Grace K Dy2 1Department of Internal Medicine, State University of New York, 2Department of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths, both within the US and worldwide. There have been major treatment advances in NSCLC over the past decade with the discovery of molecular drivers of NSCLC, which has ushered in an era of personalized medicine. There are several actionable genetic aberrations in NSCLC, such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK. In 3%–7% of NSCLC, a chromosomal inversion event in chromosome 2 leads to fusion of a portion of the ALK gene with the echinoderm microtubule–associated protein-like 4 (EML4 gene. The constitutive activation of the ALK fusion oncogene renders it vulnerable to therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the first-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive NSCLC using ALK inhibitors. Crizotinib was the first agent proven to be efficacious as first-line treatment for ALK-positive NSCLC. However, acquired resistance inevitably develops. The central nervous system is a sanctuary site that represents a common site for disease progression as well. Hence, more potent, selective next-generation ALK inhibitors that are able to cross the blood–brain barrier have been developed for treatment against crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC and are also currently being evaluated for first-line therapy as well. In this review, we provide summary of the clinical experience with these drugs in the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, ALK, first line, crizotinib, pemetrexed

  2. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  3. Treatment toxicities in long-term survivors of limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frytak, S.; Shaw, J.N.; Lee, R.E.; Eagan, R.T.; Shaw, E.G.; Richardson, R.L.; Creagan, E.T.; Coles, D.T.; Jett, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 211 patients with limited small cell lung cancer were assessed retrospectively for long-term toxicities, treatment-related deaths, and second primaries. All had received treatment with various combinations of doxorubicin, vincristine, cisplatin, lomustine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide with or without split-course thoracic radiotherapy (4,000 cGy/10 fractions) and/or split-course prophylactic cranial irradiation (3,600 cGy/10 fractions). Sixty-eight (32%) of the patients survived longer than 1.5 years and formed the basis of this study. Debilitating pulmonary, cardiac, and neurologic toxicity was noted in 12%, 14%, and 15%, respectively, of long-term survivors. These complications were the result of aggressive combined modality therapy. Certain drugs appeared to cause additive toxicity when combined with radiation. Three patients developed new primary tumors of squamous cell origin. Attention must be directed to defining the safest way to employ aggressive combined modality treatment for these patients

  4. Evaluation of candidate biomarkers to predict cancer cell sensitivity or resistance to PARP-1 inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oplustilova, L.; Wolanin, K.; Bartkova, J.

    2012-01-01

    (ADp-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an enzyme critical for repair pathways alternative to HR. While promising, treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors (PARP-1i) faces some hurdles, including (1) acquired resistance, (2) search for other sensitizing, non-BRCA1/2 cancer defects and (3) lack of biomarkers to predict response...... to PARP-1i. Here we addressed these issues using PARP-1i on 20 human cell lines from carcinomas of the breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and ovary. Aberrations of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex sensitized cancer cells to PARP-1i, while p53 status was less predictive, even in response to PARP-1i...... combinations with camptothecin or ionizing radiation. Furthermore, monitoring pARsylation and Rad51 foci formation as surrogate markers for PARP activity and HR, respectively, supported their candidacy for biomarkers of PARP-1i responses. As to resistance mechanisms, we confrmed the role of the multidrug...

  5. Transformation to small cell lung cancer after first-line afatinib treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Shiroyama

    Full Text Available Acquiring resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs is inevitable. Transformation to small cell lung cancer (SCLC is reported as a possible mechanism of this acquired resistance. We describe the case of a 35-year-old man with lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion. After 7 months of successful treatment with afatinib, he experienced relapse and rebiopsy revealed SCLC with EGFR exon 19 deletion. Tumor marker tests at this point showed normal levels of serum neuron-specific enolase and pro-gastrin releasing peptide. Our case highlights the importance of rebiopsy for revealing SCLC transformation, a potential mechanism of acquired resistance to afatinib as with other EGFR-TKIs, and normal-range values of tumor markers for SCLC cannot exclude the possibility of SCLC transformation. Keywords: Transformation, Small cell lung cancer, Adenocarcinoma, Rebiopsy, Acquired resistance, Afatinib

  6. The effect of wool hydrolysates on squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro. Possible implications for cancer treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Damps

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is the second most common cutaneous malignancy. Despite various available treatment methods and advances in noninvasive diagnostic techniques, the incidence of metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is rising. Deficiency in effective preventive or treatment methods of transformed keratinocytes leads to necessity of searching for new anticancer agents. The present study aims to evaluate the possibility of using wool hydrolysates as such agents. Commercially available compounds such as 5-fluorouracil, ingenol mebutate, diclofenac sodium salt were also used in this study. The process of wool degradation was based on chemical pre-activation and enzymatic digestion of wool. The effect of mentioned compounds on cell viability of squamous carcinoma cell line and healthy keratinocytes was evaluated. The obtained data show a significantly stronger effect of selected wool hydrolysates compared to commercial compounds (p<0.05 on viability of cells. The wool hydrolysates decreased squamous cell carcinoma cells viability by up to 67% comparing to untreated cells. These results indicate bioactive properties of wool hydrolysates, which affect the viability of squamous carcinoma cells and decrease their number. We hypothesize that these agents may be used topically for treatment of transformed keratinocytes in actinic keratosis and invasive squamous skin cancer in humans.

  7. Combinational treatment of gap junctional activator and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhar, Gunjan; Hua, Duy H; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2010-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a drug of choice for endocrine-responsive breast tumor patients. However, tamoxifen resistance has become a major concern for the treatment of breast cancer. Combinational therapies of tamoxifen and different drugs are being frequently studied. In this study, we tested the efficacy of substituted quinolines (code name=PQ1; a gap junctional activator) in combination with tamoxifen in T47D cells. Colony growth assay was performed using soft agar to measure the colony growth, whereas cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay in T47D cells. The level of Ki67, survivin, and BAX was measured using confocal microscopy along with western blot analysis. Apoptosis-bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate labeling was also examined in the induced treatment of T47D cells. We observed a 55% decrease in the colony growth in the presence of combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen, whereas tamoxifen alone had little effect. A combination of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1 resulted in only 16% cell viability compared with controls at 48 h in T47D cells by the MTT assay. We found a significant increase in BAX protein at 1 h in the presence of 500 nmol/l PQ1 alone, 10 micromol/l tamoxifen alone, and the combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen. A two-fold increase was observed in active caspase 3 in the presence of combinational treatment of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1. In addition, flow cytometric analysis showed a 50% increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the presence of the combination of tamoxifen and PQ1 compared with the control. Furthermore, the results show that combinational treatment of tamoxifen and PQ1 significantly reduces the expression of survivin in T47D cells. Gap junction inhibitor studies with carbenexolone were also performed confirming the role of gap junctions in cell proliferation and cell death. The combinational treatment of PQ1 and tamoxifen has a significant increase in BAX expression, caspase 3 activation, and DNA

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of miRNome Alterations in Response to Sorafenib Treatment in Colorectal Cancer Cells

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    Anna-Maria Pehserl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are master regulators of drug resistance and have been previously proposed as potential biomarkers for the prediction of therapeutic response in colorectal cancer (CRC. Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor which has been approved for the treatment of liver, renal and thyroid cancer, is currently being studied as a monotherapy in selected molecular subtypes or in combination with other drugs in metastatic CRC. In this study, we explored sorafenib-induced cellular effects in Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog olog (KRAS wild-type and KRAS-mutated CRC cell lines (Caco-2 and HRT-18, and finally profiled expression changes of specific miRNAs within the miRNome (>1000 human miRNAs after exposure to sorafenib. Overall, sorafenib induced a time- and dose-dependent growth-inhibitory effect through S-phase cell cycle arrest in KRAS wild-type and KRAS-mutated CRC cells. In HRT-18 cells, two human miRNAs (hsa-miR-597 and hsa-miR-720 and two small RNAs (SNORD 13 and hsa-miR-3182 were identified as specifically sorafenib-induced. In Caco-2 cells, nine human miRNAs (hsa-miR-3142, hsa-miR-20a, hsa-miR-4301, hsa-miR-1290, hsa-miR-4286, hsa-miR-3182, hsa-miR-3142, hsa-miR-1246 and hsa-miR-720 were identified to be differentially regulated post sorafenib treatment. In conclusion, we confirmed sorafenib as a potential anti-neoplastic treatment strategy for CRC cells by demonstrating a growth-inhibitory and cell cycle–arresting effect of this drug. Changes in the miRNome indicate that some specific miRNAs might be relevant as indicators for sorafenib response, drug resistance and potential targets for combinatorial miRNA-based drug strategies.

  9. Hurthle Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Hurthle cell cancer Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  10. Treatment schedule-dependent effect of 5-fluorouracil and platinum derivatives in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kohji; Fujita, Megumi; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Minoru; Yokoyama, Teruyoshi; Okumura, Katsuhiko

    2012-02-14

    Combination chemotherapy for treating cancer often is superior in clinical efficacy to monotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the schedule-dependent effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and platinum derivatives (cisplatin or oxaliplatin) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, and to explore factors affecting it. Two human CRC-derived cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT116, were used. Three treatment schedules were tested, and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated with a WST-1 assay. Combined effects were assessed with isobolograms and a combination index. Cellular accumulation and DNA-binding of platinum were measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Exposure to 5-FU followed by cisplatin produced synergistic effects in DLD-1 cells, and the amount of platinum bound to DNA was substantially increased as compared with that for other schedules. 5-FU and oxaliplatin also tended to be synergistic when 5-FU was given first, but no significant change in the cellular kinetics of platinum was observed. On the other hand, in HCT116 cells, the combined effects of 5-FU and platinum derivatives were comparable among the three schedules. Exposure to 5-FU followed by cisplatin had a synergistic effect in DLD-1 cells, suggesting that the amount of platinum bound to DNA contributes to this result. Also, the effect was dependent on the type of platinum derivative and cell. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. EGFR mutation positive stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer : Treatment beyond progression

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    Katrijn eVan Assche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of death from cancer for both men en women. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease, but is only marginally effective. In about 30% of patients with advanced NSCLC in East Asia and in 10-15% in Western countries, EGFR mutations are found. In this population, first-line treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI erlotinib, gefitinib or afatinib is recommended. The treatment beyond progression is less well-defined. In this paper we present 3 patients, EGFR mutation positive, with local progression after an initial treatment with TKI. These patients were treated with local radiotherapy. TKI was temporarily stopped and restarted after radiotherapy. We give an overview of the literature and discuss the different treatment options in case of progression after TKI: TKI continuation with or without chemotherapy, TKI continuation with local therapy, alternative dosing or switch to next-generation TKI or combination therapy. There are different options for treatment beyond progression in EGFR mutation positive metastatic NSCLC, but the optimal strategy is still to be defined. Further research on this topic is ongoing.

  12. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  13. Percutaneous cryoablation for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikane Yamauchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous cryoablation for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between January 2004 and June 2010, 160 patients underwent computer tomography guided percutaneous cryoablation for lung tumors at our institution. Of these patients, histologically proven stage I lung cancer patients with more than one year of follow-up, were retrospectively reviewed. All of these patients were considered to be medically inoperable with Charlson comorbidity index of 3 or greater. Follow-up was based primarily on computed tomography. There were 22 patients with 34 tumors who underwent 25 sessions of cryoablation treatment. Complications were pneumothoraces in 7 treatments (28%, chest tube required in one treatment, and pleural effusions in 8 treatments (31%. The observation period ranged from 12-68 months, average 29±19 months, median 23 months. Local tumor progression was observed in one tumor (3%. Mean local tumor progression-free interval was 69±2 months. One patient died of lung cancer progression at 68 months. Two patients died of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis which were not considered to be directly associated with cryoablation, at 12 and 18 months, respectively. The overall 2- and 3-year survivals were 88% and 88%, respectively. Mean overall survival was 62±4 months. Median overall survival was 68 months. The disease-free 2- and 3-year survivals were 78% and 67%, respectively. Mean disease-free survival was 46±6 months. Pulmonary function tests were done in 16 patients (18 treatments before and after cryoablation. Percentage of predicted vital capacity, and percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, did not differ significantly before and after cryoablation (93±23 versus 90±21, and 70±11 versus 70±12, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although further accumulation of data is necessary regarding efficacy

  14. SRC drives growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines and is a marker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Bak, Martin; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kirkegaard, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms leading to antiestrogen resistance in estrogen-receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was therefore to identify biomarkers and novel treatments for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer. We performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive T47D breast cancer cells and T47D-derived tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistant cell lines. We found that dasatinib, a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor, inhibited growth of the antiestrogen resistant cells compared to parental T47D cells. Furthermore western blot analysis showed increased expression and phosphorylation of Src in the resistant cells and that dasatinib inhibited phosphorylation of Src and also signaling via Akt and Erk in all cell lines. Immunoprecipitation revealed Src: ER complexes only in the parental T47D cells. In fulvestrant resistant cells, Src formed complexes with the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor (HER)1 and HER2. Neither HER receptors nor ER were co-precipitated with Src in the tamoxifen resistant cell lines. Compared to treatment with dasatinib alone, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant had a stronger inhibitory effect on tamoxifen resistant cell growth, whereas dasatinib in combination with tamoxifen had no additive inhibitory effect on fulvestrant resistant growth. When performing immunohistochemical staining on 268 primary tumors from breast cancer patients who had received tamoxifen as first line endocrine treatment, we found that membrane expression of Src in the tumor cells was significant associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In conclusion, Src was identified as target for treatment of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cells. For tamoxifen resistant T47D cells, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant was superior to treatment with dasatinib alone. Src located at the membrane has potential as a new biomarker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen.

  15. SRC drives growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines and is a marker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Larsen

    Full Text Available The underlying mechanisms leading to antiestrogen resistance in estrogen-receptor α (ER-positive breast cancer is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was therefore to identify biomarkers and novel treatments for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer. We performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive T47D breast cancer cells and T47D-derived tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistant cell lines. We found that dasatinib, a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor, inhibited growth of the antiestrogen resistant cells compared to parental T47D cells. Furthermore western blot analysis showed increased expression and phosphorylation of Src in the resistant cells and that dasatinib inhibited phosphorylation of Src and also signaling via Akt and Erk in all cell lines. Immunoprecipitation revealed Src: ER complexes only in the parental T47D cells. In fulvestrant resistant cells, Src formed complexes with the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor (HER1 and HER2. Neither HER receptors nor ER were co-precipitated with Src in the tamoxifen resistant cell lines. Compared to treatment with dasatinib alone, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant had a stronger inhibitory effect on tamoxifen resistant cell growth, whereas dasatinib in combination with tamoxifen had no additive inhibitory effect on fulvestrant resistant growth. When performing immunohistochemical staining on 268 primary tumors from breast cancer patients who had received tamoxifen as first line endocrine treatment, we found that membrane expression of Src in the tumor cells was significant associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In conclusion, Src was identified as target for treatment of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cells. For tamoxifen resistant T47D cells, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant was superior to treatment with dasatinib alone. Src located at the membrane has potential as a new biomarker for reduced benefit of

  16. Src Drives Growth of Antiestrogen Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Is a Marker for Reduced Benefit of Tamoxifen Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sarah L.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Bak, Martin; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E.; Kirkegaard, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms leading to antiestrogen resistance in estrogen-receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was therefore to identify biomarkers and novel treatments for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer. We performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive T47D breast cancer cells and T47D-derived tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistant cell lines. We found that dasatinib, a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor, inhibited growth of the antiestrogen resistant cells compared to parental T47D cells. Furthermore western blot analysis showed increased expression and phosphorylation of Src in the resistant cells and that dasatinib inhibited phosphorylation of Src and also signaling via Akt and Erk in all cell lines. Immunoprecipitation revealed Src: ER complexes only in the parental T47D cells. In fulvestrant resistant cells, Src formed complexes with the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor (HER)1 and HER2. Neither HER receptors nor ER were co-precipitated with Src in the tamoxifen resistant cell lines. Compared to treatment with dasatinib alone, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant had a stronger inhibitory effect on tamoxifen resistant cell growth, whereas dasatinib in combination with tamoxifen had no additive inhibitory effect on fulvestrant resistant growth. When performing immunohistochemical staining on 268 primary tumors from breast cancer patients who had received tamoxifen as first line endocrine treatment, we found that membrane expression of Src in the tumor cells was significant associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In conclusion, Src was identified as target for treatment of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cells. For tamoxifen resistant T47D cells, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant was superior to treatment with dasatinib alone. Src located at the membrane has potential as a new biomarker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen. PMID

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle clusters radiosensitise human nasopharyngeal and lung cancer cells after alternating magnetic field treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jia; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhanjie; Huang, Jing; Qin, You; Li, Xu; Liu, Hongli; Yang, Kunyu; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Heat generated by magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) can be used for hyperthermia cancer treatment. Here, we have synthesised polyacrylic acid-coated MNCs according to previous report, with the ability to increase particle stability in suspension. Radiosensitisation effects of the MNCs under an AMF were investigated in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay, flow cytometry, clone formation assay, Western blotting, and a γ-H2AX experiment were used to explore the biocompatibility and radiosensitisation effect of the MNCs and their putative radiosensitisation mechanism. An NCI-H460 mouse xenograft model was used to investigate the anti-tumour effect under an AMF in vivo. The temperature of MNC fluids at different concentrations (200 μg/mL to 2 mg/mL) increased rapidly. The MNCs were endocytosed by the cells and were found to be biocompatible. Hsp70 and caspase-3 were found to be up-regulated upon MNCs under an AMF, radiation, and combination of both treatments. MNCs under an AMF efficiently radiosensitised both CNE-2 cells and NCI-H460 cells. Finally, the tumour inhibition rate after treatment with MNCs under an AMF and radiation was significantly higher than that after either treatment alone. The mechanism of radiosensitisation putatively involves inhibition of DNA repair and induction of apoptosis. The MNC fluids under an AMF enhanced the radiosensitivity of tumour cells both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. SRC drives growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines and is a marker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2015-01-01

    effect on tamoxifen resistant cell growth, whereas dasatinib in combination with tamoxifen had no additive inhibitory effect on fulvestrant resistant growth. When performing immunohistochemical staining on 268 primary tumors from breast cancer patients who had received tamoxifen as first line endocrine...... treatment, we found that membrane expression of Src in the tumor cells was significant associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In conclusion, Src was identified as target for treatment of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cells. For tamoxifen resistant T47D cells, combined...

  19. Combination of aging and dimethylhydrazine treatment causes an increase in cancer-stem cell population of rat colonic crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Edi; Misra, Sandhya; Du, Jianhua; Patel, Bhaumik B; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2009-07-31

    Aging is associated with increased incidence of colon cancers. It is also becoming evident that cancer stem cells (CSC) play a vital role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of colon cancer. Recently, we reported the presence of colon cancer stem-like cells in macroscopically normal mucosa in patients with adenomatous polyps and that they increase with aging, suggesting that aging may predispose the colon to carcinogenesis. In the current study we have examined the combined effects of aging and carcinogen exposure on the status of colon CSCs in an experimental model. We used young (4-6 months) and aged (22-24 months) rats and exposed them to the carcinogen, dimethylhydroxide (DMH). We investigated the expression of colon cancer stem cell markers, CD44, CD166, EpCam, and ALDH1 as well as EGFR expression in normal colonic crypt epithelium following carcinogen treatment. Our results demonstrate that aging per se or carcinogen treatment alone causes an increase in the number of colon cancer stems cells, as evidenced by increased immunoreactive-CSC-markers positive cells in the colonic mucosa. In aged rats, carcinogen exposure results in a more pronounced increase in colon cancer stem cells. Our study shows that in aging colon the effects of carcinogens are more pronounced, and an increase in colon CSCs is one of the earliest changes preceding tumor development. Moreover, the current investigation of the use of a panel of immunohistochemical markers of colon CSC can potentially serve as a prognostic marker during screening for colon cancer.

  20. Molecularly targeted approaches herald a new era of non-small-cell lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneda H

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyasu Kaneda,1 Takeshi Yoshida,1 Isamu Okamoto2 1Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University, Osakasayama, Japan; 2Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Abstract: The discovery of activating mutations in the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR gene in 2004 opened a new era of personalized treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. EGFR mutations are associated with a high sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib. Treatment with these agents in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients results in dramatically high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival compared with conventional standard chemotherapy. Subsequently, echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK, a novel driver oncogene, has been found in 2007. Crizotinib, the first clinically available ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor, appeared more effective compared with standard chemotherapy in NSCLC patients harboring EML4-ALK. The identification of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in NSCLC has further accelerated the shift to personalized treatment based on the appropriate patient selection according to detailed molecular genetic characterization. This review summarizes these genetic biomarker-based approaches to NSCLC, which allow the instigation of individualized therapy to provide the desired clinical outcome. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor, ALK rearrangement, gefitinib, erlotinib, crizotinib

  1. Role of EGF inhibitors in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen H Lorch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Jochen H LorchDana Farber Cancer institute, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality worldwide. In recent years, inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor has become an established treatment strategy in SCCHN both in the up-front treatment and in the recurrent and metastatic setting. This review summarizes the most important developments of the recent past and provides an overview of newer developments. Keywords: squamous cell cancer, head, neck, epidermal growth factor receptor

  2. Treatment of small cell lung cancer with TRA-8 in combination with cisplatin and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, James A.; Willey, Christopher D.; Yang, Eddy S.; Dobelbower, Michael C.; Sanford, Leisa L.; Bright, Sheila J.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Raisch, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represents a minority of SCLC. Despite extensive clinical trials, standard treatment remains cisplatin-based chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation (TI). This study focused on the interaction of cisplatin/radiation with the anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody TRA-8 in SCLC cells. TRA-8 binds specifically to DR5 and has been shown to activate apoptosis. Methods: Four human SCLC cell lines were utilized for experimentation (SCLC-41, SCLC-58, SCLC-68, and SCLC-74). Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein levels of DR5, DR4 and pro-caspase 8 for each cell line. Using a tetrazolium-based assay (XTT), the IC 50 values for cisplatin with or without TRA-8 were determined for the SCLC cell lines. Four SCLC lines were assayed with a combination of TRA-8 (10 μg/ml), 2 Gy radiation and various concentrations of cisplatin. Apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC and cleaved caspase immunoblotting. Using a SCLC-58 subcutaneous xenograft model, treatment began 21 d after tumor cell injection. Treatment included weekly cisplatin (4 mg/kg) and radiation of 1 Gy (24 h after cisplatin) and TRA-8 (200 μg) was administered i.p. twice weekly for three weeks. Results: Immunoblot analysis showed similar levels of DR5 for all cell lines with variable levels of DR4. Various concentrations of TRA-8 antibody (⩽10 μg/ml) induced no significant cytotoxicity in the SCLC cell lines. The in vitro combination treatment with TRA-8 (10 μg/ml), 1.25 μg/ml cisplatin and 2 Gy radiation showed increased cytotoxicity when compared to combinations without TRA-8. Furthermore, the triple combination demonstrated the greatest amount of apoptosis as measured by Annexin V staining. The in vivo studies showed the combination of 1 Gy, cisplatin and TRA-8 extended the tumor doubling time to 44 d as compared to any doublet treatment groups that ranged from 12 to 20 d. Analysis of survival data showed 100% of the combination group

  3. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Brian I; McDermott, David F; Hammers, Hans; Bro, William; Bukowski, Ronald M; Faba, Bernard; Faba, Jo; Figlin, Robert A; Hutson, Thomas; Jonasch, Eric; Joseph, Richard W; Leibovich, Bradley C; Olencki, Thomas; Pantuck, Allan J; Quinn, David I; Seery, Virginia; Voss, Martin H; Wood, Christopher G; Wood, Laura S; Atkins, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has produced durable clinical benefit in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). In the past, patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have achieved complete responses, many of which have lasted for multiple decades. More recently, a large number of new agents have been approved for RCC, several of which attack tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and VEGF receptors (VEGFR), as well as tumor metabolism, inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Additionally, a new class of immunotherapy agents, immune checkpoint inhibitors, is emerging and will play a significant role in the treatment of patients with RCC. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a Task Force, which met to consider the current role of approved immunotherapy agents in RCC, to provide guidance to practicing clinicians by developing consensus recommendations and to set the stage for future immunotherapeutic developments in RCC.

  4. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  5. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France); Richard, S.; Khalil, A. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Alexandre, I. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Centre of Bligny, Briis-sous-Forges (France); Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Lotz, J.P. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France)

    2014-11-04

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis.

  6. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis

  7. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  8. Studying Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cell Characteristics for Developing New Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardo, Enza; Cioffi, Michele; Sancho, Patricia; Crusz, Shanthini; Heeschen, Christopher

    2015-06-20

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) contains a subset of exclusively tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) which have been shown to drive tumor initiation, metastasis and resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. Here we describe a specific methodology for culturing primary human pancreatic CSCs as tumor spheres in anchorage-independent conditions. Cells are grown in serum-free, non-adherent conditions in order to enrich for CSCs while their more differentiated progenies do not survive and proliferate during the initial phase following seeding of single cells. This assay can be used to estimate the percentage of CSCs present in a population of tumor cells. Both size (which can range from 35 to 250 micrometers) and number of tumor spheres formed represents CSC activity harbored in either bulk populations of cultured cancer cells or freshly harvested and digested tumors. Using this assay, we recently found that metformin selectively ablates pancreatic CSCs; a finding that was subsequently further corroborated by demonstrating diminished expression of pluripotency-associated genes/surface markers and reduced in vivo tumorigenicity of metformin-treated cells. As the final step for preclinical development we treated mice bearing established tumors with metformin and found significantly prolonged survival. Clinical studies testing the use of metformin in patients with PDAC are currently underway (e.g., NCT01210911, NCT01167738, and NCT01488552). Mechanistically, we found that metformin induces a fatal energy crisis in CSCs by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reducing mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In contrast, non-CSCs were not eliminated by metformin treatment, but rather underwent reversible cell cycle arrest. Therefore, our study serves as a successful example for the potential of in vitro sphere formation as a screening tool to identify compounds that potentially target CSCs, but this technique will require further in vitro and in vivo

  9. Skin cancer (Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma): new cases, treatment practice, and health care costs in new brunswick, Canada, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Wilfred; Hayes, Robert; Hanson, Dana W; Zhang, Bin; Boudreau, Bonnie; Leonfellner, Suzanne

    2014-10-01

    In Canada, there is no formal process for registering nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC); thus, the epidemiology, treatment practices, and associated health costs are not well known. To investigate trends in new cases of skin cancer, treatment practices, and health care costs in New Brunswick, Canada. Data were extracted from the Provincial Cancer Registry and New Brunswick administrative health databases for 2002-2010. New cases: Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) was the most common skin cancer diagnosed, and incidence rates significantly increased between 1992 and 2010.Treatment practice: Dermatologists managed the majority (45%) of the overall skin cancer treatments.Health care costs: NMSC accounted for ∼80% of the health care costs for skin cancer and was dominated by BCC. Development of best practice treatment guidelines for NMSC in New Brunswick would improve future health care efficiencies, and standard protocols for registering new cases of NMSC in Canada would strengthen surveillance and reporting capacity.

  10. Pembrolizumab in the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasundaram A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwin Somasundaram, Timothy F Burns Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading killer of both men and women in the US, and the 5-year survival remains poor. However, the approval of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy has shifted the treatment paradigm and provides hope for improved survival. The ability of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC to evade the host immune system can be overcome by agents such as pembrolizumab (MK-3475/lambrolizumab, which is a monoclonal antibody targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1 receptor. In early studies, treatment with pembrolizumab led to dramatic and durable responses in select patients (PD-L1+ tumors. This remarkable efficacy lead to approval of pembrolizumab in the second-line setting as response rates were almost doubled compared to standard of care (SOC chemotherapy. Most recently, data in the first-line setting from the KEYNOTE-024 study have redefined the SOC therapy for a selected subset of patients. In patients with ≥50% PD-L1+ tumors, pembrolizumab had a clear progression-free survival and overall survival benefit. Toxicity was mostly immune related and similar to checkpoint blockade toxicities observed in previous studies. The initial approval and subsequent studies of pembrolizumab required and utilized a companion diagnostic test, Dako’s IHC 22C3, to assess PD-L1 status of patients. The evaluation and scoring system of this assay has been used by other companies as a reference to develop their own assays, which may complicate selection of patients. Finally, the impact of pembrolizumab in NSCLC is growing as evidenced by the numerous, ongoing trials open for combinations with chemotherapy, chemoradiation, other immunotherapeutics, immunomodulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, PI3K inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, hypomethylating agents, and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Further studies

  11. Effects of Administered Cardioprotective Drugs on Treatment Response of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tim A D; Phyu, Su M; Akabuogu, Emmanuel U

    2016-01-01

    Anticancer drug treatment, particularly with anthracyclines, is frequently associated with cardiotoxicity, an effect exacerbated by trastuzumab. Several compounds are in use clinically to attenuate the cardiac-damaging effects of chemotherapy drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, the anti-diabetic drug metformin, and dexrazoxane. However, there is concern that the cardiac-preserving mechanisms of these drugs may also limit the anticancer efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents. Herein two breast cancer cell lines, SKBr3 and BT474, overexpressing human epithelial receptor 2 (HER2), the target of the humanised antibody trastuzumab, were treated with a range of concentrations (20-2000 nM) of doxorubicin with and without trastuzumab in the presence of clinically relevant doses of the ACE inhibitor enalapril, the beta-blocker carvedilol, metformin or dexrazoxane, and cell survival determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. None of the drugs reduced the anticancer effect of doxorubicin or trastuzumab (nor of the two drugs combined). Using Chou and Talalay's combination index, dexrazoxane and doxorubicin were found to act synergistically on the SKBr3 cells. (18)F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) incorporation was reduced by treatment of SKBr3 cells with doxorubicin and this was shown to be due to reduced phosphorylation of (18)F-FDG in doxorubicin-treated cells. Treatment of SKBr3 cells with doxorubicin and dexrazoxane further reduced (18)F-FDG incorporation, indicating that the synergy in the cytotoxicity of these two drugs was reflected in their combined effect on (18)F-FDG incorporation. Commonly administered cardioprotective drugs do not interfere with anticancer activity of doxorubicin or tratsuzumab. Further studies to establish the effect of cardioprotective drugs on anticancer drug efficacy would be beneficial. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research

  12. Novel treatment options in stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Svitlana; Lauwers, Patrick; Vandaele, Frederik; van Meerbeeck, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    In the last 5 years, the current management of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer has been challenged due to novel surgical approaches and advances in radiation technology. The outcome after a sublobar resection is promising, especially for tumors less than 2 cm. Other treatment opportunities are available for high risk patients with comorbidity and impaired pulmonary function. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is a good alternative treatment to surgery, especially in elderly and comorbid patients. However, randomized evidence comparing sublobar resection and stereotactic radiotherapy is presently lacking. The most recent development in radiotherapy is hadron therapy with a presumed reduced toxicity because of its peculiar physical and biological effects. Promising thermal and microwave ablative techniques are in development and have specific niche indications.

  13. Crizotinib in the treatment of non--small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Sacha I; Gautschi, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    An anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation giving rise to activated ALK tyrosine kinase is present in approximately 5% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Crizotinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting ALK, met proto-oncogene, and c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1). It was recently approved in several countries for the treatment of patients with advanced, ALK-rearranged NSCLC. In 2012, results from the first phase III trial showing superiority of crizotinib compared with standard chemotherapy in second-line treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC were presented. Furthermore, crizotinib was recently shown to be active in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Here, we give an overview of the molecular pathogenesis of ALK-rearranged NSCLC, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of crizotinib, and clinical trials of crizotinib for ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metatastic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    calculation of SI as explained in Materials and Meth - ods section. 812 FUSION OF DCs WITH BREAST CARCINOMA CELLS were isolated by FACS gating of cells...tumour-in- duced dendritic-cell defects. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 4: 941–952. 10. Asavaroengchai, W., Y. Kotera, and J. J. Mule . 2002. Tumor lysate-pulsed...J. D. Geiger, and J. J. Mule . 2002. A phase I trial of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells in the treatment of advanced cancer. Clin. Cancer Res. 8

  15. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Off-Label Drug Use in Cancer Treatment Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) CAM for Patients CAM for Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Lasers in Cancer Treatment On This Page What is laser light? What is laser therapy, and how is it used in cancer treatment? ...

  16. Patients' preferences: a discrete-choice experiment for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Bethge, Susanne

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths and thus represents a global health problem. According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, approximately 1.37 million people die each year from lung cancer. Different therapeutic approaches as well as several treatment options exist. To date decisions on which therapies to use have largely been made by clinical experts. Comparative preference studies show that underlying weighting of treatment goals by experts is not necessarily congruent with the preferences of affected patients. The aim of this empirical study was to ascertain patient preferences in relation to treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After identification of patient-relevant treatment attributes via literature review and qualitative interviews(ten) a discrete-choice experiment including seven patient-relevant attributes was conducted using a fractional factorial NGene-design. Statistical data analysis was performed using latent class models. The qualitative part of this study identified outcome measures related to efficacy, side effects and mode of administration. A total of 211 NSCLC patients (N = 211) participated in the computer-assisted personal interview. A clear preference for an increase in "progression-free survival" (coef.: 1.087) and a reduction of "tumor-associated symptoms"(cough, shortness of breath and pain); coef.: 1.090) was demonstrated, followed by the reduction of side effects: "nausea and vomiting" (coef.: 0.605); "rash" (coef.: 0.432); "diarrhea" (coef.: 0.427); and, "tiredness and fatigue" (coef.: 0.423). The "mode of administration" was less important for participants (coef.: 0.141). Preference measurement showed "progression-free survival" and "tumor-associated symptoms" had a significant influence on the treatment decision. Subgroup analysis revealed that the importance of "progression-free survival" increases with increased therapy experience. Based on the presented results therapies can be

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide . Taking Aristolochia fangchi , a Chinese herb . Drinking water from a well that has high ... patients may be given chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ...

  18. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treatment for your prostate cancer is chosen after a thorough evaluation. Your doctor ...

  19. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  20. Intracellular ZnO Nanorods Conjugated with Protoporphyrin for Local Mediated Photochemistry and Efficient Treatment of Single Cancer Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishwar, S.; Asif, M. H.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Larsson, Per-Olof

    2010-10-01

    ZnO nanorods (NRs) with high surface area to volume ratio and biocompatibility is used as an efficient photosensitizer carrier system and at the same time providing intrinsic white light needed to achieve cancer cell necrosis. In this letter, ZnO nanorods used for the treatment of breast cancer cell (T47D) are presented. To adjust the sample for intracellular experiments, we have grown the ZnO nanorods on the tip of borosilicate glass capillaries (0.5 μm diameter) by aqueous chemical growth technique. The grown ZnO nanorods were conjugated using protoporphyrin dimethyl ester (PPDME), which absorbs the light emitted by the ZnO nanorods. Mechanism of cytotoxicity appears to involve the generation of singlet oxygen inside the cell. The novel findings of cell-localized toxicity indicate a potential application of PPDME-conjugated ZnO NRs in the necrosis of breast cancer cell within few minutes.

  1. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL RADIATIOTHERAPY AND ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED RADIATIOTHERAPY IN CHEMORADIATION TREATMENT FOR SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 5-year treatment outcomes of 69 patients with stage IIA–IIIA locally advanced small cell lung cancer have been presented. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered in the uneven daily dose fractionation (single dose of 1 + 1,5 Gy with a 5–6hour interval to a total dose of 60–70 Gy depending on the health status and lung function. The complete response was achieved in 13 (42 % patients, the median survival was 28 months and the 5-year survival rate was 26,2 %. Grade III lung and pericardium toxicities (according to RTOG toxicity scale were observed in 3,2 % and 6,5 % of patients, respectively. No grade III–IV radiation-induced blood and esophageal damages were found.

  2. Characterising Castrate Tolerant Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ASHLEE KATE CLARK

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent disease in aging males. This thesis explores prostate cancer cells that escape current therapy and give rise to end-stage disease. Using sophisticated experimental approaches, this important cancer cell population was identified and characterised in human prostate cancer tissues.  Our discoveries will eventually lead to improved cancer treatments for men with prostate cancer.

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  4. DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment abrogates 17 beta-estradiol-induced cell growth and restores expression of DNA repair genes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Treas, Justin; Tyagi, Tulika; Gao, Weimin

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of estrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer. Though increased cell growth and loss of DNA repair capacity is one of the proposed mechanisms for estrogen-induced cancers, the mechanism through which estrogen induces cell growth and decreases DNA repair capacity is not clear. DNA hypermethylation is known to inactivate DNA repair genes and apoptotic response in cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the role of DNA hypermethylation in estrogen-induced cell growth and regulation of DNA repair genes expression in breast cancer cells. To achieve this objective, the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells either pretreated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or untreated (as control) were exposed to 17 beta-estradiol (E2), and its effect on cell growth and expression of DNA repair genes were measured. The result revealed that 5-aza-dC abrogates the E2-induced growth in MCF-7 cells. An increased expression of OGG1, MSH4, and MLH1 by 5-aza-dC treatment alone, suggest the DNA hypermethylation as a potential cause for decreased expression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. The decreased expression of ERCC1, XPC, OGG1, and MLH1 by E2 alone and its restoration by co-treatment with 5-aza-dC further suggest that E2 reduces the expression of these DNA repair genes potentially through promoter hypermethylation. Reactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and abrogation of E2-induced cell growth by 5-aza-dC treatment suggest that estrogen causes increased growth in breast cancer cells potentially through the inhibition of MMR-mediated apoptotic response. In summary, this study suggests that estrogen increases cell growth and decreases the DNA repair capacity in breast cancer cells, at least in part, through epigenetic mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MEK inhibitors under development for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is intimately implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Aberrant MAPK signaling resulting from the upstream activating mutations converges on mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), making MEK inhibition an attractive strategy for the treatment of NSCLC. Several MEK inhibitors have demonstrated anticancer activity in patients with NSCLC. Areas covered: In this article, we discuss the biological rationale for the use of MEK inhibitors and summarize the clinical experience with MEK1/2 inhibitors for the treatment of NSCLC, from initial phase I studies to phase II/III studies, both as monotherapy or in combination with other anticancer agents. Expert opinion: Trametinib in combination with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib represents the first MEK1/2 inhibitor containing regimen that is approved for advanced BRAF V600E -mutant NSCLC. Other MEK1/2 inhibitors that are also in advanced stages of clinical development include selumetinib, cobimetinib, and binimetinib. Several studies of MEK inhibitor combination therapies are underway, including trials using combined MEK inhibition and immune checkpoint blockade. Further research aimed at discovering biomarkers of response and resistance to MEK1/2 inhibitors will be needed to develop rational combination strategies for the treatment of NSCLC driven by aberrant MAPK signaling.

  6. Microgel-encapsulated methylene blue for the treatment of breast cancer cells by photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Anil; Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Seo, Seong S

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is gaining increasing recognition for breast cancer treatment because it offers local selectivity and reduced toxic side effects compared to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In PDT, photosensitizer drugs are loaded in different nanomaterials and used in combination with light exposure. However, the most representative issue with PDT is the difficulty of nanomaterials to encapsulate anticancer drugs at high doses, which results in low efficacy of the PDT treatment. Here, we proposed the development of the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel for the encapsulation of methylene blue, an anticancer drug, for its use as breast cancer treatment in MCF-7 cell line. We developed biocompatible microgels based on nonfunctionalized PNIPAM and its corresponding anionically functionalized PNIPAM and polyacrylic acid (PNIPAM-co-PAA) microgel. Methylene blue was used as the photosensitizer drug because of its ability to generate toxic reactive oxygen species upon exposure to light at 664 nm. Core PNIPAM and core/shell PNIPAM-co-PAA microgels were synthesized and characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The effect of methylene blue was evaluated using the MCF-7 cell line. Loading of methylene blue in core PNIPAM microgel was higher than that in the core/shell PNIPAM-co-PAA microgel, indicating that electrostatic interactions did not play an important role in loading a cationic drug. This behavior is probably due to the skin layer inhibiting the high uptake of drugs in the PNIPAM-co-PAA microgel. Core PNIPAM microgel effectively retained the cationic drug (i.e., methylene blue) for several hours compared to core/shell PNIPAM-co-PAA and enhanced its photodynamic efficacy in vitro more than that of free methylene blue. Our results showed that the employment of core PNIPAM and core/shell PNIPAM-co-PAA microgels enhanced the encapsulation of methylene blue. Core PNIPAM microgel released the drug more slowly

  7. Safety of Racotumomab in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Leslie; Estevez, Daymys; Gaston, Yoisbel

    2013-01-01

    In Cuba, lung cancer ranks second in incidence and first in mortality. Therefore, it is necessary to identify new therapeutical options. Immunological approaches are interesting because of the potential activity without the toxicities of conventional chemotherapy. The Center of Molecular Immunology developed a vaccine called Racotumomab; it acts on the lung carcinoma inducing an increase in tumor apoptosis and a decrease in the number of tumor vessels. A expanded access, multicenter, open study was conducted in 86 patients with non-small cell lung cancer in order to assess its safety. The administered dose was 1 mg/mL intradermically. The first 5 doses were administered every 14 days and the remaining 10 every 28 days until completing the treatment. The follow-up re immunizations were every 28 days. The occurrence of adverse events (AE) was analyzed and they were classified according to CTC v4.02 criteria. Adverse events were reported by 58 patients (67.4%), making a total of 215 events. burning at the injection site was the most frequently reported event, 32 (14.9%). The use of the vaccine in the patients under study showed good safety and tolerance

  8. Synthetic Beta-Lactam Antibiotics as a Selective Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis Inducer: Significance in Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    cancer cells. Front Biosci. 2005 May 1;10:1183-90. 11. Turos E, Long TE, Heldreth B, Leslie JM, Reddy GS, Wang Y , Coates C, Konaklieva M, Dickey S...S. J. Martin, D. R. Green & J. Y . Wang: Degradation of retinoblastoma protein in tumor necrosis factor- and CD95 - induced cell death. J Biol Chem...MCF10AT cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 65, 101-110 (2001) 21. Sanchez-Prieto, R., J. M. Rojas, Y . Taya & J. S. Gutkind: A role for the p38 mitogen

  9. Treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer with erlotinib. Two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Bárbara; Gomes, Joana; Nogueira, Carla; Ferreira, Diva; Neves, Sofia; Barroso, Ana; Conde, Sara; Machado, José Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Early studies with tirosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), namely Erlotinib and Gefitinib, in patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), showed that although most patients did not respond radiologically, a small percentage of those patients (about 10%) had an excellent response to treatment, with radiological regression and clinical response duration. Four patient populations are known as having better response to TKI as opposed to other patients: adenocarcinoma patients, non-smokers, women and asians. Nevertheless, a good general status remains a predictive factor for treatment response. The discovery of the EGFR mutation in NSCLC patients' tumors and its association with clinical response to Erlotinib and Gefitinib, confirmed by a considerable number of retrospective and prospective studies, showed that response rates are between 75-80% in patients carrying this mutation. Although several mutations have been identified, the two commonest (approximately 90%) are located in exons 19 and 21. The authors present two patients studied and treated at the Pulmonology Department's Lung Oncology Unit of CHVNGaia, where Erlotinib was used as 3(rd) line treatment: in one patient, which was part of the population with good response to TKI, a classic exon 19 was identified, and was treated with Erlotinib for twenty months with clinical stability; the other patient did not belong to the above mentioned population and an Exon 20 mutation was identified (a mutation not yet described in literature, being not clear its association with response to treatment with TKI) - treatment was stopped after 7.4months due to disease progression. Rev Port Pneumol 2008; XIV (Supl 3): S43-S51. © 2008 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia/SPP.

  10. Cryotherapy for renal-cell cancer: diagnosis, treatment, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, M. H.; Lagerveld, B. W.; Laguna, M. P.; de la Rosette, J. J. M. C. H.; Wijkstra, H.

    2006-01-01

    Cryotherapy is a curative treatment option for patients with small ( <4 cm) renal-cell cancers. For the followup of ablated lesions, imaging is the only available method, but the best tool has not yet been determined. The method selected should be able to determine the presence or absence of

  11. Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor as a novel marker of stem cells in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Fang, Bingliang; Mohan, Radhe; Chang, Joe Y

    2012-11-01

    Treatment resistance resulting from the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains a challenge in cancer treatment. Little is known about possible markers of CSCs in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) as one such marker of CSCs in models of treatment-resistant NSCLC. Resistant H460 and A549 cell lines were established by repeated exposure to paclitaxel or fractionated radiation. CSC markers were measured by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We also established stable CAR-overexpressing and stable shRNA-CAR-knockdown cell lines and assessed their survival, invasiveness, and tumorigenic capabilities with clonogenic, telomerase, Matrigel, and tumor formation assays. CAR expression was associated with CSC phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-overexpressing cells were more treatment-resistant, self-renewing, and tumorigenic than were parental cells, and shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAR expression was sufficient to inhibit these functions. CAR expression also correlated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We showed for the first time that CAR is a marker of CSCs and may affect the activities of CSCs in treatment-resistant NSCLC. CAR may prove to be a target for CSC treatment and a predictor of treatment response in patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor as a novel marker of stem cells in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Fang, Bingliang; Mohan, Radhe; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment resistance resulting from the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains a challenge in cancer treatment. Little is known about possible markers of CSCs in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) as one such marker of CSCs in models of treatment-resistant NSCLC. Materials and methods Resistant H460 and A549 cell lines were established by repeated exposure to paclitaxel or fractionated radiation. CSC markers were measured by western blotting and flow cytometry. We also established stable CAR-overexpressing and stable shRNA-CAR-knockdown cell lines and assessed their survival, invasiveness, and tumorigenic capabilities with clonogenic, telomerase, Matrigel, and tumor formation assays. Results CAR expression was associated with CSC phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-overexpressing cells were more treatment-resistant, self-renewing, and tumorigenic than were parental cells, and shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAR expression was sufficient to inhibit these functions. CAR expression also correlated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Conclusions We showed for the first time that CAR is a marker of CSCs and may affect the activities of CSCs in treatment-resistant NSCLC. CAR may prove to be a target for CSC treatment and a predictor of treatment response in patients with NSCLC. PMID:23022172

  13. Inhibition of RalA signaling pathway in treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Heather; Patel, Vijay; Jacob, Mark A; Borrego-Diaz, Emma; Wang, Kun; Young, Derek A; Wise, Amanda L; Huang, Chao; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy; Williamson, Stephen K; Taylor, Sarah A; Tawfik, Ossama; Esfandyari, Tuba; Farassati, Faris

    2012-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer and relatively resistant to chemotherapy. The most prevalent molecular abnormality in NSCLC is the overactivation of K-Ras proto-oncogene; therefore, elucidating down-stream Ras signaling in NSCLC is significantly important in developing novel therapies against this malignancy. Our work indicates that RalA, an important effector of Ras, is activated in NSCLC cell lines. While RalA was also overactivated in fetal human broncho-epithelial cells, RalBP1 (Ral binding protein-1), an important down-stream effector of RalA, was expressed at higher levels in cancer cell lines. Aurora kinase-A (AKA), an upstream activator of RalA, was also found to be active only in malignant cells. The outcome of inhibition of RalA (by gene specific silencing using a lentivirus) on the malignant phenotype of A549 cells was also studied. While proliferation and invasiveness of A549 cells were reduced upon silencing RalA, apoptosis and necrosis were elevated in such conditions. Additionally, the in vivo tumorigenesis of A549 cells was reduced upon partial inhibition of RalA and AKA using pharmacological inhibitors. Finally, we were interested in evaluating the level of active RalA in the fraction of NSCLC cells expressing cancer stem cell markers. For this purpose cells with increased expression of CD44 were separated from A549 cells and compared with cells with low level of expression of this marker and an unsorted population. A significant enhancement of RalA activation in high CD44+ cells was found as potential evidence for involvement of RalA signaling in initiation of the neoplastic procedure and an important contributor for tumor maintenance in NSCLC. Further studies can reveal therapeutic, preventive and diagnostic value of RalA pathway in this deadly disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Resveratrol and cancer treatment: updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengdong; Chen, Ke; Cheng, Liang; Yan, Bin; Qian, Weikun; Cao, Junyu; Li, Jie; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Yang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Cancer, a growing health problem worldwide, affects millions of people every year. The overall survival rates of most cancers have been prolonged owing to the efforts of clinicians and scientists. However, some tumors develop resistance to chemoradiotherapeutic agents, and the cancer research community continues to search for effective sensitizers. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic phytoalexin, has shown promising effects in inhibiting proliferation and cancer progression in several tumor models. However, its molecular mechanisms and applications in chemotherapy and radiotherapy have yet to be fully determined. In this concise review, we highlight the role and related molecular mechanisms of resveratrol in cancer treatment. In particular, we focus on the role of resveratrol in the tumor microenvironment and the sensitization of cancer cells for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Resveratrol shows promising efficacies in cancer treatment and may be applied in clinical therapy, but it requires further clinical study. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Severe, but not mild heat-shock treatment induces immunogenic cell death in cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adkins, I.; Sadílková, L.; Hradilová, N.; Tomala, Jakub; Kovář, Marek; Spíšek, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku e1311433. ISSN 2162-4011 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Antitumor immunity * calreticulin * cancer immunotherapy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  16. Modeling Cancer Cell Growth Dynamics In vitro in Response to Antimitotic Drug Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Lorz, Alexander

    2017-08-30

    Investigating the role of intrinsic cell heterogeneity emerging from variations in cell-cycle parameters and apoptosis is a crucial step toward better informing drug administration. Antimitotic agents, widely used in chemotherapy, target exclusively proliferative cells and commonly induce a prolonged mitotic arrest followed by cell death via apoptosis. In this paper, we developed a physiologically motivated mathematical framework for describing cancer cell growth dynamics that incorporates the intrinsic heterogeneity in the time individual cells spend in the cell-cycle and apoptosis process. More precisely, our model comprises two age-structured partial differential equations for the proliferative and apoptotic cell compartments and one ordinary differential equation for the quiescent compartment. To reflect the intrinsic cell heterogeneity that governs the growth dynamics, proliferative and apoptotic cells are structured in “age,” i.e., the amount of time remaining to be spent in each respective compartment. In our model, we considered an antimitotic drug whose effect on the cellular dynamics is to induce mitotic arrest, extending the average cell-cycle length. The prolonged mitotic arrest induced by the drug can trigger apoptosis if the time a cell will spend in the cell cycle is greater than the mitotic arrest threshold. We studied the drug\\'s effect on the long-term cancer cell growth dynamics using different durations of prolonged mitotic arrest induced by the drug. Our numerical simulations suggest that at confluence and in the absence of the drug, quiescence is the long-term asymptotic behavior emerging from the cancer cell growth dynamics. This pattern is maintained in the presence of small increases in the average cell-cycle length. However, intermediate increases in cell-cycle length markedly decrease the total number of cells and can drive the cancer population to extinction. Intriguingly, a large “switch-on/ switch-off” increase in the average

  17. Modeling Cancer Cell Growth Dynamics In vitro in Response to Antimitotic Drug Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lorz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the role of intrinsic cell heterogeneity emerging from variations in cell-cycle parameters and apoptosis is a crucial step toward better informing drug administration. Antimitotic agents, widely used in chemotherapy, target exclusively proliferative cells and commonly induce a prolonged mitotic arrest followed by cell death via apoptosis. In this paper, we developed a physiologically motivated mathematical framework for describing cancer cell growth dynamics that incorporates the intrinsic heterogeneity in the time individual cells spend in the cell-cycle and apoptosis process. More precisely, our model comprises two age-structured partial differential equations for the proliferative and apoptotic cell compartments and one ordinary differential equation for the quiescent compartment. To reflect the intrinsic cell heterogeneity that governs the growth dynamics, proliferative and apoptotic cells are structured in “age,” i.e., the amount of time remaining to be spent in each respective compartment. In our model, we considered an antimitotic drug whose effect on the cellular dynamics is to induce mitotic arrest, extending the average cell-cycle length. The prolonged mitotic arrest induced by the drug can trigger apoptosis if the time a cell will spend in the cell cycle is greater than the mitotic arrest threshold. We studied the drug’s effect on the long-term cancer cell growth dynamics using different durations of prolonged mitotic arrest induced by the drug. Our numerical simulations suggest that at confluence and in the absence of the drug, quiescence is the long-term asymptotic behavior emerging from the cancer cell growth dynamics. This pattern is maintained in the presence of small increases in the average cell-cycle length. However, intermediate increases in cell-cycle length markedly decrease the total number of cells and can drive the cancer population to extinction. Intriguingly, a large

  18. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals. Talk with your doctor about using stool softeners or laxatives if you are straining when you ... flushing Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Drinking water safely during cancer treatment Dry mouth during cancer ...

  19. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  20. Profile of ramucirumab in the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maryann R Cooper,1 Chelsea Binkowski,2,3 Jessica Hartung,2,4 Jennifer Towle1 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy – Worcester/Manchester, MCPHS University, Manchester, NH, 2School of Pharmacy – Boston, MCPHS University, Boston, MA, 3North America Medical Affairs, 4Global Medical Affairs, Sanofi Oncology, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: The interaction between vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor is an important therapeutic target due to the importance of this pathway in carcinogenesis. In particular, this pathway promotes and regulates angiogenesis as well as increases endothelial cell proliferation, permeability, and survival. Ramucirumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, the key receptor implicated in angiogenesis. Currently, ramucirumab is approved for the second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in combination with docetaxel. In a Phase III clinical trial, ramucirumab was shown to improve the overall survival in patients with disease progression, despite platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC. This review describes the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, adverse event profile, and the clinical activity of ramucirumab observed in Phase II and III trials in NSCLC. Keywords: NSCLC, antiangiogenesis, VEGF-targeted therapy

  1. Role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibition in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croegaert, Katie; Kolesar, Jill M

    2015-09-01

    Published data on the clinical efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, and costs of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed and compared. The ALK protein functions as a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase; rearrangements of the ALK gene are associated with the development of NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology. Crizotinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved in 2011 as a first-line therapy for patients with metastatic ALK mutation-driven NSCLC. Significantly improved response rates and progression-free survival (PFS) have been reported with the use of crizotinib therapy versus standard chemotherapy, but mutations conferring resistance to treatment develop in most cases. The second-generation ALK inhibitor ceritinib was approved in 2014 for the treatment of ALK-mutated NSCLC in patients who are intolerant or develop resistance to crizotinib. In a clinical trial of ceritinib involving 130 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, the majority of whom had experienced disease progression during crizotinib use, patients receiving at least 400 mg of ceritinib daily had an overall response rate of 56% and median PFS of seven months. Adverse effects commonly reported with the use of either drug include visual disturbances, gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., diarrhea), and liver enzyme abnormalities. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib provide an effective treatment approach for patients with ALK-mutated NSCLC. Efficacy data for both crizotinib and ceritinib indicate improved response rates and PFS with the use of either drug as an alternative to standard chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry Llyn; Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar; Wong, Ching-yee Oliver; Margolis, Jeffrey Harold; Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  3. Change in number and size of circulating tumor cells with high telomerase activity during treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Onimaru, Manabu; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Sato, Jun; Ito, Shun; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-12-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is useful for estimating the prognosis of patients with cancer. We previously reported the detection of CTCs by OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. We demonstrated that the number of large (L)-GFP+ cells (≥7.735 µm in diameter) in peripheral blood samples correlated significantly with the prognosis of treatment-naïve gastric cancer patients, whereas the number of small (S)-GFP+ cells (number of GFP+ cells during treatment, and analyzed the association between the number of GFP+ cells in blood samples and the outcome of patients. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 37 gastric patients prior and subsequent to surgery (three samples per time point). Upon infection of blood cells with OBP-401, GFP+ cells of different sizes were counted and measured. The association between the number of GFP+ cells and surgical outcome was determined by statistical analysis. The median follow-up period after surgery was 39 months. Although the difference was not significant, patients with ≥6 L-GFP+ cells in preoperative blood samples had a lower relapse-free survival rate than patients with 0-5 L-GFP+ cells. There was no significant correlation between the number of L-GFP+ cells in postoperative blood samples and the prognosis of patients receiving adjuvant therapy. Although the difference was not significant, the number of S-GFP+ cells in samples from patients who had received postoperative chemotherapy was higher than in those who had not. The number of L-GFP+ cells was not significantly correlated with the relapse-free survival rate in gastric cancer patients who underwent surgery. The number of S-GFP+ cells was relatively high in samples from patients who had received postoperative chemotherapy.

  4. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and the future of preclinical models for predicting their toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja

    2017-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy has achieved highly promising results in clinical trials, particularly in B-cell malignancies. However, reports of serious adverse events including a number of patient deaths have raised concerns about safety of this treatment. Presently available preclinical models are not designed for predicting toxicities seen in human patients. Besides choosing the right animal model, careful considerations must be taken in chimeric antigen receptor T-cell design and the amount of T cells infused. The development of more sophisticated in vitro models and humanized mouse models for preclinical modeling and toxicity tests will help us to improve the design of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Rac1 contributes to trastuzumab resistance of breast cancer cells: Rac1 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokmanovic, Milos; Hirsch, Dianne S; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin

    2009-06-01

    Although treatment with trastuzumab improves outcomes for women with ErbB2-positive breast cancer, many patients who achieve an initial response to trastuzumab subsequently acquire resistance within 1 year. Rac1, a Ras-like small GTPase, has been implicated in the control of cell growth and morphology and is believed to be associated with breast cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we show that when parental SKBR3 cells become resistant to trastuzumab, Rac1 activity is increased, leading to altered cell morphology, which is accompanied by significant cytoskeleton disorganization. Furthermore, both trastuzumab-mediated down-regulation of ErbB2 and epidermal growth factor-induced down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor are impaired in the trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells, indicating that the endocytic down-regulation of ErbB receptors is compromised in the resistant cells. This results in an aberrant accumulation of ErbB2 on the cell surface and enhanced ErbB2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity in trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells. Additionally, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1G12V in parental SKBR3 cells reduces sensitivity to trastuzumab. After reduction of Rac1 activity by NSC23766, a specific Rac1 inhibitor, trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells display a cellular morphology similar to parental SKBR3 cells. Moreover, we show that NSC23766 restores trastuzumab-mediated endocytic down-regulation of ErbB2 and reduces extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity in resistant SKBR3 cells. Our findings highlight an important role for Rac1 in trastuzumab resistance of human breast cancer cells and identify the impaired trastuzumab-mediated endocytic down-regulation of ErbB2 as a novel mechanism of trastuzumab resistance. The significant effects of NSC23766 on trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells warrant further study of NSC23766 as a potential treatment of trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, and risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer: cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaschou, Pauline; Simard, Julia F; Asker Hagelberg, Charlotte; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-28

    To investigate the risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologic drugs, in patients starting tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment, and in the general population. Population based cohort study. Nationwide data from Sweden. Cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologics (n=46 409), cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting TNF inhibitor treatment as first biologic in 1998-2012 (n=12 558), and matched general population comparator cohort, identified through national quality of care and health registers. Hazard ratio of first in situ or invasive squamous cell skin cancer (1998-2012) and first basal cell cancer (2004-12). For basal cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.41) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.14 (0.98 to 1.33; 236 v 1587 events) comparing TNF inhibitor treated patients with biologics-naive patients. For squamous cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.88 (1.74 to 2.03) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.30 (1.10 to 1.55; 191 v 847 events) comparing TNF inhibitors with biologics-naive patients; the latter translated to an annual number needed to harm in the order of 1600. Among people with a history of squamous cell or basal cell cancer, TNF inhibitors did not further increase risks. A small to moderately increased risk of basal cell cancer was seen in biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients, with no further effect of TNF inhibitors. For squamous cell cancer, the risk was nearly doubled in biologics-naive patients, with a further 30% increase in risk among patients treated with TNF inhibitors; this translates to one additional case for every 1600 years of treatment experience, assuming that this association reflected causality. Vigilance regarding skin malignancies may be advisable in rheumatoid arthritis

  7. Simulating cancer-cell kinetics after drug treatment: Application to cisplatin on ovarian carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalenti, F.; Sena, G.; Cappella, P.; Ubezio, P.

    1998-05-01

    The kinetics of a cancer-cell population under the effects of an antitumoral drug is a topic of particular interest. Its theoretical understanding, along with the improvement of experimental investigation techniques, can indeed play an important role in antitumoral therapies development. Starting from the analysis of flow-cytometric data, with the aid of computer simulation we are able to give a detailed, quantitative description of the main kinetic parameters describing drug action on cancer cells. In this paper we describe the main features of our investigation method, showing an application to Igrov-1 ovarian carcinoma cells treated with cisplatin. Intermitotic time of phases, cell-cycle delay, and block effects with consequent repair or cell mortality, in a wide range of drug doses and recovery times, are discussed and interesting information about cisplatin action is found.

  8. Melatonin potentiates “inside-out” nano-thermotherapy in human breast cancer cells: a potential cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded nanocomposite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wensheng; Gao, Qin; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Guo, Zhenhu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiumei; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose With the wide recognition of oncostatic effect of melatonin, the current study proposes a potential breast cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded magnetic nanocomposite particles (Melatonin-MNPs). Methods Melatonin-MNPs were fabricated by the single emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. Results Based on the facilitated transport of melatonin by the GLUT overexpressed on the cell membrane, such Melatonin-MNPs can be more favorably uptaken by MCF-7 cells compared with the melatonin-free nanocomposite particles, which indicates the cancer targeting ability of melatonin molecule. Inductive heating can be generated by exposure to the Melatonin-MNPs internalized within cancer cells under alternative magnetic field, so as to achieve the “inside-out” magnetic nano-thermotherapy. In addition to demonstrating the superior cytotoxic effect of such nano-thermotherapy over the conventional exogenous heating by metal bath, more importantly, the sustainable release of melatonin from the Melatonin-MNPs can be greatly promoted upon responsive to the magnetic heating. The multimodality treatment based on Melatonin-MNPs can lead to more significant decrease in cell viability than any single treatment, suggesting the potentiated effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic response to nano-thermotherapy. Conclusion This study is the first to fabricate the precisely engineered melatonin-loaded multifunctional nanocomposite particles and demonstrate the potential in breast cancer target multimodality treatment. PMID:29066887

  9. Melatonin potentiates "inside-out" nano-thermotherapy in human breast cancer cells: a potential cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wensheng; Gao, Qin; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Guo, Zhenhu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiumei; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    With the wide recognition of oncostatic effect of melatonin, the current study proposes a potential breast cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded magnetic nanocomposite particles (Melatonin-MNPs). Melatonin-MNPs were fabricated by the single emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. Based on the facilitated transport of melatonin by the GLUT overexpressed on the cell membrane, such Melatonin-MNPs can be more favorably uptaken by MCF-7 cells compared with the melatonin-free nanocomposite particles, which indicates the cancer targeting ability of melatonin molecule. Inductive heating can be generated by exposure to the Melatonin-MNPs internalized within cancer cells under alternative magnetic field, so as to achieve the "inside-out" magnetic nano-thermotherapy. In addition to demonstrating the superior cytotoxic effect of such nano-thermotherapy over the conventional exogenous heating by metal bath, more importantly, the sustainable release of melatonin from the Melatonin-MNPs can be greatly promoted upon responsive to the magnetic heating. The multimodality treatment based on Melatonin-MNPs can lead to more significant decrease in cell viability than any single treatment, suggesting the potentiated effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic response to nano-thermotherapy. This study is the first to fabricate the precisely engineered melatonin-loaded multifunctional nanocomposite particles and demonstrate the potential in breast cancer target multimodality treatment.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of the Effects of Iododeoxyuridine and Ionizing Radiation Treatment on the Cell Cycle Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Schupp, J. E.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is involved in processing DNA damage following treatment with ionizing radiation (IR) and various classes of chemotherapy drugs including iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), a known radiosensitizer. In this study, we have developed asynchronous probabilistic cell cycle models to assess the isolated effects of IUdR and IR and the combined effects of IUdR+IR treatments on MMR damage processing. We used both synchronous and asynchronous MMR-proficient/MMR-deficient cell populations and followed treated cells for up to 2 cell cycle times. We have observed and quantified differential cell cycle responses to MMR damage processing following IR and IUdR+IR treatments, principally in the duration of both G1 and G2/M cell cycle phases. The models presented in this work form the foundation for the development of an approach to maximize the therapeutic index for IR and IUdR+IR treatments in MMR-deficient (damage tolerant) cancers. PMID:23919954

  11. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  12. Natural killer cells: the journey from puzzles in biology to treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Madhana, Rajaram Mohan Rao; Sriram, Chandra Shaker

    2015-02-28

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune effectors that are primarily involved in immunosurveillance to spontaneously eliminate malignantly transformed and virally infected cells without prior sensitization. NK cells trigger targeted attack through release of cytotoxic granules, and secrete various cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. NK cells selectively attack target cells with diminished major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression. This "Missing-self" recognition by NK cells at first puzzled researchers in the early 1990s, and the mystery was solved with the discovery of germ line encoded killer immunoglobulin receptors that recognize MHC-I molecules. This review summarizes the biology of NK cells detailing the phenotypes, receptors and functions; interactions of NK cells with dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. Further we discuss the various strategies to modulate NK cell activity and the practice of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy employing NK cell lines, autologous, allogeneic and genetically engineered cell populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  14. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van, E-mail: M.vanDuursen@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Smeets, Evelien E.J.W. [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijk, Jeroen C.W. [RIKILT - Institute for Food Safety, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  15. Assessing tumor treatment response and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer with perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianwei; Wu Ning; Song Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively investigate whether any of the perfusion parameters would predict early tumor response to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: In a prospective series, Perfusion CT were performed in 152 patients suspected lung cancer with 16-slice or 8-slice multislice CT. Contrast medium (50 ml) was injected at a rate of 4 ml/s with a power injector. The scanning delay was 10 seconds and the scanning time was 50 seconds. Among 152 patients, 123 patients were proved lung cancer by pathology. With the perfusion 3.0 software, the parameters including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and capillary permeability surface area product (PS) were calculated. The perfusion image quality was evaluated on a 4-1eveal scale. The treatment response after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and then the relationship between perfusion parameters with early tumor response to chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was evaluated. Student t test and Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for data analysis. Results: In 84 patients (68.3%), the perfusion image quality was staged level 2 (moderate) and level 3 (good). Among them, 35 patients with NSCLC were assessed with RECIST after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy. In these 35 patients, The BF of responders and nonresponders was (81.0 ± 33.6)and (56.3 ± 23.1) ml · min -1 ·100 g -1 , respectively, which was significantly different(t=2.393, P=0.023). The median PFS of low-BF group (BF ≤ 80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) and high-BF group (BF>80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) was 11.8 and 8.0 months respectively (P>0.05), and the median PFS of low-BV group (BF ≤ 6 ml/100 g -1 ) and high-BV group (BF>6 ml/100 g -1 ) was 9.2 and 8.0 months respectively(P>0.05), both of them were not significantly different. Conclusion: NSCLC in high perfusion are relatively sensitive to chemotherapy

  16. Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Cancer Using a Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Restricted T-Cell Receptor Targeting the Cancer Germline Antigen MAGE-A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Parker, Linda L; Lu, Tangying; Zheng, Zhili; Toomey, Mary Ann; White, Donald E; Yao, Xin; Li, Yong F; Robbins, Paul F; Feldman, Steven A; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Goff, Stephanie L; Sherry, Richard M; Kammula, Udai S; Yang, James C; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2017-10-10

    Purpose Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is being explored as a treatment for patients with metastatic cancer. Most current strategies use genes that encode major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors to genetically modify CD8 + T cells or bulk T cells for treatment. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of an adoptive CD4 + T-cell therapy using an MHC class II-restricted, HLA-DPB1*0401-restricted TCR that recognized the cancer germline antigen, MAGE-A3 (melanoma-associated antigen-A3). Patients and Methods Patients received a lymphodepleting preparative regimen, followed by adoptive transfer of purified CD4 + T cells, retrovirally transduced with MAGE-A3 TCR plus systemic high-dose IL-2. A cell dose escalation was conducted, starting at 10 7 total cells and escalating at half-log increments to approximately 10 11 cells. Nine patients were treated at the highest dose level (0.78 to 1.23 × 10 11 cells). Results Seventeen patients were treated. During the cell dose-escalation phase, an objective complete response was observed in a patient with metastatic cervical cancer who received 2.7 × 10 9 cells (ongoing at ≥ 29 months). Among nine patients who were treated at the highest dose level, objective partial responses were observed in a patient with esophageal cancer (duration, 4 months), a patient with urothelial cancer (ongoing at ≥ 19 months), and a patient with osteosarcoma (duration, 4 months). Most patients experienced transient fevers and the expected hematologic toxicities from lymphodepletion pretreatment. Two patients experienced transient grade 3 and 4 transaminase elevations. There were no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion These results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of administering autologous CD4 + T cells that are genetically engineered to express an MHC class II-restricted antitumor TCR that targets MAGE-A3. This clinical trial extends the reach of TCR

  17. Surgical treatment in non-small cell lung cancer with pulmonary oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinyuan; Li, Yun; An, Jun; Hu, Liu; Zhang, Junhang

    2017-02-02

    Previous studies have demonstrated survival benefits for local treatment in solitary metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).This study aimed to investigate the effect of local surgery for NSCLC with pulmonary oligometastasis. This study included 21 patients of NSCLC with pulmonary oligometastasis between January 2003 and December 2013, which were divided into two groups, group A (11 cases) for local surgery and group B (10 cases) for systematic chemotherapy, compared the median survival time (MST) and 5-year survival rate between the two groups, and analyzed the impact of the pathological types, the TNM and pN stage of primary tumor, the site, and the mode and number of oligometastatic nodule on group A. The MST of group A and B were 37 and 11.6 months respectively, 5-year survival rates were 18.2 and 9.1% respectively (p  0.05). Local surgery significantly prolonged the overall survival time and 5-year survival rate of primary NSCLC with pulmonary oligometastasis.

  18. In vitro study of cell death with 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy to improve the efficiency of cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.; Ikram, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a kind of photochemo therapeutic treatment that exerts its effect mainly through the induction of cell death. Distinct types of cell death may be elicited by different PDT regimes. In this study, efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy and combination of all three PDT mechanisms involved in the different human carcinomas cell narcosis. Our in vitro cell culture experiments with 5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA) a clinically approved photiosensitizer (PS) and 635 nm laser light have yielded promising results, as follow: (1) (human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line incubated, for 18 h, with 30 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 50 J/cm2 can produce 85% of cell killing (2) human larynx carcinoma (Hep2c) cell line incubated, for 7 h, with 55 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 85 J/cm2 can produce 75% of cell killing (3) human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line incubated, for 22-48 h, with 262 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 120 J/cm2 can produce 95% of cell killing (4) human muscle cancer (RD) cell line incubated, for 47 h, with 250 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 80 J/cm2 can produce 76% of cell killing (5) Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line incu-bated, for 18 h, with 400 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 40 J/cm2 can produce 82% of cell killing confirming the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

  19. Effect of DC-CIK treatment on tumor markers and T cell subsets in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Qun Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dendritic cells (DC and cytokine induced killer cells (CIK on tumor markers and T cell subsets in peripheral blood of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: A total of 100 cases of patients with advanced ovarian cancer who were proved by operation and pathology in the department of gynecologic oncology in our hospital were selected from April 2013 to April 20l6, and randomly divided into experimental group and control group, the control group was treated with TC (Taxinol+Cisplat chemotherapy alone, the experimental group was treated with DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy. Before and after treatment, the changes of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, CD4+/CD25+, NK cells in peripheral blood and serum tumor markers (CA125, CA19-9, HE4 were detected. Results: Before treatment, the phenotypes of T cell subsets in the two groups were not significantly different; in the experimental group after treatment, the levels of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, and NK cells were increased,while the levels of CD4+/CD25+ and CD8+ were decreased, compared with before treatment, the differences were statistically significant; the phenotype changes of T cells were not statistically significant before and after treatment in the control group; after treatment, there were significant differences in the levels of CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, CD4+/CD25+ and NK cells between the two groups. Before treatment, there were no significant differences in HE4 value, CA125 value and CA19-9 value between the two groups; after treatment, the tumor markers in the two groups were all decreased, and the difference was significant as compared with those before treatment; after treatment, the CA125 value, CA19-9 value and HE4 value were (73.68±79.46 U/mL, (54.32±32.85 U/mL and (69.57±39.85 pmol/L respectively, the values of three tumor markers were compared with the control group, with a statistical difference. Conclusion: DC-CIK treatment can improve the

  20. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  1. Pemetrexed in maintenance treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Seigo; Kijima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Pemetrexed, a multitargeting antifolate cytotoxic drug, plays a leading role in front-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Following its approval as second-line monotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic non-squamous NSCLC, pemetrexed has established itself as the first-line regimen in combination with cisplatin, and its powerful antitumor effects and less cumulative toxicities were then taken advantage of in the JMEN and PARAMOUNT trials, respectively, to pioneer a new treatment strategy of switch and continuation maintenance monotherapy. These developments have brought about a marked paradigm shift, and made pemetrexed indispensable in the treatment for non-squamous NSCLC. So far, only three drugs have been approved for maintenance therapy; pemetrexed both by switch and continuation maintenance, erlotinib by switch maintenance, and bevacizumab by continuation maintenance. Compared with observation alone after defined cycles of the first-line chemotherapy, subsequent pemetrexed maintenance therapy has provided significantly longer survival and infrequent severe adverse events. The cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed maintenance therapy is controversial, as well as the other two maintenance drugs, bevacizumab and erlotinib. The latest attractive attention is a combination maintenance therapy. We may have to consider epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status for selection of a combination pattern. A combination maintenance therapy of pemetrexed plus bevacizumab is potential for patients with wild-type EGFR status, while a EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-containing combination is promising for patients with active EGFR mutation status. Pemetrexed will be a pivotal drug when a combination maintenance therapy is used in practice. For future maintenance therapy, we need to explore reliable predictive selection or exclusion markers that can predict who will really benefit from maintenance therapy.

  2. Cell-free DNA levels and correlation to stage and outcome following treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Wettergren, Yvonne; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Taflin, Helena; Gustavson, Bengt; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm

    2017-11-01

    Accurate staging of rectal cancer remains essential for optimal patient selection for combined modality treatment, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. We aimed at examining the correlation of cell free DNA with the pathologic stage and subsequent risk of recurrence for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. We examined 75 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Blood samples for translational use were drawn prior to rectal surgery. The level of cell free DNA was quantified by digital droplet PCR and expressed as copy number of beta 2 microglobulin. We found a median level of cell free DNA in the AJCC stages I-III of 3100, 8300, and 10,700 copies/mL respectively. For patients with 12 sampled lymph nodes or above, the median level of cell free DNA were 2400 copies/mL and 4400 copies/mL (p = 0.04) for node negative and node positive disease respectively. The median follow-up was 39 months and 11 recurrences were detected (15%). The median level for patients with recurrent disease was 13,000 copies/mL compared to 5200 copies/mL for non-recurrent patients (p = 0.08). We have demonstrated a correlation between the level of total cell free DNA and the pathologic stage and nodal involvement. Furthermore, we have found a trend towards a correlation with the risk of recurrence following resection of localized rectal cancer.

  3. Impact of the putative cancer stem cell markers and growth factor receptor expression on the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Puvanenthiran, Soozana; Essapen, Sharadah; Seddon, Alan M.; Modjtahedi, Helmout

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression and activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2 have been reported in numerous cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a large panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines (OCCLs) to treatment with various forms of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs. The aim was to see if there was any association between the protein expression of various biomarkers including three putative ovarian cancer s...

  4. Putative contribution of CD56 positive cells in cetuximab treatment efficacy in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maréchal, Raphaël; De Schutter, Jef; Nagy, Nathalie; Demetter, Pieter; Lemmers, Arnaud; Devière, Jacques; Salmon, Isabelle; Tejpar, Sabine; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Activity of cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, is largely attributed to its direct antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) could be another possible mechanism of cetuximab antitumor effects and its specific contribution on the clinical activity of cetuximab is unknown. We assessed immune cells infiltrate (CD56, CD68, CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3) in the primary tumor of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with a first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy in the framework of prospective trials (treatment group) and in a matched group of mCRC patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without cetuximab (control group). The relationship between intra-tumoral immune effector cells, the K-ras status and the efficacy of the treatment were investigated. We also evaluated in vitro, the ADCC activity in healthy donors and chemonaive mCRC patients and the specific contribution of CD56 + cells. ADCC activity against DLD1 CRC cell line is maintained in cancer patients and significantly declined after CD56 + cells depletion. In multivariate analysis, K-ras wild-type (HR: 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.3), p = 0.001) and tumor infiltrating CD56 + cells (HR: 2.6, (95%CI:1.14-6.0), p = 0.019) were independent favourable prognostic factors for PFS and response only in the cetuximab treatment group. By contrast CD56 + cells failed to predict PFS and response in the control group. CD56 + cells, mainly NK cells, may be the major effector of ADCC related-cetuximab activity. Assessment of CD56 + cells infiltrate in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma may provide additional information to K-ras status in predicting response and PFS in mCRC patients treated with first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy

  5. CANCER STEM CELLS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Bashur, Lindsay; Zhou, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in pediatric patients. Despite conventional treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy, long-term survival rates for patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma have not improved over the last 30 years, likely due to drug-resistant metastasis and disease recurrence. An emerging concept in cancer research is that within a heterogeneous tumor there is a small subset of cells called “cancer stem c...

  6. Percentages of NKT cells in the tissues of patients with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszniak, Maria; Rybojad, Paweł; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Jabłonka, Andrzej; Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are involved in the antitumor response by direct cytotoxicity and indirectly through activation of effector cells. Recent studies have shown a relationship between the number and function of NKT cells and clinical outcomes. NKT cells seem to represent a promising tool for immunotherapy of cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the distribution of NKT cells in peripheral blood, lymph nodes and tumor tissue of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, as well as development of the most efficient set of cytokines stimulating differentiation of NKT cells. We evaluated the percentage of iNKT+CD3+ cells in the tissues collected from patients with NSCLC. For the generation of NKT cells, we cultured cells isolated from the blood of 20 healthy donors and from the tissues of 4 NSCLC patients. Cells were stimulated with α-GalCer in combinations with cytokines. We noted significant differences in the percentages of NKT cells in the patients' tissues. The highest percentage of these cells was observed in the tumor tissue and the lowest in the lymph nodes. In vitro, in healthy donors all α-GalCer-cytokine combinations were effective in stimulation of NKT cells' proliferation. NKT cells' proliferation was the most efficiently stimulated by α-GalCer+IL-2+IL-7 and α-GalCer+IL-2+IFN-γ. Our results suggest that in the course of NSCLC, NKT cells migrate to the primary tumor and accumulate therein. All tested combinations of α-GalCer and cytokines were capable of generation of NKT cells in vitro.

  7. Doxorubicin-loaded magnetic nanoparticle clusters for chemo-photothermal treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weibing; Zheng, Xinmin [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Shen, Shun [School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, No. 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai, 201203 (China); Wang, Xinghuan, E-mail: xinghuanwang9@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2015-10-16

    In addition to the conventional cancer treatment such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgical management, nanomedicine-based approaches have attracted widespread attention in recent years. In this paper, a promising nanocarrier, magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) as porous materials which provided enough room on the surface, was developed for loading chemotherapeutic agent of doxorubicin (DOX). Moreover, MNCs are a good near-infrared (NIR) photothermal mediator. Thus, MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy (PTT) and drug delivery for chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer. We firstly explored the destruction of prostate cancer in vitro by the combination of PTT and chemotherapy using DOX@MNCs. Upon NIR irradiation at 808 nm, more cancer cells were killed when PC3 cells incubated with DOX@MNCs, owing to both MNCs-mediated photothermal ablation and cytotoxicity of light-triggered DOX release. Compared with PTT or chemotherapy alone, the chemo-photothermal therapy by DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy. - Highlights: • MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy and drug delivery. • DOX@MNCs were used for chemo-photothermal therapy of prostate cancer cells. • DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, Justin K.; Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Baanstra, Mirjam; Bussink, Johan; Hollema, Harry; Os, Ronald P. van; Plukker, John Th. M.; Coppes, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  9. Pemetrexed in maintenance treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seigo Minami,1 Takashi Kijima2 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka Police Hospital, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatic Diseases, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Pemetrexed, a multitargeting antifolate cytotoxic drug, plays a leading role in front-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Following its approval as second-line monotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic non-squamous NSCLC, pemetrexed has established itself as the first-line regimen in combination with cisplatin, and its powerful antitumor effects and less cumulative toxicities were then taken advantage of in the JMEN and PARAMOUNT trials, respectively, to pioneer a new treatment strategy of switch and continuation maintenance monotherapy. These developments have brought about a marked paradigm shift, and made pemetrexed indispensable in the treatment for non-squamous NSCLC. So far, only three drugs have been approved for maintenance therapy; pemetrexed both by switch and continuation maintenance, erlotinib by switch maintenance, and bevacizumab by continuation maintenance. Compared with observation alone after defined cycles of the first-line chemotherapy, subsequent pemetrexed maintenance therapy has provided significantly longer survival and infrequent severe adverse events. The cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed maintenance therapy is controversial, as well as the other two maintenance drugs, bevacizumab and erlotinib. The latest attractive attention is a combination maintenance therapy. We may have to consider epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status for selection of a combination pattern. A combination maintenance therapy of pemetrexed plus bevacizumab is potential for patients with wild-type EGFR status, while a EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-containing combination is promising for patients with active EGFR mutation status. Pemetrexed will be

  10. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptome Profiling of Caco-2 Cancer Cell Line following Treatment with Extracts from Iodine-Biofortified Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta A Koronowicz

    Full Text Available Although iodization of salt is the most common method used to obtain iodine-enriched food, iodine deficiency disorders are still a global health problem and profoundly affect the quality of human life. Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulators of human metabolism, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and have been reported to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, for the first time, we evaluated the effect of iodine-biofortified lettuce on transcriptomic profile of Caco-2 cancer cell line by applying the Whole Human Genome Microarray assay. We showed 1326 differentially expressed Caco-2 transcripts after treatment with iodine-biofortified (BFL and non-fortified (NFL lettuce extracts. We analysed pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and protein classes based on comparison between BFL and NFL specific genes. Iodine, which was expected to act as a free ion (KI-NFL or at least in part to be incorporated into lettuce macromolecules (BFL, differently regulated pathways of numerous transcription factors leading to different cellular effects. In this study we showed the inhibition of Caco-2 cells proliferation after treatment with BFL, but not potassium iodide (KI, and BFL-mediated induction of mitochondrial apoptosis and/or cell differentiation. Our results showed that iodine-biofortified plants can be effectively used by cells as an alternative source of this trace element. Moreover, the observed differences in action of both iodine sources may suggest a potential of BFL in cancer treatment.

  12. Nanomedicine strategies for sustained, controlled, and targeted treatment of cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Yuan; Xu, Wei-Heng; Yin, Chuan; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Qiang; Gao, Jie

    2016-10-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) constitute a small proportion of the cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability. They have been identified in a variety of tumors, including tumors of the digestive system. CSCs exhibit some unique characteristics, which are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence. Consequently, the development of effective therapeutic strategies against CSCs plays a key role in increasing the efficacy of cancer therapy. Several potential approaches to target CSCs of the digestive system have been explored, including targeting CSC surface markers and signaling pathways, inducing the differentiation of CSCs, altering the tumor microenvironment or niche, and inhibiting ATP-driven efflux transporters. However, conventional therapies may not successfully eradicate CSCs owing to various problems, including poor solubility, stability, rapid clearance, poor cellular uptake, and unacceptable cytotoxicity. Nanomedicine strategies, which include drug, gene, targeted, and combinational delivery, could solve these problems and significantly improve the therapeutic index. This review briefly summarizes the ongoing development of strategies and nanomedicine-based therapies against CSCs of the digestive system.

  13. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1981-01-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using 252 Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  14. Synthetic Beta-Lactam Antibiotic as a Selective Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis Inducer: Significance in Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    lactams the name "penicillin" in 1928 after his discovery that molds from the Penicillium genus secrete powerful antimicrobial compounds, called beta...whi Nis required for antimicrobial activity . These antibiotics act as bactericidal agens by serv a sub te 1 pepti gylcaAtranspeptidase, the enzyme...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Activation of the cellular apoptotic program is a current strategy for the prevention and treatment of human cancer including

  15. Molecular regulation of MICA expression after HDAC inhibitor treatment of cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle

    be induced by HDAC-inhibitor treatment. However, nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 was not observed after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells and even though we could effectively inhibit p65 expression by siRNA, it did not modify MICA/B expression. To identify important elements in MICA regulation...

  16. Fluorescence detection and depletion of T47D breast cancer cells from human mononuclear cell-enriched blood preparations by photodynamic treatment: Basic in vitro experiments towards the removal of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Verena G; Knaup, Julia; Stahl, Dorothea; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2011-09-01

    A major obstacle for permanent cancer eradication is the persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood, which often escape radio- or chemotherapy. Currently no efficient strategy to remove CTCs from peripheral blood in order to lower the risk of metastases or tumor recurrence exists. Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) as photosensitizer offers an innovative approach to overcome this problem. This study aims at providing basic evidence towards fluorescence detection and photodynamic depletion of scattered cancer cells from blood preparations. The breast cancer cell line T47D, endothelial GP8 cells, red blood cells (RBCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) have been tested for ALA-induced formation kinetics of PPIX by flow cytometry and microplate fluorescence analysis. The influence of the presence of RBCs on the PPIX-accumulation in cancer cells was evaluated by flow cytometry; the efficacy of PDT on cancer cells and MNCs has been tested by resazurin assay. Mixtures of T47D and GP8 cells and MNCs spiked with cancer cells were tested to determine the limit of fluorescence detection by flow cytometry and antibody co-staining. T47D cells accumulated significantly higher PPIX-amounts after ALA-incubation than any other cell type tested. The presence of RBCs had no impact on PPIX-formation in T47D cells. Experiments towards the fluorescence detection of cancer cells in blood revealed that the sensitivity of this method is yet limited. Viability testing after PDT showed that cancer cells where almost completely eradicated after illumination whereas MNCs were almost spared. We clearly demonstrate in vitro tumor cell selectivity of PPIX-accumulation over endothelial cells, MNCs and RBCs. Breast cancer cells are efficiently killed by PDT with minor depletion of MNCs. Our findings provide a basis for the PDT of blood samples for a future depletion of CTCs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Iodine-131 treatment of thyroid cancer cells leads to suppression of cell proliferation followed by induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by regulation of B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated JNK/NF-κB pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.M.; Pang, A.X., E-mail: zhaoliming515@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China); Department of Urology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China)

    2017-10-01

    Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) is widely used for the treatment of thyroid-related diseases. This study aimed to investigate the expression of p53 and BTG2 genes following {sup 131}I therapy in thyroid cancer cell line SW579 and the possible underlying mechanism. SW579 human thyroid squamous carcinoma cells were cultured and treated with {sup 131}I. They were then assessed for {sup 131}I uptake, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, p53 expression, and BTG2 gene expression. SW579 cells were transfected with BTG2 siRNA, p53 siRNA and siNC and were then examined for the same aforementioned parameters. When treated with a JNK inhibitor of SP600125 and {sup 131}I or with a NF-kB inhibitor of BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, non-transfected SW579 cells were assessed in JNK/NFkB pathways. It was observed that {sup 131}I significantly inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Both BTG2 and p53 expression were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. An increase in cell viability by up-regulation in Bcl2 gene, a decrease in apoptosis by enhanced CDK2 gene expression and a decrease in cell cycle arrest at G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase were also observed in SW579 cell lines transfected with silenced BTG2 gene. When treated with SP600125 and {sup 131}I, the non transfected SW579 cell lines significantly inhibited JNK pathway, NF-kB pathway and the expression of BTG2. However, when treated with BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, only the NF-kB pathway was suppressed. {sup 131}I suppressed cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis, and promoted cell cycle arrest of thyroid cancer cells by up-regulating B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated activation of JNK/NF--κB pathways. (author)

  18. Clinical potential of nintedanib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothschild SI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sacha I Rothschild Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: The therapeutic landscape in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is changing. The description of molecular alterations leading to NSCLC carcinogenesis and progression (so-called oncogenic driver mutations and the development of targeted agents interfering with the tumor-promoting intracellular signaling pathways have improved the outcome for many patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. However, many patients with stage IV NSCLC do not have one of the targetable predictive biomarkers, and are therefore in need of classical chemotherapy. This especially applies to squamous cell cancer. A platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with stage IV NSCLC. As second-line therapies, docetaxel, pemetrexed, and the EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib have demonstrated benefit in Phase III randomized trials. Recently, the addition of the angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib to docetaxel has proven efficacious, and is a new treatment option in the second-line setting. Preclinical and clinical data of nintedanib for the treatment of lung cancer patients are reviewed here. Keywords: nintedanib, lung cancer, angiokinase inhibitor, VEGFR, PDGF, FGFR

  19. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  20. Oral squamous cell carcinoma proliferative phenotype is modulated by proanthocyanidins: a potential prevention and treatment alternative for oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapp Aaron

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recently reported drop in the overall death rate from cancer, the estimated survival rate and number of deaths from oral cancer remain virtually unchanged. Early detection efforts, in combination with strategies for prevention and risk-reduction, have the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. The identification of non-toxic, effective treatments, including complementary and alternative therapies, is critical if the survival rate is to be improved. Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect from certain plant-derived foods and extracts; however, it has been difficult to isolate and identify the compounds most responsible for these observations. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the response of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to proanthocyanidin (PAC, a plant-derived compound that may inhibit the progression of several other cancers. Methods Using a series of in vitro assays, we sought to quantify the effects of PAC on OSCC, cervical carcinoma, and non-cancerous cell lines, specifically the effects of PAC on cell proliferation. Recent data suggest that infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV may also modulate the proliferative potential of OSCC; therefore, we also measured the effects of PAC administration on HPV-transfected OSCC proliferation. Results Our results demonstrated that PAC administration was sufficient to significantly suppress cellular proliferation of OSCC in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the increased proliferation of OSCC after transfection with HPV 16 was reduced by the administration of PAC, as was the proliferation of the cervical cancer and non-cancerous cell lines tested. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that PAC administration may induce apoptosis in cervical and oral cancer cell lines, while acting merely to suppress proliferation of the normal cell line control. Conclusion These results signify that PAC may be

  1. Evaluation of adaptive treatment planning for patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Siddiqui, Salim M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop metrics to evaluate uncertainties in deformable dose accumulation for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Initial treatment plans (primary) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images were retrospectively processed for seven NSCLC patients, who showed significant tumor regression during the course of treatment. Each plan was developed with IMRT for 2 Gy  ×  33 fractions. A B-spline-based DIR algorithm was used to register weekly CBCT images to a reference image acquired at fraction 21 and the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) were then modified using a finite element method (FEM). The doses were calculated on each of these CBCT images and mapped to the reference image using a tri-linear dose interpolation method, based on the B-spline and FEM-generated DVFs. Contours propagated from the planning image were adjusted to the residual tumor and OARs on the reference image to develop a secondary plan. For iso-prescription adaptive plans (relative to initial plans), mean lung dose (MLD) was reduced, on average from 17.3 Gy (initial plan) to 15.2, 14.5 and 14.8 Gy for the plans adapted using the rigid, B-Spline and FEM-based registrations. Similarly, for iso-toxic adaptive plans (considering MLD relative to initial plans) using the rigid, B-Spline and FEM-based registrations, the average doses were 69.9  ±  6.8, 65.7  ±  5.1 and 67.2  ±  5.6 Gy in the initial volume (PTV1), and 81.5  ±  25.8, 77.7  ±  21.6, and 78.9  ±  22.5 Gy in the residual volume (PTV21), respectively. Tumor volume reduction was correlated with dose escalation (for isotoxic plans, correlation coefficient  =  0.92), and with MLD reduction (for iso-fractional plans, correlation coefficient  =  0.85). For the case of the iso-toxic dose escalation, plans adapted with the B-Spline and FEM DVFs differed from the primary plan adapted with rigid registration by 2.8  ±  1

  2. Cellular response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cell lines during treatment and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravik Katherine L

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of cells with the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU causes DNA damage, which in turn affects cell proliferation and survival. Two stable wild-type TP53 5-FU-resistant cell lines, ContinB and ContinD, generated from the HCT116 colon cancer cell line, demonstrate moderate and strong resistance to 5-FU, respectively, markedly-reduced levels of 5-FU-induced apoptosis, and alterations in expression levels of a number of key cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulatory genes as a result of resistance development. The aim of the present study was to determine potential differential responses to 8 and 24-hour 5-FU treatment in these resistant cell lines. We assessed levels of 5-FU uptake into DNA, cell cycle effects and apoptosis induction throughout treatment and recovery periods for each cell line, and alterations in expression levels of DNA damage response-, cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulatory genes in response to short-term drug exposure. Results 5-FU treatment for 24 hours resulted in S phase arrests, p53 accumulation, up-regulation of p53-target genes on DNA damage response (ATF3, GADD34, GADD45A, PCNA, cell cycle-regulatory (CDKN1A, and apoptosis-regulatory pathways (FAS, and apoptosis induction in the parental and resistant cell lines. Levels of 5-FU incorporation into DNA were similar for the cell lines. The pattern of cell cycle progression during recovery demonstrated consistently that the 5-FU-resistant cell lines had the smallest S phase fractions and the largest G2(/M fractions. The strongly 5-FU-resistant ContinD cell line had the smallest S phase arrests, the lowest CDKN1A levels, and the lowest levels of 5-FU-induced apoptosis throughout the treatment and recovery periods, and the fastest recovery of exponential growth (10 days compared to the other two cell lines. The moderately 5-FU-resistant ContinB cell line had comparatively lower apoptotic levels than the parental cells during treatment and recovery

  3. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sign of disease. Sestamibi scan : A type of radionuclide scan used to find an overactive parathyroid gland. ... speech problems caused by this nerve damage. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses ...

  4. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007 is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel. A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.Keywords: ABI-007, Abraxane, nab

  5. Lack of relationship between TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity, treatment efficacy and prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Christensen, Rikke Kølby

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a natural inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are proteolytic enzymes involved in degradation of extracellular matrix thereby favoring tumour cell invasion and metastasis. TIMP-1 activity in tumour tissue may ther...... immunoreactivity in tumour tissue from patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer did not correlate with patient survival or response to combination platinum/cyclophosphamide therapy.......BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a natural inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are proteolytic enzymes involved in degradation of extracellular matrix thereby favoring tumour cell invasion and metastasis. TIMP-1 activity in tumour tissue may...... therefore play an essential role in the progression of a malignant tumour.The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate TIMP-1 protein immunoreactivity in tissue from primary ovarian cancer patients and associate these findings with the course of the disease including response to treatment...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant Ablation therapy Embolization therapy Targeted therapy Radiation therapy New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. ... needles and tumor which kills cancer cells . Microwave therapy : A type of treatment in which the tumor is exposed ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant Ablation therapy Embolization therapy Targeted therapy Radiation therapy New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. ... needles and tumor which kills cancer cells . Microwave therapy : A type of treatment in which the tumor is exposed ...

  8. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation-induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation-induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell transplantation, bone marrow-derived cell mobilization, molecular regulation of parotid stem cells, stem cell sparing RT, and adaptive RT are promising techniques that are discussed in this study. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta,1 Rodney Shackelford2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Science Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. Keywords: crizotinib, EML4

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  12. Enhancing the Effects of Low Dose Doxorubicin Treatment by the Radiation in T47D and SKBR3 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaee, Fahimeh; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Baradaran, Behzad; Mesbahi, Asghar; Mohammadzadeh, Mohammad; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy of women worldwide. Radiotherapy consists of a vital element in the treatment of breast cancer but relative side effects and different radioactive responses are limiting factors for a successful treatment. Doxorubicin has been used to treat cancers for over 30 years and is considered as the most effective drug in the treatment of breast cancer. There are also many chronic side effects that limit the amount of doxorubicin that can be administered. The combined radio-drug treatment, with low doses, can be an approach for reducing side effects from single modality treatments instead of suitable cure rates. We have studied the effect of 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy doses of 9 MV X-rays along with 1 µM doxorubicin on inducing cell death, apoptosis and also p53 and PTEN gene expression in T47D and SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Doxorubicin treatment resulted in upregulation of radiation-induced levels of p53 and downregulation of PTEN at 1 and 1.5 Gy in T47D breast cancer cells, as well as downregulation of p53 mRNA level of expression and upregulation of PTEN mRNA level of expression in SKBR3 breast cancer cell line. In addition, doxorubicin in combination with radiation decreased the viability of breast cancer cell lines in the both cell lines. Low doses of doxorubicin, with least cell toxicity, may be an effective treatment for breast cancer when used in conjunction with ionizing radiation.

  13. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  14. Metallated DNA Aptamers for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    different cancers including a high percentage of bladder 8 , gastric and colorectal 9 , as well as hepatocellular, renal, breast and ovarian cancer ...12 and have been utilized for cancer imaging. PSMA inhibitors have been used to deliver theranostic NPs to cancer cells. 13 The A10-3 RNA...used as a chemotherapeutic for the treatment of diverse malignancies, including breast and prostate cancer . Serious toxicities, including an

  15. Treatment monitoring in metastatic colorectal cancer patients by quantification and KRAS genotyping of circulating cell-free DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas W Berger

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC has continuously improved over the last decade. However, disease monitoring remains underdeveloped and mostly dependent on imaging e.g. RECIST 1.1 criteria. The genetic landscape of individual cancers and subsequently occurring treatment-induced evolution remain neglected in current surveillance strategies. Novel biomarkers demand minimally invasive and repetitive tracking of the cancer mutagenome for therapy stratification and to make prognostic predictions. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a routinely used tumor marker for CRC, does not meet these goals and thus prevents its use as a reliable monitoring tool. A tumor-derived fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA, isolated from blood samples, may bypass the limitations of currently available biomarkers and could be a tool for noninvasive disease monitoring. Here, total cfDNA levels differentiated a cohort of metastatic CRC patients from healthy controls. Furthermore, we correlated cfDNA during chemotherapy of 27 stage IV patients with clinical parameters to establish its prognostic and predictive value. Indeed, cfDNA levels in chemotherapy naive patients correlate with the tumor burden and CEA values at diagnosis and increase upon disease progression during 1st and 2nd line treatment. Moreover, we confirm the possibility of cfDNA-based genotyping of KRAS to early detect the emergence of resistance during chemotherapy. These data indicate that repetitive quantitative and mutational analysis of cfDNA might complement current treatment standards but may have also limited value in some patients.

  16. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  17. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  18. Increasing Rates of No Treatment in Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: A Propensity Matched Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Daly, Megan E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Chiu, Chi-Lu; Cooke, David T; Brown, Lisa M; Melnikow, Joy; Kelly, Karen; Canter, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Variation in treatment and survival outcomes for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is high among patients with stage III or IV, but untreated NSCLC patients have not been critically analyzed to evaluate for improvable outcomes. We evaluated treatment trends and their association with oncologic outcomes for NSCLC, hypothesizing that there are a substantial number of untreated patients who are similar to patients who undergo treatment. Methods Linear regression was used to calculate trends in utilization of treatment. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression modeling were used to determine predictors of receiving treatment. Propensity-matching was used to compare survival among subsets of treated versus untreated patients. Results Patients with primary NSCLC were identified from the National Cancer Data base from 1998–2012 and 21% (190,539) of patients received no treatment. For stage IIIA and IV, the proportion of untreated patients increased over the study period by 0.21% and 0.4% respectively (p= 0.003, <0.0001). Regardless of stage, untreated patients had significantly shorter OS (p<0.0001). Propensity-matched analyses of 6,144 stage IIIA patient pairs treated with chemoradiation vs no treatment confirmed shorter OS for untreated patients (Median, 16.5 vs 6.1 months, p <0.0001). For 19,046 stage IV patient pairs treated with chemotherapy vs no treatment, similar results were obtained (Median OS, 9.3 vs 2.0 months, p<0.0001). Conclusions The proportion of untreated stage IIIA and IV patients is increasing. Survival outcomes among advanced stage patients are superior with treatment, independent of selection bias. The benefits and risks of treatment should be carefully assessed prior to choosing to forego treatment. PMID:28109804

  19. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A......OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology...

  20. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and forty...

  1. Results of surgical treatment of T4 non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitz, CCM; de la Riviere, AB; van Swieten, HA; Westermann, CJJ; Lammers, JWJ; van den Bosch, JMM

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Because of location and invasion of surrounding structures, the role of surgical treatment for T4 tumors remains unclear. Extended resections carry a high mortality and should be restricted for selected patients. This study clarifies the selection process in non-small cell T4 tumors with

  2. Unmet Medical Needs in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment: How to Design Pre-Emptive Combination Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Karachaliou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding catalogue of human oncogenic mutations, coupled with difficulties in identifying the cellular targets of active compounds in phenotypic screens, has refocused drug discovery efforts on inhibitors of specific cellular proteins. This new ‘target-based’ approach has enjoyed some spectacular successes in several types of tumours, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations occur in 17% of NSCLC patients, with notable response to single agent therapy. Unfortunately, all patients eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, while complete remission rate to EGFR TKIs monotherapy is low. Priming BIM, a proapoptotic signalling BH3-only protein, induces sensitivity to erlotinib [Tarceva®] in EGFR-mutant cell lines. Synthetic lethal approaches and pre-emptive therapies based on the initial expression of BIM may significantly improve treatment outcomes. EGFR mutations result in transient pro-death imbalance of survival and apoptotic signalling in response to EGFR inhibition. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 is essential to the balance between extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide- 3-kinase/protein kinase B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity. Furthermore, stromal hepatocyte growth factor confers EGFR TKI resistance and induces inter-receptor crosstalk with Ephrin Type-A receptor 2, CDCP1, AXL, and JAK1. A better understanding of the complex cancer molecular biology of EGFR mutant lung cancer is crucial for development of effective treatment and design of successful future clinical studies.

  3. Incremental Innovation and Progress in Advanced Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: Current Status and Future Impact of Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Corey J; Obasaju, Coleman; Bunn, Paul; Bonomi, Philip; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Kim, Edward S; Natale, Ronald B; Novello, Silvia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pérol, Maurice; Reck, Martin; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Reynolds, Craig H; Socinski, Mark A; Spigel, David R; Wakelee, Heather; Mayo, Carlos; Thatcher, Nick

    2016-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (sqCLC) is an aggressive form of cancer that poses many therapeutic challenges. Patients tend to be older, present at a later stage, and have a high incidence of comorbidities, which can compromise treatment delivery and exacerbate toxicity. In addition, certain agents routinely available for nonsquamous cell histologic subtypes, such as bevacizumab and pemetrexed, are contraindicated or lack efficacy in sqCLC. Therapeutic progress has been much slower for advanced sqCLC, with median survival times of approximately 9 to 11 months in most studies. Herein, we discuss the current therapeutic landscape for patients with sqCLC versus with nonsquamous NSCLC. Current evidence indicates that new targeted treatments, notably monoclonal antibodies such as ramucirumab and necitumumab, and immunotherapies such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab can provide survival prolongation, although the benefits are still relatively modest. These incremental improvements, all realized since 2012, in aggregate, will very likely have a clinically meaningful impact for patients with sqCLC. We also discuss recent genomic studies of sqCLC that have identified potentially actionable molecular targets, as well as the relevant targeted agents in clinical development. Finally, we discuss the magnitude of survival benefit and the risk-to-benefit ratio that would prove clinically meaningful in this underserved patient population with unmet needs. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous Surgical Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Off-pump Coronary Artery bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi ZHANG

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Patients with resectable lung cancer and unstable coronary heart disease are at high risks of postoperative death or severe cardioovascular complications. They always pose a therapeutic challenge for thoracic surgeons. The aim of this study is to summarize clinical experience of radical lung resection for cancer with simultaneous off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods Seven patients who suffered from non small cell lung cancer concomitant arrhythmia, unstable angina and recent history of myocardial infarction had been carried out simultaneous radical lobectomy and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative 6 patients had been confirmed to be misfit for either coronary arterioplasty or stent implanting by performing the coronary angiography. One patient had undergone stenting before the lung cancer had been diagnosed. The procedure through median sternotomy performed offpump coronary artery bypass grafting preceded lobectomy and mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Left upper lobectomy was performed in 2 patients, right upper lobectomy was performed in 1 patient, right upper and middle lobectomy was performed in one patient, video thoracoscopy assisted left lower lobectomy was performed in 1 patient, right lower lobectomy was performed in 2 patients. Results There was no death of patient in hospital, however, a patient died 7th month postoperatively because of cerebrovascular accident. Atrial fibrillation was observed postoperatively in 1 patient. Five patients were diagnosed as squamous cell lung cancer by pathology examination, and 2 patients were adenocarcinoma. Follow-up ranging from 2 months to 59 monthswas available for these patients postoperatively. None of the patients showed evidence of angina and myocardial infarction after surgery. In one patient, who underwent left superior lobectomy, local recurrence was found at 19 months after surgery. Conclusion In selected patients, simultaneous radical

  5. Altered efficacy of AT1R-targeted treatment after spontaneous cancer cell-AT1R upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, Eleanor I; Wen, Shu Wen; Chan, Joyna; Chong, Way W; Neo, Jaclyn H; Christophi, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Targeting of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) reduces tumour growth in experimental models of cancer. We aimed to establish if combined targeting of the 'classical' and 'alternative' arms of the RAS could result in synergistic inhibition of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Immediately following induction of CRC liver metastases through intrasplenic injection of murine CRC cells, treatment with irbesartan (AT1R blocker; 50 mg/kg/day s.c.), captopril (ACE inhibitor; 750 mg/kg/day i.p.), CGP42112A (AT2R agonist; 0.6 μg/kg/hr i.p.), and/or ANG-(1-7) (24 μg/kg/hr i.p.) began and continued for 21 days. Liver to body weight ratio and/or stereology were used as a measure of tumour burden. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine AT1R and VEGF expression as well as proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (active caspase 3) and angiogenesis (CD34). Combined RAS therapies failed to improve upon single arm therapies. However, while irbesartan previously inhibited tumour growth in this model, in the current experiments irbesartan failed to affect tumour burden. Subsequent analysis showed a cancer-cell specific upregulation of the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) in irbesartan-insensitive compared to irbesartan-sensitive tumours. The upregulation of AT1R was associated with an increase in proliferation and VEGF expression by cancer cells. While animals bearing irbesartan-sensitive tumours showed a marked decrease in the number of proliferating cells in the liver and VEGF-expressing infiltrating cells in the tumour following AT1R treatment, these were unchanged by treatment in animals bearing irbesartan-insensitive (high AT1R expressing) tumours. Although the results do not support increased efficacy of combined treatment, they provide intriguing evidence of the importance of RAS expression in determining patient response and tumour growth potential and suggest that components of the RAS could be used as biomarkers to aid in patient selection

  6. Exploring a Novel Target Treatment on Breast Cancer: Aloe-emodin Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Induced Cell Apoptosis and Inhibited Cell Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Tian, Si; Zhu, Jing; Li, Kai-Ting; Yu, Ting-He; Yu, Le-Hua; Bai, Ding-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a clinical cancer therapy, is a mild therapy, which involves application of photosensitizers (PSs) located in target cells and then irradiated by corresponding wavelength. The activation of PSs generates radical oxygen species (ROS) to exert a selective cytotoxic activity for the target cells. Aloe-emodin (AE) has been found to be an anti-tumor agent in many studies, and has also been demonstrated as a photosensitizer, in the recent years. In order to study the mechanisms of aloe-emodin as a photosensitizer, we investigated the mechanisms of photo-cytotoxicity induced by aloe-emodin in breast cancer MCF-7 cells in the present study. Analysis of cell proliferation evidenced that there was a drastic depression after photodynamic treatment with a series of aloe-emodin concentrations and light doses. We observed changes in apoptosis and demonstrated that the mechanisms of apoptosis were involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum death pathways. The capacity of adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cells was measured using WST8 and transwell assay and demonstrated that AE-PDT significantly inhibited adhesion, migration and invasion of MCF-7cells. The expression of MMP2, MMP9, VEGF and Nrf2 demonstrated that the metastasis was related to oxidative stress. Analysis of changes in cytoskeleton components (F-actin) evidenced cytoskeleton disorganization after treatment with AE-PDT. Taken together, the present results indicated that PDT with aloe-emodin effectively suppressed cancer development in MCF-7cells, suggesting the potential of AE as a new photosensitizer in PDT which can provide a new modility for treating cancer.

  7. Cancer stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-05-24

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Determining the role of cancer stem cell metabolism in carcinogenesis has become a major focus in cancer research, and substantial efforts are conducted towards discovering clinical targets.

  8. Profile of bavituximab and its potential in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasi I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Irene Stasi, Federico Cappuzzo Medical Oncology Department, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Ospedale Civile, Livorno, Italy Abstract: Bavituximab is a an unconjugated, chimeric immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the phosphatidylserine (PS expressed on tumor endothelium, with a specific mechanism of action. PS is an anionic membrane phospholipid, physiologically restricted to the internal membrane leaflet; various pathophysiologic processes cause the exposure of PS on the external membrane leaflet. Bavituximab, once bound, starts up host effector activities, such as antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity, causing vessel destruction and enhancing antitumor immunity. Phase I clinical trials of bavituximab administered as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents in adults with pretreated solid tumors have been accomplished, indicating that bavituximab can be safely dispensed weekly, with a recommended dose of 1 and 3 mg/kg. A Phase II randomized, placebo-controlled trial of bavituximab plus docetaxel, in the second-line therapy setting of locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, has been conducted and recently presented, suggesting a clinical benefit of the combination, with an overall response rate of 17% and median overall survival of more than 11 months. A Phase III trial is currently ongoing. Bavituximab has been studied in combination with platinum-based doublets with promising results. In the present paper we summarize the preclinical development and clinical experience with bavituximab in non-small-cell lung cancer. Keywords: bavituximab, NSCLC, targeted therapy, vascular disrupting agent, vascular targeting agent

  9. Profile of bavituximab and its potential in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Irene; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Bavituximab is a an unconjugated, chimeric immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody directed against the phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on tumor endothelium, with a specific mechanism of action. PS is an anionic membrane phospholipid, physiologically restricted to the internal membrane leaflet; various pathophysiologic processes cause the exposure of PS on the external membrane leaflet. Bavituximab, once bound, starts up host effector activities, such as antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity, causing vessel destruction and enhancing antitumor immunity. Phase I clinical trials of bavituximab administered as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents in adults with pretreated solid tumors have been accomplished, indicating that bavituximab can be safely dispensed weekly, with a recommended dose of 1 and 3 mg/kg. A Phase II randomized, placebo-controlled trial of bavituximab plus docetaxel, in the second-line therapy setting of locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, has been conducted and recently presented, suggesting a clinical benefit of the combination, with an overall response rate of 17% and median overall survival of more than 11 months. A Phase III trial is currently ongoing. Bavituximab has been studied in combination with platinum-based doublets with promising results. In the present paper we summarize the preclinical development and clinical experience with bavituximab in non-small-cell lung cancer.

  10. Determination of free cisplatin in medium by differential pulse polarography after ultrasound and cisplatin treatment of a cancer cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Vladan; Skorpikova, Jirina; Mornstein, Vojtech; Fojt, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro study was carried out for detection of the cisplatin in free form and in culture medium, depending on various conditions of sonodynamic human ovarian cancer cells A2780 treatment by differential pulse polarography (DPP). For sonodynamic treatment, we used cisplatin alone and combined cisplatin/ultrasound treatments. The ultrasound exposure intensity of 1.0 and 2.0 Wcm 2 in far field for incubation periods 1, 24 and 48 h was used. The parameters of DPP measurements were - 1 s drop time, 5 mV.s -1 voltage scan rate, 50 mV modulation amplitude and negative scanning direction; platinum wire served as counter electrode and Ag|AgCl|3 M KCI as reference electrode. The results showed the dependence of free platinum quantities in culture medium on incubation time and treatment protocol. We found difference in concentration of free cisplatin between conventional application of cisplatin and sonodynamic treatment. The sonodynamic combined treatment of cisplatin and ultrasound field showed a higher cisplatin content in the culture medium than cisplatin treatment alone; a difference of 20% was observed for incubation time 48 h. The results also showed the influence of a time sequence of ultrasound and cytostatics in the sonodynamic treatment. The highest amount of free cisplatin in the solution was found for primary application of cisplatin and the subsequent ultrasound exposure. The quantity of free cisplatin increased with time, namely for time intervals 1-24 h. There was no difference between the DPP signal of cisplatin in reaction mixture containing cells in small quantities and micro-filtered mixture without cells. Thus, the DPP method is suitable for the detection and quantification of free cisplatin in the culture medium of cell suspension. Ultrasound field can be important factor during cytostatic therapy. (author)

  11. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa ePalange

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with Curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER– breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48 and 72h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02 and 47% (p = 0.001, respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231 and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings.

  12. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palange, Anna L.; Mascolo, Daniele Di; Singh, Jaykrishna; Franceschi, Maria S. De; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis) is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER – ) breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48, and 72 h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC 50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02) and 47% (p = 0.001), respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231, and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings.

  13. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  14. Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells by IGF1R Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Combined with Conventional Systemic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Wesseling, J.

    Aim: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  15. Treatment of breast cancer cells by IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with conventional systemic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boezen, H.M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  16. Role of erlotinib in first-line and maintenance treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Reguart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Noemí Reguart1, Andrés Felipe Cardona2, Rafael Rosell31Medical Oncology Service, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Clinical and Translational Oncology Group, Institute of Oncology, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia; 3Medical Oncology Service, Catalan Institute of Oncology, ICO, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva® is a member of a class of small molecule inhibitors that targets the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, with anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. Erlotinib represents a new-generation of agents known as “targeted therapies” designed to act upon cancer cells by interfering with aberrant specific activated pathways needed for tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell survival. Since its approval in November 2004 for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after the failure of at least one prior chemotherapy regimen and with a view to improving patients’ outcomes and prevent symptoms, the scientific community has evaluated the potential role of erlotinib in other scenarios such as in maintenance therapy and, in first-line setting for a selected population based on biological markers of response such as mutations of the EGFR. The convenient once-a-day pill administration and the good toxicity profile of erlotinib make it a reasonable candidate for testing in this context. This report provides a review of the role of erlotinib therapy in advanced NSCLC. It summarizes current data and perspectives of erlotinib in upfront treatment and maintenance for advanced NSCLC as well as looking at candidate biomarkers of response to these new targeted-agents.Keywords: erlotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, first line, maintenance, non-small-cell lung cancer

  17. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology...

  18. Non small-cell lung cancer and treatment options after tyrosine kinase inhibitors failure in the first line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowaniecova, G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced non-small cell lung cancer with present epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) sensitising mutation is standardly treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). During treatment a resistance to TKI develops, disease progresses. We differ primary and secondary resistance. The most effective treatment after TKI failure is not definitively proven. Standard chemotherapy is usually introduced, eventually it is possible to use other TKI in the next lines. Case: The author presents a case of 60-year old patient with lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR sensitising mutation, where primary resistance to TKI was observed. Chemotherapy after progression was introduced. Planned therapy with afatnib was not carried out due to deterioration of patient´s condition. Conclusion: Presented case of EGFR mutation-positive patient represents an example of not very frequent primary resistance to TKI. Mechanisms of primary resistance are not well understood. Treatment after first line TKI failure in non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutation represents a challenge for medical research. (author)

  19. [Treatment of liver cancer in vitro and in mice by monoclonal antibody targeting epithelial specific antigen-positive liver cancer stem cells in combination with cisplatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y Y; Yu, L; Rong, Y; Sun, L X; Sun, L C; Yang, Z H; Ran, Y L; Li, L

    2016-05-23

    To investigate the biological characteristics of monoclonal antibodies against human liver cancer stem cells and its therapeutic effect in combination with cisplatin in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Cell culture in serum-free medium and PKH26 staining were used to determine the existence of cancer stem cells in human liver Bel7402-V3 cell line. The co-expression of antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody (McAb) 15D2 and epithelial specific antigen (ESA) and PKH26-positive cells in the Bel7402-V3 cells were detected by immunofluorescence assay. Serum-free suspension culture was used to detect the self-renewal ability of 15D2-positive Bel7402-V3 cells sorted by flow cytometry and the effect of 15D2 on the self-renewal ability of Bel7402-V3 cells. The effect of 15D2 on cisplatin resistance in the cells was examined by CCK8 method. The inhibitory effect of 15D2 combined with cisplatin on the transplanted tumor growth in mice was also observed. Single PKH26-positive cells were observed in the Bel7402-V3 cell spheroids cultured for 11 days. Immunofluorescence assay showed that the 15D2-recognized antigen could be conjugated with PKH26 and ESA and co-localized on Bel7402-V3 cells. The spheroid formation rate of 15D2-positive cells in serum-free medium was significantly higher than that of 15D2-negative cells [(30.4±3.4)% vs. (8.8±1.8)%, Pcisplatin resistance of 15D2-positive cells was obviously higher than that of 15D2-negative cells (IC50: 1.014 μmol/L vs. 0.365 μmol/L). McAb 15D2 significantly suppressed the spheroid formation of Bel7402-V3 cells, with an inhibition rate of 37.5%. McAb 15D2 also notably inhibited the cisplatin resistance of Bel7302-V3 cells. The IC50 was 0.211 μg/ml in the 15D2 group and 0.325 μg/ml in the control group. The mouse experiment showed that the tumor growth rates of 50 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg and 12.5 mg/kg 15D2-treatment groups were 82.6%, 71.4% and 60.0%, respectively; that of the 50 mg/kg 15D2 + cisplatin group was 91

  20. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheong J; Dosch, Joseph; Simeone, Diane M

    2008-06-10

    Cellular heterogeneity in cancer was observed decades ago by studies in mice which showed that distinct subpopulations of cells within a tumor mass are capable of driving tumorigenesis. Conceptualized from this finding was the stem-cell hypothesis for cancer, which suggests that only a specific subset of cancer cells within each tumor is responsible for tumor initiation and propagation, termed tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data has been provided to support the existence of CSCs in human blood cell-derived cancers and solid organ tumors of the breast, brain, prostate, colon, and skin. Study of human pancreatic cancers has also revealed a specific subpopulation of cancer cells that possess the characteristics of CSCs. These pancreatic cancer stem cells express the cell surface markers CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen, and represent 0.5% to 1.0% of all pancreatic cancer cells. Along with the properties of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, pancreatic CSCs display upregulation of important developmental genes that maintain self-renewal in normal stem cells, including Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and BMI-1. Signaling cascades that are integral in tumor metastasis are also upregulated in the pancreatic CSC. Understanding the biologic behavior and the molecular pathways that regulate growth, survival, and metastasis of pancreatic CSCs will help to identify novel therapeutic approaches to treat this dismal disease.

  1. Brain irradiation for metastasis prevention and radiation treatment of small cell lung cancer metastases into the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhina, Z.P.; Motorina, L.I.; Glekov, I.V.

    1985-01-01

    The report presents the results of cranial irradiation of 44 small cell lung cancer patients with clinically-identified intracranial metastases and 40 patients - for metastatic spread prevention. Whole brain irradiation was carried out with single doses of 2-4 Gy (total dose - 30-40 Gy) in both groups 5 times weekly. Patients irradiated for metastasis prevention revealed a 3.3 - fold decrease in intracranial metastasis frequency and a good post-treatment tolerance. In the other group, radiation failed to reach tumor lesions in 20%; treatment produced a poor effect in 30%. There was a correlation between survival time, initial expansion of process and tumor response to primary treatment. No relationship was observed between survival time and procedure and duration of cranial irradiation. Prophylactic irradiation may be beneficial in responders to therapy

  2. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: Unsolved questions and frontiers ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingze; Kong, Li; Jiao, Qinghua; Li, Minghuan; Yu, Jingming

    2017-08-10

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has been recognized as a standard alternative treatment to surgery for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Guaranteed local control rates over 90% makes oncologists wonder whether SABR is qualified enough to challenge surgery in operable patients. The role of SABR for centrally located lesions would be another question because of the increased risk of severe toxic effect. Plenty of studies suggest that optimization of dose regimen and appropriate case selection would be helpful. Additionally, the effect of adjuvant therapy following SABR in selected patients is worth looking forward, given that it significantly reduced risk of recurrence after complete resection. A consensus about salvage treatment after SABR also needs, given the current diversity of options. Finally, witnessing the emergence of proton therapy and immunotherapy, we believe that the future of SABR lay behind these novel forms of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic morphine treatment attenuates cell growth of human BT474 breast cancer cells by rearrangement of the ErbB signalling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Regine Weingaertner

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that opioid analgesics may interfere with tumour growth. It is currently thought that these effects are mediated by transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK-controlled ERK1/2 and Akt signalling. The growth of many breast cancer cells is dependent on hyperactive ErbB receptor networks and one of the most successful approaches in antineoplastic therapy during the last decade was the development of ErbB-targeted therapies. However, the response rates of single therapies are often poor and resistance mechanisms evolve rapidly. To date there is no information about the ability of opioid analgesics to interfere with the growth of ErbB-driven cancers.Here we demonstrate that ErbB2 overexpressing BT474 human breast cancer cells carry fully functional endogenous µ-opioid receptors. Most interestingly, the acute opioid effects on basal and Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation changed considerably during chronic Morphine treatment. Investigation of the underlying mechanism by the use of protein kinase inhibitors and co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that chronic Morphine treatment results in rearrangement of the ErbB signalling network leading to dissociation of ERK1/2 from Akt signalling and a switch from ErbB1/ErbB3 to ErbB1/ErbB2-dependent cell growth. In chronically Morphine-treated cells Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 signalling is redirected via a newly established PI3K- and metalloproteinase-dependent feedback loop. Together, these alterations result in apoptosis of BT474 cells. A similar switch in Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 signalling from an ErbB2-independent to an ErbB2-, PI3K- and metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism was also observed in κ-opioid receptor expressing SKBR3 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells.The present data demonstrate that the ErbB receptor network of human breast cancer cells represents a target for chronic Morphine treatment. Rearrangement of ErbB signalling by chronic

  4. Cisplatin treatment increases stemness through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors by interleukin-6 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuquan; Duan, Shanzhou; Tsai, Ying; Keng, Peter C; Chen, Yongbing; Lee, Soo Ok; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin-resistant A549 and H157 (A549CisR and H157CisR) non-small cell lung cancer cells show increased stemness of cancer stem cells (CSCs) compared to their parental cells. We investigated whether interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling contributes to this increased stemness in cisplatin-resistant cells. When A549CisR and H157CisR cells were treated with neutralizing IL-6 antibody, decreased cisplatin resistance was observed, whereas IL-6 treatment of parental cells resulted in increased cisplatin resistance. Expression of the CSC markers was significantly upregulated in IL-6-expressing scramble cells (in vitro) and scramble cell-derived tumor tissues (in vivo) after cisplatin treatment, but not in IL-6 knocked down (IL-6si) (in vitro) cells and in IL-6si cell-derived tumor tissues (in vivo), suggesting the importance of IL-6 signaling in triggering increased stemness during cisplatin resistance development. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) were upregulated by IL-6 and responsible for the increased CSC stemness on cisplatin treatment. Mechanism dissection studies found that upregulation of HIFs by IL-6 was through transcriptional control and inhibition of HIF degradation. Treatment of HIF inhibitor (FM19G11) abolished the upregulation of CSC markers and increased sphere formations in IL-6 expressing cells on cisplatin treatment. In all, IL-6-mediated HIF upregulation is important in increasing stemness during cisplatin resistance development, and we suggest that the strategies of inhibiting IL-6 signaling or its downstream HIF molecules can be used as future therapeutic approaches to target CSCs after cisplatin treatment for lung cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Irene; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Since their first description, activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations identify a distinct clinical entity of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). New targeted therapies for molecularly selected NSCLC are changing the natural history of the disease, with results superior to standard chemotherapy as demonstrated in large phase III studies with first generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib. However, after an initial response, all patients inevitably progress and several mechanisms including a secondary mutation in exon 20 of the EGFR gene (T790M) or MET or HER2 amplifications are responsible for acquired resistance (AR). In clinical practice few options are available for patients with AR, and several new agents or strategies are currently under investigation, including second generation TKIs. Aim of the present review is to present available data on new EGFR-TKIs and to discuss how these agents could overcome AR to erlotinib or gefitinib.

  6. Differences in cell cycle regulation after platinum derivatives treatment in sensitive and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Viktor; Souček, Karel; Šindlerová, Lenka; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Sova, P.; Kozubík, Alois

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 5 (2006), s. 383-384 ISSN 0009-2770. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /6./. 14.06.2006-17.06.2006, Milovy] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507; GA MPO(CZ) PZ-Z2/29 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ovarian cancer * cell cycle * cisplatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  7. The interplay between GRP78 expression and Akt activation in human colon cancer cells under celecoxib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaobo; Chang, Weilong; Du, Hansong; Bai, Jie; Sun, Zhenhai; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Guangsheng; Tao, Kaixiong; Long, Yueping

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported previously that celecoxib shows antitumor effects in many types of cancers. Here, we detected its effects on DLD-1 and SW480 (two human colon cancer cell lines) and investigated the dynamic relationship between the 78-kDa glucose-regulatory protein (GRP78) and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Gene expression was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis; the cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT assay and flow cytometry. First, the results showed that celecoxib induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found the celecoxib-triggered unfolded protein response and the bidirectional regulation of Akt activation in both cell lines. Inhibiting the Akt activation by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 markedly enhanced GRP78 expression. Besides, silencing the GRP78 expression regulated Akt activation in a time-dependent manner and increased the induction of the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) as well as considerably promoted celecoxib-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that under the celecoxib treatment, GRP78 plays a protective role by modulating Akt activation and abrogating CHOP expression. However, Akt activation can provide a feedback loop to inhibit GRP78 expression. These studies can lead to novel therapeutic strategies for human colon cancer.

  8. Maintenance treatment after induction therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzler, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death in the industrialized world. Despite significant progress in early stage disease, survival rates for advanced disease remain low. Maintenance therapy is a treatment strategy that has been investigated extensively in NSCLC. Therapies that have been studied in this setting in randomized trials to date include chemotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. Following the development of multiple new agents that show activity in NSCLC and have a tolerable side-effect profile, there has been increasing interest in utilizing them to maintain response to initial therapy after treatment with platinum-based doublets. Two effective strategies have evolved: continuation and switch maintenance. Despite improvements in progression-free survival and often overall survival on multiple clinical trials, there remains considerable controversy around this treatment paradigm. Here, we briefly outline the evolution of this treatment strategy and examine the available data, including recently updated data from the PARAMOUNT, AVAPERL, and PointBreak maintenance trials. Ultimately, the decision to use maintenance chemotherapy requires a nuanced discussion between the patient and physician that adequately assesses benefits of prolonged therapy and impact in terms of toxicity, quality of life, and financial cost. PMID:24381656

  9. Exercise training for people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheri, Vinicius; Jenkins, Sue; Cecins, Nola; Gain, Kevin; Phillips, Martin J; Sanders, Lucas H; Hill, Kylie

    In people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, to investigate the effects of supervised exercise training on exercise capacity, physical activity and sedentary behavior, peripheral muscle force, health-related quality of life, fatigue, feelings of anxiety and depression, and lung function. This pilot randomized controlled trial included participants 6-10 weeks after lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer or, for those who required adjuvant chemotherapy, 4-8 weeks after their last cycle. Participants were randomized to either 8 weeks of supervised exercise training (exercise group) or 8 weeks of usual care (control group). Prior to and following the intervention period, both groups completed measurements of exercise capacity, physical activity and sedentary behavior, quadriceps and handgrip force, HRQoL, fatigue, feelings of anxiety and depression, and lung function. Intention-to-treat analysis was undertaken. Seventeen participants (mean age 67, SD=9 years; 12 females) were included. Nine and eight participants were randomized to the exercise and control groups, respectively. Four participants (44%) adhered to exercise training. Compared with any change seen in the control group, those in the exercise group demonstrated greater gains in the peak rate of oxygen consumption (mean difference, 95% confidence interval for between-group difference: 0.19 [0.04-0.33]Lmin -1 ) and 6-minute walk distance (52 [12-93]m). No other between-group differences were demonstrated. In people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, 8 weeks of supervised exercise training improved exercise capacity, measured by both laboratory- and field-based exercise tests. These results suggest that this clinical population may benefit from attending exercise training programs. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term treatment with the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant durably remodels estrogen signaling in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Badia, Eric; Docquier, Aurélie; Busson, Muriel; Lapierre, Marion; Pujol, Pascal; Balaguer, Patrick; Cavailles, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Most ovarian cancers are estrogen-positive and hormonal treatments using anti-estrogens or aromatase inhibitors are under investigation for treating the tumors that are resistant to conventional therapies. In this study, the long-term effects of two anti-estrogens, namely 4-hydroxytamoxifen and fulvestrant (or ICI182,780), were investigated in ERα-positive BG1 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. To this aim, cells were grown in the presence of anti-estrogen concentrations...

  11. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for treatment of adrenal gland metastases from non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holy, Richard; Piroth, Marc; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Metastatic disease from a non-small cell lung cancer to the adrenal gland is common, and systemic treatment is the most frequent therapeutic option. Nevertheless, in patients suffering from an isolated adrenal metastasis, a survival benefit could be achieved after surgical resection. Stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) increase local tumor control and could be an alternative option. We present our initial institutional experiences with SBRT for adrenal gland metastases. Between July 2002 and September 2009, 18 patients with a non-small cell lung cancer and adrenal metastasis received SBRT. An isolated adrenal metastasis was diagnosed in 13 patients, while 5 patients with multiple metastatic lesions had SBRT due to back pain. Depending on treatment intent and target size, the dose/fraction concept varied from 5 x 4 Gy to 5 x 8 Gy. Dose was given with an isotropic convergent beam technique to a median maximum dose of 132% to the target's central part. The mean clinical (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) was 89 cm³ (5-260 cm³) and 176 cm³ (20-422 cm³). A median progression-free survival time (PFS) of 4.2 months was obtained for the entire patient group, with a markedly increased PFS of 12 months in 13 patients suffering from an isolated metastasis of the adrenal gland. After a median follow-up of 21 months, 10 of 13 patients (77%) with isolated adrenal metastasis achieved local control. In these patients, median overall survival (OS) was 23 months. SBRT is a feasible and safe technique for lung cancer patients with adrenal gland metastasis. In patients with an isolated adrenal metastasis median OS of 23 months was excellent and comparable to data after surgical removal, but noninvasive. Acute side effects were mild.

  13. Combination Treatment of Polo-Like Kinase 1 and Tankyrase-1 Inhibitors Enhances Anticancer Effect in Triple-negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Geun-Hyoung; Kim, Dong-Young; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Chung Kwon

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer type in women, and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an extremely aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor prognosis rates. The present study investigated the antitumor effect of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitor in combination with the tankyrase-1 (TNKS1) inhibitor on TNBC cells. We evaluated the antitumor effects of combination therapy with PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitor using cell viability analysis, apoptosis assay and transwell assay for cell invasion and migration in TNBC cells. Combination treatment with PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitors not only inhibited the invasion and migration capacity of TNBC cells, but also increased the apoptosis and cell death of TNBC cells. The viability of TNBC cells with low expression of β-catenin and high expression of PLK1 was not affected by treatment with PLK1 inhibitor. However, the combination treatment with the TNKS1 inhibitor significantly decreased cell invasion and migration and increased apoptosis. Combination therapy of PLK1 and TNKS1 inhibitors may improve the therapeutic efficacy of the current treatment for TNBC. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pemetrexed and gemcitabine treatment for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçin Balçik, Pınar; Şahin, Bayram

    2016-01-05

    The purpose of the study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of the chemotherapy medications that contain gemcitabine and pemetrexed, which are used in the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of platinum-based pemetrexed and gemcitabine treatments as the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC with the use of the Markov model, and from the perspective of the Social Security Institution. NSCLC costs calculated on the basis of experts' opinions and the effectiveness values calculated by administering the EQ-5D questionnaire to the patients were analyzed. All direct medical costs were included in the model. While the life-long cost of gemcitabine/cisplatin treatment was determined to be 10,347.45 Turkish lira per patient, it was determined as 17,783.34 for pemetrexed/cisplatin treatment. The incremental cost of pemetrexed/cisplatin treatment is 220,754 per quality-adjusted life year. Although there is no official threshold value in Turkey, due to the fact that the incremental cost effectiveness ratio exceeds the threshold value calculated on the basis of GDP per capita, it is understood that pemetrexed/cisplatin is not cost-effective in the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC.

  16. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo E

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca's pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca's known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca's possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  17. Drug Combination Synergy in Worm-like Polymeric Micelles Improves Treatment Outcome for Small Cell and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaomeng; Min, Yuanzeng; Bludau, Herdis; Keith, Andrew; Sheiko, Sergei S; Jordan, Rainer; Wang, Andrew Z; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based systems for concurrent delivery of multiple drugs can improve outcomes of cancer treatments, but face challenges because of differential solubility and fairly low threshold for incorporation of many drugs. Here we demonstrate that this approach can be used to greatly improve the treatment outcomes of etoposide (ETO) and platinum drug combination ("EP/PE") therapy that is the backbone for treatment of prevalent and deadly small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A polymeric micelle system based on amphiphilic block copolymer poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline- block-2-butyl-2-oxazoline- block-2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (P(MeOx- b-BuOx- b-MeOx) is used along with an alkylated cisplatin prodrug to enable co-formulation of EP/PE in a single high-capacity vehicle. A broad range of drug mixing ratios and exceptionally high two-drug loading of over 50% wt. drug in dispersed phase is demonstrated. The highly loaded POx micelles have worm-like morphology, unprecedented for drug loaded polymeric micelles reported so far, which usually form spheres upon drug loading. The drugs co-loading in the micelles result in a slowed-down release, improved pharmacokinetics, and increased tumor distribution of both drugs. A superior antitumor activity of co-loaded EP/PE drug micelles compared to single drug micelles or their combination as well as free drug combination was demonstrated using several animal models of SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer.

  18. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of colon cancer cell HCT-15 in response to all-trans retinoic acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Wen, Gaotian; Ding, Ming; Pan, Jian-Yi; Yu, Mei-Lan; Zhao, Fukun; Weng, Xia-Lian; Du, Jiang-Li

    2012-12-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common malignances. In vitro and in vivo study show that retinoic acids inhibit a wide variety of cancer cells but the molecular mechanism of their anti-tumor effects are not yet fully understood. Alltrans retinoic acid (ATRA), an isomer of retinoic acid, can inhibit the proliferation of HCT-15 human colon cancer cell line. A proteomic analysis was performed using HCT-15 treated with ATRA to further elucidate the retinoic acid signaling pathway and its anti-tumor effect mechanism. MTT results showed that the growth of HCT-15 cells were significantly inhibited by ATRA. The alkaline phosphatase activity assay showed that ATRA failed to induce the differentiation of HCT-15. The DNA ladder detection showed that ATRA induced apoptosis in HCT-15. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identified 13 differentially expressed proteins in HCT-15 cells after all-trans retinoic acid treatment. Among the identified differentially expressed proteins, there were four scaffold proteins (YWHAE, SFN, YWHAB, and YWHAZ), two ubiquitin modification related proteins (ISG-15 and UBE2N), two translational initiation factors (EIF1AX and EIF3K), two cytoskeleton related proteins (EZRI and CNN3), two proteinmodification related proteins (TXNDC17 and PIMT), and one enzyme related to phospholipid metabolism (PSP). Both EZRI and UBE2N were rendered to western-blot validation and the results were consistent with the two-dimension electrophoresis analysis. In this study, the differentially expressed proteins in HCT-15 treated by ATRA were identified, which will assist the further elucidation of the anti-tumor mechanism of retinoic acids.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and IRE-1 signaling cause apoptosis in colon cancer cells in response to andrographolide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ahmed, Hafiz; Yang, Peixin; Czinn, Steven J.; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. The mechanism(s) by which andrographolide induces apoptosis however, have not been elucidated. The present study was performed to determine the molecular events that promote apoptosis in andrographolide treated cells using T84, HCT116 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines. Andrographolide was determined to limit colony formation and Ki67 expression, alter nuclear morphology, increase cytoplasmic histo...

  1. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular ...

  2. Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient with Profound Hyponatremia and Acute Neurological Symptoms: An Effective Treatment with Fludrocortisone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jaal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte abnormality in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC. Being usually asymptomatic, hyponatremia may cause symptoms like nausea, fatigue, disorientation, headache, muscle cramps, or even seizures, particularly if severe and rapid decrease of serum sodium levels occurs. Here we report a case of SCLC patient with severe hyponatremia and acute neurological symptoms that developed 2 days after the first course of second-line chemotherapy, most probably due to the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also known as arginine vasopressin during lysis of the tumour cells. Initial treatment consisted of continuous administration of hypertonic saline that resulted in improvement of patient’s neurological status. However, to obtain a persistent increase in serum sodium level, pharmacological intervention with oral fludrocortisone 0.1 mg twice daily was needed. We can therefore conclude that mineralocorticoids may be used to correct hyponatremia in SCLC patients when appropriate.

  3. Application of multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song X

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-li Song,1 Rui-jun Ju,2 Yao Xiao,1 Xin Wang,1 Shuang Liu,1 Min Fu,1 Jing-jing Liu,1 Li-yan Gu,1 Xue-tao Li,1 Lan Cheng1 1School of Pharmacy, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Dalian, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, China Abstract: Chemotherapy for aggressive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC usually results in a poor prognosis due to tumor metastasis, vasculogenic mimicry (VM channels, limited killing of tumor cells, and severe systemic toxicity. Herein, we developed a kind of multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes to enhance antitumor efficacy for NSCLC. In the liposomes, octreotide was modified on liposomal surface for obtaining a receptor-mediated targeting effect, and honokiol was incorporated into the lipid bilayer for inhibiting tumor metastasis and eliminating VM channels. In vitro cellular assays showed that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes not only exhibited the strongest cytotoxic effect on Lewis lung tumor cells but also showed the most efficient inhibition on VM channels. Action mechanism studies showed that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes could downregulate PI3K, MMP-2, MMP-9, VE-Cadherin, and FAK and activate apoptotic enzyme caspase 3. In vivo results exhibited that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes could accumulate selectively in tumor site and display an obvious antitumor efficacy. In addition, no significant toxicity of blood system and major organs was observed at a test dose. Therefore, multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes may provide a safe and efficient therapy strategy for NSCLC. Keywords: octreotide, honokiol, chemotherapy, vasculogenic mimicry, tumor metastasis, targeting drug delivery

  4. Combined treatment with vitamin C and sulindac synergistically induces p53- and ROS-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Shin, Yu Jin; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee; Hur, Dae Young; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Lee, Won Keun; Lee, Wang-Jae

    2016-09-06

    Sulindac has anti-neoplastic properties against colorectal cancers; however, its use as a chemopreventive agent has been limited due to toxicity and efficacy concerns. Combinatorial treatment of colorectal cancers has been attempted to maximize anti-cancer efficacy with minimal side effects by administrating NSAIDs in combination with other inhibitory compounds or drugs such as l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which is known to exhibit cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells at high concentrations. In this study, we evaluated a combinatorial strategy utilizing sulindac and vitamin C. The death of HCT116 cells upon combination therapy occurred via a p53-mediated mechanism. The combination therapeutic resistance developed in isogenic p53 null HCT116 cells and siRNA-mediated p53 knockdown HCT116 cells, but the exogenous expression of p53 in p53 null isogenic cells resulted in the induction of cell death. In addition, we investigated an increased level of intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species), which was preceded by p53 activation. The expression level of PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), but not Bim, was significantly increased in HCT116 cells in response to the combination treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that combination therapy with sulindac and vitamin C could be a novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy for p53 wild type colon cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thymidylate synthase protein expression levels remain stable during paclitaxel and carboplatin treatment in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a potential predictive marker for efficacy of treatment with pemetrexed. The current study aimed at investigating whether TS expression changes during non-pemetrexed chemotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), thus making rebiopsy necessary...... for deciding on pemetrexed second-line treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: TS immunohistochemístry was performed on biopsies and available resection specimens from 65 NSCLC patients stage T1-3N0-2 treated with preoperative carboplatin and paclitaxel [neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC)-group] and from 53 NSCLC...... in primary tumors remained unchanged, and new biopsies for deciding on second-line pemetrexed does not seem warranted based on the current results....

  6. A new chemotherapy agent-free theranostic system composed of graphene oxide nano-complex and aptamers for treatment of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni, Amirhossein; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Hashemitabar, Shirin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Ramezani, Pouria; Abnous, Khalil; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-06-30

    The common cancer treatment strategies like chemotherapy and radiotherapy are nonspecific and can trigger severe side effects by damaging normal cells. So, targeted cancer therapies, such as apoptosis induction, have attracted great attention in recent years. In this project, two nano-complexes, MUC1 aptamer-NAS-24 aptamer-Graphene oxide (GO) and MUC1 aptamer-Cytochrome C aptamer-GO, were designed to induce cell programmed death in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells (breast cancer cell lines) and to verify the level of apoptosis in both cell lines. MUC1 aptamer was a molecular recognition probe that led the internalization of two nano-complexes into MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells (MUC1 positive cells) but not into HepG2 cell (liver cancer cell line, MUC1 negative cells). The apoptosis induction relied on binding of NAS-24 aptamer to its target, vimentin, in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 (target cells) with different levels of vimentin content. The function of first nano-complex was confirmed by binding of FAM-labeled cytochrome C aptamer to its target (cytochrome C) which was released from mitochondria, based on the function of the first nano-complex. Fluorometric analysis and gel retardation assay proved the formation of nano-complexes. The results of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy indicated efficient apoptosis induction just in target cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells) but not in non-target cells (HepG2 cell). The results of MTT assay also confirmed cell death process. Overall, our results proved excellent targeted apoptosis in breast cancer cells by designed nano-complexes which can be applied as an efficient cancer therapy method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety and feasibility of radiotherapy treatment in elderly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, F; Cartei, F; Ursino, S; Stefanelli, A; Zagatti, Y; Berretta, S; Figura, S; Maugeri, D; Zanet, E; Spartà, D; La Morella, C; Tirelli, U; Berretta, M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and activity of radiotherapy (RT) treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced lung cancer. From January 2002 to December 2007, 51 consecutive patients (43 men and 8 women) aged > or = 65 received RT for locally advanced lung cancer, 22 with radical intent and 16 in adjuvant setting. Thirty-six patients received chemotherapy. Variables considered were age, co-morbidities, evaluated according to the adult co-morbidity evaluation index (ACE-27), surgery vs. no surgery, radiation dose and chemotherapy. The median age was 74.7 years (range 65-91). Of the patients, 15.7% had no co-morbidity, 41.2% mild, 25.5% moderate, and 17.6% had severe co-morbidities. Sixteen subjects (31.4%) underwent surgery. All patients completed the planned radiation schedule, while chemotherapy was reduced in 16 patients. At a median follow-up of 22 months, the 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 46.5% and 35.4%, respectively. Patients with no or mild co-morbidities (p < 0.0001) and a good performance status (p < 0.0001) had a better survival. The actuarial progression-free survival at 2 and 3 years was 41.4% and 38.2%, respectively. Acute lung toxicity rates were different between patients with different ACE-27 indexes, whereas late toxicity was not influenced. In conclusion, in elderly patients, the compliance with RT is good and the rate of toxicity is acceptable. Patients with no or mild co-morbidities have a significantly better survival. The increasing severity of co-morbidities may sufficiently shorten the remaining life expectancy, cancel the gains obtained by RT and increase the acute lung toxicity. Further prospective trials are needed to confirm these results. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Physician and Patient Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Irwin H.; Hayman, James A.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Tepper, Joel; Tao, May Lin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of patient age, comorbidity, and physician factors on treatment recommendations for locally advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We surveyed radiation oncologists regarding their recommendations for treatment (chemoradiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, or no therapy) for hypothetical patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC who varied by age (55 vs. 80 years) and comorbid illness (none, moderate, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the impact of physician and practice characteristics on radiation oncologists' treatment recommendations for three scenarios with the least agreement. Results: Of 214 radiation oncologists, nearly all (99%) recommended chemoradiation for a healthy 55 year old. However, there was substantial variability in recommendations for a 55 year old with severe COPD, an 80-year-old with moderate COPD, and an 80-year-old with severe COPD. Physicians seeing a lower volume of lung cancer patients were statistically less likely to recommend radiotherapy for younger or older patients with severe COPD (both p < 0.05), but the impact was modest. Conclusions: Nearly all radiation oncologists report following the evidence-based recommendation of chemoradiation for young, otherwise healthy patients with locally advanced, unresectable NSCLC, but there is substantial variability in treatment recommendations for older or sicker patients, probably related to the lack of clinical trial data for such patients. The physician and practice characteristics we examined only weakly affected treatment recommendations. Additional clinical trial data are necessary to guide recommendations for treatment of elderly patients and patients with poor pulmonary function to optimize their management.

  9. Cabozantinib for Initial Treatment of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved cabozantinib (Cabometyx®) as an initial treatment for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The approval adds another tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the available options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide . Taking Aristolochia fangchi , a Chinese herb . Drinking water from a well that has high ... patients may be given chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ...

  11. Comparison of treatment outcomes between involved-field and elective nodal irradiation in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hak-Jae; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Heo, Dae-Seog; Kim, Young-Whan; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the usefulness of involved-field irradiation and the impact of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-based staging on treatment outcomes in limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Eighty patients who received definitive chemoradiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifty patients were treated with involved-field irradiation, which means that the radiotherapy portal includes only clinically identifiable tumors. The other 30 patients were irradiated with a comprehensive portal, including uninvolved mediastinal and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes, so-called elective nodal irradiation. No significant difference was seen in clinical factors between the two groups. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 5-75 months), no significant differences were observed in 3 year overall survival (44.6 vs. 54.1%, P=0.220) and 3 year progression-free survival (24.4 vs. 42.8%, P=0.133) between the involved-field irradiation group and the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. For patients who did not undergo positron emission tomography scans, 3 year overall survival (29.3 vs. 56.3%, P=0.022) and 3 year progression-free survival (11.0 vs. 50.0%, P=0.040) were significantly longer in the elective nodal irradiation group. Crude incidences of isolated nodal failure were 6.0% in the involved-field irradiation group and 0% in the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. All isolated nodal failures were developed in patients who had not undergone positron emission tomography scans in their initial work-ups. If patients did not undergo positron emission tomography-based staging, the omission of elective nodal irradiation resulted in impaired survival outcomes and raised the risk of isolated nodal failure. Therefore, involved-field irradiation for limited-stage small cell lung cancer might be reasonable only with positron emission tomography scan implementation. (author)

  12. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk with your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  13. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  14. Treatment outcomes of female germ cell tumors: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, M.M.; Zeeneldin, A.A.; El Gammal, M.M.; Salem, S.E.; Darweesh, A.D.; Abdelaziz, A.A.; Monir, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Female germ cell tumors (GCTS) are rare tumors that carry a good prognosis. Aim: To report the experience of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (ENCI) in managing female GCTs. Methods: This retrospective study included 19 females with ovarian GCTs presenting to the ENCI between 2006 and 2010. Results: The median age was 23 years. Ovaries were the primary site in all patients. Dysgerminoma and teratoma were the predominant pathologies followed by mixed GCT in females. Unilateral ovariectomy or ovarian tumorectomy were the classic surgical procedures with R0 resection being feasible in most cases. Surveillance was adopted in six patients with stage I disease. Chemotherapy was administered in 63% of ovarian GCTs with BEP being the commonest regimen with reasonable tolerability and good response rates. The median OS and EFS were not reached. The projected 5-year OS rate was 93.8%. Both OS and EFS were better in patients responding to chemotherapy than non-responders (p< 0.002). Stage of disease did not significantly affect OS or EFS. Conclusions: Female GCTs rarely affect Egyptian females. They have good prognosis.

  15. Correlation between Pre-treatment Anemia and Prognosis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhua DENG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC might contract anemia, however, whether anemia is one of the independent prognostic factors to the patients with NSCLC is still controversial. So the aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between anemia and overall survival (OS in patients with NSCLC. Methods 1 018 patients with operable NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed in our hospital from January 2000 to December 2008. Results The occurrence of anemia before operation was 252/1 018 (24.1%. The OS in NSCLC patients without anemia was (2 425.98±50.03 days, and the OS in patients with anemia was (2 107.15±93.86 days. There was significant difference in the OS between them (P=0.001. The patients with anemia in stage I had shorter survival time than those without anemia (P < 0.001. But there was no difference in other stage patients. TNM stage, gender, tumor size and lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with OS using Cox regression analysis. Conclusion Anemia is correlated with survival in operable NSCLC patients. Moreover, it is an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC patients with stage I.

  16. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common types of skin cancer. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for skin cancer.

  17. Dual energy CT allows for improved characterization of response to antiangiogenic treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellbach, K.; Sterzik, A.; Sommer, W.; Karpitschka, M.; Hummel, N.; Ingrisch, M.; Graser, A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Casuscelli, J.; Staehler, Michael [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Urology, Muenchen (Germany); Schlemmer, M. [Krankenhaus Barmherzige Brueder Muenchen, Department of Palliative Care, Muenchen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the potential role of dual energy CT (DECT) to visualize antiangiogenic treatment effects in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) while treated with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI). 26 patients with mRCC underwent baseline and follow-up single-phase abdominal contrast enhanced DECT scans. Scans were performed immediately before and 10 weeks after start of treatment with TKI. Virtual non-enhanced (VNE) and colour coded iodine images were generated. 44 metastases were measured at the two time points. Hounsfield unit (HU) values for VNE and iodine density (ID) as well as iodine content (IC) in mg/ml of tissue were derived. These values were compared to the venous phase DECT density (CTD) of the lesions. Values before and after treatment were compared using a paired Student's t test. Between baseline and follow up, mean CTD and DECT-derived ID both showed a significant reduction (p < 0.005). The relative reduction measured in percent was significantly greater for ID than for CTD (49.8 ± 36,3 % vs. 29.5 ± 20.8 %, p < 0.005). IC was also significantly reduced under antiangiogenic treatment (p < 0.0001). Dual energy CT-based quantification of iodine content of mRCC metastases allows for significantly more sensitive and reproducible detection of antiangiogenic treatment effects. (orig.)

  18. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  19. Role of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer: evolving strategies for non-small cell histologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggia, F.M.; Blum, R.H.; Foreman, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Lung cancer treatment has been considered to have made little progress except for advances in small cell carcinoma. For other histologies an attitude of nihilism has prevailed principally because of lack of effective systemic therapy and of no persuasive evidence that results could be improved by combined modality treatment. On the other hand, favorable results from surgery are confined to a small percent of all patients with this disease. This review emphasizes possibilities for progress in evolving new therapeutic strategies. Although improvement over other systemic therapies is modest, cisplatin-containing regimens yield more consistent response rates and apparent survival advantage relative to single agents. Immediate progression occurs in the minority of patients. In addition, regimens combining cisplatin with vinca alkaloids have no substantial deleterious effects on the lung, marrow or esophagus to aggravate radiation-induced complications. These features encourage the evolution of strategies which begin with chemotherapy and then use consolidation with radiation therapy. Clinical trials using these and newer strategies must be instituted if progress is to occur in the treatment of non-small cell histologies at all stages

  20. Role of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer: evolving strategies for non-small cell histologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggia, F.M. (NYU Medical Center, New York); Blum, R.H.; Foreman, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Lung cancer treatment has been considered to have made little progress except for advances in small cell carcinoma. For other histologies an attitude of nihilism has prevailed principally because of lack of effective systemic therapy and of no persuasive evidence that results could be improved by combined modality treatment. On the other hand, favorable results from surgery are confined to a small percent of all patients with this disease. This review emphasizes possibilities for progress in evolving new therapeutic strategies. Although improvement over other systemic therapies is modest, cisplatin-containing regimens yield more consistent response rates and apparent survival advantage relative to single agents. Immediate progression occurs in the minority of patients. In addition, regimens combining cisplatin with vinca alkaloids have no substantial deleterious effects on the lung, marrow or esophagus to aggravate radiation-induced complications. These features encourage the evolution of strategies which begin with chemotherapy and then use consolidation with radiation therapy. Clinical trials using these and newer strategies must be instituted if progress is to occur in the treatment of non-small cell histologies at all stages.

  1. Laetrile treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Stefania; Horneber, Markus

    2015-04-28

    Laetrile is the name for a semi-synthetic compound which is chemically related to amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside from the kernels of apricots and various other species of the genus Prunus. Laetrile and amygdalin are promoted under various names for the treatment of cancer although there is no evidence for its efficacy. Due to possible cyanide poisoning, laetrile can be dangerous. To assess the alleged anti-cancer effect and possible adverse effects of laetrile and amygdalin. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (2014, Issue 9); MEDLINE (1951-2014); EMBASE (1980-2014); AMED; Scirus; CINAHL (all from 1982-2015); CAMbase (from 1998-2015); the MetaRegister; the National Research Register; and our own files. We examined reference lists of included studies and review articles and we contacted experts in the field for knowledge of additional studies. We did not impose any restrictions of timer or language. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs. We searched eight databases and two registers for studies testing laetrile or amygdalin for the treatment of cancer. Two review authors screened and assessed articles for inclusion criteria. We located over 200 references, 63 were evaluated in the original review, 6 in the 2011 and none in this update. However, we did not identify any studies that met our inclusion criteria. The claims that laetrile or amygdalin have beneficial effects for cancer patients are not currently supported by sound clinical data. There is a considerable risk of serious adverse effects from cyanide poisoning after laetrile or amygdalin, especially after oral ingestion. The risk-benefit balance of laetrile or amygdalin as a treatment for cancer is therefore unambiguously negative.

  2. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo E Schenberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. Results: At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca’s pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. Conclusion: The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca’s known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca’s possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  3. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation?induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation?induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation?induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell trans...

  4. [Concurrent radiochemotherapy in the treatment of squamous cell oral and oropharyngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, D Iu; Medvedev, V S; Marbynskiĭ, Iu S; Gulidov, I A; Isaev, P A; Radzhanova, M U; Derbugov, D N; Pol'kin, V V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the end results of the radiochemotherapy of 237 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa (locally advanced, stage III-IV, - 134; 56.4%, and metastases to regional lymph nodes of the neck - 91; 38.4%) carried out at the Center's Clinic. Interstitial neutron (252 californium) plus polychemotherapy was given to 26 (11%) (group 1); neutron + distant radio + polychemotherapy - 34 (14 %) (group 2); distant fractionated radiotherapy + polychemotherapy - 177 (75%) (group 3). Complete response was reported in 190 (80.2%); partial - 44 (18.6%) and stabilization - 3 (1.3%). Overall response was 98.8%; 5-year survival - 64.5 +/- 3.3%, irrespective of tumor site, grade and method of treatment. Concomitant modality proved highly effective, free from toxic and functional or cosmetic harm.

  5. Smoking history as a predictive factor of treatment response in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Paul; Mok, Tony; Barraclough, Helen; Strizek, Alena; Lew, Rebecca; van Kooten, Maximiliano

    2012-07-01

    Recent trials in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggest that nonsmokers may benefit more from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy than will smokers. The aim of this systematic review was to assess smoking history as a predictive factor for treatment outcomes in patients with NSCLC. Relevant published literature was identified through systematic searches of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library), oncology and thoracic journals, and abstracts from major oncology conferences using prespecified criteria. Articles reporting treatment outcomes (overall survival [OS], progression-free survival [PFS], and/or response rate) in smoking history subgroups from randomized controlled trials of targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy were reviewed. Data from 30 trials (32 articles, 4 abstracts) were included. Of these, 23 trials tested first-line therapy. Treatment arms included EGFR TKIs (13 trials), EGFR monoclonal antibodies (2 trials), non-EGFR targeted treatments (9 trials), chemotherapy (27 trials), and placebo or best supportive care only (3 trials). Smoking history definitions and analyses of its effect on treatment outcomes varied widely. Only 11 trials reported testing for a treatment-by-smoking history interaction. The available evidence supports but does not confirm smoking history as a predictive factor for the response to TKIs, particularly in previously treated patients. The evidence does not support smoking history as a predictor of response to non-EGFR-targeted therapies or chemotherapy. Smoking history and its effect on treatment response are inadequately reported. More rigorous collection, analysis, and reporting may clarify whether smoking history is a predictor of treatment response in advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Current treatment of metastatic endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Sarah M; Fleming, Gini

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. The majority of patients have disease confined to the uterus and have an excellent overall prognosis. However, subgroups of patients have advanced primary disease or recurrences following primary treatment. The management of metastatic disease is variable, depending on factors such as comorbidities, tumor grade, performance status, and prior treatments. Management options include hormonal therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy, as well as targeted therapies that inhibit angiogenesis and the cellular signaling pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation. A comprehensive review of these treatments for metastatic endometrial cancer was conducted and is discussed. Hormonal therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy have traditionally been used in the treatment of metastatic endometrial cancer. Advances in molecular biology have led to multiple potential targeted therapies to be used in the treatment of metastatic endometrial cancer. While several treatment modalities are now available to treat patients who present with metastatic endometrial cancer, overall prognosis remains poor.

  7. Substantially Modified Ratios of Effector to Regulatory T Cells During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Patients Return to Pre-Treatment Levels at Completion: Implications for Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Anthony; Govindaraj, Chindu; Xiang, Sue D.; Halo, Julene; Quinn, Michael; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancy. Despite improved detection and treatment options, relapse rates remain high. Combining immunotherapy with the current standard treatments may provide an improved prognosis, however, little is known about how standard chemotherapy affects immune potential (particularly T cells) over time, and hence, when to optimally combine it with immunotherapy (e.g., vaccines). Herein, we assess the frequency and ratio of CD8+ central memory and effector T cells as well as CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during the first 18 weeks of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients. In this pilot study, we observed increased levels of recently activated Tregs with tumor migrating ability (CD4+CD25 hi Foxp3+CD127−CCR4+CD38+ cells) in patients when compared to controls. Although frequency changes of Tregs as well as the ratio of effector T cells to Tregs were observed during treatment, the Tregs consistently returned to pre-chemotherapy levels at the end of treatment. These results indicate T cell subset distributions associated with recurrence may be largely resistant to being “re-set” to healthy control homeostatic levels following standard treatments. However, it may be possible to enhance T effector to Treg ratios transiently during chemotherapy. These results suggest personalized immune monitoring maybe beneficial when combining novel immuno-therapeutics with standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients

  8. Substantially Modified Ratios of Effector to Regulatory T Cells During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Patients Return to Pre-Treatment Levels at Completion: Implications for Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Anthony; Govindaraj, Chindu; Xiang, Sue D., E-mail: Sue.Xiang@monash.edu [Department of Immunology, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Halo, Julene; Quinn, Michael [Department of Oncology, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Plebanski, Magdalena, E-mail: Sue.Xiang@monash.edu [Department of Immunology, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia)

    2012-06-18

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancy. Despite improved detection and treatment options, relapse rates remain high. Combining immunotherapy with the current standard treatments may provide an improved prognosis, however, little is known about how standard chemotherapy affects immune potential (particularly T cells) over time, and hence, when to optimally combine it with immunotherapy (e.g., vaccines). Herein, we assess the frequency and ratio of CD8+ central memory and effector T cells as well as CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during the first 18 weeks of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients. In this pilot study, we observed increased levels of recently activated Tregs with tumor migrating ability (CD4+CD25{sup hi}Foxp3+CD127−CCR4+CD38+ cells) in patients when compared to controls. Although frequency changes of Tregs as well as the ratio of effector T cells to Tregs were observed during treatment, the Tregs consistently returned to pre-chemotherapy levels at the end of treatment. These results indicate T cell subset distributions associated with recurrence may be largely resistant to being “re-set” to healthy control homeostatic levels following standard treatments. However, it may be possible to enhance T effector to Treg ratios transiently during chemotherapy. These results suggest personalized immune monitoring maybe beneficial when combining novel immuno-therapeutics with standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients.

  9. Substantially Modified Ratios of Effector to Regulatory T Cells During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Patients Return to Pre-Treatment Levels at Completion: Implications for Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Anthony; Govindaraj, Chindu; Xiang, Sue D.; Halo, Julene; Quinn, Michael; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancy. Despite improved detection and treatment options, relapse rates remain high. Combining immunotherapy with the current standard treatments may provide an improved prognosis, however, little is known about how standard chemotherapy affects immune potential (particularly T cells) over time, and hence, when to optimally combine it with immunotherapy (e.g., vaccines). Herein, we assess the frequency and ratio of CD8+ central memory and effector T cells as well as CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during the first 18 weeks of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients. In this pilot study, we observed increased levels of recently activated Tregs with tumor migrating ability (CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+CD127−CCR4+CD38+ cells) in patients when compared to controls. Although frequency changes of Tregs as well as the ratio of effector T cells to Tregs were observed during treatment, the Tregs consistently returned to pre-chemotherapy levels at the end of treatment. These results indicate T cell subset distributions associated with recurrence may be largely resistant to being “re-set” to healthy control homeostatic levels following standard treatments. However, it may be possible to enhance T effector to Treg ratios transiently during chemotherapy. These results suggest personalized immune monitoring maybe beneficial when combining novel immuno-therapeutics with standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:24213326

  10. Dendritic cells serve as a "Trojan horse" for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-Cheng; Wang, Zi-Ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa.

  11. Catalase down-regulation in cancer cells exposed to arsenic trioxide is involved in their increased sensitivity to a pro-oxidant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2018-01-01

    Pro-oxidant drugs have been proposed for treating certain cancers but the resistance developed by cancer cells to oxidative stress limits its potential use in clinics. To understand the mechanisms underlying resistance to oxidative stress, we found that the chronic exposure to an H 2 O 2 -generating system (ascorbate/menadione, Asc/Men) or catalase overexpression (CAT3 cells) increased the resistance of cancer cells to oxidative stress, likely by increasing the antioxidant status of cancer cells. Modulation of catalase expression was performed by either protein overexpression or protein down-regulation using siRNA against catalase and aminotriazole as pharmacological inhibitor. The former approach was done by transfecting cells with a plasmid construct containing human catalase cDNA (CAT3 cells, derived from MCF-7 breast cancer cell line) or by generating resistant cells through chronic exposure to an oxidant injury (Resox cells). Cell survival was monitored by using the MTT reduction assay and further calculation of IC 50 values. Protein expression was done by Western blots procedures. The formation of reactive oxygen species was performed by flow cytometry. The transcriptional activity of human catalase promoter was assessed by using transfected cells with a plasmid containing the - 1518/+ 16 promoter domain. Using Resox and CAT3 cells (derived from MCF-7 breast cancer cell line) as models for cancer resistance to pro-oxidative treatment, we found that arsenic trioxide (ATO) remarkably sensitized Resox and CAT3 cells to Asc/Men treatment. Since catalase is a key antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying Asc/Men (as shown by siRNA-mediated catalase knockdown) that is overexpressed in resistant cells, we hypothesized that ATO might regulate the expression levels of catalase. Consistently, catalase protein level is decreased in Resox cells when incubated with ATO likely by a decreased transcriptional activity of the catalase promoter. Our findings support the

  12. Combination treatment of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) cause growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in the human gastric cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrad, Elham; Niapour, Ali; Farassati, Faris; Amani, Mojtaba

    2018-04-01

    Current medication for gastric cancer patients has a low success rate with resistance and side effects. According to recent studies, γ-secretase inhibitors is used as therapeutic drugs in cancer. Moreover, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural compound proposed for the treatment/chemo-prevention of cancers. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of ATRA in combination with N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) as γ-secretase inhibitor on viability and apoptosis of the AGS and MKN-45 derived from human gastric cancer. AGS and MKN-45 gastric cancer cell lines were treated with different concentrations of ATRA or DAPT alone or ATRA plus DAPT. The viability, death detection and apoptosis of cells was examined by MTT assay and Ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining. The distribution of cells in different phases of cell cycle was also evaluated through flow cytometry analyses. In addition, caspase 3/7 activity and the expression of caspase-3 and bcl-2 were examined. DAPT and ATRA alone decreased gastric cancer cells viability in a concentration dependent manner. The combination of DAPT and ATRA exhibited significant synergistic inhibitory effects. The greater percentage of cells were accumulated in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle in combination treatment. The combination of DAPT and ATRA effectively increased the proportion of apoptotic cells and the level of caspase 3/7 activities compared to single treatment. Moreover, augmented caspase-3 up-regulation and bcl-2 down-regulation were found following combined application of DAPT and ATRA. The combination of DAPT and ATRA led to more reduction in viability and apoptosis in respect to DAPT or ATRA alone in the investigated cell lines.

  13. Factors Associated with Adherence to and Treatment Duration of Erlotinib Among Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Louder, Anthony; Winfree, Katherine; Zhu, Yajun E; Oton, Ana B; Nair, Radhika

    2017-06-01

    In lung cancer, there is an increasing number of oral agents available for patients; however, little is known about the factors associated with adherence to and treatment duration on oral medications in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To evaluate the clinical and demographic factors associated with adherence and treatment discontinuation, respectively, to oral oncolytics among patients with NSCLC. A retrospective, claims-based analysis of the Humana Research Database supplemented with medical chart review was conducted among patients with NSCLC who started an oral oncolytic between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013. Patients were required to be enrolled at least 1 year before the start of oral oncolytics and have no evidence of any oral oncolytic use during this period. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify predictors associated with medication adherence and treatment duration, respectively. Among all oral oncolytics, only the cohort starting on erlotinib had sufficient sample size (n = 1,452). A wide variety of factors were found to be associated with adherence. Low-income subsidy status, previous use of intravenous chemotherapy, and lower total baseline health care costs were significantly related to decreasing adherence (each P associated with decreasing adherence to erlotinib (P associated with low adherence to or shorter treatment duration on oral chemotherapy. This study was supported by funding from Eli Lilly and Company to Comprehensive Health Insights, a Humana company, as a collaborative research project involving employees of both companies. Hess, Winfree, Zhu, and Oton are employees of Eli Lilly and Company. Louder and Nair are employees of Comprehensive Health Insights, which received funding to complete this research. Study concept and design were contributed by Hess, Zhu, Winfree, and Oton. Nair and Louder collected the data, and data interpretation was performed by all the authors. The manuscript

  14. Targeted therapies for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: Monoclonal antibodies and biological inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana P S; Coelho, Priscila V; Anazetti, Maristella; Simioni, Patricia U

    2017-04-03

    The usual treatments for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), such as advanced lung adenocarcinoma, are unspecific and aggressive, and include lung resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recently, treatment with monoclonal antibodies and biological inhibitors has emerged as an effective alternative, generating effective results with few side effects. In recent years, several clinical trials using monoclonal antibodies presented potential benefits to NSCLC, and 4 of them are already approved for the treatment of NSCLC, such as cetuximab, bevacizumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Also, biological inhibitors are attractive tolls for biological applications. Among the approved inhibitors are crizotinib, erlotinib, afatinib and gefitinib, and side effects are usually mild to intense. Nevertheless, biological molecule treatments are under development, and several new monoclonal antibodies and biological inhibitors are in trial to treat NSCLC. Also under trial study are as follows: anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies (nimotuzumab and ficlatuzumab), anti-IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R) monoclonal antibody (figitumumab), anti-NR-LU-10 monoclonal antibody (nofetumomab) as well as antibodies directly affecting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) molecule (ipilimumab and tremelimumab), to receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) (denosumab) or to polymerase enzyme (veliparib and olaparib). Among new inhibitors under investigation are poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (veliparib and olaparib) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (buparlisib). However, the success of immunotherapies still requires extensive research and additional controlled trials to evaluate the long-term benefits and side effects.

  15. Galactose conjugated platinum(II) complex targeting the Warburg effect for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Li, Hong; Liu, Ran; Gao, Xiangqian; Zhang, Menghua; Liu, Pengxing; Fu, Zheng; Yang, Jinna; Zhang-Negrerie, Daisy; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-03-03

    Malignant neoplasms exhibit a higher rate of glycolysis than normal cells; this is known as the Warburg effect. To target it, a galactose-conjugated (trans-R,R-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine)-2-chloromalonato-platinum(II) complex (Gal-Pt) was designed, synthesized, and evaluated in five human cancer cell lines and against two different xenograft tumour models. Gal-Pt exhibits much higher aqueous solubility (over 25 times) and improved cytotoxicity than oxaliplatin, especially in human colon (HT29) and lung (H460) cancer cell lines. The safety profile of Gal-Pt was investigated in vivo by exploring the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and animal mortality rate. The ratios of the animal lethal dosage values to the cytotoxicity in HT29 (LD50/IC50) showed that Gal-Pt was associated with an increased therapeutic index by over 30-fold compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin. We evaluated in vivo antitumor activity by single agent intravenous treatment comparison studies of Gal-Pt (50 mg/kg as 65% MTD) and cisplatin (3 mg/kg, as 80% MTD) in a H460 lung cancer xenograft model, and with oxaliplatin (7 mg/kg, as 90% MTD) in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft model. The results show that Gal-Pt was more efficacious against H460 than cisplatin, and had superior potency in HT29 cells compared to oxaliplatin under nontoxic dosage conditions. The dependency between cytotoxicity of Gal-Pt and glucose transporters (GLUTs) was investigated by using quercetin as an inhibitor of GLUTs in HT29 cells. The cytotoxic potency of Gal-Pt was highly reduced by the inhibitor, suggesting that the uptake of Gal-Pt was regulated by glucose transporters. The GLUT mediated transportability and cellular uptake of Gal-Pt was also demonstrated using a fluorescent glucose bioprobe in HT29 competition assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Combining mTOR inhibition with radiation improves antitumor activity in bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: a novel strategy for treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Nassim

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer allows for organ preservation but toxicity and local control remain problematic. As such, improving efficacy of treatment requires radiosensitization of tumor cells. The aim of study is to investigate if the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR, a downstream kinase of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT survival pathway, may be a target for radiation sensitization.Clonogenic assays were performed using 6 bladder cancer cell lines (UM-UC3, UM-UC5, UM-UC6, KU7, 253J-BV, and 253-JP in order to examine the effects of ionizing radiation (IR alone and in combination with RAD001, an mTOR inhibitor. Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. In vivo, athymic mice were subcutaneously injected with 2 bladder cancer cell lines. Treatment response with RAD001 (1.5 mg/kg, daily, fractionated IR (total 9Gy = 3Gy×3, and combination of RAD001 and IR was followed over 4 weeks. Tumor weight was measured at experimental endpoint.Clonogenic assays revealed that in all bladder cell lines tested, an additive effect was observed in the combined treatment when compared to either treatment alone. Our data indicates that this effect is due to arrest in both G1 and G2 phases of cell cycle when treatments are combined. Furthermore, our data show that this arrest is primarily regulated by changes in levels of cyclin D1, p27 and p21 following treatments. In vivo, a significant decrease in tumor weight was observed in the combined treatment compared to either treatment alone or control.Altering cell cycle by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway in combination with radiation have favorable outcomes and is a promising therapeutic modality for bladder cancer.

  17. [Prostate cancer. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, G; Valeri, A; Mangin, P; Cussenot, O

    2004-10-01

    The discovery and the utilisation of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) that allows early diagnosis of prostate cancer, have considerably improved the management of this disease. Before the PSA era, prostate cancer was just a disease of the old man, generally detected at an advanced stage and incurable, with a fatal outcome delayed by the androgenic deprivation. Since early 1990's, prostate cancer has become primarily a disease of the man of 60 years, detectable earlier, and curable provided no extraprostatic dissemination has occurred. Early treatment of prostate cancer has benefited from important advances in surgical and radio-therapeutic techniques (conformational irradiation, brachytherapy), with, as principal goal, the combination of a better survival and the reduction of the potential adverse effects that alter quality of life. A better definition of the characteristics of the tumours in terms of progression regarding various parameters (clinical stage, PSA, tumoral differentiation) have resulted, despite the heterogeneity of the disease, in the determination of subgroups of tumours with different prognosis, which leads to an improved therapeutic strategy. The assessment of men's life expectancy ( 10 years) is the second primary parameter on which is based the indication for curative or non curative therapy in case of localized tumour. Roughly, before the age of 75, a curative therapy is indicated whereas after this age a surveillance is reasonable as first-line treatment, followed by hormone therapy in case of onset of symptoms indicating some progression of the disease (urinary symptoms, bone lesion). At a Later stage, in case of a metastatic or locally advanced cancer, hormone therapy by androgenic deprivation is highly indicated. The hormone sensitivity characterizes prostate cancer; it has been discovered more than 50 years ago by Charles Huggins (Nobel prize-winner). This hormone therapy is a palliative treatment since its efficacy is transient

  18. Randomized Phase III Trial of Low Molecular Weight Heparin Enoxaparin in Addition to Standard Treatment in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, L; Gezelius, E; Bergman, B

    2018-01-01

    Background: Coagulation activation and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are hallmarks of malignant disease and represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer. Coagulation inhibition with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) may improve survival specifically in small cell lung cancer (SCLC...

  19. Focal adhesion signaling in breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Yafeng

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of survival and migratory pathways in cancer cells is essential to better comprehending cancer progression, metastasis formation and drug resistance, thereby benefiting the development of novel anticancer treatments. The overall goal of the work is to better

  20. Evaluation of an objective plan-evaluation model in the three dimensional treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Mary V.; Jain, Nilesh L.; Kahn, Michael G.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Purdy, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy plans is difficult because it requires the review of vast amounts of data. Selecting the optimal plan from a set of competing plans involves making trade-offs among the doses delivered to the target volumes and normal tissues. The purpose of this study was to test an objective plan-evaluation model and evaluate its clinical usefulness in 3D treatment planning for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy were studied using full 3D techniques for treatment design and implementation. For each patient, the evaluator (the treating radiation oncologist) initially ranked three plans using room-view dose-surface isplays and dose-volume histograms, and identified the issues that needed to be improved. The three plans were then ranked by the objective plan-evaluation model. A figure of merit (FOM) was computed for each plan by combining the numerical score (utility in decision-theoretic terms) for each clinical issue. The utility was computed from a probability of occurrence of the issue and a physician-specific weight indicating its clinical relevance. The FOM was used to rank the competing plans for a patient, and the utility was used to identify issues that needed to be improved. These were compared with the initial evaluations of the physician and discrepancies were analyzed. The issues identified in the best treatment plan were then used to attempt further manual optimization of this plan. Results: For the 20 patients (60 plans) in the study, the final plan ranking produced by the plan-evaluation model had an initial 73% agreement with the ranking provided by the evaluator. After discrepant cases were reviewed by the physician, the model was usually judged more objective or 'correct'. In most cases the model was also able to correctly identify the issues that needed improvement in each plan. Subsequent

  1. Cooperative Enhancement of Radiosensitivity After Combined Treatment of 17-(Allylamino)-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin and Celecoxib in Human Lung and Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Mee

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether the combined treatment of 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an inhibitor of heat-shock protein 90 (hsp90), and celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, can cooperatively enhance the radiosensitivity of various human cancer cells. Combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib, at clinically relevant concentrations, cooperatively induced radiosensitization in all tested cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Cooperative radiosensitization by the drug combination was also shown in a human tumor xenograft system. We found that ataxia-telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are novel client proteins of hsp90. Combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib cooperatively induced downregulation of ATR and ATM. In conclusion, combined treatment with 17-AAG and celecoxib at clinically relevant concentrations may significantly enhance the therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation. PMID:21830942

  2. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  3. Dealing with initial chemotherapy doses: a new basis for treatment optimization in limited small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Chevalier, T.; Le Cesne, A.; Arriagada, R.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains disappointing despite high initial complete response rates. The dramatic initial chemosensitivity of tumor cells is frustrated by the early emergence of chemoresistant clonogenic cells, regardless of front line treatments. Although the dose relationship is fairly well established regarding the response rate, its effect on survival is inconclusive. From 1980 to 1988, 202 patients with limited SCLC were included in four consecutive protocols using an alternating schedule of thoracic radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Despite an increase of chemotherapy and/or total radiation doses, no significant difference was observed between the four protocols in terms of response rate, disease free and overall survival. However, a retrospective analysis performed on a total of 131 consecutive patients led us to propose the hypothesis that a moderate increase in the initial dose, ie first course, of cisplatin and cyclophosphamide could improve overall survival. From 1988 to 1991, 105 patients were subsequently included in a large randomized trial raising this question. The treatment difference only concerned the initial doses of cisplatin (80 vs 100 mg/m 2 ) and cyclophosphamide (900 vs 1200 mg/m 2 ). The trial was closed after inclusion of 105 patients, 32 months after the start of the study because at that time overall survival was significantly better in the higher-dose group (p = 0.001). The emergence of this debatable concept opens new directions in the therapeutic strategy of SCLC and the contribution of hematopoietic growth factors may be a great interest in the management of this disease. (authors). 27 refs., 1 tab

  4. Treatment and survival outcomes of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus: an analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew T; Shao, Meng; Rineer, Justin; Osborn, Virginia; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2017-02-01

    Given the paucity of esophageal small cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, there are few large studies evaluating this disease. In this study, the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was utilized to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and survival of patients with esophageal SCC in a large, population-based dataset. We selected patients diagnosed with esophageal SCC from 1998 to 2011. Patients were identified as having no treatment, chemotherapy alone, radiation ± sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation, and esophagectomy ± chemotherapy and/or radiation. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with OS. A total of 583 patients were identified. Most patients had stage IV disease (41.7%). Regarding treatment selection, chemoradiation was the most commonly utilized for patients with nonmetasatic disease, whereas chemotherapy alone was most common for metastatic patients. Esophagectomy (median survival 44.9 months with 3 year OS 50.5%) was associated with the best OS for patients with localized (node-negative) disease compared with chemotherapy alone (p < 0.001) or chemoradiation (p = 0.01). For locoregional (node-positive) disease, treatment with chemoradiation resulted in a median survival of 17.8 months and a 3 year OS 31.6%. On multivariate analysis, treatment with chemotherapy alone (p = 0.003) was associated with worse OS while esophagectomy (p = 0.04) was associated with improved OS compared to chemoradiation. Esophageal SCC is an aggressive malignancy with most patients presenting with metastatic disease. Either esophagectomy or chemoradiation as part of multimodality treatment appear to improve OS for selected patients with nonmetastatic disease. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Doxorubicin Treatment of Cancer Cells Impairs Reverse Transcription and Affects the Interpretation of RT-qPCR Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Ewa; Krzysztoń-Russjan, Jolanta; Gruber, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) acts in a variety of ways including DNA damage and enzyme inhibition, which consequently causes changes in gene expression of cells treated with this agent. Practical validation of experimental results followed by appropriate normalization of the factors investigated is crucial for obtaining biologically relevant results in gene expression studies. Six candidates were evaluated regarding their validity as internal reference genes: RPS23, FLOT2, UBB, ABCF1, ACTB, HPRT1. Optimization for quantitative polymerase reaction (qPCR) included: sensitivity, specificity, amplification efficiency and linear dynamic range determination. The gene expression stability was evaluated by real-time quantitative polymerase reaction (RT-qPCR) in two human cervical cancer cell lines: HeLa and DOX-resistant KB-V1 Cells treated under various concentrations of DOX. DOX treatment changed gene expression and led to re-optimization of the cDNA template amounts. ACTB, HPRT1, RPS23 and FLOT2 are proposed to be sufficient as internal reference genes. DOX may alter the reverse transcription and amplification reactions of RT-qPCR, thus creating a risk of misinterpretation of gene expression results. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in the Treatment of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: National Cancer Institute Cairo Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaafar, R.M.; Hamaza, R.; Khaled, H.M.; Elserafi, M.; Mansour, O.; Abdel Karim, N.; Abdelmomeim, D.; Elattar, I.; Soliman, S.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to document the antitumor activity of the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin for the treatment of advanced NSCLC, assess the nature and severity of the side effects and elicit the impact of the combination chemotherapy on progression free survival and overall survival. Patients and methods: From August 1997 to August 200 I, we conducted a phase II study of gemcitabine and cisplatin in 60 chemo naive patients (21 stage IIIB and 39 stage IV). For the first 34 cases, gemcitabine was given at a dose of 1,000 mg/m2 IV on days I, 8 and 15 wi th cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on day 15, every 28 days. In the following 26 patients, the regimen was modified to gemcitabine 1,250 mg/m2 days I and 8 and cisplatin 80 mg/m2 day I, every 2 I days. Patients included 53 males and 7 females [median age, 52 years (range, 28-69)]. Twenty-nine had adenocarcinoma, 18 large-cell carcinoma and 13 squamous cell carcinoma. Thirty-one patients had a performance status (PS) of 2 and 22 presented with weight loss. All patients were evaluable for response. Three patients achieved a complete response (CR) and 22 had partial response (PR), giving an overall response of 41.7%, with a median duration of 10 months (range, 4-46 months). The time to progression (TTP) was 8 months (range, 246 months), with a median overall survival of 9 months (range, 2-46 months). The one-year survival rate was 30.3% for the entire study population, 44% for responders, and statistically improved in patients with a PS of I and those with no weight loss. A total of 255 cycles were administered (median, four cycles/patient). Myelosuppression was significant (but manageable) with grade 3/4 neutropenia in 32.6% of cases, anemia in 18.6% and thrombocytopenia in 20.4%. Non hematologic toxicity was limited to grade 3/4 nausea and vomiting in 28.8% of cases and impaired liver enzymes in 13.6%. In spite of the relatively poor prognostic characteristics in the study population, gemcitabine and

  7. Erlotinib or gefitinib for the treatment of relapsed platinum pretreated non-small cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mark; Stordal, Britta

    2011-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard of care for ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, resistance to platinum agents invariably develops. Targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), have great potential here as they exert their anti-tumour effect via alternative mechanisms to platinum-based drugs and as such may remain unaffected by emergent resistance to platinum. A systematic review was conducted to investigate whether two EGFR-TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, have efficacy in the platinum-resistance setting. Preclinical studies of platinum-resistant cancer cell lines, which had been subsequently treated with EGFR-TKIs, were sought to establish proof-of-concept. Clinical trials reporting administration of EGFR-TKIs to ovarian cancer and NSCLC patients relapsed after therapy with platinum drugs were investigated to determine sensitivity of these cohorts to EGFR-TKI treatment. The role of EGFR mutation, copy number and protein expression on response to EGFR-TKIs after failure of platinum chemotherapy were also investigated. Preclinical models of platinum-resistant cancer were found which display a spectrum of cross-resistance profiles to EGFR-TKIs. Sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs is dependent on the activation of the EGFR pathway or EGFR interacting proteins such as HER-2. EGFR-TKIs show favourable response rates in platinum-pretreated NSCLC, 11.14% and 15.25% for 150mg/day erlotinib and 250mg/day gefitinib, respectively. These response rates significantly improve in patients of Asian descent (28.3% and 29.17%, respectively) and patients with EGFR activation mutations (41.6% and 63.89%, respectively) or increased copy number (33.3% and 45.45%, respectively). Gefitinib significantly outperformed erlotinib and should therefore be the EGFR-TKI of choice in platinum-pretreated relapsed NSCLC. In contrast, response rates are very poor to both erlotinib and gefitinib in platinum pretreated ovarian cancer, 0-5.9% and they should

  8. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  9. Combination of docetaxel and cisplatin in the interventional treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhijiang; Liu Yunjun; Li Ezhen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of docetaxel and cisplatin in the interventional treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Thirty patients with locally advanced (stage III) or metastatic (stage IV) NSCLC were enrolled into the study. The patients received docetaxel 75 mg/m 2 per day by bronchial artery and vein, and cisplatin 40 mg 2 on day 1-3 of a 21-day cycle. Each patient should complete two cycles. Results: An objective response rate was obtained in 46.7% of 30 patients (one complete and 13 partial response), whereas 10 patients had stable disease and 6 patients were progressive. The response rate was 60% (9/15) in the initial patients, and 33.3% (5/15) in the retreated patients. The main toxicities were leukopenia (26.7% in grade III + IV) and thrombocytopenia (10% in grade III + IV). Conclusion: The combination of docetaxel and cisplatin by interventional treatment is a feasible, well-tolerated and active scheme in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. (authors)

  10. Clinical Observation of Erlotinib in the Treatment of Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report of 92 Eases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohui HAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, has been approved effective in local advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Methods Ninety-two patients with advanced NSCLC who had failed or not tolerated or refused chemotherapy received 150 mg oral doses of erlotinib once daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 92 NSCLC patients, 2 patient got complete response (2.2%, 22 partial response (23.9%, 48 stable disease (52.2% and 20 progressive disease (21.7%. The overall response rate and the disease controlled rate of erlotinib was 26.1% (24/92 and 78.3% (72/92, respectively. The response rate of erlotinib were significantly higher in rash and ECOG 0-1 than no rash and ECOG ≥ 2. The disease controlled rate of erlotinib was significantly higher in female and non-smokers than male and smokers (P < 0.05. The response rate of erlotinib did not show significant differences within pathological type or previous treatment. The most common side effects were rash and diarrhea with 84.8% and 31.5%, respectively, but usually were mild. Conclusion Erlotinib is effective and safe in the treatment of advanced NSCLC patients.

  11. Brain Functional Connectivity in Small Cell Lung Cancer Population after Chemotherapy Treatment: an ICA fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromis, K.; Kakkos, I.; Gkiatis, K.; Karanasiou, I. S.; Matsopoulos, G. K.

    2017-11-01

    Previous neurocognitive assessments in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) population, highlight the presence of neurocognitive impairments (mainly in attention processing and executive functioning) in this type of cancer. The majority of these studies, associate these deficits with the Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation (PCI) that patients undergo in order to avoid brain metastasis. However, there is not much evidence exploring cognitive impairments induced by chemotherapy in SCLC patients. For this reason, we aimed to investigate the underlying processes that may potentially affect cognition by examining brain functional connectivity in nineteen SCLC patients after chemotherapy treatment, while additionally including fourteen healthy participants as control group. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a functional connectivity measure aiming to unravel the temporal correlation between brain regions, which are called brain networks. We focused on two brain networks related to the aforementioned cognitive functions, the Default Mode Network (DMN) and the Task-Positive Network (TPN). Permutation tests were performed between the two groups to assess the differences and control for familywise errors in the statistical parametric maps. ICA analysis showed functional connectivity disruptions within both of the investigated networks. These results, propose a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functioning in the SCLC population.

  12. Gene Expression of Vitamin D Metabolic Enzymes at Baseline and in Response to Vitamin D Treatment in Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert G.; Wakeley, Shannon E.; Hamel, Frederick G.; High, Robin R.; Korch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The association between vitamin D and thyroid cancer is unclear. It is unknown if CYP27A1 or CYP2R1 are present in normal thyroid or cancer cells and there is limited information regarding response to treatment with vitamin D. SV40 immortalized follicular cells (n-thy) and six thyroid cancer cell lines were treated with 10μM vitamin D3, 0.1μM 1,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle x 24 hours. CYP27A1, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, and CYP24A1 mRNA were measured using quantitative RT-PCR before and after treatment. Cell proliferation was also evaluated in TPC1 and C643 cells after treatment with D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3. Baseline CYP27A1 and CYP27B1 mRNA were present in all cells, CYP2R1 was higher, and CYP24A1 mRNA was lower in cancer cell lines versus N-thy. TPC1 cells had increased CYP24A1 mRNA levels when treated with both D3 (3.49, pCYP27A1 and CYP2R1 in addition to CYP27B1, establishing the potential to metabolize D3 to 1,25(OH)2D3. Additionally, vitamin D3, 25(OH)D3, and 1,25(OH)2D3 all had an anti-proliferative effect on two thyroid cancer cell lines. PMID:22992568

  13. Treatment Choices for Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cancer. Tracheostomy : Surgery to create an opening ( stoma ) into the windpipe to help you breathe. The ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  15. A new in vitro screening system for anticancer drugs for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanauske, U.; Hanauske, A.R.; Clark, G.M.; Tsen, D.; Buchok, J.; Hoff, D.D. von

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated a semiautomated radiometric assay (BACTEC 460 system) for screening of activity of anticancer drugs against human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Cells from seven cell lines were exposed to standard antineoplastic agents at four different concentrations using a 1-h incubation. Alpha 2-interferon was tested using a continuous incubation. In vitro drug activity was analyzed as a function of the clinically achievable serum concentration. Our results indicate that two cell lines (CALU-3, SK-MES-1) exhibit in vitro drug sensitivity patterns closest to those observed in clinical studies. These two cell lines might therefore be most useful for screening new anticancer compounds for activity against non-small cell lung cancer. The radiometric assay is a semiautomated system which has advantages over other, more time-consuming screening systems

  16. Automated Information Extraction on Treatment and Prognosis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Patients: Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuai; Jabbour, Salma K; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Lu, James J; Dong, Lihua; Ding, Lijuan; Xiao, Ying; Yue, Ning; Wang, Fusheng; Zou, Wei

    2018-02-01

    In outcome studies of oncology patients undergoing radiation, researchers extract valuable information from medical records generated before, during, and after radiotherapy visits, such as survival data, toxicities, and complications. Clinical studies rely heavily on these data to correlate the treatment regimen with the prognosis to develop evidence-based radiation therapy paradigms. These data are available mainly in forms of narrative texts or table formats with heterogeneous vocabularies. Manual extraction of the related information from these data can be time consuming and labor intensive, which is not ideal for large studies. The objective of this study was to adapt the interactive information extraction platform Information and Data Extraction using Adaptive Learning (IDEAL-X) to extract treatment and prognosis data for patients with locally advanced or inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We transformed patient treatment and prognosis documents into normalized structured forms using the IDEAL-X system for easy data navigation. The adaptive learning and user-customized controlled toxicity vocabularies were applied to extract categorized treatment and prognosis data, so as to generate structured output. In total, we extracted data from 261 treatment and prognosis documents relating to 50 patients, with overall precision and recall more than 93% and 83%, respectively. For toxicity information extractions, which are important to study patient posttreatment side effects and quality of life, the precision and recall achieved 95.7% and 94.5% respectively. The IDEAL-X system is capable of extracting study data regarding NSCLC chemoradiation patients with significant accuracy and effectiveness, and therefore can be used in large-scale radiotherapy clinical data studies. ©Shuai Zheng, Salma K Jabbour, Shannon E O'Reilly, James J Lu, Lihua Dong, Lijuan Ding, Ying Xiao, Ning Yue, Fusheng Wang, Wei Zou. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http

  17. Targeted erlotinib for first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Preeti S; Veenstra, David L; Goertz, Hans-Peter; Carlson, Josh J

    2014-08-01

    A recent phase III trial showed that patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors harbor specific EGFR mutations significantly benefit from first-line treatment with erlotinib compared to chemotherapy. This study sought to estimate the budget impact if coverage for EGFR testing and erlotinib as first-line therapy were provided in a hypothetical 500,000-member managed care plan. The budget impact model was developed from a US health plan perspective to evaluate administration of the EGFR test and treatment with erlotinib for EGFR-positive patients, compared to non-targeted treatment with chemotherapy. The eligible patient population was estimated from age-stratified SEER incidence data. Clinical data were derived from key randomized controlled trials. Costs related to drug, administration, and adverse events were included. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess uncertainty. In a plan of 500,000 members, it was estimated there would be 91 newly diagnosed advanced NSCLC patients annually; 11 are expected to be EGFR-positive. Based on the testing and treatment assumptions, it was estimated that 3 patients in Scenario 1 and 6 patients in Scenario 2 receive erlotinib. Overall health plan expenditures would increase by $0.013 per member per month (PMPM). This increase is largely attributable to erlotinib drug costs, in part due to lengthened progression-free survival and treatment periods experienced in erlotinib-treated patients. EGFR testing contributes slightly, whereas adverse event costs mitigate the budget impact. The budget impact did not exceed $0.019 PMPM in sensitivity analyses. Coverage for targeted first-line erlotinib therapy in NSCLC likely results in a small budget impact for US health plans. The estimated impact may vary by plan, or if second-line or maintenance therapy, dose changes/interruptions, or impact on patients' quality-of-life were included.

  18. Treatment selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer: the role of the patient in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, S; Nuyttens, J J M E; de Mol, M; Aerts, J G J V; Maat, A P W M; Birim, Ö; Bogers, A J J C; Takkenberg, J J M

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the role and experience of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient in decision making process concerning treatment selection in the current clinical practice. Stage I-II NSCLC patients (surgery 55 patients, SBRT 29 patients, median age 68) were included in this prospective study and completed a questionnaire that explored: (1) perceived patient knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options, (2) experience with current clinical decision making, and (3) the information that the patient reported to have received from their treating physician. This was assessed by multiple-choice, 1-5 Likert Scale, and open questions. The Decisional Conflict Scale was used to assess the decisional conflict. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured with SF-36 questionnaire. In 19% of patients, there was self-reported perceived lack of knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options. Seventy-four percent of patients felt that they were sufficiently involved in decision-making by their physician, and 81% found it important to be involved in decision making. Forty percent experienced decisional conflict, and one-in-five patients to such an extent that it made them feel unsure about the decision. Subscores with regard to feeling uninformed and on uncertainty, contributed the most to decisional conflict, as 36% felt uninformed and 17% of patients were not satisfied with their decision. HRQoL was not influenced by patient experience with decision-making or patient preferences for shared decision making. Dutch early-stage NSCLC patients find it important to be involved in treatment decision making. Yet a substantial proportion experiences decisional conflict and feels uninformed. Better patient information and/or involvement in treatment-decision-making is needed in order to improve patient knowledge and hopefully reduce decisional conflict.

  19. Radiation pneumonitis following treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter; D'Amico, Karen; Benstead, Kim; Elyan, Sean

    2003-06-01

    To determine whether partial volume lung irradiation influences the risk of developing acute radiation pneumonitis after the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). We conducted an analysis of 32 patients treated with CHART at the Gloucestershire Oncology Center. Twelve patients were treated using conventional two-dimensional treatment techniques and received elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Their treatment plans were subsequently recapitulated using a three-dimensional treatment planning system. Twenty patients were planned using this system from the outset. For these patients, elective nodal irradiation was omitted. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were constructed and several parameters analyzed for their ability to predict for the development of pneumonitis. Univariate analysis revealed that the percentage lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose are of predictive value for the development of pneumonitis after CHART. There is a strong correlation between these two parameters. Importantly, partial volume lung irradiation using CHART appears to be better tolerated than conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The omission of ENI considerably reduces V20. Using a commonly employed 3-beam technique it was also noted that the shape of the planning target volume (PTV) in the transverse plane (expressed as an elliptical index) affects the conformity of the V20 isodose to the PTV. This influences the scope for dose escalation with irregularly shaped tumors. In relation to acute radiation pneumonitis, CHART appears to have a superior therapeutic index than conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. V20 and mean lung dose are useful factors for predicting the risk of this complication. The use of these parameters will aid the selection of optimal treatment plans and provides a basis for future dose escalation studies.

  20. A kinase inhibitor screen identifies Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as novel treatment targets in antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, S; Pedersen, A M; Thomsen, M B H

    2015-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for antiestrogen resistance is crucial. In this study, we performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive MCF-7 cells and a panel of MCF-7-derived...

  1. Sunitinib Plus Erlotinib for the Treatment of Advanced/Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer A Lead-In Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumenschein, George R.; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Robert, Francisco; Groen, Harry J. M.; Usari, Tiziana; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Tye, Lesley; Chao, Richard C.; Juhasz, Erzsebet

    Background: This randomized, double-blind, multicenter study evaluated sunitinib plus erlotinib versus placebo plus erlotinib. Subjects with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer had received prior treatment with a platinum-based regimen. Here, we report safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor

  2. Second-Line Treatment Options in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Report From an International Experts Panel Meeting of the Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gridelli, Cesare; Baas, Paul; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Crinò, Lucio; Felip, Enriqueta; Gadgeel, Shirish; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali; Paz-Ares, Luis; Planchard, David; Perol, Maurice; Hanna, Nasser; Sgambato, Assunta; Casaluce, Francesca; de Marinis, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients inevitably progress to first-line therapy and further active treatments are warranted. In the past few years, new second-line therapies, beyond chemotherapy agents, have become available in clinical practice. To date, several options for the second-line

  3. Second-line pemetrexed treatment in Taiwanese patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: An open-label single-arm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gee-Chen Chang

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: The objective response rate, disease control rate, and safety and tolerability profile in this population of Taiwanese patients were consistent with the published findings that were conducted using Asian and Western populations. These findings support the use of single-agent, second-line pemetrexed for the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer in Taiwanese patients.

  4. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...

  5. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1994-01-01

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  6. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    significant complications, such as urinary incontinence , impotence, and rectal complications can arise due to the damage of the surrounding tissue...transport across the plasma membrane of an epithelial cell line. I. Electrical measurements at the whole-cell level. J Membr Biol 1998;166:179–85. 40...VEGF receptors of human melanoma cells. J Biol Chem 1995; 270:11322–6. 43. Tao J, Sanghera JS, Pelech SL, Wong G, Levy JG. Stimulation of stress

  7. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  8. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1, was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy. The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas. Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics.

  9. Combination treatment with dendrosomal nanocurcumin and doxorubicin improves anticancer effects on breast cancer cells through modulating CXCR4/NF-κB/Smo regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Mohammad Amin; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Babashah, Sadegh

    2017-08-01

    Despite advantageous antitumor properties of doxorubicin, the considerable cytotoxicity of this chemotherapeutic agent has made it necessary to develop combination treatment strategies. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible synergism between dendrosomal nanocurcumin (DNC) and doxorubicin in eliciting anticancer effects on MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. The expression levels of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis and Hedgehog pathway genes were evaluated in patient-derived breast carcinoma tissues by qRT-PCR. MTT assay, Annexin V-FITC staining followed by flowcytomety and wound healing assay were used to measure the effects caused by DNC and doxorubicin, alone and in combination, on the viability, apoptosis induction, and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. Also, qRT-PCR was exploited to analyze the expression of Smo, NF-κB and CXCR4 in cancer cells. Our results revealed that combination treatment with DNC and doxorubicin leads to significantly decreased viability, increased apoptosis, and reduced migration of breast cancer cells compared with using each drug alone. Also, combination treatment is more efficient that single treatment in reducing the expression levels of NF-κB and Smo transcripts. Our findings provide convincing support for the notion that DNC could synergistically enhance the anticancer effects of doxorubicin on metastatic breast cancer cells by improving its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-migratory activities. This may be mediated, in part, by downregulating CXCR4, NF-κB, and Smo genes. Overall, the findings of the current study suggest that DNC might be used as a synergistic agent for enhancing therapeutic efficiency and reducing toxic effects of doxorubicin on breast cancer cells.

  10. Anal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , ... stage of the cancer being treated. External and internal radiation therapy are used to treat anal cancer. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  11. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterus. See the PDQ summary on Uterine Sarcoma Treatment for more information about uterine sarcoma . Obesity and having metabolic syndrome may increase the risk of endometrial cancer. Anything ...

  13. Treatment of cancer cells with methioninase produces DNA hypomethylation and increases DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machover, David; Zittoun, Jacqueline; Saffroy, Raphaël; Broët, Philippe; Giraudier, Stéphane; Magnaldo, Thierry; Goldschmidt, Emma; Debuire, Brigitte; Orrico, Mireille; Tan, Yuying; Mishal, Zohar; Chevallier, Odile; Tonetti, Carole; Jouault, Hélène; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Metzger, Gérard; Hoffman, Robert M

    2002-08-15

    Methionine depletion in the human cell line CCRF-CEM through the action of recombinant methioninase (rMETase), a methionine-cleaving enzyme, was previously demonstrated to produce a strong cytotoxic synergistic effect with fluorouracil (FUra) throughout a broad range of concentrations of FUra and rMETase, including subcytotoxic levels of rMETase. Potentiation was associated with a decrease in free thymidylate synthase from preexisting levels. To further investigate the action of rMETase on CCRF-CEM cells, in the present study we explored the effects of rMETase as a single agent on DNA methylation levels and DNA synthesis, which may be changed as a result of deprivation of methionine. Cells treated with rMETase under subcytotoxic conditions contained significantly lower levels of genomic methylated DNA than did control cells, as demonstrated by incorporation of the methyl radical of [methyl-(3)H]S-adenosylmethionine in DNA and by use of methylation-sensitive arbitrarily primed PCR. DNA hypomethylation produced by rMETase was of similar magnitude as that produced with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine. Cells exposed to rMETase synthesized significantly more DNA than did untreated cells. Incorporation of [6-3H]thymidine and [6-3H]2'-deoxyuridine in these cells was augmented over that in control by mean factors of 1.78 and 2.36, respectively. Increased 3H nucleoside incorporation resulted in greater numbers of nuclear grains as demonstrated by autoradiography. The increase in DNA synthesis induced by rMETase is likely to result from enhancement of DNA repair because it was not accompanied by differences in cell cycle phase distribution or in total DNA content as determined by flow cytometry. We hypothesize that potentiation of FUra cytotoxicity by rMETase may result from increased inhibition of thymidylate synthase, together with DNA hypomethylation and enhanced DNA repair that could be involved in cell responses to drug-induced damage.

  14. [Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The first treatment ever by radio-immunotherapy (RIT) was performed by William H. Beierwaltes in 1951 and was a success. Fifty years later, the main question is to find ways of extending the success of radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to other forms of cancer. Solid tumours are much more radioresistant than lymphomas, but they respond to RIT if the lesions are small. Clinical situations of residual or minimal disease are thus the most likely to benefit from RIT in the adjuvant or consolidation settings. For disseminated disease, like leukemias or myelomas, the problem is different: beta- particles emitted by the radioactive atoms classically used for cancer treatment (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) disperse their energy in large volumes (ranges 1 mm to 1 cm) and are not very effective against isolated cells. Advances in RIT progress in two directions. One is the development of pretargeting strategies in which the antibody is not labelled but used to provide binding sites to small molecular weight radioactivity vectors (biotin, haptens). These techniques have been shown to increase tumour to non-target uptake ratios and anti-tumour efficacy has been demonstrated in the clinic. The other approach is the use of radionuclides adapted to the various clinical situations. Lutetium-177 or copper-67, because of the lower energy of their emission, their relatively long half-life and good gamma emission, may significantly improve RIT efficacy and acceptability. Beyond that, radionuclides emitting particles such as alpha particles or Auger electrons, much more efficient to kill isolated tumour cells, are being tested for RIT in the clinic. Finally, RIT should be integrated with other cancer treatment approaches in multimodality protocols. Thus RIT, now a mature technology, should enter a phase of well designed and focused clinical developments that may be expected to afford significant therapeutic advances.

  15. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicite K. Noubissi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so.

  16. Assessment of the tumor malignancy after immunotherapy combined with EGFR-TKIs drug treatment of EGFR-mutant advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai1

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of immunotherapy combined with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs drug therapy on the tumor malignancy in patients with EGFR-mutant advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods: Patients with EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC who were treated in Xi’an No.1 Hospital and Shaanxi Provincial Tumor Hospital between May 2014 and August 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into DC-CIK group and control group, the former received immunotherapy combined with EGFR-TKI drug therapy, and the latter received EGFR-TKI drug therapy. Before and after treatment, the cancer cell viability-related marker levels in serum as well as the antitumor immune response marker molecule expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined respectively, and the proliferation-related gene expression in lung cancer lesions were determined after treatment. Results: 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment, serum CEA, Cyfra21-1 and SCCA levels of both groups were significantly lower than those before treatment and serum CEA, Cyfra21-1 and SCCA levels of DC-CIK group were significantly lower than those of control group, CD3, CD4 and CD8 fluorescence intensity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those before treatment, and the CD3, CD4 and CD8 fluorescence intensity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of control group were not significantly different from those before treatment; TCF3, MEF2D and cFLIP(L expression in lung cancer lesions of DC-CIK group were significantly lower than those of control group while FRMD8, PDCD5, caspase-3 and caspase-8 expression were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Immunotherapy combined with EGFR-TKI drug treatment of EGFR-mutant advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC can enhance the antitumor immune response and promote cancer cell apoptosis.

  17. Is sperm banking of interest to patients with nongerm cell urological cancer before potentially fertility damaging treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonia, Andrea; Gallina, Andrea; Matloob, Rayan; Rocchini, Lorenzo; Saccà, Antonino; Abdollah, Firas; Colombo, Renzo; Suardi, Nazareno; Briganti, Alberto; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    We assessed the opinions of patients with nongerm cell urological cancer on sperm banking before undergoing surgical or nonsurgical therapy that could potentially endanger subsequent fertility. Between April 2007 and July 2008, 753 patients visited a urological office and were invited to complete a brief self-administered questionnaire to assess opinions on sperm banking before undergoing any eventual therapy potentially dangerous for male fertility. Logistic regression models tested the association between predictors (age, educational level, relationship status, previous fatherhood and benign disorder vs nongerm cell urological cancer) and patient wishes for sperm banking. Median patient age was 65 years (mean 61.6, range 18 to 76). Overall 522 patients (69.3%) had nongerm cell urological cancer and only 242 (32.1%) were in favor of pretreatment sperm banking. On univariate analysis age (OR 0.961, p banking, whereas having cancer and educational status were not significantly correlated. Multivariate analysis indicated that aging (OR 0.966, p = 0.001) and previous fatherhood (OR 0.587, p = 0.029) maintained inverse associations. Having urological cancer was positively (OR 1.494, p = 0.045) associated with the wish for sperm banking. In urological patients there is a low rate of willingness to bank sperm before any potential fertility damaging therapeutic approach. Having nongerm cell urological cancer is an independent predictor that is positively associated with the wish to bank sperm. It is vitally important to provide comprehensive information about pretreatment sperm banking to young adults with nongerm cell urological cancer.

  18. Targeting the Adipocyte-Tumor Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    articles : • Newswise – La Jolla, CA, July 3, 2014. “New study reveals how tumors remodel their surroundings to grow” • EurekAlert. AAAS, July 3, 2014...scale bars represent 25 mm. (F) RT-PCR of TGF-b in orthotopic tumors from WT and p62 KO mice (n = 3). (G and H) RT-PCR of CAF markers (a-SMA, TGF-b, and...human prostate tumors in a differential reactive stroma (DRS) xenograft model. Cancer Res 62, 3298-3307. Article Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1

  19. Bevacizumab for the treatment of nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Portugal: a retrospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevinho F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Estevinho1, Marta Soares2, Isabel Azevedo2, Henrique Queiroga3, Bárbara Parente4, Ulisses Brito5, Encarnação Teixeira6, Renato Sotto-Mayor7, António Araújo81Medical Oncology Resident, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 2Medical Oncology Assistant, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 3Coordinator of the Oncological Pneumology Consultation, Pneumology Departament of Hospital S João, Oporto, Portugal; 4Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Vila Nova de Gaia-Espinho Medical Center, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 5Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Faro Hospital, Faro, Portugal; 6Pneumology assistant, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 7Head of Service of Pneumology, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 8Coordinator of Lung Pathology Clinic, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, PortugalIntroduction: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. In patients with nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC stage IIIB/IV treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab led to significant improvements in progression-free and median overall survival (OS.Aim: To report the experience of five Portuguese centers in treating patients with nonsquamous NSCLC in stage IIIB or IV with bevacizumab and chemotherapy regarding survival and toxicity outcomes.Materials and methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter study on patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and chemotherapy from November 2007 to August 2010 through special use permits. We reviewed the medical records, registry of demographic characteristics, treatments provided, treatment responses, adverse

  20. Redirected Primary Human Chimeric Antigen Receptor Natural Killer Cells As an “Off-the-Shelf Immunotherapy” for Improvement in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Oberschmidt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary human natural killer (NK cells recognize and subsequently eliminate virus infected cells, tumor cells, or other aberrant cells. However, cancer cells are able to develop tumor immune escape mechanisms to undermine this immune control. To overcome this obstacle, NK cells can be genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs in order to improve specific recognition of cancer surface markers (e.g., CD19, CD20, and ErbB2. After target recognition, intracellular CAR domain signaling (CD3ζ, CD28, 4-1BB, and 2B4 leads to activation of PI3K or DNAX proteins (DAP10, DAP12 and finally to enhanced cytotoxicity, proliferation, and/or interferon γ release. This mini-review summarizes both the first preclinical trials with CAR-engineered primary human NK cells and the translational implications for “off-the-shelf immunotherapy” in cancer treatment. Signal transduction in NK cells as well as optimization of CAR signaling will be described, becoming more and more a focal point of interest in addition to redirected T cells. Finally, strategies to overcome off-target effects will be discussed in order to improve future clinical trials and to avoid attacking healthy tissues.

  1. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and IRE-1 signaling cause apoptosis in colon cancer cells in response to andrographolide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ahmed, Hafiz; Yang, Peixin; Czinn, Steven J; Blanchard, Thomas G

    2016-07-05

    The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. The mechanism(s) by which andrographolide induces apoptosis however, have not been elucidated. The present study was performed to determine the molecular events that promote apoptosis in andrographolide treated cells using T84, HCT116 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines. Andrographolide was determined to limit colony formation and Ki67 expression, alter nuclear morphology, increase cytoplasmic histone-associated-DNA-fragments, and increase cleaved caspase-3 levels. Andrographolide also induced significantly higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins GRP-78 and IRE-1 by 48 h but not PERK or ATF6. Apoptosis signaling molecules BAX, spliced XBP-1 and CHOP were also significantly increased. Moreover, chemical inhibition of ER stress or IRE-1 depletion with siRNA in andrographolide treated cells significantly limited expression of IRE-1 and CHOP as determined by immunofluorescence staining, real time PCR, or immunobloting. This was accompanied by a decreased BAX/Bcl-2 ratio. Andrographolide significantly promotes cancer cell death compared to normal cells. These data demonstrate that andrographolide associated ER stress contributes to apoptosis through the activation of a pro-apoptotic GRP-78/IRE-1/XBP-1/CHOP signaling pathway.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  5. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  6. The safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Hattori, Yoshihiro; Tohnai, Rie; Ito, Shoichi; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Kono, Yuko; Urata, Yoshiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Negoro, Shunichi; Satouchi, Miyako

    2018-01-01

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease is unclear. We therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line regimen for non-small cell lung cancer in patients with interstitial lung disease. We retrospectively reviewed advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease who received carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy regimen at Hyogo Cancer Center between February 2013 and August 2016. interstitial lung disease was diagnosed according to the findings of pretreatment chest high-resolution computed tomography. Twelve patients were included (male, n = 11; female, n = 1). The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 100%. The median progression free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 2.9-8.3 months) and the median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% CI: 4.8-not reached). A chemotherapy-related acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease was observed in one patient; the extent of this event was Grade 2. There were no treatment-related deaths. Carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer, showed favorable efficacy and safety in patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

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    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  8. Personalized treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: from bench to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passaro A

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Passaro,1 Chiara Lazzari,1,2 Niki Karachaliou,3 Gianluca Spitaleri,1 Alessia Pochesci,1 Chiara Catania,1 Rafael Rosell,4 Filippo de Marinis1 1Division of Thoracic Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Division of Experimental Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy; 3Oncology Institute Dr Rosell, Quiron-Dexeus University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 4Catalan Institute of Oncology, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain Abstract: The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene rearrangements and the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI that target them have achieved unprecedented success in the management of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Despite the high efficacy of crizotinib, the first oral ALK TKI approved for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC, almost all patients inevitably develop acquired resistance, showing disease progression in the brain or in other parenchymal sites. Second- or third-generation ALK TKIs have shown to be active in crizotinib-pretreated or crizotinib-naïve ALK-positive patients, even in those with brain metastases. In this review, the current knowledge regarding ALK-positive NSCLC, focusing on the biology of the disease and the available therapeutic options are discussed. Keywords: ALK, NSCLC, crizotinib, ceritinib, alectinib, brigatinib, lorlatinib, brain metastases

  9. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

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    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  10. Cytotoxicity, Post-Treatment Recovery, and Selectivity Analysis of Naturally Occurring Podophyllotoxins from Bursera fagaroides var. fagaroides on Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Morán, Omar Aristeo; Villarreal, María Luisa; Álvarez-Berber, Laura; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; Rodríguez-López, Verónica

    2016-08-04

    Despite prevention and treatment options, breast cancer (BC) has become one of the most important issues in the present day. Therefore, the need for more specific and efficient compounds remains paramount. We evaluated four previously isolated aryltetralin lignans: 5'-demethoxy-β-peltatin-A-methylether (1), acetylpodophyllotoxin (2), 5'-demethoxydeoxypodophyllotoxin (3), and 7',8'-dehydroacetylpodophyllotoxin (4) for cytotoxicity, clonogenicity, and selectivity against three BC cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549, as well as the non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Cytotoxicity was evaluated after 72 h of treatment, and clonogenicity was determined at 72 h post-treatment; experiments were performed using the sulforhodamine B staining assay. Selective-index (SI) was calculated by comparing pure compound IC50 values in MCF-10A cell line against the IC50 of the same compound in cancer cell lines. Structural similarities among lignans and controls (podophyllotoxin and etoposide) were analyzed using the Tanimoto coefficient (Tc). Lignans were cytotoxic against all tested cell lines (0.011-7.22 µM) and clonogenicity testing showed a dose-dependent cytocidality for all lignans (≥0.08 µg/mL); compounds 2 and 3 were more potent (14.1 and 7.6 respectively) than etoposide in BT-549 cell line, while compound 2 displayed selectivity (SI = 28.17) in BT-549 cell line. Tc values of lignans suggested a greater similarity with podophyllotoxin structure.

  11. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  12. Cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer.

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    Codony-Servat, Jordi; Verlicchi, Alberto; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors, with poor survival rates. Although patients may initially respond to treatment, this is followed by rapid development of drug resistance and disease progression. SCLC patients often present with metastasis at time of diagnosis, ruling out surgery as a treatment option. Currently, treatment options for this disease remain limited and platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice. A better understanding of the biology of SCLC could allow us to identify new therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is currently crucial in cancer research and could provide a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis of several types of tumors. Some characteristics of SCLC, such as aggressiveness, suggest that this kind of tumor could be enriched in CSCs, and drug resistance in SCLC could be attributable to the existence of a CSC subpopulation in SCLC. Herein we summarize current understanding of CSC in SCLC, including the evidence for CSC markers and signaling pathways involved in stemness. We also discuss potential ongoing strategies and areas of active research in SCLC, such as immunotherapy, that focus on inhibition of signaling pathways and targeting molecules driving stemness. Understanding of signaling pathways and the discovery of new therapeutic markers specific to CSCs will lead to new advances in therapy and improvements in prognosis of SCLC patients. Therefore, evaluation of these CSC-specific molecules and pathways may become a routine part of SCLC diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  14. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  15. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  16. Acute radiation pneumonitis after conformational radiotherapy for nonsmall cell lung cancer: clinical, dosimetric, and associated-treatment risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprieur, Etienne Giroux; Fernandez, Diego; Chatellier, Gilles; Klotz, Sylvain; Giraud, Philippe; Durdux, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Conformational thoracic radiotherapy (CTR) is a key-treatment in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) is one of the major complications. To evaluate the predictors of ARP after CTR in the treatment of LA-NSCLC. A total of 47 consecutive patients (pts) were treated with CTR for LA-NSCLC and retrospectively analyzed. The mean total dose of radiation therapy (RT) was 65 Gy, with respiratory gating (RG) in 19 cases. Induction and concomitant chemotherapy was performed in 33 pts (70%) and 41 pts (87%), respectively. Eleven pts (23%) had an ARP resulting in death for one pt. In univariate analysis, age, sex, pretherapeutic value of forced expiratory volume (FEV), not-gated radiotherapy and type of concomitant chemotherapy did not appear as contributing factors in contrast to the administration of induction gemcitabine ( p = 0.03). The occurrence of ARP was significantly associated with nontumor lung volumes irradiated to 13 Gy (V13, p = 0.04), 20 Gy (V20, p = 0.02), and 25 Gy (V25, p = 0.006), the mean lung dose ( p = 0.008) and lung normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) ( p = 0.004). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the occurrence of ARP was significantly associated with age >75 years (odds ratio (OR) = 16.72, confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.77-157.87) and administration of induction gemcitabine (OR = 18.08, CI 95% 1.09-300.08). ARP is a common acute complication, requiring close posttreatment follow-up, particularly for elderly patients. The use of gemcitabine before radiation should be avoided. The benefits and risks of CTR must be carefully analyzed, according to the dosimetric parameters.

  17. Acute radiation pneumonitis after conformational radiotherapy for nonsmall cell lung cancer: Clinical, dosimetric, and associated-treatment risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Giroux Leprieur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conformational thoracic radiotherapy (CTR is a key-treatment in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC. Acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP is one of the major complications. Aims: To evaluate the predictors of ARP after CTR in the treatment of LA-NSCLC. Materials and methods: A total of 47 consecutive patients (pts were treated with CTR for LA-NSCLC and retrospectively analyzed. The mean total dose of radiation therapy (RT was 65 Gy, with respiratory gating (RG in 19 cases. Induction and concomitant chemotherapy was performed in 33 pts (70% and 41 pts (87%, respectively. Results: Eleven pts (23% had an ARP resulting in death for one pt. In univariate analysis, age, sex, pretherapeutic value of forced expiratory volume (FEV, not-gated radiotherapy and type of concomitant chemotherapy did not appear as contributing factors in contrast to the administration of induction gemcitabine ( p = 0.03. The occurrence of ARP was significantly associated with nontumor lung volumes irradiated to 13 Gy (V13, p = 0.04, 20 Gy (V20, p = 0.02, and 25 Gy (V25, p = 0.006, the mean lung dose ( p = 0.008 and lung normal tissue complication probability (NTCP ( p = 0.004. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the occurrence of ARP was significantly associated with age >75 years (odds ratio (OR = 16.72, confidence interval (CI 95% 1.77-157.87 and administration of induction gemcitabine (OR = 18.08, CI 95% 1.09-300.08. Conclusion: ARP is a common acute complication, requiring close posttreatment follow-up, particularly for elderly patients. The use of gemcitabine before radiation should be avoided. The benefits and risks of CTR must be carefully analyzed, according to the dosimetric parameters.

  18. Fertility effects of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Donald E; Hacker, Neville

    2003-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are a subfertile group, and most treatments have the potential to adversely affect gonadal function. As cancer treatment becomes more effective and survival rates improve there are more cancer survivors in the reproductive age group for whom parenting is an important consideration. This article outlines the effects on fertility of cancer treatments and techniques to minimise the risk of infertility. The overall prospects for younger cancer sufferers to either retain their fertility or have genetic offspring is now better than ever before, due to advances in assisted reproductive technology, the appropriate use of fertility sparing surgery and other techniques to reduce the toxicity of therapy on the reproductive organs. These advances raise new moral and ethical concerns that must be considered before advising cancer sufferers of the options for preserving reproductive capacity.

  19. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ROS1 fusion protein-driven non-small cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Administration for the treatment of ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer in 2016. Other drugs that are in clinical trials for the treatment of these lung cancers include ceritinib, cabozantinib, entrectinib, and lorlatinib. Crizotinib forms a complex within the front cleft between the small and large lobes of an active ROS1 protein-kinase domain and it is classified as type I inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

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    Anne-Marie Ellegaard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C; Anand, Atul; Cederkvist, Luise; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Mellemgaard, Anders; Østerlind, Kell; Friis, Søren; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Preclinical Evaluation of Antrodia camphorata Alcohol Extracts in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Non-Invasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to provide a platform for the pre-clinical evaluation of anti-cancer properties of a unique CAM (complementary and alternative medicine agent, Antrodia camphorata alcohol extract (ACAE, in a mouse model with the advantageous non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence molecular imaging technology. In vitro analyses on the proliferation, migration/invasion, cell cycle and apoptosis were performed on ACAE-treated non-small cell lung cancer cells, H441GL and control CGL1 cells. In vivo, immune-deficient mice were inoculated subcutaneously with H441GL followed by oral gavages of ACAE. The effect of ACAE on tumor progression was monitored by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. The proliferation and migration/invasion of H441GL cells were inhibited by ACAE in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ACAE induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis in H441GL cells as shown by flow cytometric analysis, Annexin-V immunoflourescence and DNA fragmentation. In vivo bioluminescence imaging revealed that tumorigenesis was significantly retarded by oral treatment of ACAE in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on our experimental data, ACAE contains anti-cancer properties and could be considered as a potential CAM agent in future clinical evaluation.

  4. A phase I clinical study of immunotherapy for advanced colorectal cancers using carcinoembryonic antigen-pulsed dendritic cells mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent IL-2 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Jang-Yang; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Ch'ang, Hui-Ju; Kao, Woei-Yau; Wu, Yu-Chen; Yu, Wei-Lan; Chung, Tsai-Rong; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline

    2016-08-24

    To better evaluate and improve the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy, we conducted a clinical study of patients with advanced colorectal cancer using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent interleukin-2 treatment. The tetanus toxoid in the vaccine preparation serves as an adjuvant and provides a non-tumor specific immune response to enhance vaccine efficacy. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the toxicity of this treatment, (2) observe the clinical responses of vaccinated patients, and (3) investigate the immune responses of patients against CEA before and after treatment. Twelve patients were recruited and treated in this phase I clinical study. These patients all had metastatic colorectal cancer and failed standard chemotherapy. We first subcutaneously immunized patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid as an adjuvant. Patients received 3 successive injections with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs alone. Low-dose interleukin-2 was administered subcutaneously following the final DC vaccination to boost the growth of T cells. Patients were evaluated for adverse event and clinical status. Blood samples collected before, during, and after treatment were analyzed for T cell proliferation responses against CEA. No severe treatment-related side effects or toxicity was observed in patients who received the regular 4 DC vaccine injections. Two patients had stable disease and 10 patients showed disease progression. A statistically significant increase in proliferation against CEA by T cells collected after vaccination was observed in 2 of 9 patients. The results of this study indicate that it is feasible and safe to treat colorectal cancer patients using this protocol. An increase in the anti-CEA immune response and a clinical benefit was observed in a small fraction of patients. This treatment protocol should be further evaluated in

  5. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

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    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  6. The roles of beta-adrenergic receptors in tumorigenesis and the possible use of beta-adrenergic blockers for cancer treatment: possible genetic and cell-signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luong KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Khanh vinh quốc Lương, Lan Thi Hoàng NguyễnVietnamese American Medical Research Foundation, Westminster, California, USAAbstract: Cancer is the leading cause of death in the USA, and the incidence of cancer increases dramatically with age. Beta-adrenergic blockers appear to have a beneficial clinical effect in cancer patients. In this paper, we review the evidence of an association between β-adrenergic blockade and cancer. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine which proteins link β-adrenergic blockade to cancer pathology. In particular, this link involves the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the renin–angiotensin system, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Beta-adrenergic blockers also exert anticancer effects through non-genomic factors, including matrix metalloproteinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide synthase. In conclusion, β-adrenergic blockade may play a beneficial role in cancer treatment. Additional investigations that examine β-adrenergic blockers as cancer therapeutics are required to further elucidate this role.Keywords: β-adrenergic blocker, neoplasm, β-adrenergic antagonism, non-genomic factor

  7. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W.J. Lennard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP, have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC, combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  8. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kelly M.; Kirby, John A.; Lennard, Thomas W.J.; Meeson, Annette P.

    2011-01-01

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis. PMID:24212798

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  10. Treatment paradigms for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, squamous lung cancer: first, second and third-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz eAl Farsi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the treatment algorithm applied to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the same for all histologic subtypes. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular profiles of squamous and non-squamous NSCLC have changed this perspective. Histologic subtype and the presence of specific molecular abnormalities have predictive value for response to and toxicity from therapy, as well as overall survival. For patients with squamous NSCLC, a platinum agent plus gemcitabine, or paclitaxel is recommended as first-line therapy. The role of EGFR monoclonal antibodies is uncertain. Maintenance therapy is not widely recommended, although data exist for the use of erlotinib. The standard recommendation for second-line therapy is docetaxel and erlotinib should be considered as second or third-line therapy. There is ongoing research identifying molecular targets in squamous NSCLC and many agents are in early phase clinical trials. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting programmed death 1 receptor (PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1 appear promising.

  11. Carbon Nanomaterials for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Casais-Molina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, breast cancer is considered as a health problem worldwide. Furthermore, current treatments neither are capable of stopping its propagation and/or recurrence nor are specific for cancer cells. Therefore, side effects on healthy tissues and cells are common. An increase in the efficiency of treatments, along with a reduction in their toxicity, is desirable to improve the life quality of patients affected by breast cancer. Nanotechnology offers new alternatives for the design and synthesis of nanomaterials that can be used in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer and has now become a very promising tool for its use against this disease. Among the wide variety of nanomaterials, the scientific community is particularly interested in carbon nanomaterials (fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene due to their physical properties, versatile chemical functionalization, and biocompatibility. Recent scientific evidence shows the potential uses of carbon nanomaterials as therapeutic agents, systems for selective and controlled drug release, and contrast agents for diagnosing and locating tumors. This generates new possibilities for the development of innovative systems to treat breast cancer and can be used to detect this disease at much earlier stages. Thus, applications of carbon nanomaterials in breast cancer treatment are discussed in this article.

  12. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  13. The impact of rare EGFR mutations on the treatment response of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Mutational activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is implicated in lung cancer; clinical and cancer genome sequencing studies have identified hundreds of mutations in the protein kinase domain. EGFR mutation testing usually focuses on common mutations like the exon 19 deletion and exon 21 point mutation (L858R). However, molecular screening methods have started to extend beyond identification of classic EGFR mutations to prevent exclusion of patients with rare or complex mutations who may benefit from anti-EGFR therapy. Rare EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancers are heterogeneous: exon 20 insertions lack sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors while exon 18 or complex mutations are more sensitive and require individual assessment. Until testing for uncommon EGFR mutations evolves and studies with large number of patients are performed, knowledge of this field will remain limited.

  14. Safety and tolerability of combination therapy vs. standard treatment alone for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. James Gulley is leading a team to test the safety and tolerability of the combination of nivolumab and CV301 to see if it can improve the survival for patientis with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.  Learn more...

  15. Metronomic treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with daily oral vinorelbine – a Phase I trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetz S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sylvia Guetz,1,* Amanda Tufman,2,* Joachim von Pawel,3 Achim Rittmeyer,4 Astrid Borgmeier,2 Pierre Ferré,5 Birgit Edlich,6 Rudolf Maria Huber2 1Ev. Diakonissenkrankenhaus Leipzig, Leipzig, 2University Hospital Munich and Thoracic Oncology Centre Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (DZL CPC-M, Munich, 3Asklepios Fachkliniken Muenchen-Gauting, Gauting, 4Lungenfachklinik Immenhausen, Immenhausen, Germany; 5Pierre Fabre Pharmaceuticals, Oncology Research and Development Center, Toulouse, France; 6Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Micro-abstract: In a Phase I dose-finding study of metronomic daily oral vinorelbine in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, a recommended dose was established for this therapeutic approach. In addition, this trial revealed promising efficacy data and an acceptable tolerability profile. The observed vinorelbine blood concentrations suggest continuous anti-angiogenic coverage. Introduction: We present a Phase I dose-finding study investigating metronomic daily oral vinorelbine (Navelbine® Oral, NVBo in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients and methods: Patients with stage III/IV NSCLC received daily NVBo at fixed dose levels of 20–50 mg/d for 21 days of each 4-week cycle. Primary end point was the maximum tolerated dose. Secondary end points included tumor response, time to progression (TTP, overall survival (OS and tolerability. Results: Twenty-seven patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Most of them were extensively pretreated. Daily NVBo was well tolerated up to 30 mg/d. At 40 mg/d, two of five patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs. Three of six patients had DLTs at the 50 mg/d level. The recommended dose was established at 30 mg/d in cycle 1, with escalation to 40 mg/d in cycle 2, if tolerated. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed continuous blood exposure over 21

  16. A comparison of the gene expression profiles and pathway network analyses after treatment of Prostate cancer cell lines with different Ganoderma lucidum based extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ganoderma lucidum is a type of fungus commonly consumed in Asia for the promotion of health and longevity. The observed biological activity of G. lucidum includes anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects which may be useful in the treatment and prevention of cancer and other chronic diseases. G. lucidum grows under conditions which range from tropical to temperate and has a different physiology depending on the geographical region in which it is grown. For this reason, the health benefits may vary depending on the form of G. lucidum and the environmental conditions to which it was exposed. This led us to investigate the effect of wildly grown G. lucidum, from the Himalayan region versus other commercially available G. lucidum products, on two human cancer cell lines. Methods: Extraction of the bioactive components found in G. lucidum is essential, as the fungus is tough and indigestible. Four different Ganoderma extracts were prepared. Thereafter, the extracts were tested on two human prostate cancer cell lines, and the IC50s were determined. This was followed by the use of Affymetrix GeneChip® PrimeView™ Human Gene Expression Arrays to identify the changes in gene expression due to the treatment of prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and DU145 with Ganoderma extracts. Several key genes identified with Affymetrix analysis were validated using RT-PCR. Results and Discussion: We found that all the Ganoderma extracts showed growth inhibition in the cancer cell lines tested. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis, we identified four main biologically active pathways: cell cycle control/apoptosis, cell-cell adhesion, DNA repair, and inflammatory /immune response, where activity was influenced by the Ganoderma extracts used. Using RT-PCR, we tested ten genes associated with all four pathways. The RT-PCR results supported our findings in the Affymetrix analysis, i.e. that G. lucidum extracts have an anti-inflammatory and cell cycle effect and

  17. Biophysical insights into cancer transformation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Foletti, Alberto; Kobilková, Jitka; Jandová, Anna; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan; Nedbalová, Martina; Čoček, Aleš; Danani, Andrea; Tuszyński, Jack A

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are hierarchically self-organized complex structures characterized by nonlinear interactions. Biochemical energy is transformed into work of physical forces required for various biological functions. We postulate that energy transduction depends on endogenous electrodynamic fields generated by microtubules. Microtubules and mitochondria colocalize in cells with microtubules providing tracks for mitochondrial movement. Besides energy transformation, mitochondria form a spatially distributed proton charge layer and a resultant strong static electric field, which causes water ordering in the surrounding cytosol. These effects create conditions for generation of coherent electrodynamic field. The metabolic energy transduction pathways are strongly affected in cancers. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells (Warburg effect) or in fibroblasts associated with cancer cells (reverse Warburg effect) results in decreased or increased power of the generated electromagnetic field, respectively, and shifted and rebuilt frequency spectra. Disturbed electrodynamic interaction forces between cancer and healthy cells may favor local invasion and metastasis. A therapeutic strategy of targeting dysfunctional mitochondria for restoration of their physiological functions makes it possible to switch on the natural apoptotic pathway blocked in cancer transformed cells. Experience with dichloroacetate in cancer treatment and reestablishment of the healthy state may help in the development of novel effective drugs aimed at the mitochondrial function.

  18. Biophysical Insights into Cancer Transformation and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pokorný

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems are hierarchically self-organized complex structures characterized by nonlinear interactions. Biochemical energy is transformed into work of physical forces required for various biological functions. We postulate that energy transduction depends on endogenous electrodynamic fields generated by microtubules. Microtubules and mitochondria colocalize in cells with microtubules providing tracks for mitochondrial movement. Besides energy transformation, mitochondria form a spatially distributed proton charge layer and a resultant strong static electric field, which causes water ordering in the surrounding cytosol. These effects create conditions for generation of coherent electrodynamic field. The metabolic energy transduction pathways are strongly affected in cancers. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells (Warburg effect or in fibroblasts associated with cancer cells (reverse Warburg effect results in decreased or increased power of the generated electromagnetic field, respectively, and shifted and rebuilt frequency spectra. Disturbed electrodynamic interaction forces between cancer and healthy cells may favor local invasion and metastasis. A therapeutic strategy of targeting dysfunctional mitochondria for restoration of their physiological functions makes it possible to switch on the natural apoptotic pathway blocked in cancer transformed cells. Experience with dichloroacetate in cancer treatment and reestablishment of the healthy state may help in the development of novel effective drugs aimed at the mitochondrial function.

  19. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... specimens express syncytin, an endogenous retroviral envelope protein, previously implicated in fusions between placental trophoblast cells. Additionally, endothelial and cancer cells are shown to express ASCT-2, a receptor for syncytin. Syncytin antisense treatment decreases syncytin expression...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  20. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Bokobza, Sivan M.; Jiang, Yanyan; Weber, Anika M.; Devery, Aoife M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm{sup 3}) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a

  1. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokobza, Sivan M.; Jiang, Yanyan; Weber, Anika M.; Devery, Aoife M.; Ryan, Anderson J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm 3 ) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a

  2. [Effect of Erlotinib in 2nd and 3rd Line Anticancer Treatment in Patients with Squamous Cell Lung Cancer - Case Series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šatánková, M; Brat, K; Tomíšková, M; Robešová, B; Skřičková, J

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (SCC) represents cca 30-40% of new cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the Czech Republic. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib is indicated as a 1st line treatment for patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease and activating mutations in endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), or as a 2nd or 3rd line treatment in EGFR-negative NSCLC patients after chemotherapeutic failure. We present three case reports of patients with SCC treated with erlotinib as a 2nd or 3rd line of treatment. All patients were verified by histological analysis of tumor samples. EGFR mutation status was negative in one patient, while the other samples were not suitable for genetic screening. The therapeutic response to erlotinib lasted for 68, 40, and 13 months, resp. The patient with the longest therapeutic response (patient no. 1) is still continuing erlotinib treatment (as of December 2016). The overall survival of the two patients who died was 50 and 43 months, resp. One patient died of an unknown cause with no signs of progression of the disease on CT scans. The other patient died of terminal progression of the oncological disease. All three patients experienced major therapeutic benefit from erlotinib treatment as shown by the long periods of progression-free survival and prolonged overall survival. The three case reports demonstrate that erlotinib may be effective as a 2nd or 3rd line treatment in patients with SCC, especially in patients with limited alternative anticancer treatment options.Key words: non-small cell lung cancer - squamous cell carcinoma - erlotinib - treatment - tyrosine kinase inhibitor The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 5. 8. 2016Accepted: 14. 12. 2016.

  3. Combined high-intensity local treatment and systemic therapy in metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Luu, Michael; Yoshida, Emi J; Kim, Sungjin; Tighiouart, Mourad; David, John M; Shiao, Stephen L; Mita, Alain C; Scher, Kevin S; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that primary tumor ablation can improve survival for some cancer patients with distant metastases. This may be particularly applicable to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) because of its tropism for locoregional progression. This study included patients with metastatic HNSCC undergoing systemic therapy identified in the National Cancer Data Base. High-intensity local treatment was defined as radiation doses ≥ 60 Gy or oncologic resection of the primary tumor. Multivariate Cox regression, propensity score matching, landmark analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to account for imbalances in covariates, including adjustments for the number and location of metastatic sites in the subset of patients with this information available. In all, 3269 patients were included (median follow-up, 51.5 months). Patients undergoing systemic therapy with local treatment had improved survival in comparison with patients receiving systemic therapy alone in propensity score-matched cohorts (2-year overall survival, 34.2% vs 20.6%; P < .001). Improved survival was associated only with patients receiving high-intensity local treatment, whereas those receiving lower-intensity local treatment had survival similar to that of patients receiving systemic therapy without local treatment. The impact of high-intensity local therapy was time-dependent, with a stronger impact within the first 6 months after the diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.255; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.210-0.309; P < .001) in comparison with more than 6 months after the diagnosis (AHR, 0.622; 95% CI, 0.561-0.689; P < .001) in the multivariate analysis. A benefit was seen in all subgroups, in landmark analyses of 1-, 2-, and 3-year survivors, and when adjusting for the number and location of metastatic sites. Aggressive local treatment warrants prospective evaluation for select patients with metastatic HNSCC. Cancer 2017;123:4583-4593. © 2017 American Cancer

  4. GRP78 knockdown enhances apoptosis via the down-regulation of oxidative stress and Akt pathway after epirubicin treatment in colon cancer DLD-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Chang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78 is induced in the cancer microenvironment and can be considered as a novel predictor of responsiveness to chemotherapy in many cancers. In this study, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear translocation were higher in GRP78 knockdown DLD-1 colon cancer cells compared with scrambled control cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with epirubicin in GRP78 knockdown DLD-1 cells enhanced apoptosis and was associated with decreased production of intracellular ROS. In addition, apoptosis was increased by the antioxidants propyl gallate (PG and dithiothreitol (DTT in epirubicin-treated scrambled control cells. Epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells resulted in more inactivated Akt pathway members, such as phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β, as well as downstream targets of β-catenin expression. Knockdown of Nrf2 with small interfering RNA (siRNA increased apoptosis in epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells, which suggested that Nrf2 may be a primary defense mechanism in GRP78 knockdown cells. We also demonstrated that epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells could decrease survival pathway signaling through the redox activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which is a serine/threonine phosphatase that negatively regulates the Akt pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that epirubicin decreased the intracellular ROS in GRP78 knockdown cells, which decreased survival signaling through both the Akt pathway and the activation of PP2A. Together, these mechanisms contributed to the enhanced level of epirubicin-induced apoptosis that was observed in the GRP78 knockdown cells.

  5. Reprogramming of retinoblastoma cancer cells into cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Fengming; Hirashima, Kanji; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2017-01-22

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in pediatric patients. It develops rapidly in the retina and can be fatal if not treated promptly. It has been proposed that a small population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), initiate tumorigenesis from immature tissue stem cells or progenitor cells. Reprogramming technology, which can convert mature cells into pluripotent stem cells (iPS), provides the possibility of transducing malignant cancer cells back to CSCs, a type of early stage of cancer. We herein took advantage of reprogramming technology to induce CSCs from retinoblastoma cancer cells. In the present study, the 4 Yamanaka transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-myc, were transduced into retinoblastoma cells (Rbc51). iPS-like colonies were observed 15 days after transduction and showed significantly enhanced CSC properties. The gene and protein expression levels of pluripotent stem cell markers (Tra-1-60, Oct4, Nanog) and cancer stem cell markers (CD133, CD44) were up-regulated in transduced Rbc51 cells compared to control cells. Moreover, iPS-like CSCs could be sorted using the Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) method. A sphere formation assay demonstrated spheroid formation in transduced Rbc51 cells cultured in serum free media, and these spheroids could be differentiated into Pax6-, Nestin-positive neural progenitors and rhodopsin- and recoverin-positive mature retinal cells. The cell viability after 5-Fu exposure was higher in transduced Rbc51 cells. In conclusion, CSCs were generated from retinoblastoma cancer cells using reprogramming technology. Our novel method can generate CSCs, the study of which can lead to better understanding of cancer-specific initiation, cancer epigenetics, and the overlapping mechanisms of cancer development and pluripotent stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Apoptosis of human carcinoma cells in the presence of potential anti-cancer drugs: III. Treatment of Colo-205 and SKBR3 cells with: cis -platin, Tamoxifen, Melphalan, Betulinic acid, L-PDMP, L-PPMP, and GD3 ganglioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhash; Ma, Rui; Boyle, Patrick J; Mikulla, Brian; Bradley, Mathew; Smith, Bradley; Basu, Manju; Banerjee, Sipra

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer, predominantly among women over 20, whereas colo-rectal cancer occurs in both men and women over the age of 50. Chemotherapy of both cancers affect rapidly growing normal as well as cancer cells. Cancer cells are non-apoptotic. Seven anti-cancer agents (cis -platin, Tamoxifen, Melphalan, Betulinic acid, D-PDMP, L-PPMP, and GD3) have been tested with human breast (SKBR3) and colon (Colo-205) carcinoma cells for their apoptotic effect and found to be positive by several assay systems. Colo-205 cells were obtained from ATCC, and the SKBR3 cells were a gift from the Cleveland Clinic. All of these six agents killed those two cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. In the early apoptotic stage (6 h), these cells showed only a flopping of phosphatidylserine on the outer lamella of the plasma membranes as evidenced by the binding of a novel fluorescent dye PSS-380. After 24 h of the treatment, those apoptotic cells showed damage of the plasma as well as the nuclear membrane as evidenced by binding of propidium iodide to the nuclear DNA. DNA laddering assay viewed further breakdown of DNA by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis analysis. It is concluded that during apoptosis the signaling by Mitochondrial Signaling Pathway (MSP) is stimulated by some of these agents. Caspase 3 was activated with the concomitant appearance of its p17 polypeptide as viewed by Westernblot analyses. Incorporation of radioactivity from [U-(14)C]-L-serine in total sphingolipid mixture was observed between 2 and 4 micromolar concentrations of most of the agents except ci s-platin. However, apoptosis in carcinoma cells in the presence of cis -platin is induced by a caspase 3 activation pathway without any increase in synthesis of ceramide.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Parathyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sign of disease. Sestamibi scan : A type of radionuclide scan used to find an overactive parathyroid gland. ... speech problems caused by this nerve damage. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  10. Integrative medicine for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000932.htm Integrative medicine for cancer treatment To use the sharing features ... This is why many people turn to integrative medicine. Integrative medicine (IM) refers to any type of ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  12. A CD44high/EGFRlow subpopulation within head and neck cancer cell lines shows an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype and resistance to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea La Fleur

    Full Text Available Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high/EGFR(low, CD44(high/EGFR(high and CD44(low cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high/EGFR(low population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high/EGFR(low population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high/EGFR(low cells in comparison to CD44(low cells. Moreover, CD44(high/EGFR(low cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high/EGFR(high and CD44(low counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high and EGFR (low cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  13. Osimertinib in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: design, development and place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Liguori, Alessia; Karachaliou, Niki; Gonzalez-Cao, Maria; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; D'Aveni, Alessandro; Marabello, Grazia; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) mutations and subsequent demonstration of the efficacy of genotype-directed therapies with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) marked the advent of the era of precision medicine for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First- and second-generation EGFR TKIs, including erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib, have consistently shown superior efficacy and better toxicity compared with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy and currently represent the standard of care for EGFR -mutated advanced NSCLC patients. However, tumors invariably develop acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, thereby limiting the long-term efficacy of these agents. The T790M mutation in exon 20 of the EGFR gene has been identified as the most common mechanism of acquired resistance. Osimertinib is a third-generation TKI designed to target both EGFR TKI-sensitizing mutations and T790M, while sparing wild-type EGFR . Based on its pronounced clinical activity and good safety profile demonstrated in early Phase I and II trials, osimertinib received first approval in 2015 by the US FDA and in early 2016 by European Medicines Agency for the treatment of EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC patients in progression after EGFR TKI therapy. Recent results from the Phase III AURA3 trial demonstrated the superiority of osimertinib over standard platinum-based doublet chemotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC with disease progression following first-line EGFR TKI therapy, thus definitively establishing this third-generation TKI as the standard of care in this setting. Herein, we review preclinical findings and clinical data from Phase I-III trials of osimertinib, including its efficacy in patients with central nervous system metastases. We further discuss currently available methods used to analyze T790M mutation status and the main mechanisms of resistance to osimertinib. Finally, we provide an outlook on ongoing

  14. Expression of PD-L1 and presence of CD8-positive T cells in pre-treatment specimens of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emeka K; Kornaga, Elizabeth N; Dean, Michelle; Koulis, Theodora A; Phan, Tien; Kalantarian, Maria; Köbel, Martin; Ghatage, Prafull; Magliocco, Anthony M; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Doll, Corinne M

    2017-04-01

    Several of the cancer immunotherapies under investigation or in clinical use target the programmed death-ligand 1/programmed death-1 (PD-L1/PD-1) signaling axis. PD-L1 expression in tumor samples has been used as a predictive marker for response to these therapeutics, and may also have independent prognostic utility when assessed along with immune cell markers. Our objectives were to assess the expression of PD-L1 in tumor specimens from a uniformly treated patient cohort with locally advanced cervical cancer, and to determine its prognostic significance along with the density of tumor-infiltrating T cells. We identified 120 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radical chemoradiotherapy, and built tissue microarrays from their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pre-treatment biopsies. We used conventional brightfield and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to detect PD-L1, and quantified protein expression using both manual pathologist scoring and automated software analysis. We also evaluated the effect of PD-L1 expression in tumors, along with the presence and density of intra-tumoral CD8 + T cells, on patient survival outcomes. Approximately 96% of the tumor samples expressed PD-L1, as determined using quantitative software analysis. Neither expression of PD-L1 nor density of CD8 + T cells was associated with progression-free or overall survival. However, there was a trend towards worse progression-free survival in patients whose tumors expressed PD-L1 but lacked CD8 + T cells (hazard ratio=0.43 (0.18-1.01), P=0.053). Nevertheless, the high percentage of cervical cancer tumor samples expressing PD-L1 suggests that anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-1 therapies are potential treatment options for this patient population.

  15. Personalized treatment strategies for non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: the role of crizotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu FY

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fei-Yu Niu,1,2 Yi-Long Wu2 1Graduate School, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangement is an oncogene targeted with approved drugs second to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in lung cancer. Crizotinib was developed and introduced into clinical practice rapidly and successfully after the discovery of ALK rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancer. Chinese and other Asian patients treated with crizotinib seem to have lower toxicity and higher efficacy compared with other ethnicities. Crizotinib showed potent antitumor activity and manageable toxicity in mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor (c-Met/ROS1-positive non-small-cell lung cancer patients, but prospective clinical trials are still needed to confirm its efficacy and safety. Crizotinib appears to be effective against tumors originating from various organs that harbor ALK abnormalities. In the near future, we would classify the tumors by their genetic information beyond organs, such as ALKoma, EGFRoma, and RAFoma, and a single compound could be used for many different types of cancer in different organs. The major challenge of the widespread use of crizotinib in clinical practice is establishing convenient diagnostic techniques for the detection of ALK/c-Met/ROS1. In the present study, we reviewed the application of crizotinib in Chinese patients. Keywords: NSCLC, crizotinib, ALK, c-Met, ROS1

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Rectal ...

  17. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  18. Immunomodulatory Agents with Antivascular Activity in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Focus on TLR9 Agonists, IMiDs and NGR-TNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Corti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, often lead to disappointing results. Unfortunately, also the various immunotherapeutic approaches so far tested have not produced satisfactory results to be widely applied in the clinical practice. However, the recent development of new immunomodulatory agents may open promising therapeutic options. This paper focuses on PF3512676, lenalidomide, and NGR-TNF, that is, drugs belonging to three different classes of immunomodulatory agents, that are also capable to affect tumor blood vessels with different mechanisms, and discusses the potential role of such agents in NSCLC treatment strategy.

  19. Maintenance treatment with chemotherapy and immunotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer:A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabella eLlanos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old woman was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma state IV (synchronous pleural involvement in April 2009. First-line systemic treatment included 6 cycles of Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Bevacizumab. Partial response was achieved. Maintenance therapy with Bevacizumab and Pemetrexed was given from September 2009 to February 2010. No response changes were observed. Immunotherapy was initiated, and then Pemetrexed was given with the same disease status. Both treatments were well tolerated. Immunotherapy toxicity included reaction at the site of injection grade 2. At present, the patient is still on this treatment. Given the poor prognosis of patients with advanced lung cancer, the combination of both treatments during the stable phase of the disease may improve progression-free survival.

  20. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  1. Osimertinib in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: design, development and place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santarpia M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariacarmela Santarpia,1 Alessia Liguori,1 Niki Karachaliou,2 Maria Gonzalez-Cao,3 Maria Grazia Daffinà,1 Alessandro D’Aveni,1 Grazia Marabello,1 Giuseppe Altavilla,1 Rafael Rosell3–5 1Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Human Pathology “G. Barresi”, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 2Institute of Oncology Rosell (IOR, University Hospital Sagrat Cor, 3Department of Oncology, Institute of Oncology Rosell (IOR, Quirón-Dexeus University Institute, Barcelona, 4Cancer Biology and Precision Medicine Program, Germans Trias i Pujol Research Institute, 5Catalan Institute of Oncology, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Spain Abstract: The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations and subsequent demonstration of the efficacy of genotype-directed therapies with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs marked the advent of the era of precision medicine for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. First- and second-generation EGFR TKIs, including erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib, have consistently shown superior efficacy and better toxicity compared with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy and currently represent the standard of care for EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC patients. However, tumors invariably develop acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, thereby limiting the long-term efficacy of these agents. The T790M mutation in exon 20 of the EGFR gene has been identified as the most common mechanism of acquired resistance. Osimertinib is a third-generation TKI designed to target both EGFR TKI-sensitizing mutations and T790M, while sparing wild-type EGFR. Based on its pronounced clinical activity and good safety profile demonstrated in early Phase I and II trials, osimertinib received first approval in 2015 by the US FDA and in early 2016 by European Medicines Agency for the treatment of EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC patients in progression after EGFR TKI therapy. Recent results from the Phase III AURA3

  2. Updates in the treatment of bone cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, J Sybil

    2013-05-01

    Although extremely rare, primary bone cancers are often curable with proper treatment. Effective management of primary bone tumors hinges on the involvement of a multidisciplinary team of physicians with expertise in this area, both in the realms of diagnosis and treatment. In her presentation at the NCCN 18th Annual Conference, Dr. J. Sybil Biermann reviewed the changes to the 2013 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for bone cancer, featuring the introduction of new sections on giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) and chordoma. The benefits of denosumab for the benign GCTB and the unique challenges associated with the malignant chordoma are also explored.

  3. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  4. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing revealed differences in the response of renal cancer cells to hypoxia and CoCl2 treatment [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Zhigalova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cancer cells are subjected to hypoxic conditions in many tumours. Hypoxia causes alterations in the glycolytic pathway activation through stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Currently, two approaches are commonly used to model hypoxia: an alternative to generating low-oxygen conditions in an incubator, cells can be treated with CoCl2. We performed RNA-seq experiments to study transcriptomes of human Caki-1 cells under real hypoxia and after CoCl2 treatment. Despite causing transcriptional changes of a much higher order of magnitude for the genes in the hypoxia regulation pathway, CoCl2 treatment fails to induce alterations in the glycolysis / gluconeogenesis pathway. Moreover, CoCl2 caused aberrant activation of other oxidoreductases in glycine, serine and threonine metabolism pathways.

  6. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  7. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  8. Gastric cancer: current and evolving treatment landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weijing; Yan, Li

    2016-08-31

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical efficacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in implementing new treatment options for this disease.

  9. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers and HER3 expression are predictors of elisidepsin treatment response in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teixidó

    Full Text Available Elisidepsin (elisidepsin trifluoroacetate, Irvalec®, PM02734 is a new synthetic depsipeptide, a result of the PharmaMar Development Program that seeks synthetic products of marine origin-derived compounds. Elisidepsin is a drug with antiproliferative activity in a wide range of tumors. In the present work we studied and characterized the mechanisms associated with sensitivity and resistance to elisidepsin treatment in a broad panel of tumor cell lines from breast and pancreas carcinomas, focusing on different factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and the use of HER family receptors in predicting the in vitro drug response. Interestingly, we observed that the basal protein expression levels of EMT markers show a significant correlation with cell viability in response to elisidepsin treatment in a panel of 12 different breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines. In addition, we generated three elisidepsin treatment-resistant cell lines (MCF-7, HPAC and AsPC-1 and analyzed the pattern of expression of different EMT markers in these cells, confirming that acquired resistance to elisidepsin is associated with a switch to the EMT state. Furthermore, a direct correlation between basal HER3 expression and sensitivity to elisidepsin was observed; moreover, modulation of HER3 expression levels in different cancer cell lines alter their sensitivities to the drug, making them more resistant when HER3 expression is downregulated by a HER3-specific short hairpin RNA and more sensitive when the receptor is overexpressed. These results show that HER3 expression is an important marker of sensitivity to elisidepsin treatment.

  10. First-line systemic treatment of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer in Asia: consensus statement from the Asian Oncology Summit 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Ross A; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cho, Byoung Chul; Yang, Chih-Hsin; Liao, Meilin; Lim, Wan-Teck; Goldstraw, Peter; Mok, Tony S

    2009-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an increasing global challenge, especially in low-income countries. Most guidelines for the management of advanced-stage NSCLC have limited effect in countries with resource constraints. Following a systematic literature search, we present an overview of the management of advanced-stage NSCLC in the first-line setting, discuss resources required for systemic therapy, and provide treatment recommendations stratified to four resources levels. Treatment guidelines appropriate for different resource levels offer a realistic approach to management of advanced-stage NSCLC, by recognising the limitations of a particular health-care system. Although there are many barriers to cancer control in low-resource countries, these can be overcome by using measures that are culturally appropriate, economically feasible, and evidence-based. Initiatives include strategic planning, tobacco control, training of health-care workers, access to therapeutic agents, acquisition of information, public education, and alliances with established institutions and international organisations.

  11. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapasso S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal, giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division. A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on

  12. Cancer stem cells: a metastasizing menace!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandhavkar, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and is estimated to be a reason of death of more than 18 billion people in the coming 5 years. Progress has been made in diagnosis and treatment of cancer; however, a sound understanding of the underlying cell biology still remains an unsolved mystery. Current treatments include a combination of radiation, surgery, and/or chemotherapy. However, these treatments are not a complete cure, aimed simply at shrinking the tumor and in majority of cases, there is a relapse of tumor. Several evidences suggest the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating stem-like cells, a small population of cells present in the tumor, capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny. The presence of these CSCs can be attributed to the failure of cancer treatments as these cells are believed to exhibit therapy resistance. As a result, increasing attention has been given to CSC research to resolve the therapeutic problems related to cancer. Progress in this field of research has led to the development of novel strategies to treat several malignancies and has become a hot topic of discussion. In this review, we will briefly focus on the main characteristics, therapeutic implications, and perspectives of CSCs in cancer therapy

  13. Prolonged Sulforaphane Treatment Activates Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling in Nontumorigenic Colon Cells but not Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  14. Lung cancer: diagnosis, treatment principles, and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Kelly M; Mott, Timothy F

    2015-02-15

    Lung cancer is classified histologically into small cell and non-small cell lung cancers. The most common symptoms of lung cancer are cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and systemic symptoms such as weight loss and anorexia. High-risk patients who present with symptoms should undergo chest radiography. If a likely alternative diagnosis is not identified, computed tomography and possibly positron emission tomography should be performed. If suspicion for lung cancer is high, a diagnostic evaluation is warranted. The diagnostic evaluation has three simultaneous steps (tissue diagnosis, staging, and functional evaluation), all of which affect treatment planning and determination of prognosis. The least invasive method possible should be used. The diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a patient with lung cancer require a team of specialists, including a pulmonologist, medical oncologist, radiation oncologist, pathologist, radiologist, and thoracic surgeon. Non-small cell lung cancer specimens are tested for various mutations, which, if present, can be treated with new targeted molecular therapies. The family physician should remain involved in the patient's care to ensure that the values and wishes of the patient and family are considered and, if necessary, to coordinate end-of-life care. Early palliative care improves quality of life and may prolong survival. Family physicians should concentrate on early recognition of lung cancer, as well as prevention by encouraging tobacco cessation at every visit. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography in high-risk patients. However, the American Academy of Family Physicians concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against screening. Whether to screen high-risk patients should be a shared decision between the physician and patient.

  15. New Cancer Pain Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Kenneth D; Kusper, Teresa M; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2017-02-01

    Cancer pain is often incapacitating and discouraging to patients; is demoralizing to family members and care takers; and is taxing and difficult to subdue for the pain specialists. The consequences of implementing suboptimal treatment are far-reaching; therefore, effective treatment methods are in a great demand. The face of cancer pain management has changed in considerable ways, and interventional procedures have become an integral part of providing multimodal analgesia in cancer pain treatment. The goals of this review are to draw attention to the critical role that regional anesthetic nerve blocks and interventional pain management techniques play in treating malignancy-related pain and emphasize the benefits provided by the aforementioned treatment strategies. A large proportion of cancer patients continues to struggle with an inadequately treated pain despite a strict adherence to the WHO analgesic step ladder. The previous pain treatment algorithm has been modified to include peripheral neural blockade, neuro-destructive techniques, neuromodulatory device use, and intrathecal drug delivery systems. The accumulated evidence highlights the opioid-sparing qualities and other benefits afforded by these modalities: decreasing medication-induced side effects, reducing economic burden of poor analgesia, and overall improvement in quality of life of the patients afflicted with a painful neoplastic disease. The rising prevalence of cancer-related pain syndromes is paralleled by an unmatched growth of innovative treatment strategies. Modified WHO analgesic ladder represents one of the greatest paradigm shifts within the domain of oncologic pain treatment. The cancer patient population requires a prompt and liberal, albeit judicious, delivery of unorthodox pain treatment options freed from the rigid bonds of conventional guidelines and standard practices.

  16. Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Performance of Nanosized Anatase TiO2 Doped with CdS Quantum Dots for Cancer-Cell Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangqiang Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS quantum-dots-(QDs-doped TiO2 nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using the sol-gel technique and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS, UV-Vis, and FS. They were then used as a new “photosensitizer” based on photodynamic therapy (PDT for cancer-cell treatment. The photocatalytic activities of CdS-TiO2 on leukemia tumors were investigated by using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. The ultrastructural morphology of treated cells was also studied by AFM. The experimental results indicated that an obvious inhibition of tumor growth would be observed in groups treated with CdS-TiO2 nanocomposites, and the PDT efficiency in the presence of CdS-doped TiO2 was significantly higher than that of TiO2, revealing that the photocatalytic activities of TiO2 could be effectively enhanced by the modification of CdS QDs. Additionally, CdS- TiO2 can exhibit a very high photodynamic efficiency of 80.5% at a final concentration of 200 μg/mL under visible-light irradiation. CdS-TiO2 nanocomposites in this case were regarded as a promising application for cancer-cell treatment.

  17. Palliative treatment efficacy of glucose inhibition combined with chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer with widespread bone and brain metastases: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongping; Zhang, Yaping; Mao, Xibao; Qi, Qiufeng; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Changsong; Pan, Xuefeng; Ling, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Otto Warburg observed in 1924 that cancer cells were dependent exclusively on glycolysis for the production of energy even in the presence of oxygen (the 'Warburg effect'). Consequently, cancer cells require ~19 times more glucose uptake to obtain equivalent amounts of energy as normal cells. The Warburg effect is the scientific basis for positron emission tomography (PET), which has markedly improved cancer detection. During chemotherapy, cancer cells may upregulate their expression of multi-drug resistance proteins and ultimately cause treatment failure. As multi-drug resistance proteins require energy to operate, the present report evaluated the potential clinical efficacy of lowering blood glucose with insulin during chemotherapy for a patient with advanced pulmonary adenocarcinoma with multiple metastases. A 64-year-old male was admitted to the Department of Medical Oncology at Changzhou Tumor Hospital (Changzhou, China) due to an irritating cough and multiple bone pain. PET/computed tomography (CT) with F-18 fluorodeoxy glucose (18F-FDG) identified multiple hypermetabolic foci in the right hilum, right upper lung, shoulder blades, thoracic vertebrae, lumbar, sacrum, bilateral iliac crest and pelvis. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging detected multiple metastases in the brain. The patient received 56 repeat treatments with insulin to induce hypoglycemia combined with reduced doses of chemotherapy over an 8-month period. For each treatment, insulin at 0.2 U/kg body weight was injected intravenously (i.v.), and when blood glucose level reached 2.5-3.0 mmol/l, navelbine (10 mg), cisplatin (10 mg) and fluorouracil (250 mg) were injected (i.v.) over a period of ~10 min. The patient's blood glucose level was returned to normal immediately after chemotherapy with an i.v. injection of 20 ml 50% glucose solution. During the 8-month chemotherapy regimen, the patient received two PET/CT follow-ups. The results demonstrated that the levels of 18F-FDG uptake in all

  18. Paradigm shift in cancer treatment: Cancer treatment as a metabolic disease – fusion of Eastern and Western medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Hamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current standard therapies for cancer, including surgery, anti-cancer drugs, and radiotherapy, are thought to contribute to the improvement in the survival rates of cancer patients. However, such standard therapies have 3 major problems: in advanced cancers, it is unlikely that standard cancer treatments will cure the disease; adverse side effects that accompany standard cancer treatments put many patients in distress; and a large amount of medical expenditure is required for new and expensive anti-cancer drugs. These problems may be viewed as a result of establishing treatments without any consideration regarding the root cause of the cancer. Otto Warburg suggested that particular changes in the energy metabolism of cells, which are associated with a shortage of oxygen, are the root cause of cancer. Cancer cells have unique metabolic characteristics, and thus we believe that it is important to treat cancer as a metabolic disease. More specifically, not only is it important to suppress cancer cell metabolism, but it is also important to improve the chronic inflammation that is associated with the development and progression of cancer, and to support the functions of immune cells. This type of view of cancer treatment coincides with the principles of Chinese medicine, which has a history of 4000 years, such as “fuzheng quxie” and “zhibing qiuben”, which can assist in the establishment of cancer treatments for patients. In this article, we discuss cancer treatments from the view of cancer as a metabolic disease and their association with Chinese medicine, and introduce some clinical cases along with a review of the literature.

  19. Tackling ageism in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffin, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Evidence shows that older patients are discriminated against when it comes to cancer treatment. A pilot project was commissioned by the Department of Health in partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support and Age UK. The project involved staff, including nurses, from five cancer networks in England examining ways to improve care for this patient group. Drawing on approaches used in geriatric medicine, patients' needs in accessing treatment were explored by conducting assessments and, for example, providing taxis for hospital appointments and practical support from voluntary organisations. Challenges for nurses included lack of training in patient screening and the extra workload caused by the assessments. The report on the pilot project concluded that involving elderly care specialists and using comprehensive geriatric assessments were useful approaches in the care of older cancer patients.

  20. Treatment-Related Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Trimodality Approach in Stage IIIA/N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Jeremić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While there are no established pretreatment predictive and prognostic factors in patients with stage IIIA/pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC indicating a benefit to surgery as a part of trimodality approach, little is known about treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors in this setting. A literature search was conducted to identify possible treatment-related predictive and prognostic factors for patients for whom trimodality approach was reported on. Overall survival was the primary endpoint of this study. Of 30 identified studies, there were two phase II studies, 5 “prospective” studies, and 23 retrospective studies. No study was found which specifically looked at treatment-related predictive factors of improved outcomes in trimodality treatment. Of potential treatment-related prognostic factors, the least frequently analyzed factors among 30 available studies were overall pathologic stage after preoperative treatment and UICC downstaging. Evaluation of treatment response before surgery and by pathologic tumor stage after induction therapy were analyzed in slightly more than 40% of studies and found not to influence survival. More frequently studied factors—resection status, degree of tumor regression, and pathologic nodal stage after induction therapy as well as the most frequently studied factor, the treatment (in almost 75% studies—showed no discernible impact on survival, due to conflicting results. Currently, it is impossible to identify any treatment-related predictive or prognostic factors for selecting surgery in the treatment of patients with stage IIIA/pN2 NSCLC.

  1. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Research Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Genetics ...

  2. Mortality and morbidity in two-year disease-free survivors of small cell lung cancer after treatment with combination chemotherapy with or without irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnoshi, Taisuke; Hiraki, Shunkichi; Fujii, Masafumi

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of 148 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) who had been entered into clinical trials of chemotherapy with or without thoracic and prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) between 1981 and 1987. Eighteen patients (12%) survived for 2 or more years. With a minimum follow-up of 4.5 years, 10 of the 18 patients who remained disease-free at 2 years are currently alive and free of SCLC. Seven of these 10 patients currently function as they did before diagnosis. However, three suffer from central nervous system changes of varying degrees in severity which appeared 2-3 years after PCI. Eight of the 18 patients who were disease-free at 2 years have died. Two died of isolated relapse in the brain at 3.6 and 4.2 years after initiation of chemotherapy. Five died of other malignancies while continuing their complete response to SCLC; two of non-small cell lung cancer, two of acute myelogenous leukemia, and one of hepatocellular carcinoma. Another patient died of unrelated disease without any evidence of SCLC. A small but substantial proportion of patients who underwent intensive treatment will achieve long-term survival; however, these patients remain at higher risk for second cancers and late toxicities. Therefore, attention must be directed to defining the safety way to employ such treatment in the management of SCLC. (author)

  3. The Role of Vaginal Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Surgical Stage I Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mariani, Andrea; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N. [Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The optimal adjuvant therapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I papillary serous (UPSC) or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer is unknown. We report on the largest single-institution experience using adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) for surgically staged women with FIGO stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1998-2011, 103 women with FIGO 2009 stage I UPSC (n=74), CC (n=21), or mixed UPSC/CC (n=8) endometrial cancer underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by adjuvant high-dose-rate VBT. Nearly all patients (n=98, 95%) also underwent extended lymph node dissection of pelvic and paraortic lymph nodes. All VBT was performed with a vaginal cylinder, treating to a dose of 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Thirty-five patients (34%) also received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 1-146 months), 2 patients had experienced vaginal recurrence, and the 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate of vaginal recurrence was 3%. The rates of isolated pelvic recurrence, locoregional recurrence (vaginal + pelvic), and extrapelvic recurrence (including intraabdominal) were similarly low, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 4%, 7%, and 10%, respectively. The estimated 5-year overall survival was 84%. On univariate analysis, delivery of chemotherapy did not affect recurrence or survival. Conclusions: VBT is effective at preventing vaginal relapse in women with surgical stage I UPSC or CC endometrial cancer. In this cohort of patients who underwent comprehensive surgical staging, the risk of isolated pelvic or extrapelvic relapse was low, implying that more extensive adjuvant radiation therapy is likely unnecessary.

  4. Implications of MicroRNAs in the Treatment of Gefitinib-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Sin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents about 85% of the reported cases of lung cancer. Acquired resistance to targeted therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, such as gefitinib, is not uncommon. It is thus vital to explore novel strategies to restore sensitivity to gefitinib. Provided that microRNAs (miRNAs negatively regulate their gene targets at the transcriptional level, it is speculated that miRNA mimetics may reduce the expression, activity and signal transduction of EGFR so that sensitization of tumour sites to gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity can be achieved. Indeed, a growing body of evidence has shown that the manipulation of endogenous levels of miRNA not only attenuates the EGFR/PI3K/Akt phosphorylation cascade, but also restores apoptotic cell death in in vitro models of experimentally-induced gefitinib resistance and provoked tumour regression/shrinkage in xenograft models. These data are in concordant with the clinical data showing that the differential expression profiles of miRNA in tumour tissues and blood associate strongly with drug response and overall survival. Furthermore, another line of studies indicate that the chemopreventive effects of a variety of natural compounds may involve miRNAs. The present review aims to discuss the therapeutic capacity of miRNAs in relation to recent discoveries on EGFR-TKI resistance, including chronic drug exposure and mutations.

  5. Non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) using a new image-guided, enzyme-targeted, and breast cancer stem cell targeted radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for patients with stage I or II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Tadokoro, Michiko

    2012-01-01

    Tumor tissue can be re-oxygenated by inactivating peroxidase/catalase in the tumor tissue through application of hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide in turn is then degraded to produce oxygen. In this way, low-LET (linear energy transfer) radioresistant tumors can be transformed into radiosensitive ones (Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 12: 453-458, 845-850, 2003, Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 14: 397-403, 2004, Kariya S, et al: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 75: 449-454, 2009). The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by utilizing a novel Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II) radiosensitization treatment. KORTUC I was shown to remarkably enhance radiotherapeutic effects in various types of superficially exposed and locally advanced neoplasms (Ogawa Y, et al: Oncol Rep 19: 1389-1394, 2008). Based on clinical experiences using KORTUC I, a new radiosensitizing agent containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate has been developed for intra-tumoral injection in various tumors which are not superficially exposed. The agent is composed of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (CD44 molecule). Sodium hyaluronate mixed with hydrogen peroxide attaches to CD44-positive tumor cells, which are generally reported to be breast cancer stem cells. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for treatment of advanced skin cancer (including malignant melanoma), bone/soft tissue malignant neoplasm, breast cancer and metastatic lymph node. A total of 39 early stage breast cancer patients (stage I: 12 patients and stage II: 27) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial upon fully informed consent. Mean age of the patients was 61.1 years old. All 39 patients were unable or unwilling to undergo surgery and therefore undertook non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by KORTUC II. A maximum of 6 ml of the agent was

  6. Treatment planning with intensity modulated particle therapy for multiple targets in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderle, Kristjan; Stroom, Joep; Vieira, Sandra; Pimentel, Nuno; Greco, Carlo; Durante, Marco; Graeff, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) can produce highly conformal plans, but is limited in advanced lung cancer patients with multiple lesions due to motion and planning complexity. A 4D IMPT optimization including all motion states was expanded to include multiple targets, where each target (isocenter) is designated to specific field(s). Furthermore, to achieve stereotactic treatment planning objectives, target and OAR weights plus objective doses were automatically iteratively adapted. Finally, 4D doses were calculated for different motion scenarios. The results from our algorithm were compared to clinical stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) plans. The study included eight patients with 24 lesions in total. Intended dose regimen for SBRT was 24 Gy in one fraction, but lower fractionated doses had to be delivered in three cases due to OAR constraints or failed plan quality assurance. The resulting IMPT treatment plans had no significant difference in target coverage compared to SBRT treatment plans. Average maximum point dose and dose to specific volume in OARs were on average 65% and 22% smaller with IMPT. IMPT could also deliver 24 Gy in one fraction in a patient where SBRT was limited due to the OAR vicinity. The developed algorithm shows the potential of IMPT in treatment of multiple moving targets in a complex geometry.

  7. The impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients: the key to improve patient treatment strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretas, Gustavo Oliveira; Guedes, Juliana Barroso; Carvalho, Fernanda Monteiro Castro; Viana, Marcelo; Amaral, Nilson; Lewer, Marcelo Mamede; Elcordis Centro de Diagnosticos Ltda., Contagem, MG; Fundacao Hospitalar do Estado de Minas Gerais; Hospital Julia Kubistchek, Cirurgia Toracica, Belo Horizonte, MG; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer leads the cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women around the world. The most common is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for NSCLC. The positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) can provide molecular and metabolic information, which acquired simultaneously with computed tomography (CT), has proved to be a very useful tool in the cancer diagnosis and staging. Identifying the stage of lung cancer is important to avoid unnecessary surgeries, reducing morbidity and treatment costs. This study aims to examine the impact of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation of patients with NSCLC in the Brazilian reality. Twenty-six patients with histopathologic diagnosis of NSCLC were included. They underwent staging in two separated moments: first with morphological images (x-ray and computed tomography scan) and after with 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The performance of 18 F-FDG PET/CT changed lymph node staging in around 30% of the patients initially classified as potentially operable, with high sensitivity and negative predictive values. Regarding the stage of metastasis, 18 F-FDG PET/CT increased by 11.5% the detection of metastasis not previously detected. About the clinical staging, using the 1 '8F-FDG PET/CT significantly reduced the number of patients classified as potentially operable in the early stages, avoiding the use of unnecessary thoracotomies in 19.2% of patients. The metabolic information obtained by 18 F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated better accuracy when compared to anatomic methods in the detection of lymph node and distant metastases. Thus, having important impact on therapeutic strategy and treatment cost related. (author)

  8. Medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad M. Zlatić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a review of highly developed medicinal usages of plants in the treatment of cancer. In the last decades, the cancer treatment has been included in this range of plant use, due to plant active substances. Active substances or secondary metabolites are generally known for their widespread application. When it comes to the cancer treatment, these substances affect the uncontrolled cell division. Therefore, the plants which are the source of these substances are proved to be irreplaceable in this field of medicine. This paper deals with some of the most significant plants well known for their multiple aspects of beneficial medicinal influence. The group of the plants described is comprised of the following species: Taxus brevifolia (Taxaceae, Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae, Podophyllum peltatum (Berberidaceae, Camptotheca accuminata (Cornaceae, and Cephalotaxus harringtonia (Cephalotaxaceae. The comprehensive description of the plants in this paper includes the morphological characteristics, the features and the representation of the molecular structures of active substances, the particular influence that these active substances have and the general importance of the substances as seen from the aspect of cancer treatment mostly with reference to the impacts on cell cycle.

  9. Outcome of Treatment of Human HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells With Roscovitine Strongly Depends on the Dosage and Cell Cycle Status Prior to the Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wesierska-Gadek, J.; Borza, A.; Walzi, E.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Maurer, M.; Komina, O.; Wandl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2009), s. 937-955 ISSN 0730-2312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : APOPTOSIS * CELL CYCLE ARREST * CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.935, year: 2009

  10. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  11. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  12. "It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be": a qualitative study of early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sara E; Thomas, Charles R; Deffebach, Mark E; Sukumar, Mithran S; Schipper, Paul H; Tieu, Brandon H; Kee, Andrew Y; Tsen, Andrew C; Slatore, Christopher G

    2017-11-29

    While surgical resection is recommended for most patients with early stage lung cancer, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly utilized. Provider-patient communication regarding risks/benefits of each approach may be a modifiable factor leading to improved patient-centered outcomes. Our objective was to determine a framework and recommended strategies on how to best communicate with patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the post-treatment setting. We qualitatively evaluated the experiences of 11 patients with early clinical stage NSCLC after treatment, with a focus on treatment experience, knowledge obtained, communication, and recommendations. We used conventional content analysis and a patient-centered communication theoretical model to guide our understanding. Five patients received surgery and six received SBRT. Both treatments were generally well-tolerated. Few participants reported communication deficits around receiving follow-up information, although several had remaining questions about their treatment outcome (mainly those who underwent SBRT). They described feeling anxious regarding their first surveillance CT scan and clinician visit. Overall, participants remained satisfied with care because of implicit trust in their clinicians rather than explicit communication. Communication gaps remain but may be addressed by a trusting relationship with the clinician. Patients recommend clinicians give thorough explanations and personalize when possible.

  13. Impact of age and comorbidity on treatment of non-small cell lung cancer recurrence following complete resection: A nationally representative cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Melisa L.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Stukenborg, George J.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Amato-Martz, Carla; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Chang, George J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Winchester, David P.; McKellar, Daniel P.; Walter, Louise C.; Kozower, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Older patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are less likely to receive guideline-recommended treatment at diagnosis, independent of comorbidity. However, national data on treatment of postoperative recurrence are limited. We evaluated the associations between age, comorbidity, and other patient factors and treatment of postoperative NSCLC recurrence in a national cohort. Materials and Methods We randomly selected 9,001 patients with surgically resected stage I-III NSCLC in 2006–2007 from the National Cancer Data Base. Patients were followed for 5 years or until first NSCLC recurrence, new primary cancer, or death, whichever came first. Perioperative comorbidities, first recurrence, treatment of recurrence, and survival were abstracted from medical records and merged with existing registry data. Factors associated with active treatment (chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery) versus supportive care only were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Results Median age at initial diagnosis was 67; 69.7% had ≥1 comorbidity. At 5-year follow-up, 12.3% developed locoregional and 21.5% developed distant recurrence. Among patients with locoregional recurrence, 79.5% received active treatment. Older patients (OR 0.49 for age ≥75 compared with <55; 95% CI 0.27–0.88) and those with substance abuse (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.23–0.81) were less likely to receive active treatment. Women (OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.43–0.89) and patients with symptomatic recurrence (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.47–0.99) were also less likely to receive active treatment. Among those with distant recurrence, 77.3% received active treatment. Older patients (OR 0.42 for age ≥75 compared with <55; 95% CI 0.26–0.68) and those with any documented comorbidities (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.38–0.89) were less likely to receive active treatment. Conclusion Older patients independent of comorbidity, patients with substance abuse, and women were less likely to receive active treatment for

  14. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  15. Small interfering RNA targeting S100A4 sensitizes non-small-cell lung cancer cells (A549) to radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ruixue; Qiao, Tiankui; Zhuang, Xibing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of S100A4-small interfering RNA (S100A4-siRNA) on apoptosis and enhanced radiosensitivity in non-small-cell lung cancer (A549) cells. We also explored the mechanisms of radiosensitization and identified a new target to enhance radiosensitivity and gene therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. RNA interference is a powerful tool for gene silencing. In this study, we constructed an effective siRNA to knock down S100A4. A549 cells were randomly divided into three groups: blank, negative control, and S100A4-siRNA. To investigate the effect of S100A4-siRNA, the expression of S100A4, E-cadherin, and p53 proteins and their messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected by Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Transwell chambers were used to assess cell invasion. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Radiosensitivity was determined by colony formation ability. Our results demonstrate that S100A4-siRNA effectively silenced the S100A4 gene. When siRNA against S100A4 was used, S100A4 protein expression was downregulated, whereas the expressions of E-cadherin and p53 were upregulated. In addition, a clear reduction in S100A4 mRNA levels was noted compared with the blank and negative control groups, whereas E-cadherin and p53 mRNA levels increased. Transfection with S100A4-siRNA significantly reduced the invasiveness of A549 cells. S100A4 silencing induced immediate G2/M arrest in cell cycle studies and increased apoptosis rates in A549 cells. In clonogenic assays, we used a multitarget, single-hit model to detect radiosensitivity after S100A4 knockdown. All parameters (D0, Dq, α, β) indicated that the downregulation of S100A4 enhanced radiosensitivity in A549 cells. Furthermore, S100A4-siRNA upregulated p53 expression, suggesting that S100A4 may promote A549 cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis by regulating the expression of other proteins. Therefore, siRNA-directed S100A4 knockdown may

  16. Engineering of DNA templated tri-functional nano-chain of Fecore–Aushell and a preliminary study for cancer cell labeling and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Mandal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Here DNA has been used as templating and self-assembling reagent to grow the chain like nanostructure. We have designed the composite in such a fashion that we obtained optical and magnetic properties together in a single biological material. Optical properties characterized by UV–visible absorption, Circular Dichroism (CD and their analysis show no denaturization of DNA. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM indicate formation of chain like structure of the nanoparticles. Particles were functionalized with folic acid for labeling and treatment of cancer cell.

  17. Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Erlotinib following Gefitinib-Induced Hepatotoxicity: Review of 8 Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gefitinib often induces liver damage. A few reports have described that the subsequent administration of erlotinib was associated with less hepatotoxicity, but the safety and efficacy of this treatment are still not fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated retrospectively the patients with erlotinib following gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods and Patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records between December 2007 and March 2010. The patients were evaluated including the following information: age, gender, histology of lung cancer, performance status, smoking status, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status, liver metastasis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver injury, clinical response, and hepatotoxicity due to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results. We identified 8 patients with erlotinib following gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity. All achieved disease control by gefitinib. Hepatotoxicity was grades 2 and 3 in 3 and 5 patients, respectively. The median duration of treatment with gefitinib was 112.5 days and the median time to gefitinib-induced hepatotoxicity was 51.5 days. The median duration of treatment with erlotinib was 171.5 days. Grade 1 and 2 erlotinib-induced hepatotoxicity was observed in 2 and 1 patient, respectively. Conclusions. Erlotinib administration with careful monitoring is thought to be a good alternative strategy for patients who respond well to gefitinib treatment but experience hepatotoxicity.

  18. Pre-Treatment of Platinum Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells with an MMP-9/MMP-2 Inhibitor Prior to Cisplatin Enhances Cytotoxicity as Determined by High Content Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. O'Leary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer. We previously identified matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 as a potential therapeutic target of chemoresistant disease. A2780cis (cisplatin-resistant and A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used. The cytotoxic effect of MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor, (2R-2-[(4-Biphenylsulfonyl amino]-3 phenylpropionic acid (C21H19NO4S alone or in combination with cisplatin was determined using high content screening. Protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Co-incubation of cisplatin and an MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor, (2R-2-[(4-Biphenylsulfonyl amino]-3 phenylpropionic acid (C21H19NO4S resulted in significantly greater cytotoxicity as compared to either treatment alone in a cisplatin resistant MMP-9 overexpressing cell line; A2780cis. In addition, pre-incubating with MMP-9i prior to cisplatin further enhances the cytotoxic effect. No significant difference was observed in MMP-9 protein in tissue but a trend towards increased MMP-9 was observed in recurrent serum. We propose that MMP-9/MMP-2i may be utilized in the treatment of recurrent/chemoresistant ovarian cancers that overexpress MMP-9 mRNA but its role in vivo remains to be evaluated.

  19. Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Perica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT. Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  20. Treatment Results for Supraglottic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun

    1994-01-01

    Purpose: In supraglottic cancer, radiation therapy is used to preserve the laryngeal function but combined surgery and radiation therapy is required in advanced stage. The authors present the results of radiation therapy alone and combined surgery plus postoperative radiation therapy for supraglottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was done for 43 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the supraglottic larynx who were treated from February 1982 to December 1991, in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Hospital. Patient distribution according to the AJCC staging system was as follows; I, 3(7.0%); II, 7(16.3%); III, 17(39.5%); IV, 16(37.2%). Patients' age ranged from 30 to 72 years(median 62). Follow up durations were from 21 to 137 months(median 27). Seventeen patients(39.5%) were treated by radiation therapy alone with radiation doses of 6840-7380 cGy and 26 patients(60.5%) were treated with surgery plus postoperative irradiation with doses of 5820-6660 cGy. Results: Overall five-year survival rate for all stage was 51.8%, with 100% for Stage I and II, 47.3% for Stage III, and 29.2% for Stage IV. The difference of the survival rate by stage was statistically significant(p=0.0152). Five-year survival rates were 100% for locally confined tumor in the supraglottic larynx, 37.5% for transglottic extension, 26.7% for hypopharynx extension, and only two of 5 patients with both transglottic and hypopharynx extension were alive(p=0.0033). Five-year survival rates by neck node status were as follows: 55.0% for N0, 64.3% for N1, 50.0% for N2, and all 2 of N3 were died of disease. Overall survival rate for radiation therapy alone group was 42.8% and it was 56.7% for surgery plus postoperative radiation therapy group with no statistically significant difference(p=0.5215). In Stage I and II, all patients survived. In Stage III and IV, 5-year survival rate for radiation therapy alone group was 28.5% and 43.4% for surgery plus

  1. The role of maintenance therapy in the treatment of elderly non-small-cell lung cancer patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liangzhe Zhang, Shugeng Gao, Jie He Department of Thoracic Surgery, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China Purpose: Maintenance therapy is an effective treatment strategy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We aim to investigate whether age would affect the efficacy of maintenance therapy in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Materials and methods: Relevant trials were identified by searching electronic databases and conference meetings. Prospective randomized controlled trials assessing maintenance therapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC were included. Outcomes of interest included overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. Results: A total of 2,724 patients from 5 randomized controlled trials were included for analysis, with 897 patients aged ≥65 years and 1,577 patients aged <65 years. Single-agent maintenance therapy in elderly patients significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.65, 95% CI: 0.43–0.98, p=0.04 and OS (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68–0.97, p=0.024 when compared with placebo. In addition, doublet maintenance therapy significantly improved PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68–0.97, p=0.024 in comparison with single-agent maintenance therapy. However, doublet maintenance did not improve OS in comparison with single-agent maintenance therapy (HR 1.05, 95% CI: 0.60–1.83, p=0.86. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that single-agent maintenance therapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC offers an improved PFS and OS when compared with placebo. Further trials are recommended to clearly investigate the efficacy of combination maintenance therapy for advanced NSCLC in this setting. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, maintenance therapy, elderly, meta-analysis, lung neoplasm, older, systematic review

  2. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  3. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  5. Fatal Necrotizing Encephalopathy after Treatment with Nivolumab for Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Leitinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors are antibodies, which enhance cellular and humoral immune responses and are approved for the treatment of various tumors. Immune-related adverse events (irAE involving different organs and systems are, however, among the side-effects. Recent reports of severe persistent neurological deficits and even fatal cases underpin the need for better understanding of the exact pathomechanisms of central nervous system (CNS toxicity. To our knowledge, we report the first biopsy-proven case of fatal necrotizing encephalopathy after treatment with nivolumab. Nivolumab targets the immune-check point inhibitor programmed cell death-1 and was used for squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Partly reversible neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were observed after the first course. Neurological symptoms progressed and recurrent seizures developed after the second course. Brain MRI disclosed multiple edematous and confluent supra- and infratentorial lesions, partly with contrast-enhancement. We excluded autoimmune and paraneoplastic causes and performed ancillary investigations to rule out common and opportunistic infections. Eventually, postmortem histopathological analysis of the brain revealed a necrotizing process, which contrasts previous cases reporting parenchymal immune cell infiltration or demyelination. Appropriate diagnostic pathways and treatment algorithms need to be implemented for the work-up of CNS toxicity and irAEs related to immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment.

  6. Immuno Nanoparticles Integrated Electrical Control of Targeted Cancer Cell Development Using Whole Cell Bioelectronic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Chengxiao; Chen, Chunying; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Electrical properties of cells determine most of the cellular functions, particularly ones which occur in the cell's membrane. Manipulation of these electrical properties may provide a powerful electrotherapy option for the treatment of cancer as cancerous cells have been shown to be more electronegative than normal proliferating cells. Previously, we used an electrical impedance sensing system (EIS) to explore the responses of cancerous SKOV3 cells and normal HUVEC cells to low intensity (electrotherapy for clinical and drug delivery applications. PMID:25057316

  7. Struggling with cancer and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, L; Andersen, C; Midtgaard, J

    2009-01-01

    Cancer and treatment can negatively affect the body's performance and appearance. Exercise has been tested in a few studies for altered body image among middle-aged women with breast cancer. The aim of the study was to explore how young pre-cancer athletes of both genders experience disease...... patients (median age 28 years). The young athletes experienced a change from a high level of physical activity, body satisfaction and a positive self-identity to a low level of physical activity, body denial and a negative self-identity. In the program, the patients experienced increased physical strength...... and self-identity. This should be taken into account when designing programs to rehabilitate and encourage these patients through the often-strenuous antineoplastic treatments....

  8. Targeted treatment of mutated EGFR-expressing non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on erlotinib with companion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Deeper understanding of the pathobiology of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has led to the development of small molecules that target genetic mutations known to play critical roles in the progression to metastatic disease. The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in 15%–20% of lung adenocarcinomas and the associated response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors have provided a successful avenue of attack in late-stage adenocarcinomas. Use of the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib is limited to patients who have adenocarcinomas with known activating EGFR mutations. However, the EGFR mutation testing landscape is varied and includes many screening and targeted methods, each with its own benefits and limitations. These tests can simplify the drug discovery process, make clinical trials more efficient and informative, and individualize cancer therapy. In practice, the choice of method should be determined by the nature of the sample to be tested, the testing laboratory’s expertise and access to equipment, and whether the detection of only known activating EGFR mutations, or of all possible mutations, is required. Development of companion diagnostic tests for this identification is advancing; nevertheless, the use of such tests merits greater attention. PMID:28210145

  9. Long-term ethanol exposure causes human liver cancer cells to become resistant to mitomycin C treatment through the inactivation of bad-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Shui; Lee, Yi-Ru; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Wang, Ying-Jan; Lee, Chia-Hwa; Chen, Li-Ching; Chang, Hui-Wen; Chang, Chien-Hsi; Chih-Ming, Su; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Ho, Yuan-Soon

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether long-term ethanol consumption confers therapeutic resistance to human liver cancer patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Chronic ethanol-treated cells were established by consecutively culturing a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep 3B, which contains integrated HBV sequences, for 20-40 passages with or without 10 mM ethanol (designated as E20-E40 and C20-C40, respectively). Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that a growth promoting effect of long-term ethanol treatment was induced in the E40 cells through preferential acceleration of S-phase in these cells. Lower protein expression levels of p16, p21/Cip1, and p27/Kip1 were detected in the ethanol-treated E40 cells. We further demonstrated that long-term ethanol-treated E40 cells develop drug resistance in response to mitomycin C (MMC) treatment (>8 microM). Immunoblot analysis revealed that caspase-8-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic signals (such as Bad) were inactivated in the MMC-resistant E40 cells. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the sequestration of phosphorylated Bad (Ser-112) through its binding with 14-3-3 was detected more profoundly in the MMC-resistant E40 cells. Next, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of MMC (10 mg MMC/kg body weight, three times per week) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing E40- and C40-xenografted tumors. Significant reductions (>3-fold) in tumor growth were detected in MMC-treated C40-xenografted mice. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that AKT- and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated survival factors inhibited the Bad-induced mitochondrial apoptotic signals that were involved in E40 tumor cells and that conferred resistance to MMC. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells with emphasis on thyroid cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHombach-Klonisch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance to anti-cancer treatments are common and main causes of death in cancer patients. Tumor cells mount complex and still poorly understood molecular defense mechanisms to counteract and evade oxygen deprivation, nutritional restrictions as well as radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens aimed at destabilizing their genomes and important cellular processes. In thyroid cancer, as in other tumors, such defense strategies include the reactivation in cancer cells of early developmental programs normally active exclusively in stem cells, the stimulation of cancer stem-like cells resident within the tumor tissue and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived progenitors into the tumor (Thomas et al., 2008;Klonisch et al., 2009;Derwahl, 2011. Metastasis and therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells involves the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition- (EMT- mediated enhancement in cellular plasticity, which includes coordinated dynamic biochemical and nuclear changes (Ahmed et al., 2010. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of the role of DNA repair mechanisms contributing to therapeutic resistance in thyroid cancer and highlight the emerging roles of autophagy and damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP responses in EMT and chemoresistance in tumor cells. Finally, we use the stem cell factor and nucleoprotein High Mobility Group A2 (HMGA2 as an example to demonstrate how factors intended to protect stem cells are wielded by cancer (stem cells to gain increased transformative cell plasticity which enhances metastasis, therapeutic resistance and cell survival. Wherever possible, we have included information on these cellular processes and associated factors as they relate to thyroid cancer cells.

  11. Cross-market cost-effectiveness analysis of erlotinib as first-line maintenance treatment for patients with stable non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnenègre A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alain Vergnenègre1, Joshua A Ray2, Christos Chouaid3, Francesco Grossi4, Helge G Bischoff5, David F Heigener6, Stefan Walzer21Department of Pneumology, Hôpital du Cluzeau, Limoges, France; 2Global Health Economics and Strategic Pricing, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland; 3Respiratory Service, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France; 4Lung Cancer Unit, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy; 5Thoracic Oncology, Onkologie Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 6Department of Thoracic Oncology, Krankenhaus Großhansdorf, Großhansdorf, GermanyBackground: Platinum-doublet, first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited to 4–6 cycles. An alternative strategy used to prolong the duration of first-line treatment and extend survival in metastatic NSCLC is first-line maintenance therapy. Erlotinib was approved for first-line maintenance in a stable disease population following results from a randomized, controlled Phase III trial comparing erlotinib with best supportive care. We aimed to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of erlotinib 150 mg/day versus best supportive care when used as first-line maintenance therapy for patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC and stable disease.Methods: An economic decision model was developed using patient-level data for progression-free survival and overall survival from the SATURN (SequentiAl Tarceva in UnResectable NSCLC study. An area under the curve model was developed; all patients entered the model in the progression-free survival health state and, after each month, moved to progression or death. A time horizon of 5 years was used. The model was conducted from the perspective of national health care payers in France, Germany, and Italy. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results: Treatment with erlotinib in first-line maintenance resulted in a mean life expectancy of 1.39 years in all countries

  12. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. SU-F-R-54: CT-Texture Based Early Tumor Treatment Response Assessment During Radiation Therapy Delivery: Small Cell Versus Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J; Gore, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor treatment response may potentially be assessed during radiation therapy (RT) by analyzing changes in CT-textures. We investigated the different early RT-responses between small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as assessed by CT-texture. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during routine CT-guided RT using a CT-on-Rails for 13-NSCLC and 5-SCLC patients were analyzed. These patient had ages ranging from 45–78 and 38–63 years, respectively, for NSCLC and SCLC groups, and tumor-stages ranging from T2-T4, and were treated with either RT or chemotherapy and RT with 45–66Gy/ 20–34 fractions. Gross-tumor volume (GTV) contour was generated on each daily CT by populating GTV contour from simulation to daily CTs with manual editing if necessary. CT-texture parameters, such as Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and short-run high-gray level emphasis (SRHGLE), were calculated in GTV from each daily CT-set using an in house software tool. Difference in changes of these texture parameters during RT between NSCLC and SCLC was analyzed and compared with GTV volume changes. Results: Radiation-induced changes in CT-texture were different between SCLC and NSCLC. Average changes from first to the last fractions for NSCLC and SCLC in GTV were 28±10(12–44) and 30±15(11–47) HU (mean HU reduction), 12.7% and 18.3% (entropy), 50% and 55% (SRHGLE), 19% and 22% (kurtosis), and 5.2% and 22% (skewness), respectively. Good correlation in kurtosis changes and GTV was seen (R{sup 2}=0.8923) for SCLC, but not for NSCLC (R{sup 2}=0.4748). SCLC had better correlations between GTV volume reduction and entropy (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.847; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.6485), skewness (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.935; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.7666), or SRHGLE (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.9619; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.787). Conclusion: NSCLC and SCLC exhibited different early RT-responses as assessed by CT-texture changes during RT-delivery. The observed larger changes in

  14. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells. It is therefore mandatory to explore if these important molecules for T cell cytotoxicity are expressed by cancer target cells. We have indications that different types of immunotherapy can modify the tumor microenvironment and up-regulate reduced HLA class I expression in cancer cells but only if the associated molecular mechanisms is reversible (soft). However, in case of structural (hard) aberrations causing HLA class I loss, tumor cells will not be able to recover HLA class I expression and as a consequence will escape T-cell lysis and continue to growth. Characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the lack or downregulation of HLA class I expression, seems to be a crucial step predicting clinical responses to T cell mediated immunotherapy, and possibly aid the

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Radical hysterectomy : Surgery ... tubes. Pelvic exenteration : Surgery to remove the lower colon , ... Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or ...

  16. Development of cancer treatment guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krystyna Kiel

    2011-05-26

    May 26, 2011 ... Development of cancer treatment guidelines. Krystyna Kiel *. Rush University Medical Center and Rush University Medical School, Chicago, IL, USA. Received 3 December 2010; accepted 5 January 2011 ... doi:10.1016/j.ajme.2011.01.002. Production and hosting by Elsevier. Alexandria Journal of ...

  17. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P

    2014-12-18

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to be a major cause of cancer recurrence, respond to these variations. Here, in vitro environmental perturbations designed to mimic different aspects of the in vivo environment were used to characterize how an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived, isogenic cancer stem cells metabolically respond to environmental cues. Mass spectrometry was used to profile metabolite levels in response to in vitro environmental perturbations. Docetaxel, the chemotherapeutic used for this experiment, caused significant metabolic changes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism in ovarian cancer cells, but had virtually no metabolic effect on isogenic ovarian cancer stem cells. Glucose deprivation, hypoxia, and the combination thereof altered ovarian cancer cell and cancer stem cell metabolism to varying extents for the two cell types. Hypoxia had a much larger effect on ovarian cancer cell metabolism, while glucose deprivation had a greater effect on ovarian cancer stem cell metabolism. Core metabolites and pathways affected by these perturbations were identified, along with pathways that were unique to cell types or perturbations. The metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived isogenic cancer stem cells differ greatly under most conditions, suggesting that these two cell types may behave quite differently in an in vivo tumor microenvironment. While cancer metabolism and cancer stem cells are each promising potential therapeutic targets, such varied behaviors in vivo would need to

  18. Inhalable oridonin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolicacid large porous microparticles for in situ treatment of primary non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifei Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers. Traditional chemotherapy for this disease leads to serious side effects. Here we prepared an inhalable oridonin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolicacid (PLGA large porous microparticle (LPMP for in situ treatment of NSCLC with the emulsion/solvent evaporation/freeze-drying method. The LPMPs were smooth spheres with many internal pores. Despite a geometric diameter of ~10 µm, the aerodynamic diameter of the spheres was only 2.72 µm, leading to highly efficient lung deposition. In vitro studies showed that most of oridonin was released after 1 h, whereas the alveolar macrophage uptake of LPMPs occurred after 8 h, so that most of oridonin would enter the surroundings without undergoing phagocytosis. Rat primary NSCLC models were built and administered with saline, oridonin powder, gemcitabine, and oridonin-loaded LPMPs via airway, respectively. The LPMPs showed strong anticancer effects. Oridonin showed strong angiogenesis inhibition and apoptosis. Relevant mechanisms are thought to include oridonin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by low mitochondrial membrane potentials, downregulation of BCL-2 expressions, upregulation of expressions of BAX, caspase-3 and caspase-9. The oridonin-loaded PLGA LPMPs showed high anti-NSCLC effects after pulmonary delivery. In conclusion, LPMPs are promising dry powder inhalations for in situ treatment of lung cancer.

  19. Concise Review: Cancer Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Influence in Cancer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaccio, Federica; Paino, Francesca; Regad, Tarik; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tumors are composed of different types of cancer cells that contribute to tumor heterogeneity. Among these populations of cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in cancer initiation and progression. Like their stem cells counterpart, CSCs are also characterized by self‐renewal and the capacity to differentiate. A particular population of CSCs is constituted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that differentiate into cells of mesodermal characteristics. Several studies have reported the potential pro‐or anti‐tumorigenic influence of MSCs on tumor initiation and progression. In fact, MSCs are recruited to the site of wound healing to repair damaged tissues, an event that is also associated with tumorigenesis. In other cases, resident or migrating MSCs can favor tumor angiogenesis and increase tumor aggressiveness. This interplay between MSCs and cancer cells is fundamental for cancerogenesis, progression, and metastasis. Therefore, an interesting topic is the relationship between cancer cells, CSCs, and MSCs, since contrasting reports about their respective influences have been reported. In this review, we discuss recent findings related to conflicting results on the influence of normal and CSCs in cancer development. The understanding of the role of MSCs in cancer is also important in cancer management. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2115–2125 PMID:29072369

  20. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Predictive Biomarkers in the Treatment of Non- Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinton, Cindy [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ellis, Peter M., E-mail: peter.ellis@jcc.hhsc.ca [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, McMaster University Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to improvements in patient survival and quality of life. It is unclear whether molecular abnormalities associated with NSCLC cell survival, growth and proliferation are useful in predicting treatment benefit. We conducted a systematic review to establish which biomarkers contribute meaningfully to the management of NSCLC. A team of researchers searched PubMed and conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, IASLC, USCAP) using MESH terms for NSCLC and randomized trials (RCT), plus keywords for variables of interest. Evidence from multiple RCTs confirmed that histologic subtype is prognostic for survival and predictive of treatment efficacy and/or toxicity in NSCLC. Likewise, activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC and should be assessed routinely. No biomarkers to date reliably predict response to anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapies. There are inconsistent data on the role of ERCC1, BRCA, Beta tubulin III, RRM1, K-RAS, or TP-53 in treatment decisions. These tests should not be routinely used in selecting treatment at this time, whereas EML4/ALK translocations predict responses to specific targeted agents, the optimal assessment of this molecular abnormality has yet to be established. Personalized care of patients with NSCLC based on biomarkers is increasingly important to both clinical practice and research.

  1. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  2. Hormophysa triquerta polyphenol, an elixir that deters CXCR4- and COX2-dependent dissemination destiny of treatment-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindan, Sheeja; Ramraj, Satishkumar; Kandasamy, Kathiresan; Thirugnanasambandan, Somasundaram S; Somasundaram, Dinesh Babu; Herman, Terence S; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2017-01-24

    Therapy-resistant pancreatic cancer (PC) cells play a crucial role in tumor relapse, recurrence, and metastasis. Recently, we showed the anti-PC potential of an array of seaweed polyphenols and identified efficient drug deliverables. Herein, we investigated the benefit of one such deliverable, Hormophysa triquerta polyphenol (HT-EA), in regulating the dissemination physiognomy of therapy-resistant PC cells in vitro,and residual PC in vivo. Human PC cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), with/without HT-EA pre-treatment were examined for the alterations in the tumor invasion/metastasis (TIM) transcriptome (93 genes, QPCR-profiling). Utilizing a mouse model of residual PC, we investigated the benefit of HT-EA in the translation regulation of crucial TIM targets (TMA-IHC). Radiation activated 30, 50, 15, and 38 TIM molecules in surviving Panc-1, Panc-3.27, BxPC3, and MiaPaCa-2 cells. Of these, 15, 44, 12, and 26 molecules were suppressed with HT-EA pre-treatment. CXCR4 and COX2 exhibited cell-line-independent increases after IR, and was completely suppressed with HT-EA, across all PC cells. HT-EA treatment resulted in translational repression of IR-induced CXCR4, COX2, β-catenin, MMP9, Ki-67, BAPX, PhPT-1, MEGF10, and GRB10 in residual PC. Muting CXCR4 or COX2 regulated the migration/invasion potential of IR-surviving cells, while forced expression of CXCR4 or COX2 significantly increased migration/invasion capabilities of PC cells. Further, treatment with HT-EA significantly inhibited IR-induced and CXCR4/COX2 forced expression-induced PC cell migration/invasion. This study (i) documents the TIM blueprint in therapy-resistant PC cells, (ii) defines the role of CXCR4 and COX2 in induced metastatic potential, and (iii) recognizes the potential of HT-EA in deterring the CXCR4/COX2-dependent dissemination destiny of therapy-resistant residual PC cells.

  3. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    killing ovarian cancer cells in vitro. This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main...This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main activities and objectives completed to date...What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?  Now that the basic groundwork for the experimental assays has

  4. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Rebecca SY

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects.

  5. Personalized nanomedicine: future medicine for cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiekh FA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Farooq A ShiekhAvalon University School of Medicine, Willemstad, CuracaoCancer as a grave disease is becoming a larger health problem,1 and the medicines used as treatments have clear limitations.2–4 Chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, all of which are drastic treatments, wreak havoc on healthy cells and tissues as well as cancerous ones.5–7 Pathophysiologically, there are more than 200 types of cancers,8,9 each with many variants.10 Some are aggressive, some are not; some are easily treated, and others are always fatal.11Unlike previous "revolutions" in the "war" on cancer that raised hope, nanomedicine is not just one more tool, it is an entire field, and the science in this area is burgeoning, and benefiting from use of modern cutting edge molecular tools.12–14 These breakthrough advancements have radically changed the perception of future medicine. Importantly, they are enabling landmark research to combine all advances, creating nanosized particles that contain drugs targeting cell surface receptors and other potent molecules designed to kill cancerous cells.15–19 If there is a case to be made for personalized medicine, cancer is it. For example, the current literature reveals the need for a great scientific effort to be made in this field.20–22 However, new paradigms are needed to interpret toxicogenomic and nanotoxicological data in order to predict drug toxicities and gain a more indepth understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity, so that more specific therapeutic targets which are essentially devoid of side effects could be selected.23,24

  6. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of funda