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Sample records for cell cancer treatment

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  3. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  4. Metastatic renal cell cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, C N

    2003-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been considered to be resistant to chemotherapy, with responses observed in only limited numbers of patients. For this reason, therapeutic options have ranged from no treatment, to immunotherapy with cytokines such as IL-2 and interferon-alpha, chemotherapy alone or in combination with cytokines, and to a variety of new investigational approaches. Interferon and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have led to long-term survival in selected patients. Immunotherapy with cytokines, monoclonal antibodies, new agents, dendritic cell therapy, and allotransplantation offer promise. Novel therapeutic strategies include combining cytokines, and antiangiogenic approaches such as thalidomide and antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Pathologic, cytogenic and molecular studies have proven that renal cell carcinoma is not a single tumor entity. Efforts to improve results also include the identification of prognostic factors, which allow treatment to be better directed towards those patients most likely to benefit. Increasing understanding of cancer biology is beginning to allow for a more targeted approach to the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Adequate positioning of known treatments is essential and many trials of new targeted therapies are underway. PMID:14988745

  5. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  8. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  9. Stem cell technology and engineering for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh Truong Nguyen; Phuc Van Pham

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are not only widely used for regenerative medicine, but are also considered as a useful tool for cancer treatment. For a long time, stem cells have been utilized to renew the immune system for radiation or chemotherapy treated patients. Recently, stem cells are being engineered to carry therapeutic reagents to target tumor sites. Cancer vaccines based on the knowledge of cancer stem cells have been studied and applied for cancer treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been u...

  10. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis: Implication for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Nurrani Mustika Dewi; Andi Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer is a disease of genomic instability, evasion of immune cells, and adaptation of the tumor cells to the changing environment. Genetic heterogeneity caused by tumors and tumor microenvironmental factors forms the basis of aggressive behavior of some cancer cell populations. CONTENT: Cancers arise in self-renewing cell populations and that the resulting cancers, like their normal organ counterparts, are composed of hierarchically organized cell populations. Self–renewing “...

  11. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  12. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs

  13. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J;

    2012-01-01

    sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant to the...... antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression was...... combination with Bcl-xL and Bax, could explain the observed responses to carboplatin in all tamoxifen‑resistant cell lines, indicating that more markers are needed to predict the response to carboplatin in tamoxifen‑resistant breast cancer....

  14. Cancer Stem Cells: A Novel Paradigm for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, D; Ramalingam, S; Houchen, C.W.; Anant, S

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause for mortality in US only after heart disease and lacks a good or effective therapeutic paradigm. Despite the emergence of new, targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations, none of the treatment options available is curative in patients with advanced cancer. A growing body of evidence is supporting the idea that human cancers can be considered as a stem cell disease. Malignancies are believed to originate from a fraction of cancer cells th...

  15. Economics of Treatments for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christos Chouaid; Kukovi Atsou; Gilles Hejblum; Alain Vergnenegre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the economics of treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We systematically analysed the cost effectiveness of treatments for the different stages of NSCLC, with particular emphasis on more recently approved agents. Numerous economic analyses in NSCLC have been conducted, with a variety of methods and in a number of countries. In patients with localized disease, adjuvant chemotherapy appears to have greater cost effectiveness than observation...

  16. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M.; Daniel Flynn; Jennifer Sims-Mourtada

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable o...

  17. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen Abernathy; Jeremy Burke

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this pa...

  18. A novel strategy for cancer treatment:Targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; MA LeiNa; WANG YiGang; LIU XinYuan; QIAN QiJun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating cell (CSC/TIC) is a subclass of cancer cells possessing parts of properties of normal stem cell. It has a high capacity of proliferation and plays a pivotal role in tumor recurrence and tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At present, small molecule in-hibitors and fusion proteins are widely used in the CSC-targeting strategy. Gene-virotherapy, which uses oncolytic adenovirus as a vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, shows a signifi-cant superiority to other regimens of cancer treatment and has a good efficacy in the treatment of solid tumors. Thus, it is a promising choice to apply gene-virotherapy into the CSC-targeting treatment. Based on the molecular mechanism underlying CSC self-renewal, a series of effective strategies for targeting CSC have been established. This review will summarize the recent research progresses on CSC-targeting treatment.

  19. Combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin efficiently targets HER2-positive cancer cells and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Prajakta S; Kopp, Florian; Thakur, Chitra; Ellwart, Joachim W; Rapp, Ulf R; Ullrich, Axel; Wagner, Ernst; Knyazev, Pjotr; Roidl, Andreas

    2012-12-15

    A major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer is the occurrence of chemoresistance. Cancer cells surviving chemotherapy and giving rise to a recurrence of the tumor are termed cancer stem cells and can be identified by elevated levels of certain stem cell markers. Eradication of this cell population is a priority objective in cancer therapy. Here, we report elevated levels of stem cell markers in MCF-7 mammospheres. Likewise, an upregulation of HER2 and its differential expression within individual cells of mammospheres was observed. Sorting for HER2(high) and HER2(low) cells revealed an upregulation of stem cell markers NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in the HER2(low) cell fraction. Accordingly, HER2(low) cells also showed reduced proliferation, ductal-like outgrowths and an increased number of colonies in matrigel. Xenografts from subcutaneously injected HER2(low) sorted cells exihibited earlier onset but slower growth of tumors and an increase in stem cell markers compared to tumors developed from the HER2(high) fraction. Treatment of mammospheres with salinomycin reduced the expression of SOX2 indicating a selective targeting of cancer stem cells. Trastuzumab however, did not reduce the expression of SOX2 in mammospheres. Furthermore, a combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin was superior to single treatment with each drug. Thus, targeting HER2 expressing tumors with anti-HER2 therapies will not necessarily eliminate cancer stem cells and may lead to a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype. Our study demonstrates efficient killing of both HER2 positive cells and cancer stem cells, hence opening a possibility for a new combinatorial treatment strategy. PMID:22511343

  20. Phenotypic modifications in ovarian cancer stem cells following Paclitaxel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite initial responsiveness, 80% of EOC patients recur and present with chemoresistant and a more aggressive disease. This suggests an underlying biology that results in a modified recurrent disease, which is distinct from the primary tumor. Unfortunately, the management of recurrent EOC is similar to primary disease and does not parallel the molecular changes that may have occurred during the process of rebuilding the tumor. We describe the characterization of unique in vitro and in vivo ovarian cancer models to study the process of recurrence. The in vitro model consists of GFP+/CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells and mCherry+/CD44−/MyD88− EOC cells. The in vivo model consists of mCherry+/CD44+/MyD88+ EOC cells injected intraperitoneally. Animals received four doses of Paclitaxel and response to treatment was monitored by in vivo imaging. Phenotype of primary and recurrent disease was characterized by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot analysis. Using the in vivo and in vitro models, we confirmed that chemotherapy enriched for CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells. However, we observed that the surviving CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells acquire a more aggressive phenotype characterized by chemoresistance and migratory potential. Our results highlight the mechanisms that may explain the phenotypic heterogeneity of recurrent EOC and emphasize the significant plasticity of ovarian cancer stem cells. The significance of our findings is the possibility of developing new venues to target the surviving CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells as part of maintenance therapy and therefore preventing recurrence and metastasis, which are the main causes of mortality in patients with ovarian cancer

  1. Importance of Molecular Features of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer for Choice of Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 85% of lung cancer is categorized as non–small cell lung cancer, and traditionally, non–small cell lung cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Targeted agents that inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have been developed and integrated into the treatment regimens in non–small cell lung cancer. Currently, approved epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors ...

  2. Treatment of squamous-cell cancer of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods of treatment for squamous-cell cancer of the anal canal, namely abdominoperineal extirpation of the rectuim, radiotherapy and thermoradiotherapy were compared. The rate of relapse following thermoradiotherapy was 5.4 times lower than in the radiotherapy alone group and 3.9 times lower than in patients undergoing surgery. Five-year survival rate for thermoradiotherapy (75.1±9.5%) was significantly higher than for radiotherapy (6.9±4.0%) and extripation of the rectum (39.4±7.7%)

  3. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  4. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M; Flynn, Daniel; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable of repopulating the tumor after treatment, causing local and systemic recurrences. In this review, we highlight proinflammatory cytokines and developmental pathways involved in tissue repair, whose deregulation in the tumor microenvironment may promote growth and survival of CSCs. We propose that the addition of anti-inflammatory agents to current treatment regimens may slow the growth of CSCs and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25674014

  5. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples

  6. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  7. Cytokine induced killer cell immunotherapy in cancer treatment: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arashar Arafar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells are T effector cells generated by monocytes cultured and stimulated by cytokines. CIK cells were studied for more than 20 years ago. They can cause lysis of tumor cells that of both autologous and allogeneic origins, so that they were used in cancer treatment. This review aimed to summarize advancements of CIK cells and their current clinical applications in cancer treatment. In general, CIK cells were widely clinically used for recent 5 years. They gave promising results in hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer, breast cancer, renal cancer, and treatment. Looking into the future, CIK cell based immunotherapy will become an important tool in cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(2.000: 71-77

  8. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Cancer Terms: After Treatment Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/2015 Cure: To fully restore health. This term is sometimes ... five years after treatment. However, the concept of “cure” is difficult to apply to cancer because undetected cancer cells can sometimes remain in ...

  9. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... focused beam of light to destroy cancer cells. Laser therapy can be used to: Destroy tumors and precancerous growths Shrink tumors that are blocking the stomach, colon, or esophagus Help treat cancer symptoms, such as bleeding Seal nerve endings after ...

  11. Gastric cancer stem cells in gastric carcinogenesis, progression, prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kang; Dan, Zeng; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the study of the mechanism of tumorigenesis has brought much progress to cancer treatment. However, cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed previous views of tumors, and has provided a new method for treatment of cancer. The discovery of CSCs and their characteristics have contributed to understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor genesis and development, resulting in a new effective strategy for cancer treatment. Gastric CSCs (GCSCs) are the basis for the onset of gas...

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Biofield Treatment on Cancer Biomarkers Involved in Endometrial and Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cancer rates particularly in the developed world are associated with related lifestyle and environmental exposures. Combined immunotherapy and targeted therapies are the main treatment approaches in advanced and recurrent cancer. An alternate approach, energy medicine is increasingly used in life threatening problems to promote human wellness. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofield treatment on cancer biomarkers involved in human endometrium and prostate cancer cell...

  13. Cell cycle arrest biomarkers in human lung cancer cells after treatment with selenium in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Dong, Yan; Reid, Mary; Marshall, James; Ip, Clement

    2003-11-01

    In the planning of future intervention trials using chemopreventive agents against lung cancer, it is critical to evaluate the effect on biomarkers implicated specifically in lung carcinogenesis. With the use of the H520 and H522 human lung cancer cell lines, the present study showed that treatment with selenium (in the form of methylseleninic acid) inhibited cell growth, arrested cell cycle progression at G(1), and induced apoptosis as a late event. Because H520 cells were more sensitive to selenium than H522 cells (IC(50) of MSA was 2.5 or 10 micro M for H520 or H522 cells, respectively, at 24 h), a panel of nine cell cycle regulatory proteins known to be involved in G(1)-->S transition was assessed by Western analysis using whole cell lysate from H520 cells. These nine proteins (DP1, cdc25A, cyclin A, cyclin B(1), cyclin D(1), cdk1, cdk5, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) have been reported previously by our laboratory to be modulated by MSA in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Our data showed that only four (DP1, cdc25A, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) of nine biomarkers produced the expected changes after treatment of lung cancer cells with MSA. This finding raises the possibility that the molecular targets sensitive to selenium modulation may be tissue specific. Thus, the selection of selenium biomarkers for evaluation in an intervention trial must be based on empirical data derived from the cancer cell type of interest. PMID:14652289

  14. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  15. Refining the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    Shin Ogita, Antoinette J WozniakKarmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a debilitating and deadly disease with virtually no chance for long-term survival. Chemotherapy has improved both survival and quality of life for patients with advanced disease. Overall survival of patients with metastatic NSCLC has gradually increased from 8 to 12 months over the past three decades with the introduction of new chemother...

  16. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  17. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  18. Change of the cell cycle after flutamide treatment in prostate cancer cells and its molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Wei-Jun Qin; He Wang; Guo-Xing Shao; Chen Shao; Chang-Hong Shi; Lei Zhang; Hong-Hong Yue; Peng-Fei Wang; Bo Yang; Yun-Tao Zhang; Fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on the expression of the cell cycle-related genes, such as CDKN1A and BTG1, in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: After AR antagonist flutamide treatment and confirmation of its effect by phase contrast microscope and flow cytometry, the differential expression of the cell cycle-related genes was analyzed by a cDNA microarray. The flutamide treated cells were set as the experimental group and the LNCaP cells as the control. We labeled cDNA probes of the experimental group and control group with Cy5 and Cy3 dyes, respectively, through reverse transcription. Then we hybridized the cDNA probes with cDNA microarrays, which contained 8 126 unique human cDNA sequences and the chip was scanned to get the fluorescent values of Cy5 and Cy3 on each spot. After primary analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) tests were carried out to confirm the results of the chips. Results:After AR antagonist flutamide treatment,three hundred and twenty-six genes (3.93 %) expressed differentially, 97 down-regulated and 219 up-regulated.Among them, eight up-regulated genes might be cell cycle-related, namely CDC10, NRAS, BTG1, Weel, CLK3,DKFZP564A122, CDKN1A and BTG2. The CDKN1A and BTG1 gene mRNA expression was confirmed to be higher in the experimental group by RT-PCR, whilep53 mRNA expression had no significant changes. Conclusion: Flutamide treatment might up-regulate CDKN1A and BTG1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The protein expressions of CDKN1A and BTG1 play an important role in inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. CDKN1A has a great impact on the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells and may play a role in the cancer cells in a p53-independent pathway. The prostate cancer cells might affect the cell cycle-related genes by activating AR and thus break the cell cycle control.

  19. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways

  20. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  1. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia, E-mail: mariagrazia.daidone@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Amadeo 42, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2011-03-16

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup −/low} and/or CD133{sup +} expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1{sup +}), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  3. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wicha, Max S.; Madhuri Kakarala; Reddy, Rishindra M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approac...

  4. Surgical Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Hao; Han, Baohui

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. Usual treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, these methods result in poor patient prognosis. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of surgical resection in the multimodality management of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. Methods The clinical data of 46 non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis...

  5. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with non-thermal atmospheric plasma generated in water

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) can be applied to living tissues and cells as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Even though studies report on the successful use of NTAP to directly irradiate cancer cells, this technology can cause cell death only in the upper 3-5 cell layers. We report on a NTAP argon solution generated in DI water for treating human gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). Our findings showed that the plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment. Furthermore, the data showed that elevated levels of RNS may play an even more significant role than ROS in the rate of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  6. Diagnosis, staging and treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer for the surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Ayesha S.; Cerfolio, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This article covers the risk factors, diagnostic tools, staging methods/modalities and treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Also presented is the new 7th edition American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) TNM classification for staging of NSCLC and a recommended treatment algorithm.

  7. Rational use of cetuximab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Borghaei, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Charu Aggarwal, Hossein BorghaeiDepartment of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 85% of all lung cancers. Most NSCLC patients present with loco-regionally advanced or metastatic disease where response rates are low and median overall survival approximates 8 to 10 months. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for NSCLC pati...

  8. Expression of cancer stem cell surface markers after chemotherapeutic drug treatment to reflect breast cancer cell regrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Liu; Wings Tjing Yung Loo; Louis Wing Cheong Chow; Kelly Wei Yu Rui

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the cell viability and the expressions of stem cell surface markers after chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Methods We observed the cytotoxic effects of three chemotherapeutic agents [ epirubicin ( Epi ) , fluorouracil ( 5-FU ) and cyclophosphamide ( Cyc ) ] in three cell lines, and the cell viabilities after removed these chemotherapeutic agents. Expressions of stem cell surface markers CD44, CD24, CD90, CD14 and aldehyde dehydrogenase1(ALDH1) in breast cancer cells were analyzed by real-time PCR. The post hoc analysis (Tukey’s tests) in conjunction with one-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results The initial cytotoxic efficacy was most notable. After the treatment of the same therapeutic agents, cell viability was decreased by 64. 8% 35. 14%, 32. 25% in BT-483 cells, 66. 4%, 22. 94% and 45. 88% in MDA-MB-231 cells, 97. 1%, 99. 5% and 76. 4% in MCF cells. The difference was significant compared with that before treatment ( P=0. 000 ) . However, the inhibitory effects were diminished after chemotherapeutic agent withdrawal. Cell viabilities were increased to 167. 9%, 212. 04% and 188. 66% in MDA-MB-231 cells at 48 h after withdrawal. At 72 h after withdrawal, cell viability was increased with a significant difference in three cell lines (all P values=0. 000). Expressions of CD44 and ALDH1 were most prevalent for MDA-MB-231, BT-483 and MCF-7 cells. ALDH1 mRNA level was significant higher in BT-483 ( HER-2 overexpression cell line) than MDA-MB-231 ( triple negative cell line ) ( P = 0. 012 ) . CD14 mRNA level in MCF-7 cells were significantly lower than that in MDA-MB-231 and BT-483 (P=0. 003, 0. 001). BT-483 showed significantly higher level of CD44 than MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell line (P= 0.013, 0.020), and no significant difference was detected between MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells ( P=0. 955 ) . CD90 mRNA expressions were detected in MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells, but not in BT-483 cells. Conclusion Some malignant

  9. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  10. Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Melosky, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A number of developments have altered the treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer. These include increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways, as well as the outcomes of several large-scale trials. As a result, treatments are becoming more efficacious and more personalized, and are changing the management and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients. This is resulting in increased survival in select patient groups. In this paper, a simplified al...

  11. Nanotechnology for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, William H.; Ghosh, Supratim

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to increase the selectivity and potency of chemical, physical, and biological approaches for eliciting cancer cell death while minimizing collateral toxicity to nonmalignant cells. Materials on the nanoscale are increasingly being targeted to cancer cells with great specificity through both active and passive targeting. In this review, we summarize recent literature that has broken new ground in the use of nanotechnology for cancer treatment with an emphasis o...

  12. [Stereotactic radiotherapy is established treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailas, Liisa; Virsunen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has been the standard treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer. Some of the early stage lung cancer patients are not suitable for surgery owing to associated diseases or refusing surgery. Ninety percent of untreated patients die within five years. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a technique in which highly focused radiation treatment is given at a couple of high single doses to the tumor region. The treatment results in an average of 90% local control of the cancer, and the adverse effects are minor. Treatment outcome is equivalent to those of surgical therapy and is better than obtained with conventional external radiation therapy. PMID:27132296

  13. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D' Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Bocco, Jose L., E-mail: jbocco@fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Koritschoner, Nicolas P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquimica Clinica e Inmunologia (CIBICI-CONICET), Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-02-10

    marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

  14. Cancer stem cells – a new chance for successful treatment of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, Anna M.; Michał P. Budzik

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are undifferentiated cells capable of being transformed into all types of cells comprising the tumour mass. As demonstrated by recent findings, they are responsible for the development of both haematopoietic malignancies and solid lesions. Cancer stem cells determine the unlimited growth of tumours and the variety of their morphology; they are also suspected of being the factor responsible for metastases. Their capability for renewal is the cause of disease recurrences even ...

  15. What's New in Research and Treatment of Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell skin cancers. Still, even some small cancers can be hard to treat if they’re in certain areas. Newer forms of non-surgical treatment such as new topical drugs, photodynamic therapy, and laser surgery may help reduce scarring and other possible ...

  16. Combined Use of Metformin and Everolimus Is Synergistic in the Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshan; Wei, Junmin; Li, Li; Fan, Cong; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and leads to decreased protein synthesis and decreased cancer cell proliferation in many experimental systems. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as metformin have similar actions in keeping with the TSC2/1 pathway linking activation of AMPK to inhibition of mTOR. Histopathological and biochemical studies of breast cancer show frequent dysregulation of the AMPK and the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and metformin in the treatment of breast cancer cells. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of everolimus alone or in combination with metformin on breast cancer cells. MTT assay was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of the drugs on breast cancer cells in vitro. SCID mice injected with HCC1428 cells followed by different treatments were used to assess the in vivo efficacy of different agents. Data showed that the combination of everolimus and metformin exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on the growth of breast cancer cells both in culture and in a mouse xenograft model. Further, this combination abrogated S6 and 4EBP1phosphorylation. Collectively, we suggest that the combination of everolimus and metformin may be an effective regimen for treatment of breast cancer, hence warranting further evaluation of the combination in the clinic. PMID:26351208

  17. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  18. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  19. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  20. Cancer Stem and Progenitor-Like Cells as Pharmacological Targets in Breast Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria B. de Souza; Schenka, André A

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focused on the current role of neoplastic stem and progenitor-like cells as primary targets in the pharmacotherapy of cancer as well as in the development of new anticancer drugs. We begin by summarizing the main characteristics of these tumor-initiating cells and key concepts that support their participation in therapeutic failure. In particular, we discuss the differences between the major carcinogenesis models (ie, clonal evolution vs cancer stem cell (CSC) model) wit...

  1. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of testicular germ cell cancer constitutes a major success story in modern oncology. Today, the vast majority of patients are cured by a therapeutic strategy using one or more highly effective components including surgery (orchiectomy), radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy......-induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate....... However, the excellent cancer-specific survival comes at considerable costs, as individuals with a history of germ cell cancer experience serious long-term complications, including markedly increased risk of cardiovascular morbidities and premature cardiovascular death. The factors responsible, as well as...

  2. Treatment of HER2-Expressing Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Cells With Alpha Particle-Emitting 227Th-Trastuzumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of low-dose-rate alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate 227Th-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-DOTA-trastuzumab (227Th-trastuzumab [where DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]) internalized by breast and ovarian cancer cell lines in order to assess the potential of 227Th-trastuzumab as a therapeutic agent against metastatic cancers that overexpress the HER2 oncogene. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival and cell growth rates of breast cancer cells treated with 227Th-trastuzumab were compared with rates of cells treated with nonbinding 227Th-rituximab, cold trastuzumab, and X-radiation. Cell growth experiments were also performed with ovarian cancer cells. Cell-associated radioactivity was measured at several time points, and the mean radiation dose to cells was calculated. Results: SKBR-3 cells got 50% of the mean absorbed radiation dose from internalized activity and 50% from cell surface-bound activity, while BT-474 and SKOV-3 cells got 75% radiation dose from internalized activity and 25% from cell surface-bound activity. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 2.5 kBq/ml 227Th-trastuzumab for 1 h at 4oC, followed by washing, resulted in mean absorbed radiation doses of 2 to 2.5 Gy. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and an increase in apoptosis were induced in all cell lines. Conclusions: Clinically relevant activity concentrations of 227Th-trastuzumab induced a specific cytotoxic effect in three HER2-expressing cell lines. The cytotoxic effect of 227Th-trastuzumab was higher than that of single-dose X-radiation (relative biological effectiveness = 1.2). These results warrant further studies of treatment of breast cancer and ovarian cancer with 227Th-trastuzumab.

  3. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:10217615

  4. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  5. Cellular responses with thymoquinone treatment in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh Motaghed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigella sativa or black seed extract has been reported to show various medicinal benefits. Thymoquinone which is an active compound of its seed has been reported to contain anti-cancer properties. Objective: The study addressed the anti-cancer efficiency of long-term in vitro treatment with thymoquinone towards human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation was determined with CellTiter 96 Aqueous. Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. It was followed with trypan blue exclusion test to determine the percentage of viable cells. The study incorporated cell cycle assay to distinguish cell distribution at various cell cycle phases using Cycletest Plus DNA Reagent Kit. The apoptosis detection kit was used to determine the percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells using flow cytometry. Results: The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 value determined using the proliferation assay was 25 μM thymoquinone. Late apoptotic cell percentage increased rapidly when treatment duration was increased to 24 h with 25 and 100 μM thymoquinone. Further analysis using cell cycle assay showed thymoquinone inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation at minimal dose 25 μM and led to S phase arrest significantly at 72 h treatment (P = 0.009. It was also noted elevation sub-G 1 peak following treatment with 25 μM thymoquinone for 12 h. Increase in thymoquinone to 50 μM caused G 2 phase arrest at each time-point studied. Conclusion: In general thymoquinone showed sustained inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation with long-term treatment. Specificity of phase arrest was determined by thymoquinone dose.

  6. Evaluation of Irinotecan as a Third- or Fourth-line Treatment for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keener, James

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. There are two major types of lung cancer: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises approximately 85% of all lung cancers, and small cell lung cancer. Currently, the most prevalent third- and fourth- line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer is cisplatin-based therapy. This form of therapy has been long established as the chief treatment for advanced NSCLC; however, cisplatin-based therapy also impai...

  7. Radiation treatment in recurrent squamous cell cancer of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment and outcome of recurrent vulvar cancer. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective review of 26 women referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology between 1982 and 1995, patient records were analyzed with respect to the findings at original surgery, the time to locoregional recurrence, the location of the recurrence, and the subsequent management and outcome. Results: Sixteen recurrences were managed with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, and the remainder with radiation treatment, combined with chemotherapy in some cases. The overall survival for the entire cohort at 5 years was 22%. The 5-year survival for those with recurrence confined to the vulva (n = 13) was 46%, compared with 0% for those women with a recurrence located or extending beyond the vulva (p = 0.002). The local control rate was 34.6%. Conclusion: Our results confirm the poor overall prognosis for this condition. In particular, they highlight the importance of the location of the recurrence as a prognostic indicator. Based on this review, we conclude that radiotherapy fields should encompass the region at risk if the intent is curative. Finally, low-dose palliation for groin node recurrence is ineffectual

  8. Current situation of interventional treatment for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary bronchogenic carcinoma, which referred to as lung cancer, is one of the most common malignant tumors in china. The 2010 China Health Statistical Yearbook indicates that in 2005 the mortality of lung cancer was at the first place of all cancers. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 8.5% of all the lung cancers, most of the patents are diagnosed in their late stages and have lost the chance of operation resection, and the 5-year survival rate is only about 15%. Being of technical simplicity, mild side reaction, satisfactory local effect and reliable reproducibility, interventional therapy has become an important and non-surgical method for advanced NSCLC, and has been widely applied in clinical practice. This paper aims to make a review about the current situation of interventional treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  9. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  10. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  11. Medical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: progress in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong SONG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common pathological type of lung cancer. Along with the rising incidence in recent years, lung cancer has been the leading cause of death due to malignancies both in our country and worldwide. Due to simplistic therapeutic approach for lung cancer decades ago, those patients suffering from advanced lung cancer had short lifetime, and it was difficult to ensure their life quality. In recent years, many molecular targeted drugs, such as Gefitinib, Erlotinib and Crizotinib etc., have been successively applied in clinical use, and they bring about a substantial prolongation of survival life and improvement in life quality of those patients with advanced lung cancer. In 2014, there was a number of important reports concerning the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the annual meetings of either American Society of Clinical Oncology or European Society for Medical Oncology. On the basis of the relevant reports delivered in the conferences, it is our attempt to summarize the recent advances in regard to chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy, measures to treat TKI therapy resistant cases, and immune therapy, followed by a comment regarding recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in 2014. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.01.03

  12. Progress of Treatments in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Brain Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    MA, CHUNHUA; Jiang, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastases is one of the most common complications of non-small cell lung cancer, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), surgery and chemotherapy are standard methods in the treatment of brain metastases. But the effect of those treatments are still sad. Comprehensive treatment can prolong the survival and improve the quality of life. Recently, the improvement of technology, targeted therapy, survival time and the quality of life are in increasingly concerned....

  13. Molecular regulation of MICA expression after HDAC inhibitor treatment of cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle

    and NKG2D-ligands are upregulated on the surface of abnormal cells. We have previously shown that cancer cells can be stimulated to express the NKG2D-ligands MICA/B after exposure to HDAC-inhibitors (HDAC-i), an occurrence that is not observed in healthy cells. Here we characterize the molecular...... signal pathways that lead to MICA expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of cancer cells. Chelating Calcium with Bapta-AM or EGTA potently inhibited HDAC-inhibitor and CMV mediated MICA/B expression. It was further observed that ER Calcium stores were depleted after HDAC-inhibitor treatment. NF......The immune system is critically dependent on the ability to recognize or sense infected, stressed and transformed cells. One of these sensing systems rely on NKG2D/NKG2D-ligand interaction, where NKG2D is an activating receptor constitutively expressed by several effector cells of the immune system...

  14. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, Paul; Muller,Mirte; van den Heuvel,Michel; Zago,Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Giulia Zago,1,2,* Mirte Muller,1,* Michel van den Heuvel,1 Paul Baas1 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL), Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Medical Oncology 2, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the ...

  15. Epithelial cell polarity and tumorigenesis: new perspectives for cancer detection and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danila CORADINI; Claudia CASARSA; Saro ORIANA

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity is commonly observed in tumors of epithelial origin and correlates with their invasion into adjacent tissues and formation of metastases. Growing evidence indicates that loss of cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion may also be important in early stage of cancer. In first part of this review, we delineate the current understanding of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues and discuss the involvement of cell polarity and apical junctional complex components in tumor pathogenesis. In the second part we address the clinical significance of cell polarity and junctional complex components in can- cer diagnosis and prognosis. Finally, we explore their potential use as therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer.

  16. Graphene oxide selectively targets cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: Implications for non-toxic cancer treatment, via “differentiation-based nano-therapy”

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Marco; Verre, Andrea F.; Iliut, Maria; Peiris-Pagés, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Gandara, Ricardo; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a.k.a. cancer stem cells (CSCs), are difficult to eradicate with conventional approaches to cancer treatment, such as chemo-therapy and radiation. As a consequence, the survival of residual CSCs is thought to drive the onset of tumor recurrence, distant metastasis, and drug-resistance, which is a significant clinical problem for the effective treatment of cancer. Thus, novel approaches to cancer therapy are needed urgently, to address this clinical need. Towards...

  17. In vitro study of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment in breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastasis from breast cancer poses a major clinical challenge. Integrins play a role in regulating adhesion, growth, motility, and survival, and have been shown to be critical for metastatic growth in the brain in preclinical models. Cilengitide, an αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin inhibitor, has previously been studied as an anti-cancer drug in various tumor types. Previous studies have shown additive effects of cilengitide and radiation in lung cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. The ability of cilengitide to enhance the effects of radiation was examined preclinically in the setting of breast cancer to assess its possible efficacy in the setting of brain metastasis from breast cancer. Our panel of breast cells was composed of four cell lines: T-47D (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MCF-7 (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MDA-MB-231 (TNBC, basal B), MDA-MB-468 (TNBC, basal A). The presence of cilengitide targets, β3 and β5 integrin, was first determined. Cell detachment was determined by cell counting, cell proliferation was determined by MTS proliferation assay, and apoptosis was measured by Annexin V staining and flow cytometry. The efficacy of cilengitide treatment alone was analyzed, followed by assessment of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment. Integrin β3 knockdown was performed, followed by cilengitide and radiation treatment to test for incomplete target inhibition by cilengitide, in high β3 expressing cells. We observed that all cell lines examined expressed both β3 and β5 integrin and that cilengitide was able to induce cell detachment and reduced proliferation in our panel. Annexin V assays revealed that a portion of these effects was due to cilengitide-induced apoptosis. Combined treatment with cilengitide and radiation served to further reduce proliferation compared to either treatment alone. Following β3 integrin knockdown, radiosensitization in combination with cilengitide was observed in a previously non-responsive cell line (MDA-MB-231

  18. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to th...

  19. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  20. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild SI

    2016-01-01

    Sacha I Rothschild Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of ...

  1. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR ...

  2. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  3. Evaluation of candidate biomarkers to predict cancer cell sensitivity or resistance to PARP-1 inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oplustilova, L.; Wolanin, K.; Bartkova, J.;

    2012-01-01

    (ADp-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an enzyme critical for repair pathways alternative to HR. While promising, treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors (PARP-1i) faces some hurdles, including (1) acquired resistance, (2) search for other sensitizing, non-BRCA1/2 cancer defects and (3) lack of biomarkers to predict response......Impaired DNA damage response pathways may create vulnerabilities of cancer cells that can be exploited therapeutically. One such selective vulnerability is the sensitivity of BRCA1- or BRCA2-defective tumors (hence defective in DNA repair by homologous recombination, HR) to inhibitors of the poly...... to PARP-1i. Here we addressed these issues using PARP-1i on 20 human cell lines from carcinomas of the breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and ovary. Aberrations of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex sensitized cancer cells to PARP-1i, while p53 status was less predictive, even in response to PARP-1i...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  5. Profile of nivolumab in the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang YLE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yvonne LE Ang,1 Joline SJ Lim,1,2 Ross A Soo1–3 1Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, 2Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 3Department of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Until recently, the prognosis and treatment of patients with advanced-stage squamous cell lung cancers have been limited. An improvement in the understanding of the role of the immune system in tumor immunosurveillance has led to the development of the programmed death-1 (PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo. Nivolumab is the first PD-1 inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced-stage squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy. In the key Phase III trial CHECKMATE 017, a better overall survival and progression-free survival were seen in patients treated with second-line nivolumab compared with docetaxel. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 expression did not predict for outcome. In addition, nivolumab had better safety and tolerability, and led to better patient reported outcomes. Further research on the role of PD-L1 expression as a predictive biomarker should be performed, and other biomarkers that can predict the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors should also be pursued. Further studies on the combination treatment are ongoing to determine the optimal role of nivolumab as monotherapy or nivolumab with other agents in non-small-cell lung cancer. Keywords: immunotherapy, programmed death-1, PD-1, NSCLC, squamous cell, nivolumab

  6. Treatment with kaempferol suppresses breast cancer cell growth caused by estrogen and triclosan in cellular and xenograft breast cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-02-01

    As a phytoestrogen, kaempferol (Kaem) is one of bioflavonoids, which are found in a variety of vegetables including broccoli, tea and tomato. In this study, the antiproliferative effects of Kaem in triclosn (TCS)-induced cell growth were examined in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. TCS promoted the cell viability of MCF-7 cells via estrogen receptor α (ERα) as did 17β-estradiol (E2), a positive control. On the other hand, Kaem significantly suppressed E2 or TCS-induced cell growth. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of TCS and Kaem, alterations in the expressions of cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis-related genes were identified using western blot assay. The treatment of the cells with TCS up-regulated the protein expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin E and cathepsin D, while down-regulated p21 and bax expressions. Kaem reversed TCS-induced gene expressions in an opposite manner. The phosphorylation of IRS-1, AKT, MEK1/2 and ERK was increased by TCS, indicating that TCS induced MCF-7 cell proliferation via nongenomic ER signaling pathway associated with IGF-1R. Kaem presented an antagonistic activity on this signaling by down-regulating the protein expression of pIRS-1, pAkt and pMEK1/2 promoted by E2 or TCS. In an in vivo xenografted mouse model, tumor growth was induced by treatment with E2 or TCS, which was identified in the measurement of tumor volume, hematoxylin and eosin staining, bromodeoxyuridine and immunohistochemistry assay. On the contrary, E2 or TCS-induced breast tumor growth was inhibited by co-treatment with Kaem, which is consistent with in vitro results. Taken together, these results revealed that Kaem has an anticancer effect against procancer activity of E2 or TCS, a xenoestrogen, in breast cancer and may be suggested as a prominent agent to neutralize breast cancer risk caused by TCS. PMID:26878784

  7. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from renal cell cancer: treatment attempt with radiation and sunitinib (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haukland Ellinor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with known brain and lung metastases from renal cell cancer without previous systemic therapy is presented. Neoplastic meningitis (NM developed 31 months after first diagnosis of simultaneous extra- and intracranial recurrence of kidney cancer and surgical resection of a cerebellar metastasis. In spite of local radiotherapy to the macroscopic NM lesions in the cervical and lumbar spine followed by initiation of sunitinib, the patient succumbed to his disease 4 months after the diagnosis of NM. The untreated lung metastases progressed very slowly during almost 3 years of observation. This case illustrates important issues around both biological behaviour and treatment approaches in metastatic renal cell cancer.

  8. Profile of nivolumab in the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yvonne LE; Lim, Joline SJ; Soo, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the prognosis and treatment of patients with advanced-stage squamous cell lung cancers have been limited. An improvement in the understanding of the role of the immune system in tumor immunosurveillance has led to the development of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo). Nivolumab is the first PD-1 inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced-stage squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy. In the key Phase III trial CHECKMATE 017, a better overall survival and progression-free survival were seen in patients treated with second-line nivolumab compared with docetaxel. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression did not predict for outcome. In addition, nivolumab had better safety and tolerability, and led to better patient reported outcomes. Further research on the role of PD-L1 expression as a predictive biomarker should be performed, and other biomarkers that can predict the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors should also be pursued. Further studies on the combination treatment are ongoing to determine the optimal role of nivolumab as monotherapy or nivolumab with other agents in non-small-cell lung cancer.

  9. Circulating regulatory T cells of cancer patients receiving radiochemotherapy may be useful to individualize cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells (Treg) play a major role in anti-tumor immune response of cancer patients. We investigated the effect of radiochemotherapy on patients’ blood immune cells and their predictive value for tumor response. Materials and methods: DCs and Treg of colorectal cancer (CRC) or breast cancer (BC) patients were examined through multicolor flow cytometry before the beginning and after the first week of radiochemotherapy (RCT). DCs were stained for BDCA1 and BDCA2, Treg were stained for CD4, CD25, CD127 and FoxP3. IL-2, IL-10 and TNF-α plasma levels of CRC patients were also determined. We examined the interrelationship between immune cell count alterations, applied dose values, cytokine plasma levels as well as histopathological parameters. Results: DCs were increased in BC and CRC patients compared to healthy control individuals (HC). CRC patients had higher levels of Treg (59.0%) compared to BC patients (31.3%) and HC (27.0%). Treg of CRC (58.7% vs. 41.3% p < 0.001) but not BC patients (31.3% vs. 38.8%, p = 0.164) decreased distinctly after the first week of radiation therapy. Applied dose values and decrease of Treg correlated positively (r = 0.216, p = 0.054). We also found a positive correlation of IL-10 plasma levels and Treg levels (r = 0.748, p = 0.021). CRC patients with favorable tumor stage (< ypT3a) have higher levels of Treg after 5 days of RCT (49.4% vs. 34.0%, p = 0.043). Conclusion: Higher Treg levels are associated with favorable tumor stage. We hypothesize that a dramatic decrease of Treg after in vivo irradiation may be a good indicator for necessary dose adjustments in radiation therapy of CRC patients.

  10. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  11. What are we able to achieve in the treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several meta analyses published in the beginning of the 1990s confirmed effectivity of chemotherapy in comparison with best supportive care in advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: the median survival time was prolonged by 6 weeks - 2 months, and the number of patients surviving one year increased by about 10%. Influence of these meta analyses on perception of non-small cell lung cancer chemotherapy as an indicated but less effective treatment continues until today in some extend. Image of the advanced non-small cell lung cancer treatment has improved during the last years markedly, mainly due to new treatment possibilities discussed in this case report. (author)

  12. Characterization of choline uptake in prostate cancer cells following bicalutamide and docetaxel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choline derivatives labelled with positron emitters are successfully used for PET imaging of prostate cancer patients. Since little is known about uptake mechanisms, the aim of this study was to characterize choline uptake in prostate cancer cells, also following anti-androgen treatment or chemotherapy. Choline uptake in prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, PC-3) and Michaelis-Menten kinetics were analysed using different concentrations of 3H-choline via liquid scintillation counting. Inhibition of 3H-choline uptake was assayed in the presence of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), unlabelled choline, guanidine and tetraethylammonium (TEA), an inhibitor of the organic cation transporter (OCT). Changes in choline uptake triggered by bicalutamide and docetaxel were evaluated and choline transporters were detected via Western blotting. Michaelis-Menten kinetics yielded a saturable transport with Km values of 6.9 and 7.0 μmol/l choline for LNCaP and PC-3 cells, respectively. Treatment of cells with bicalutamide and docetaxel caused an increase in total choline uptake but had no significant effect on Km values. Uptake of 3H-choline was NaCl dependent and 4.5-fold higher in LNCaP cells than in PC-3 cells. 3H-Choline uptake was reduced by 92-96% using HC-3 and unlabelled choline, by 63-69% using guanidine and by 20% using TEA. The high-affinity choline transporter was detected via Western blotting. Choline uptake in prostate cancer cells is accomplished both by a transporter-mediated and a diffusion-like component. Results of inhibition experiments suggest that uptake is mediated by a selective choline transporter rather than by the OCT. Bicalutamide- and docetaxel-induced changes in total choline uptake could affect PET tumour imaging. (orig.)

  13. Data on cell cycle in breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231 with ferulic acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunmi

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition to repair DNA metabolism to respond to damaged DNA can lead to genetic instability, resulting in cancer cell death (Audeh et al., 2010; Bryant et al., 2005; Farmer et al., 2005; Lukas et al., 2003; Tutt et al., 2010) [1], [2], [6], [8], [11]. Despite of various studies demonstrating efficiency of combination therapy through down-regulation of DNA repair pathway, the suppression effects of DNA repair pathway by chemotherapeutic agents from natural bioactive compounds are less understood (Eitsuka et al., 2014; Kastan et al., 2004; Kawabata et al., 2000; Mancuso et al., 2014) [5], [7], [9]. Here, the data shows that ferulic acid reduced the S-phases post to UV treatment in breast cancer cells and was hypersensitive in breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. PMID:26958638

  14. Survival and treatment patterns in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    Baunemann Ott, C.L.; Ratna, N.; Prayag, R.; Nugent, Z; Badiani, K.; Navaratnam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) is the most common form of lung cancer, with a median age at diagnosis of 70 years. These elderly patients are often underrepresented in the randomized clinical trials upon which chemotherapy plans are based. The objective of the present study was to determine the patterns of treatment and survival in elderly patients with advanced nsclc in Manitoba.

  15. An analysis of current treatment practice in uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinoma at two high volume cancer centers

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Tilley Jenkins; Knickerbocker, Abhay; Shah, Chirag A.; Schiff, Melissa A.; Isacson, Christina; Garcia, Rochelle L; Goff, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the rarity of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and uterine clear cell carcinoma (UCCC), they contribute disproportionately to endometrial cancer deaths. Sufficient clinical information regarding treatment and prognosis is lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes in a rare cancer cohort based on the experience at two tertiary care cancer centers. Methods Clinicopathologic data were retrospectively collected on 279 patients with UPSC and UCCC t...

  16. Treatment Advances in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Surmont, Veerle

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Europe. Approximately 85% of the patients with lung cancer have non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which can be classified into squamous, adeno, large cell and not otherwise specified (NOS) histologies. The most common histologies are: adenocarcinoma ( 50%), squamous cell ( 20%), and large cell ( 10%). More than two third of the patients have locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnos...

  17. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013

  18. Hyperthermia in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... but these effects are uncommon ( 1 , 3 , 7 ). Diarrhea , nausea, and vomiting ... a standard treatment for cancer ( 1 , 3 , 6 , 7 ). Many clinical trials are ...

  19. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  20. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  1. Tamoxifen Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells: Impact on Hedgehog/GLI1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Victoria E; Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Annaratone, Laura; Castellano, Isabella; Grismaldo, Adriana; Sapino, Anna; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator tamoxifen (TAM) has become the standard therapy for the treatment of ER+ breast cancer patients. Despite the obvious benefits of TAM, a proportion of patients acquire resistance to treatment, and this is a significant clinical problem. Consequently, the identification of possible mechanisms involved in TAM-resistance should help the development of new therapeutic targets. In this study, we present in vitro data using a panel of different breast cancer cell lines and demonstrate the modulatory effect of TAM on cellular proliferation and expression of Hedgehog signaling components, including the terminal effector of the pathway, the transcription factor GLI1. A variable pattern of expression following TAM administration was observed, reflecting the distinctive properties of the ER+ and ER- cell lines analyzed. Remarkably, the TAM-induced increase in the proliferation of the ER+ ZR-75-1 and BT474 cells parallels a sustained upregulation of GLI1 expression and its translocation to the nucleus. These findings, implicating a TAM-GLI1 signaling cross-talk, could ultimately be exploited not only as a means for novel prognostication markers but also in efforts to effectively target breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26927093

  2. Tamoxifen Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells: Impact on Hedgehog/GLI1 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Villegas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The selective estrogen receptor (ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM has become the standard therapy for the treatment of ER+ breast cancer patients. Despite the obvious benefits of TAM, a proportion of patients acquire resistance to treatment, and this is a significant clinical problem. Consequently, the identification of possible mechanisms involved in TAM-resistance should help the development of new therapeutic targets. In this study, we present in vitro data using a panel of different breast cancer cell lines and demonstrate the modulatory effect of TAM on cellular proliferation and expression of Hedgehog signaling components, including the terminal effector of the pathway, the transcription factor GLI1. A variable pattern of expression following TAM administration was observed, reflecting the distinctive properties of the ER+ and ER− cell lines analyzed. Remarkably, the TAM-induced increase in the proliferation of the ER+ ZR-75-1 and BT474 cells parallels a sustained upregulation of GLI1 expression and its translocation to the nucleus. These findings, implicating a TAM-GLI1 signaling cross-talk, could ultimately be exploited not only as a means for novel prognostication markers but also in efforts to effectively target breast cancer subtypes.

  3. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  4. Stem Cell Therapy and Breast Cancer Treatment: Review of Stem Cell Research and Potential Therapeutic Impact Against Cardiotoxicities Due to Breast Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Thomas E.; George, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    A new problem has emerged with the ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. While early screening and advances in treatment have allowed these patients to overcome their cancer, these treatments often have adverse cardiovascular side effects that can produce abnormal cardiovascular function. Chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy have both been linked to cardiotoxicity; these therapeutics can cause a loss of cardiac muscle and deterioration of vascular structure that can eventually ...

  5. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells than in normal cells. For skin cancer, laser light is shined onto the skin and the drug becomes active and kills the cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy causes little damage to healthy tissue. Biologic therapy ...

  6. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Edwards, Christopher; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulation of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells for 96 hr either in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. 24 hr after the culture started, mitoxantrone was introduced to the cells at a final concentration of 1 M. The mitoxantrone treatment lasted 72 hr and then the cells were collected for various measurements. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not show significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, in response to mitoxantrone (1uM), a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells (30%) was arrested at G2 phase and a significant number of these cells were apoptotic in comparison to their static controls. The expressions of 84 oxidative stress related genes were analyzed using Qiagen PCR array to identify the possible mechanism underlying the altered responses of bioreactor culture cells to mitoxantrone. Nine out of 84 genes showed higher expression at four hour post mitoxantrone treatment in cells cultured at rotating condition compared to those at static. Taken together, the results reported here indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the responses of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. The alteration of oxidative stress pathways

  7. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer - role of nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. PMID:27536062

  8. Does Sex Influence the Impact That Smoking, Treatment Interruption and Impaired Pulmonary Function Have on Outcomes in Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory MM Videtic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To look for survival differences between men and women with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC by examining stratified variables that impair treatment efficacy.

  9. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  10. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  11. Early responses of human cancer cells upon photodynamic treatment monitored by laser phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment of cancer cells is known to eventually cause cell death in most cases. The precise pathways and the time course seem to vary among different cell types and modes of photodynamic treatment. In this contribution, the focus was put on the responses of human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 within the first 15 minutes after laser irradiation in the presence of Photofrin« II (PII). To monitor the cell response in this early time period laser phase microscopic imaging was used, a method sensitive to changes in overall cell shape and intracellular structures, mediated by changes in the local refractive index. Laser irradiation of cells loaded with PII induced a significant reduction of the phase shifts, which probably reflects the induced damage to the different cellular membrane structures. The data suggest that even within the first 30 s after the onset of laser illumination, a significant reduction of the phase shifts can be detected. These results underline that laser phase microscopy is a suitable diagnostic tool for cellular research, also in the early time domain.

  12. Changes of Survivin mRNA and Protein Expression during Paclitaxel Treatment in Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Huihua; YU Shiying; ZHUANG Liang; XIONG Hua

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of antiapoptosis gene, survivin in the resistance to palcitaxel, the expression of survivin mRNA and protein in the process of paclitaxel treatment in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was detected. MCF-7 cells were incubated with paclitaxel at different concentrations. The growth inhibition rate of MCF-7 was investigated by tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry. The change of apoptosis was detected by Annexin-V/PI methods. The changes in the expression of survivin mRNA and protein were studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western-blot assay respectively. The growth inhibition rate of MCF-7 was increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Paclitaxel of higher concentration could effectively induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after 48 h, while the expression of survivin was increased at early time (within 6 h) and decreased after 24 h regardless of treatment concentrations of paclitaxel. It suggested that tumor cells might evade the paclitaxel-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing the level of survivin at early treatment time.

  13. Myrtucommulone-A treatment decreases pluripotency- and multipotency-associated marker expression in bladder cancer cell line HTB-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Banu; Izgi, Kenan; Karaca, Halit; Canatan, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Cancer and stem cells exhibit similar features, including self-renewal, differentiation and immortality. The expression of stem-cell-related genes in cancer cells is demonstrated to be potentially correlated with cancer cell behaviour, affecting both drug response and tumor recurrence. There is an emerging body of evidence that subpopulations of tumors carry a distinct molecular sign and are selectively resistant to chemotherapy. Therefore, it is important to find novel therapeutic agents that could suppress the stem-like features of cancer cells while inhibiting their proliferation. Myrtucommulone-A (MC-A) is an active compound of a nonprenylated acylphloroglucinol isolated from the leaves of myrtle. Here we have investigated the potential of MC-A in inhibiting the expression of self-renewal regulatory factors and cancer stem cell markers in a bladder cancer cell line HTB-9. We used RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and western blotting to examine the expression of pluripotency- and multipotency-associated markers with or without treatment with MC-A. Treatment with MC-A not only decreased cancer cell viability and proliferation but also resulted in a decrease in the expression of pluripotency- and multipotency-associated markers such as NANOG, OCT-4, SOX-2, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, CD90, CD73 and CD44. MC-A treatment was also observed to decrease the sphere-forming ability of HTB-9 cells. In summary, this study provides valuable information on the presence of stem-cell marker expression in HTB-9 cells and our results imply that MC-A could be utilized to target cancer cells with stem-like characteristics. PMID:26054707

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Vinorelbine in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faller, Bryan A; Pandit, Trailokya N.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes the majority (more than 80%) of lung cancer diagnoses. Systemic therapy, with either cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, has been established to provide benefit to patients with NSCLC in both the adjuvant and advanced disease settings. Vinorelbine, a semi-synthetic vinca-alkaloid has been extensively tested alone and in...

  15. Chemoradiation treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer oriented to apoptosis induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative analysis of the radiotherapy results in different modes of fractionation with etoposide modification on gamma-therapeutic apparatus and linear accelerator in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Objective effect and one year survival rates were significantly higher in the cases of accelerated fractionation regimes, while the frequency of radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis was reduced in cases of the treatment on a linear accelerator compared to gamma radiation. Modes of accelerated hyperfractionated combined with etoposide modification are aimed at the induction of ceramide apoptosis pathway, as evidenced by the dynamics of sphingomyelinase activity in serum of patients with NSCLC

  16. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, inevitably, patients experience disease progression and the most common mechanism of acquired resistance is an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation. Several agents (AZD9291, CO-1686 and HM61713) have demonstrated impressive activity in patients with T790M resistance mutations. Additional data on the efficacy of first-line therapy with afatinib and the combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab for patients with EGFR mutant NSCLC were presented. The results of a phase III trial of crizotinib compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting, and a phase I trial and expansion cohort of ceritinib, provided additional efficacy and toxicity data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged NSCLC. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine, with and without necitumumab, revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of necitumumab in patients with squamous NSCLC. In the second-line setting, a phase III trial of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of ramucirumab. In extensive stage small cell lung cancer phase III trials of consolidative thoracic radiation therapy and prophylactic cranial radiation failed to reveal an improvement in overall survival. PMID:25580271

  17. Decreased cervical cancer cell adhesion on nanotubular titanium for the treatment of cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Crear J; Kummer KM; Webster TJ

    2013-01-01

    Jara Crear, Kim M Kummer, Thomas J Webster School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Abstract: Cervical cancer can be treated by surgical resection, chemotherapy, and/or radiation. Titanium biomaterials have been suggested as a tool to help in the local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiation to cervical cancer sites. However, current titanium medical devices used for treating cervical cancer do not by themselves possess any anticancer properties; such devices...

  18. Sequential gemcitabine and tamoxifen treatment enhances apoptosis and blocks transformation in bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    TAKEUCHI, HISASHI; MMEJE, CHINEDU O.; Goodwin G. Jinesh; TAOKA, RIKIYA; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy for which regional or metastatic disease is identified at diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether tamoxifen (Tam), an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, can sensitize bladder cancer cell lines to gemcitabine (Gem) chemotherapy. ERα and ERβ protein levels were determined in each cell line using western blot analysis. The TCC-Sup, 5637, and RT4 bladder cancer cells were exposed to various concentrations and regimens of Tam or Gem alone or ...

  19. [Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: Systemic treatment of patients aged 70 and over].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Ducoloné, Alain; Mennecier, Bertrand; Fraisse, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Patients aged 70 and over represent the third of the population of patients with lung cancer. There has been for a long time a certain nihilism regarding the treatment of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer as well from medical doctors but also from families and patients themselves with the false belief of an indolent course of the disease in elderly patients. As a result, clinical trials devoted to elderly patients were quite scarce until the end of the last decade. Nevertheless, an important trial was published in 1999 with the comparison of vinorelbine as a single agent versus best supportive care only in patients aged 70 and over with an advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The survival benefit with vinorelbine was important. Then two trials were published comparing monotherapy with either vinorelbine or gemcitabine to the doublet vinorelbine and gemcitabine without convincing results. As a consequence, the ASCO 2004 recommendations were to treat elderly patients with a monotherapy (gemcitabine or vinorelbine). Recently an IFCT trial was presented at the plenary session of the ASCO 2010. A carboplatin (every 4weeks)+weekly paclitaxel doublet was compared to a vinorelbine or gemcitabine (choice of the center). The survival benefit was of such magnitude that the paradigm of treatment of elderly patients PS 0-2 with advanced NSCLC should be modified in favor of the tested doublet. There should be a reappraisal of the geriatric indexes recommended by the oncogeriatricians regarding their exact prognostic or predictive role. PMID:21388776

  20. Effect of comorbidity on the treatment and prognosis of elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen-Heijnen, M; Smulders, S.; Lemmens, V; Smeenk, F; van Geffen, H J A A; Coebergh, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: With the rising mean age, more patients will be diagnosed with one or more other serious diseases at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. Little is known about the best way to treat elderly patients with comorbidity or the outcome of treatment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the independent effects of age and comorbidity on treatment and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  1. Treatment of breast cancer stem cells with oncolytic herpes simplex virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, P; Li, J.; Zeng, W.; Zhang, Q; Rabkin, Samuel David; R. Liu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have recently been isolated from several different solid tumors. In breast cancer, the \\(CD44^{+} CD24^{−/low}\\) population is considered to comprise stem-like cells. The identification of cancer stem cells has provided new targets for the development of therapeutics. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs) are an effective strategy for killing breast cancer cells and treating breast tumors in preclinical models. Here, we examined the efficacy of the oHSV G47Δ in killing br...

  2. Renal cell cancer: a shift in approaches for treatment of advanced disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Matthew P; Harlan, Linda C; Mann, Bhupinder; Yabroff, K Robin

    2014-09-01

    Several new agents have become available to treat renal cell cancer (RCC) in recent years, although evidence on their dissemination is limited. This study examined recent trends in RCC treatment in US community practices. Data from the population-based National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies were used to evaluate treatment of patients with RCC newly diagnosed in 2004 and 2009 (N=2357). Descriptive statistics and logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to assess treatment patterns and the associations among demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics, with receipt of systemic therapy and time-to-systemic treatment. Between 2004 and 2009, systemic therapy use increased among patients with stage III and IV RCC, from 3.8% to 15.7% and 35.2% to 57.4%, respectively. Among patients with stage IV disease, the most commonly used therapies changed from interleukin-2 (16.3%) and interferon-alfa (16.6%) in 2004 to sunitinib (39.2%) and temsirolimus (15.2%) in 2009. Further, notable decreases were seen in the use of surgery and time-to-systemic treatment for patients with stage IV disease. Patients who were older, living in areas with lower educational attainment, and diagnosed in 2004 were significantly less likely to receive systemic therapy and had longer time-to-systemic treatment (P<.05). The findings indicate that over the past decade, treatment for RCC in the United States has evolved toward increased use of systemic therapy. As the diffusion of new therapies continues, it will be imperative to understand how variation in care for RCC will impact health outcomes and costs of care. PMID:25190695

  3. Regression of metastatic clear cell kidney cancer with interleukin-2 treatment following nivolumab (anti-PD-1) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, Jason; Fishman, Mayer

    2014-04-01

    Aldesleukin [interleukin-2 (IL-2)] induces durable complete responses in some kidney cancer and melanoma patients. Nivolumab is an investigational antibody drug targeting programmed death-1 (PD-1) as a treatment, demonstrating activity in multiple cancer types. An expanding complement of immunotherapeutics raises important issues regarding the best way to use them. There are issues beyond identifying an agent that provides the superior front-line response: when does one therapy potentiate another immune therapy? When is the capacity of immune response exhausted and an approach without immune mechanism the better therapy? In this case report, we present a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma with no tumor regression evident on a PD-1 blockade (given on an investigational trial), who then achieved near-complete response to bolus high-dose IL-2 therapy, maintaining a persistent response off therapy. This case emphasizes on the need to develop improved predictors of response to immune therapies, especially as they can be applied to optimize sequential immunotherapeutic modalities versus predict when to turn to alternative targeted agents in renal cell carcinoma, and is an example of efficacious IL-2 application as a second-line treatment. PMID:24598453

  4. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France); Richard, S.; Khalil, A. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Alexandre, I. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Centre of Bligny, Briis-sous-Forges (France); Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Lotz, J.P. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France)

    2014-11-04

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis.

  5. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis

  6. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MatthewJNaylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  7. Profile of ramucirumab in the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Maryann R; Binkowski, Chelsea; Hartung, Jessica; Towle, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor is an important therapeutic target due to the importance of this pathway in carcinogenesis. In particular, this pathway promotes and regulates angiogenesis as well as increases endothelial cell proliferation, permeability, and survival. Ramucirumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, the key receptor implicated in angiogenesis. Currently, ramucirumab is approved for the second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in combination with docetaxel. In a Phase III clinical trial, ramucirumab was shown to improve the overall survival in patients with disease progression, despite platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC. This review describes the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, adverse event profile, and the clinical activity of ramucirumab observed in Phase II and III trials in NSCLC. PMID:27110124

  8. Persistence of disseminated tumor cells after neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer predicts poor survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mathiesen, Randi R.; Borgen, Elin; Renolen, Anne; Løkkevik, Erik; Nesland, Jahn M; Anker, Gun; Østenstad, Bjørn; Lundgren, Steinar; Risberg, Terje; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Lønning, Per E.; Naume, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood (PB) predicts reduced survival in early breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of and alterations in DTC- and CTC-status in locally advanced breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and to evaluate their prognostic impact. Methods ...

  9. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  11. Treatment approaches for EGFR-inhibitor-resistant patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee-Seng; Gilligan, David; Pacey, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Discovery of activating mutations in EGFR and their use as predictive biomarkers to tailor patient therapy with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionised treatment of patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). At present, first-line treatment with EGFR TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib) has been approved for patients harbouring exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (Leu858Arg) substitution EGFR mutations. These agents improve response rates, time to progression, and overall survival. Unfortunately, patients develop resistance, limiting patient benefit and posing a challenge to oncologists. Optimum treatment after progression is not clearly defined. A more detailed understanding of the biology of EGFR-mutant NSCLC and the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy mean that an era of treatment approaches based on rationally developed drugs or therapeutic strategies has begun. Combination approaches-eg, dual EGFR blockade-to overcome resistance have been trialled and seem to be promising but are potentially limited by toxicity. Third-generation EGFR-mutant-selective TKIs, such as AZD9291 or rociletininb, which target Thr790Met-mutant tumours, the most common mechanism of EGFR TKI resistance, have entered clinical trials, and exciting, albeit preliminary, efficacy data have been reported. In this Review, we summarise the scientific literature and evidence on therapy options after EGFR TKI treatment for patients with NSCLC, aiming to provide a guide to oncologists, and consider how to maximise therapeutic advances in outcomes in this rapidly advancing area. PMID:26370354

  12. Tolvaptan Treatment in Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH Secretion due to Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucahit Gur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experience of ADH receptor antagonist (-vaptanes treatment in hyponatremia in malign patient is very limited. 68 years old male patient admitted to our department with a complain of nause, vomitting and epigastric pain. He has advanced stage of small cell lung cancer. He had treated with cisplatin and etoposide regimen 10 days ago as a first cure. We diagnosed inapropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone syndrome (SIADH with low sodium level (118 meq/dl. Although the treatment with water restriction and 3% NaCl infusion, sodium level was not in normal. So we ordered 30 mg tolvaptan tablet. And then sodium levels were reached normal. After one month of discharge from hospital, he has hospitilized with same symptom and diagnosis. And again we ordered same treatment procedure and tolvaptane treatment. He had normal sodium (136 mEq/dl level during his follow up. This case demostrate that tolvaptane treatment is suitable aproaches in hyponatremia due to SIADH in oncologic patient.

  13. New antiangiogenics in non-small cell lung cancer treatment: Vargatef™ (BIBF 1120 and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gori B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Gori1, Serena Ricciardi1, Alberto Fulvi1, Salvatore Intagliata2, Ester Del Signore1, Filippo de Marinis11Oncological-Pulmonary Unit 1st, San Camillo Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medical Oncology, University Campus Bio-Medico, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is a particularly aggressive cancer, the optimum management of which is still being determined. In the metastatic disease, the standard therapy is a platinum-based combination chemotherapy; however, in spite of available treatment options for patients who progress beyond first-line therapy, prognosis remains poor. Angiogenesis is a tightly regulated process which comprises a complex, complementary, and overlapping network. Inhibition of tumor-related angiogenesis has become an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Antiangiogenic strategy includes: monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR, small molecule inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, VEGF Trap, and a new class named “vascular disrupting agents,” tested in ongoing clinical trials which will further define their role in the management of NSCLC. BIBF 1120 is an investigational orally administered receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown antiangiogenic and antineoplastic activity, inhibiting VEGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, preventing tumor growth and interfering with the angiogenesis-signaling cascade and overcoming drug resistances.Keywords: NSCLC, angiogenesis, oral antiangiogenic agents, VEGF, PDGF, FGF

  14. Cancer Treatment Scams

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Items Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Miracle Health Claims Discount Plan or Health Insurance? Cancer ... Talk to Your Doctor First. Tagged with: health , miracle claims , scam September 2008 You Might Also Like ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer ... factors affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  18. Treatment of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; MABILIA, ANDREA; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically...

  19. Efifcacy of Icotinib Hydrochloride in the Treatment of Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xianglei; Tang Yiqun; Kou Yingying; Shi Meiqi

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe and evaluate the efifcacy and adverse responses of icotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and analyze the relative factors impacting its efifcacy and prognosis. Methods: The clinical data of 260 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with icotinib hydrochloride in Jiangsu Cancer Hospital was retrospectively analyzed. Results:Four weeks after initial administration, 256 patients were evaluable for efifcacy except 4 who withdrew the drug due to intolerable adverse responses. Among the 256 patients, there were 0 complete response (CR), 96 partial response (PR, 37.5%), 97 stable disease (SD, 37.9%) and 63 progression disease (PD, 24.6%), with the objective remission rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) being 37.6%and 75.4%respectively. However, in all patients, the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7 (0.4~16.3) months, and were 11 (1~16.3), 6 (0.4~11.3) and 5 (1~13.5) months in those treated with ifrst-line, second-line, and≥third-line treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Icotinib hydrochloride has significant efficiency and better safety for treating advanced NSCLC.

  20. Combined modality treatment of chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) differs from other types of lung cancer in its more aggressive clinical course and superior responsiveness to chemo- and radiotherapy. Median survival of patients with unresectable limited disease was reported only 3 months by supportive care alone. SCLC was treated by surgery in 1950s, but results were disappointing. In a British study in the 1960s, radiotherapy proved superior to surgery in survival. However, most patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy alone died of instant metastases with median survival of 5-9 months, indicating a need for primary systemic treatment. In the 1970s, combined chemotherapy came to be the main treatment for SCLC; high response rate and improved survival led to the idea that thoracic radiotherapy added only toxicities with no therapeutic advantage in chemotherapy-treated patients. Considering the fact that 80% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone relapsed in primary sites, and that radio-therapy achieved response in 90% of limited disease patients, it is reasonable to attempt to combine systemic chemotherapy and thoracic radio-therapy to improve therapeutic results for this disease. In 1980s, several randomized trials comparing chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy with thoracic radiotherapy were conducted to clarify the role of thoracic radio-therapy in combination with chemotherapy for limited SCLC. (author). 20 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Targeted therapy using novel agents in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Roy S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a poor prognosis and high mortality. The therapeutic improvement caused by the new generation of cytotoxic agents seems to have reached a plateau. The main categories of targeted therapeutics applicable for NSCLC include receptor-targeted therapy, signal transduction or cell-cycle inhibition, angiogenesis inhibitors, gene therapy, and vaccines. Several major classes of agents directed at specific cellular mechanisms exist for the treatment of NSCLC. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) group contains trastuzumab and IMC-C225, monoclonal antibodies against EGFRs that are overexpressed in many cancers. OSI-774 and ZD1839 are inhibitors of EGFR tyrosine kinase, a key enzyme of the signaling pathway. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors, such as SCH66336, and protein kinase C inhibitors, such as ISIS 3521, have also shown antitumor activity. Antiangiogenesis agents that have shown promise include TNP-470, recombinant endostatin, and angiostatin. Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also seem to control tumor progression and may prolong survival. LY317615, an inhibitor of protein kinase Cb, augmented the tumor growth delay produced by cytotoxic drugs. All of these agents are in different phases of clinical testing and have shown encouraging activity as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy drugs. These new agents are more target specific, less toxic, easier to administer, and may lead to enhanced safety and survival for patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:14720353

  2. Eradicating cancer cells: struggle with a chameleon

    OpenAIRE

    Di, Jiabo; Boer, Tjitske Duiveman-de; Figdor, Carl G.; Torensma, Ruurd

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of cancer stem cells to abrogate tumor growth is a new treatment modality. However, like normal cells cancer cells show plasticity. Differentiated tumor stem cells can acquire stem cell properties when they gain access to the stem cell niche. This indicates that eradicating of stem cells (emptying of the niche) alone will not lead to eradication of the tumor. Treatment should be directed to cancer stem cells ànd more mature cancer cells.

  3. Profile of ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Mark W Burns, Eric S Kim Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of death in both men and women in the United States, with approximately 230,000 new cases and 160,000 deaths each year. Approximately 80% of lung cancer patients are diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a subset of epithelial lung cancers that are generally insensitive to chemotherapy. An estimated 3%–7% of NSCLC patient...

  4. Profile of ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Burns MW; Kim ES

    2015-01-01

    Mark W Burns, Eric S Kim Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of death in both men and women in the United States, with approximately 230,000 new cases and 160,000 deaths each year. Approximately 80% of lung cancer patients are diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a subset of epithelial lung cancers that are generally insensitive to chemotherapy. An estimated 3%–7% of NSCLC patients ha...

  5. Clinical Perspectives on Targeting of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    YanaGeorgeNajjar; JamesHaroldFinke

    2013-01-01

    Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer (NK) cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and their levels ...

  6. Clinical Perspectives on Targeting of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Najjar, Yana G.; Finke, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes, or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and their levels have...

  7. Influence of rmhTNF on the Chemotherapy Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor (rmhTNF) combined with chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone in the treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were evaluated in this study. The selected 37 patients with SCLC were divided into experimental group (n = 18) and control group (n = 19). Bothgroups were subjected to EP regimen. While in the experimental group, a regimen of 4 × 106 U/m2 rmhTNF intramuscular injection was given once a day from the 1st to 7th day and 11th to 17th day on the chemotherapy cycle.Twenty-one days were as a chemotherapy cycle and all patients received treatment with 2 cycles.The response rate was 83.3 % (15/18) in the experimental group and 63.2 % (12/19) in the control group respectively (P<0.05). The KPS score after treatment was 78.4±9.6 in the experimental group and 71.2±9.7 in the control group with the difference being significant (P<0.05).No severe adverse effects occurred in the two groups. It was concluded that the curative effectiveness of the rmhTNF combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of SCLC was more satisfactory than chemotherapy alone. The former could obviously improve the quality of life of the patients with SCLC.

  8. Retinoic acid and cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mei-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Lin, Ho; Yang, Tsung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid which belongs to the retinoid class of chemical compounds is an important metabolite of vitamin A in diets. It is currently understood that retinoic acid plays important roles in cell development and differentiation as well as cancer treatment. Lung, prostate, breast, ovarian, bladder, oral, and skin cancers have been demonstrated to be suppressed by retinoic acid. Our results also show that low doses and high doses of retinoic acid may respectively cause cell cycle arrest and a...

  9. δ-Tocotrienol treatment is more effective against hypoxic tumor cells than normoxic cells: potential implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akira; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-08-01

    Tocotrienols, unsaturated forms of vitamin E, inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells and suppress angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying those effects on cancer cell growth remain unclear especially under hypoxic conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3) could be used as a novel anticancer agent against human colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. δ-T3 inhibited the growth of DLD-1 cells in a dose-dependent fashion by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This effect was more potent under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. The anticancer effect of δ-T3 was achieved by its up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27), the activation of caspases and the suppression of phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) at Thr(308) and Ser(473). In in vivo studies, oral administration of rice bran tocotrienol (RBT3, mainly γ-T3) (10 mg/mouse/day) significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In tumor analyses, RBT3 activated p21, p27, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, immunostaining revealed that RBT3 decreased the number of cells positive for CD31/platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in microvessels in the tumor. Taken together, these data suggest that tocotrienols are potent antitumor agents capable of inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Tocotrienols could have significant therapeutic potential in the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25979648

  10. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  11. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shahid,Kamran; Mills, Glenn; Peddi, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system an...

  12. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen and CYFRA 21-1 in cervical cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze whether serum squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen and cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA) levels can assist in selecting patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who will benefit from combined treatment or additive surgery. Methods and Materials: Of 114 patients with cervical cancer Stage IB-IV, the first 39 patients received radiotherapy, the following 75 patients received identical radiotherapy plus concomitant chemotherapy (3 cycles of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil). SCC antigen and CYFRA 21-1 serum levels were measured before treatment, after therapy, and during follow-up. Baseline tumor markers were related to tumor stage and size and clinical outcome. Results: Before treatment, SCC antigen was elevated (>1.9 μg/L) in 60% and CYFRA 21-1 (>2.2 μg/L) in 46% of patients. For all patients, disease-free survival (DFS) was better after combined treatment (67% vs. 43%, p<0.0005). For patients with elevated baseline SCC antigen, DFS was better after combination therapy (67% vs. 27%, p=0.001) which resulted more frequently in a normal SCC antigen (93% vs. 65%, p=0.004). In contrast, in those with a normal baseline CYFRA 21-1, combined therapy resulted in a better DFS (p=0.04). Patients who achieved a normal SCC antigen or CYFRA 21-1 after treatment had a better DFS (respectively 63 vs. 17% and 64 vs. 30%). Elevated SCC antigen posttreatment indicated residual tumor in 11/12 patients (92%), elevated CYFRA 21-1 in 7/10 patients (70%). Forty-seven patients had a tumor recurrence. At recurrence, SCC antigen was raised in 70% and CYFRA 21-1 in 69%. Conclusions: In patients with an elevated pretreatment SCC antigen, SCC antigen normalized more frequently with combined treatment and those patients had a better DFS. Elevated SCC antigen or CYFRA 21-1 levels after treatment completion indicated residual tumor in respectively 92% and 70%. The presence of elevated posttreatment levels of SCC antigen or CYFRA 21-1 indicates the need for additional

  13. Treatment options in patients with small-cell lung cancer and brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for some 20-25% of all lung cancers, with some 60-70% of patients presenting with the extensive stage (ES) of SCLC at the time of the diagnosis. Brain metastases are observed in 10-35% patients with ES SCLC, and 33% of them are asymptomatic. The main method of treatment in case of ES SCLC patients is cisplatin-containing systemic therapy. Radiotherapy is used as palliative treatment (primary tumour in chest, metastases localized in bones, brain or spinal cord) or as a prophylactic procedure (prophylactic cranial irradiation).The purpose of paper is to present the treatment possibilities in case of ES SCLC patients with brain metastases. Between 1995 and 2005 at the Oncology Centre in Krakow we evaluated 170 patients with SCLC in order to establish the stage of the disease recognising 39 cases (22.9%) with the extensive stage of the disease. The most frequent localizations of distant metastases were: the brain (11 patients, of whom 3 developed brain metastases without clinical symptoms), liver (10 patients), and bones (10 patients). Further analysis has been performed in the group of patients with brain metastases. In these patients treatment based on palliative irradiation of the whole brain and on chemotherapy according to the EP (etoposide and cisplatine) regimen. For cranial irradiation the dose of 20 Gy was given in 5 fractions. In 3 patients with brain metastases without clinical symptoms radiotherapy of brain was repeated after a 4-week interruption. These patients received 5-6 cycles of EP chemotherapy, followed by consolidation radiotherapy of the primary tumour region in the chest. Overall survival was estimated at 2 to 19 months (median: 8.9 months). In the subgroup of 3 patients with brain metastases without clinical symptoms we observed complete regression within the primary tumour region and of the brain metastases. These results were confirmed radiologically. In these patients disease-free survival of 5-9 months

  14. Nicotine-induced resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to treatment – possible mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Czyżykowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor of lung cancer. Data from several clinical studies suggest that continuation of smoking during therapy of tobacco-related cancers is associated with lower response rates to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and even with decreased survival. Although nicotine – an addictive component of tobacco – is not a carcinogen, it may influence cancer development and progression or effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy. Several in vitro and in vivo trials have evaluated the influence of nicotine on lung cancer cells. The best known mechanisms by which nicotine impacts cancer biology involve suppression of apoptosis induced by certain drugs or radiation, promotion of proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and migration of cancer cells. This effect is mainly mediated by membranous nicotinic acetylcholine receptors whose stimulation leads to sustained activation of such intracellular pathways as PI3K/Akt/mTOR, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT, induction of NF-κB activity, enhanced transcription of mitogenic promoters, inhibition of the mitochondrial death pathway or stimulation of pro-angiogenic factors. We herein summarize the mechanisms underlying nicotine’s influence on biology of lung cancer cells and the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Tiyasha H; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-06-30

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  16. Treatment-related MDS/AML in a patient after treatment for large-cell neuroendocrine lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; Ravipati, Hari P; Munker, Reinhold; Cotelingam, James D; Shackelford, Rodney E; Prouty, Leonard A

    2015-11-01

    Secondary leukemia is a common late complication after exposure to cancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With the increase in the overall survival of cancer patients over the past 3 decades, treatment-related malignant neoplasms have increased in incidence. Secondary leukemias due to breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma have been studied in detail, but to our knowledge only a few case studies have reported secondary leukemias with previous lung cancer.¹⁻⁴ Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.⁵ Since the overall survival (OS) as well as the progression-free survival (PFS) of lung cancer has improved, secondary malignancies, which are usually aggressive and have a poor prognosis, have become a common occurrence among survivors. The use of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy could increase the risk for secondary cancers. Here we report the case of a patient who developed treatment-related acute myelogenous leukemia (t-AML) with a likely prior myelodysplasia (t-MDS) after receiving combined chemo-radiotherapy for lung cancer. PMID:26863022

  17. Metastatic renal cell cancer treatments: An indirect comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Regan Chris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment for metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC has advanced dramatically with understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. New treatment options may provide improved progression-free survival (PFS. We aimed to determine the relative effectiveness of new therapies in this field. Methods We conducted comprehensive searches of 11 electronic databases from inception to April 2008. We included randomized trials (RCTs that evaluated bevacizumab, sorafenib, and sunitinib. Two reviewers independently extracted data, in duplicate. Our primary outcome was investigator-assessed PFS. We performed random-effects meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison analysis. Results We included 3 bevacizumab (2 of bevacizumab plus interferon-a [IFN-a], 2 sorafenib, 1 sunitinib, and 1 temsirolimus trials (total n = 3,957. All interventions offer advantages for PFS. Using indirect comparisons with interferon-α as the common comparator, we found that sunitinib was superior to both sorafenib (HR 0.58, 95% CI, 0.38–0.86, P = Conclusion New interventions for mRCC offer a favourable PFS for mRCC compared to interferon-α and placebo.

  18. Molecularly targeted approaches herald a new era of non-small-cell lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of activating mutations in the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) gene in 2004 opened a new era of personalized treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EGFR mutations are associated with a high sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib. Treatment with these agents in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients results in dramatically high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival compared with conventional standard chemotherapy. Subsequently, echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a novel driver oncogene, has been found in 2007. Crizotinib, the first clinically available ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor, appeared more effective compared with standard chemotherapy in NSCLC patients harboring EML4-ALK. The identification of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in NSCLC has further accelerated the shift to personalized treatment based on the appropriate patient selection according to detailed molecular genetic characterization. This review summarizes these genetic biomarker-based approaches to NSCLC, which allow the instigation of individualized therapy to provide the desired clinical outcome

  19. Oral treatment with etoposide in small cell lung cancer – dilemmas and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etoposide is a chemotherapeutic agent, widely used for the treatment of various malignancies, including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), an aggressive disease with poor prognosis. Oral etoposide administration exhibits advantages for the quality of life of the patient as well as economic benefits. However, widespread use of oral etoposide is limited by incomplete and variable bioavailability. Variability in bioavailability was observed both within and between patients. This suggests that some patients may experience suboptimal tumor cytotoxicity, whereas other patients may be at risk for excess toxicity. The article highlights dilemmas as well as solutions regarding oral treatment with etoposide by presenting and analyzing relevant literature data. Numerous studies have shown that bioavailability of etoposide is influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental factors. Several strategies were explored to improve bioavailability and to reduce pharmacokinetic variability of oral etoposide, including desired and undesired drug interactions (e.g. with ketoconazole), development of suitable drug delivery systems, use of more water-soluble prodrug of etoposide, and influence on gastric emptying. In addition to genotype-based dose administration, etoposide is suitable for pharmacokinetically guided dosing, which enables dose adjustments in individual patient. Further, it is established that oral and intravenous schedules of etoposide in SCLC patients do not result in significant differences in treatment outcome, while results of toxicity are inconclusive. To conclude, the main message of the article is that better prediction of the pharmacokinetics of oral etoposide may encourage its wider use in routine clinical practice

  20. Safety of Racotumomab in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Cuba, lung cancer ranks second in incidence and first in mortality. Therefore, it is necessary to identify new therapeutical options. Immunological approaches are interesting because of the potential activity without the toxicities of conventional chemotherapy. The Center of Molecular Immunology developed a vaccine called Racotumomab; it acts on the lung carcinoma inducing an increase in tumor apoptosis and a decrease in the number of tumor vessels. A expanded access, multicenter, open study was conducted in 86 patients with non-small cell lung cancer in order to assess its safety. The administered dose was 1 mg/mL intradermically. The first 5 doses were administered every 14 days and the remaining 10 every 28 days until completing the treatment. The follow-up re immunizations were every 28 days. The occurrence of adverse events (AE) was analyzed and they were classified according to CTC v4.02 criteria. Adverse events were reported by 58 patients (67.4%), making a total of 215 events. burning at the injection site was the most frequently reported event, 32 (14.9%). The use of the vaccine in the patients under study showed good safety and tolerance

  1. Specific cellular accumulation of photofrin-II in EC cells promotes photodynamic treatment efficacy in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shegan; Liang, Shuo; Ding, Kaili; Qu, Zhifeng; Wang, Ying; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which uses a light-sensitive compound and laser irradiation, is a light-based oncological treatment modality. PDT offers an alternative, less invasive treatment for various malignant tumors, such as esophageal cancer (EC), through a photochemical reaction induced by photofrin-II or other oncotropic photosensitizers without severe complications. Previous studies has shown that cancerous tissues accumulated more photosensitizers than paired normal tissues, however, whether it is cellular or vascular mechanisms remains unknown. Herein, in vivo and in vitro examinations were performed to study the mechanisms by which photofrin-II effectively and specifically killed EC cells. In this study, EC tissue of patients treated with photofrin-II, human ESCC cellline SHEEC and parental normal cellline SHEE, primary culture cells of EC tissue were used. The concentration of photofrin-II in cells were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results exhibited that accumulation of photofrin-II in cancerous cells were significantly higher than that in non-cancerous cells (p<0.05) under certain dose and time period of incubation of photofrin-II. In summary, our study showed that, photofrin-II specifically accumulated in EC cells in vivo and in vitro after controlling for vascular factors, which provided strong evidence that maybe the cellular factor is the main mechanism by which photofrin-II-mediated PDT selectively caused EC cells death. PMID:26829562

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  3. A predicted protein, KIAA0247, is a cell cycle modulator in colorectal cancer cells under 5-FU treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Chu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the predominant gastrointestinal malignancy and the leading cause of cancer death. The identification of genes related to CRC is important for the development of successful therapies and earlier diagnosis. Methods Molecular analysis of feces was evaluated as a potential method for CRC detection. Expression of a predicted protein with unknown function, KIAA0247, was found in feces evaluated using specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Its cellular function was then analyzed using immunofluorescent staining and the changes in the cell cycle in response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU were assessed. Results Gastrointestinal tissues and peripheral blood lymphocytes ubiquitously expressed KIAA0247. 56 CRC patients fell into two group categories according to fecal KIAA0247 mRNA expression levels. The group with higher fecal KIAA0247 (n = 22; ≥ 0.4897 had a significantly greater five-year overall survival rate than the group with lower fecal KIAA0247 (n = 30; p = 0.035, log-rank test. Fecal expression of KIAA0247 inversely related to CRC tumor size (Kendall's tau-b = -0.202; p = 0.047. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the cytoplasm of CRC cells evenly expresses KIAA0247 without 5-FU treatment, and KIAA0247 accumulates in the nucleus after 40 μM 5-FU treatment. In HCT116 p53-/- cells, which lack p53 cell cycle control, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase was larger (13% in KIAA0247-silent cells than in the respective shLuc control (10% and KIAA0247-overexpressing cells (7% after the addition of low dose (40 μM 5-FU. Expression of three cyclin genes (cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin B2 also downregulated in the cells overexpressing KIAA0247. Conclusions This is the first description of a linkage between KIAA0247 and CRC. The study's data demonstrate overexpression of KIAA0247 associates with 5-FU therapeutic benefits, and also identify the clinical significance of fecal KIAA0247

  4. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, S.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Schuurbiers, O.C.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Termeer, A.; Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS AND MATERIAL

  5. Plasma for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  6. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... earliest form of squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type ... cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin Images Bowen's disease on the hand Keratoacanthoma Keratoacanthoma Skin cancer, squamous ...

  7. Stem Cells and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  8. Treatment of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  9. Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor as a novel marker of stem cells in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Treatment resistance resulting from the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains a challenge in cancer treatment. Little is known about possible markers of CSCs in treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) as one such marker of CSCs in models of treatment-resistant NSCLC. Materials and methods: Resistant H460 and A549 cell lines were established by repeated exposure to paclitaxel or fractionated radiation. CSC markers were measured by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We also established stable CAR-overexpressing and stable shRNA-CAR-knockdown cell lines and assessed their survival, invasiveness, and tumorigenic capabilities with clonogenic, telomerase, Matrigel, and tumor formation assays. Results: CAR expression was associated with CSC phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-overexpressing cells were more treatment-resistant, self-renewing, and tumorigenic than were parental cells, and shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAR expression was sufficient to inhibit these functions. CAR expression also correlated with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Conclusions: We showed for the first time that CAR is a marker of CSCs and may affect the activities of CSCs in treatment-resistant NSCLC. CAR may prove to be a target for CSC treatment and a predictor of treatment response in patients with NSCLC.

  10. Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer Current treatment based on evidence (ONCOL Group)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to perform a review of evidence about the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Source of data: the information was obtained from searches conducted in Medline, CCTR, Biosis, Embase, Lilacs and CINHAL. We also collected the most representative references presented during the last five years at Asco, ESMO and IASLC. Data extraction: data were extracted by associate members to the ONCOL Group. The collection of information did not follow a uniform strategy. Results of data synthesis: therapy for NSCLC can prolong survival and improve quality of life, but the majority of advanced stage patients dies due to disease progression within 2 years, meaning that there is room for improvement. The standard chemotherapy for NSCLC involves one of a number of platinum-based doublets that have been shown to improve survival when compared with single agents or best supportive care. These doublets are generally comparable in terms of efficacy, differing primarily in their toxicity profiles. However, encouraging new options may be approaching, including therapies targeted to specific patient subpopulations, and the use of combinations of current and new drugs to produce synergistic effects. This review present a detailed analysis of current evidence regarding the treatment of NSCLC based on a representative case series. This review didn't conduct a systematic evaluation of the evidence. Conclusion: medical therapy for NSCLC produces positive changes in main outcomes, including quality of life

  11. Profile of ramucirumab in the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maryann R Cooper,1 Chelsea Binkowski,2,3 Jessica Hartung,2,4 Jennifer Towle1 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy – Worcester/Manchester, MCPHS University, Manchester, NH, 2School of Pharmacy – Boston, MCPHS University, Boston, MA, 3North America Medical Affairs, 4Global Medical Affairs, Sanofi Oncology, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: The interaction between vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor is an important therapeutic target due to the importance of this pathway in carcinogenesis. In particular, this pathway promotes and regulates angiogenesis as well as increases endothelial cell proliferation, permeability, and survival. Ramucirumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, the key receptor implicated in angiogenesis. Currently, ramucirumab is approved for the second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in combination with docetaxel. In a Phase III clinical trial, ramucirumab was shown to improve the overall survival in patients with disease progression, despite platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC. This review describes the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, adverse event profile, and the clinical activity of ramucirumab observed in Phase II and III trials in NSCLC. Keywords: NSCLC, antiangiogenesis, VEGF-targeted therapy

  12. Metastatic squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): disrupting the drug treatment paradigm with immunotherapies

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpace, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Unlike non-squamous NSCLC, squamous NSCLC rarely harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutations for which there are directed therapies, and until the recent approval of immunotherapies for squamous NSCLC, a limited number of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs have been FDA-approved for use in the treatment of advanced ...

  13. Radio-sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells by Monensin Treatment and its associated Gene Expression Profiling Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Radio-resistant or recurrent prostate cancer represents a serious health risk for approximately 20%-30% of patients treated with primary radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Here, we investigated the effect of monensin on sensitizing radiation mediated cell killing of two radio-resistant prostate cell lines Lncap (P53+ and AR+) and PC3 (P53- and AR-). Treatment with monensin alone (5 micromoles-20 micromoles) showed a significant direct cell killing of Lncap (10-30%), but not PC3 cells. Monensin was also shown to successfully sensitize Lncap cells to X-ray radiation (2Gy-10Gy) mediated cell death, up to 50% of killing with the combined treatment. To better understand the mechanisms of radio-resistance of these two cell lines and their different response to monensin, the apoptosis related gene expression profiles in both cell lines were analyzed using cDNA PCR array. Without any treatment, PC3 showed a much higher expression level of antiapoptosis genes than Lncap in the BCL2 family, the caspase/card family and the TNF ligand/receptor family. At 2 hr after 20 micormolar monensin treatment alone, only the TRAF and CIDE family showed a greater induction in Lncap cells than in PC3. Exposures to 10 Gy X-rays alone of Lncap cells significantly induced gene expression levels in the death and death receptor domain family, the TNF ligand and receptor family, and apoptotic group of BCL2 family; whereas exposures of PC3 induced only the expression of genes in the anti-apoptosis group of CASP and CARD family. Furthermore, we selectively suppressed the expression of several anti-apoptosis genes (BCL-xl, Bcl2A1, BIRC2, BIRC3 and CASP2) in PC3 cells by using the siRNA treatment. Exposure to 10Gy X-rays alone showed an enhanced cell killing (about 15%) in BCL-x1 silenced cells, but not in cells with siRNA treatment targeting other anti-apoptosis genes. We also exposed PC3 cells to protons in the Bragg peak region to compare the effectiveness of cell killing

  14. What Happens After Treatment for Kidney Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Kidney Cancer (Adult) - Renal Cell Carcinoma + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » After Treatment TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » What happens after treatment for kidney cancer? Can I get another cancer after having kidney ...

  15. Complete Regression of Metastatic Cervical Cancer After Treatment With Human Papillomavirus–Targeted Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Sanja; Draper, Lindsey M.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Campbell, Tracy E.; Kwong, Mei Li; Wunderlich, John R.; Dudley, Mark E.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic cervical cancer is a prototypical chemotherapy-refractory epithelial malignancy for which better treatments are needed. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is emerging as a promising cancer treatment, but its study in epithelial malignancies has been limited. This study was conducted to determine if ACT could mediate regression of metastatic cervical cancer. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled onto this protocol were diagnosed with metastatic cervical cancer and had previously received platinum-based chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Patients were treated with a single infusion of tumor-infiltrating T cells selected when possible for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 reactivity (HPV-TILs). Cell infusion was preceded by lymphocyte-depleting chemotherapy and was followed by administration of aldesleukin. Results Three of nine patients experienced objective tumor responses (two complete responses and one partial response). The two complete responses were ongoing 22 and 15 months after treatment, respectively. One partial response was 3 months in duration. The HPV reactivity of T cells in the infusion product (as measured by interferon gamma production, enzyme-linked immunospot, and CD137 upregulation assays) correlated positively with clinical response (P = .0238 for all three assays). In addition, the frequency of HPV-reactive T cells in peripheral blood 1 month after treatment was positively associated with clinical response (P = .0238). Conclusion Durable, complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer can occur after a single infusion of HPV-TILs. Exploratory studies suggest a correlation between HPV reactivity of the infusion product and clinical response. Continued investigation of this therapy is warranted. PMID:25823737

  16. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from renal cell cancer : treatment attempt with radiation and sunitinib (case report)

    OpenAIRE

    Haukland Ellinor; Dalhaug Astrid; Nieder Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with known brain and lung metastases from renal cell cancer without previous systemic therapy is presented. Neoplastic meningitis (NM) developed 31 months after first diagnosis of simultaneous extra- and intracranial recurrence of kidney cancer and surgical resection of a cerebellar metastasis. In spite of local radiotherapy to the macroscopic NM lesions in the cervical and lumbar spine followed by initiation of sunitinib, the pati...

  17. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27375275

  18. Thermoradiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To improve the treatment results of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient, we treated those patients with regional hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. And we conducted a retrospective analysis of the results.Methods and Materials : Thirty two non small cell lung cancer patients treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's hospital. Catholic University Medical College were the base of this analysis. Fourteen patients of above them were treated with hyperthermia and radiotherapy of more than 3000 cGy in radiation dose. Radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia was administered twice weekly, immediately after radiotherapy. Total sessions of hyperthermia ranged from 3 to 13 times (mean 7,8). Eighteen patient received an external radiation therapy alone. Median radiation dose was 5580 cGy (range, 3000-7000 cGy) in fraction of 180-300 cGy, 5 fractions per week.Results : The results of thermoradiotherapy group (HTRT group) were compared with radiation alone group (RT group). There were no complete response (CR) and 12 partial responses (PR) (CR rate 0%, response rate 85.7%) in HTRT group, whereas there were 2 CRs, 8 PRs and 8 no responses (CR rate 11.1%, response rate 55.6%) in RT group. There was significant difference in local response rate of the tumors between RT group and HTRT group (p<0.05). Overall 2 year survival rate and mean survival were 7.1% and 10.5 months for HTRT group, and 0% 8.1 months for RT group. However, by the number of hyperthermia, in cases with more than or equal to 10 sessions of hyperthermia, there were significant improvement in 2 year survival rate and mean survival (40.0% and 18.2 months) compared with those in cases with less than 10 sessions of hyperthermia (7.4% and 7.4 months) (p<0.05).Conclusion : Thermoradiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLC patients increased their response rate but not 2 year survival and mean survival, therefore thermoradiotherapy with enough number of hyperthermia is

  19. Current trends of the external radiotherapy in treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer belongs to the most frequent malign cancer on the world. Local and loco-regional methods of therapy are for this form of cancer highly important. Dominant position has radiation therapy, which is treating 60 % of all patients. Author provides an overview about the conventional and non-conventional sources of radiation, mainly about linear accelerator, which is used in therapy of NSCLC. This article offers basic information about conventional radiotherapy; it evaluates the fractional modes and doses used for curative and palliative radiation therapy. (author)

  20. Focus on the potential role of ficlatuzumab in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Arcangelo M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Manolo D’Arcangelo,1,2 Federico Cappuzzo2 1Cancer Center, University of Colorado, Aurora (CO, USA; 2Department of Oncology, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Ospedale Civile, Livorno, Italy Abstract: Lung cancer treatment has rapidly changed in the last few years thanks to novel insights into cancer biology. Several biomarkers and signaling pathways have been recognized as conceivable targets for treatment, and among them is the mesenchymal–epithelial transition/hepatocyte growth factor (c-MET/HGF axis. Alterations in the c-MET gene and aberrations of MET and HGF expression impact on lung cancer prognosis and are involved in resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Several anti-MET and anti-HGF strategies are currently under investigation, including monoclonal antibodies. Ficlatuzumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against HGF that is currently under investigation in NSCLC. The aim of the present review is to critically review available data on HGF and ficlatuzumab in NSCLC. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, MET, hepatocyte growth factor, ficlatuzumab, AV-299

  1. A Quest for Initiating Cells of Head and Neck Cancer and Their Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and other cancers have been related to cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Specific markers, which vary considerably depending on tumor type or tissue of origin, characterize CSC. CSC are cancer initiating, sustaining and mostly quiescent. Compared to bulk tumors, CSC are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy and may have low immunogenicity. Therapeutic targeting of CSC may improve clinical outcome. HNSCC has two main etiologies: human papillomavirus, a virus infecting epithelial stem cells, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. Here, current knowledge of HNSCC-CSC biology is reviewed and parallels to CSC of other origin are drawn where necessary for a comprehensive picture

  2. A Quest for Initiating Cells of Head and Neck Cancer and Their Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital (China); Köberle, Beate [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-27

    The biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and other cancers have been related to cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Specific markers, which vary considerably depending on tumor type or tissue of origin, characterize CSC. CSC are cancer initiating, sustaining and mostly quiescent. Compared to bulk tumors, CSC are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy and may have low immunogenicity. Therapeutic targeting of CSC may improve clinical outcome. HNSCC has two main etiologies: human papillomavirus, a virus infecting epithelial stem cells, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. Here, current knowledge of HNSCC-CSC biology is reviewed and parallels to CSC of other origin are drawn where necessary for a comprehensive picture.

  3. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van, E-mail: M.vanDuursen@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Smeets, Evelien E.J.W. [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijk, Jeroen C.W. [RIKILT - Institute for Food Safety, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den [Endocrine Toxicology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, PO Box 80177, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  4. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  5. Hormone signaling pathways as treatment targets in renal cell cancer (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Niedzwiedzka, Magdalena; Porta, Camillo; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, biochemical and genetic research has revealed that renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology is hormone-related. It was shown that hormone receptors are abnormally expressed in RCC cells. Abnormal endocrine stimulation also plays a significant role in RCC pathophysiology. Cellular proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, and drug resistance in RCC is modulated by para- and autocrine hormonal stimulation. In particular, RCC overexpression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and its receptor was reported. On the contrary, corticotropin releasing hormone was reported to inhibit RCC cell proliferation and regulate angiogenesis. Overexpression of luteinizing hormone also promotes RCC tumor angiogenesis. Estrogen receptor α overexpression increases the transcriptional factor activity of hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α, but estrogen receptor β has a cancer suppressive role. Glucocorticoid receptors and androgen receptor are markers of indolent RCC and assigned tumor suppressive activity. Proopiomelanocortin is upregulated in VHL-mutated renal cell carcinoma via Nur77 transcription factor signaling. In RCC, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promotes angiogenesis and metastatic formation via VEGF release. Mineralocorticoid receptor overexpression promotes cell survival and increases RCC cell proliferation. Vitamin D receptor expression is downregulated or absent in RCC and differentiate subtypes of renal cell tumors. RAR-β promotes tumorigenesis but retinoic acid receptor γ expression correlates negatively with the TNM stage at diagnosis. Finally, progesterone receptor expression is negatively correlated with the cancer stage. Molecular data analysis revealed the possibility of renal cancer cell proliferation induction via hormone activated pathways. Inhibition of hormonal signaling may thus play a putative role in supportive therapies against this cancer type. PMID:27035677

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following PDQ summaries: Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Testicular Cancer Treatment Age and gender can affect the risk ... summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and ...

  7. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grains, and a moderate amount of low-fat meat and dairy products. Limit the fat and sugar in your diet. A healthy diet will help your body get better after cancer treatment. It's also important for you to get ...

  8. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are used in cancer treatment? What are the advantages of laser therapy? What are the disadvantages of ... the drugs used in PDT. What are the advantages of laser therapy? Lasers are more precise than ...

  9. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arindam; Dey, Sanjib; Das, Pijush; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-06-01

    Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF) properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC) harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR) treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53(R273H) (GEO#: GSE77533). We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53. PMID:27114909

  10. The Result of Combined Modality Treatment for Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From July 1984 to September 1988, 27 patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer were treated with combined modality(combination chemotherapy Plus radiotherapy) at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology in Kyungpook National University Hospital. Of the 27 patients, 19(70%) achieved a complete response, 6(22%) a partial response, and 2(8%) no response. Female, performance status HO, serum enolase level below 30ng/ml, radiation dose over 4500 cGy, and 4 or more cycles of chemotherapy had a favorable effect on the rates of complete response, although there were no statistical differences according to the variables. Median survival time was 10 Months and overall 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40.7% and 12.2%, respectively. Complete response(p<0.05), performance status HO(p<0.05), 4 or more cycles of chemotherapy(p<0.05), and radiation dose over 4500 cGy had a significantly favorable effect on 2-year survival rate. Prophylactic cranial irradiation or sex had no effect on survival. The results of this study suggest that radiation treatment should be combined with combination chemotherapy in the therapeutic strategy of SCLC of limited stage

  11. Acute phase response before treatment predicts radiation esophagitis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiation esophagitis (RE) represents an inflammatory reaction to radiation therapy (RT). We hypothesized that aspects of the physiologic acute phase response (APR) predicts RE. Material and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 285 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation. The primary analysis was the association of pretreatment lab values reflective of the APR with symptomatic (grade ⩾2) RE. Univariate and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to test associations of clinical and pretreatment lab values with RE. Optimal cutpoints and multivariable risk stratification groupings were determined via recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Pretreatment platelet counts were higher and hemoglobin levels lower in patients who developed RE (P < 0.05). Based on these two pre-treatment risk factors, an APR score was defined as 0 (no risk factors), 1 (either risk factor), or 2 (both risk factors). APR score was significantly associated with RE in both univariate (OR = 2.3 for each point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.4, P = 0.001) and multivariate (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.3–3.4, P = 0.002) analyses. Conclusions: The APR score may represent a novel metric to predict RE. However, pending validation in an independent dataset, caution is advised when interpreting these results given their retrospective and thus exploratory nature

  12. Renal function in high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, A; Shpall, E J; Jones, R B; Archer, P G; Schrier, R W

    1996-09-01

    Autologous and allogeneic bone marrow grafting both require cytoreductive therapy but only the allogeneic procedure requires immunosuppressive agents. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of both renal failure and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver, the combination of which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. There is less known about the frequency and severity of these complications in patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation. In the present study renal, hepatic and other complications were examined in 232 patients with Stages II/III and IV breast cancer who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support with either marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells. The post-treatment severity of the renal dysfunction was classified as follows: Grade 0, normal renal function [ 25% decrement in GFR but twofold rise in serum creatinine but no need for dialysis; Grade 3 > than twofold rise in serum creatinine and need for dialysis. There were 102 patients (44%) who were classified as Grade 0 and 81 patients (35%) who were classified as Grade 1 renal dysfunction. Severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) was observed in 49 of the 232 patients (21%). This severe renal dysfunction of 21% compares with a previously reported 53% incidence of severe renal dysfunction for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Similarly, the frequency of hepatic VOD was less (4.7% or 11 of 232 patients) in this autologous bone marrow transplant study as compared to a reported incidence of hepatic VOD ranging from 22 to 53% in large series of allogeneic bone marrow transplant patients. The severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) in the present autologous hematopoietic cell support study correlated most significantly with sepsis, liver and pulmonary dysfunction. The major fall in GFR occurred during chemotherapy but before hematopoietic cell support, thus

  13. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  14. Key cell signaling pathways modulated by zerumbone: role in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasannan, Remya; Kalesh, Karunakaran A; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Nachiyappan, Alamelu; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Nguyen, An H; Kumar, Alan Prem; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2012-11-15

    Phytochemicals and their synthetic derivatives are making a significant contribution in modern drug discovery programs by targeting several human diseases, including cancer. Most of these natural compounds are often multitargeted in nature, which is generally a very desirable property for cancer therapy, as carcinomas typically involve dysregulation of multiple genes and associated cell-signaling pathways at various stages of initiation, progression and metastasis. Additionally, these natural agents generally have lower side-effects, are readily available and hence are cost effective. One such natural compound is zerumbone, a cyclic eleven-membered sesquiterpene, isolated from the tropical plant Zingiber zerumbet Smith that has attracted great attention recently for its potent anticancer activities in several tumor models. This review summarizes the data based on various in vitro and in vivo studies related to the effects of zerumbone on numerous pivotal molecular targets in cancer and its reported chemopreventive/therapeutic effects in different models of cancer. PMID:22842489

  15. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  16. Afatinib for the treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring sensitizing mutations in the tyrosine kinase (TKI) domain has led to a significant change in the management of this disease. The classic or sensitizing mutations are G719X mutation in exon 18, in-frame deletions or insertion of exon 19, L858R or L861Q mutation in exon 21. Approximately 90% of these mutations are exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R point mutation. Gefitinib and erlotinib are reversible first-generation inhibitors of mutant EGFR, and treatment with these agents in the first-line setting has demonstrated a progression-free survival of 9.5–13.7 months. However, the majority of these patients ultimately develop resistance to these drugs. Afatinib is an irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor that was developed to circumvent the problem of resistance to first-generation TKIs. The LUX-Lung studies have evaluated the efficacy and toxicities of afatinib in treatment-naïve and refractory NSCLC patients. The promising results of some of these trials led to approval of afatinib by the US Food and Drug Administration for patients with advanced NSCLC and EGFR exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations. Afatinib causes toxicities similar to those of the first-generation EGFR TKIs, such as diarrhea, rash, acne, and stomatitis, and overall is well tolerated. This article focuses on the clinical studies of afatinib in patients with NSCLC

  17. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  18. Myeloid derived suppressor cells – a new therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wesolowski, Robert; Markowitz, Joseph; Carson, William E

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are increased in states of cancer, inflammation and infection. In malignant states, MDSC are induced by tumor secreted growth factors. MDSC play an important part in suppression of host immune responses through several mechanisms such as production of arginase 1, release of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and secretion of immune-suppressive cytokines. This leads to a permissive immun...

  19. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Chia-Wen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ju-Hsien [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shih-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Lee, Pei-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Lee, Te-Chang, E-mail: bmtcl@ibms.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  20. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: ► ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. ► Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. ► SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. ► ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  1. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  2. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of tivantinib in the treatment of inoperable or recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tivantinib is a selective, oral, non-ATP-competitive, small molecule inhibitor of the c-Met receptor, tyrosine kinase, which is implicated at different levels of tumor cell migration, invasion, proliferation, and metastasis. Tivantinib has shown antitumor activity in various human tumor cell lines and in xenograft models of human cancers, including non-small-cell lung cancer. Few therapeutic options are available at present for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, so there is a pressing need for new therapeutic strategies to improve response and survival. Amplification of Met has been reported in more than 20% of lung tumors that have acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, implying that treatment of these tumors with a c-Met inhibitor should overcome resistance. Tivantinib has shown interesting and promising results in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and appears to be well tolerated, either alone or in combination with other drugs. An interesting additional feature is the ability of the drug to delay development of new metastasis, in agreement with the proposed role of Met in this particular setting

  3. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Jaworska; Wojciech Król; Ewelina Szliszka

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve th...

  4. Pemetrexed in maintenance treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seigo Minami,1 Takashi Kijima2 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka Police Hospital, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatic Diseases, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Pemetrexed, a multitargeting antifolate cytotoxic drug, plays a leading role in front-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Following its approval as second-line monotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic non-squamous NSCLC, pemetrexed has established itself as the first-line regimen in combination with cisplatin, and its powerful antitumor effects and less cumulative toxicities were then taken advantage of in the JMEN and PARAMOUNT trials, respectively, to pioneer a new treatment strategy of switch and continuation maintenance monotherapy. These developments have brought about a marked paradigm shift, and made pemetrexed indispensable in the treatment for non-squamous NSCLC. So far, only three drugs have been approved for maintenance therapy; pemetrexed both by switch and continuation maintenance, erlotinib by switch maintenance, and bevacizumab by continuation maintenance. Compared with observation alone after defined cycles of the first-line chemotherapy, subsequent pemetrexed maintenance therapy has provided significantly longer survival and infrequent severe adverse events. The cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed maintenance therapy is controversial, as well as the other two maintenance drugs, bevacizumab and erlotinib. The latest attractive attention is a combination maintenance therapy. We may have to consider epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status for selection of a combination pattern. A combination maintenance therapy of pemetrexed plus bevacizumab is potential for patients with wild-type EGFR status, while a EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-containing combination is promising for patients with active EGFR mutation status. Pemetrexed will be

  5. Putative contribution of CD56 positive cells in cetuximab treatment efficacy in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activity of cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, is largely attributed to its direct antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) could be another possible mechanism of cetuximab antitumor effects and its specific contribution on the clinical activity of cetuximab is unknown. We assessed immune cells infiltrate (CD56, CD68, CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3) in the primary tumor of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with a first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy in the framework of prospective trials (treatment group) and in a matched group of mCRC patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen without cetuximab (control group). The relationship between intra-tumoral immune effector cells, the K-ras status and the efficacy of the treatment were investigated. We also evaluated in vitro, the ADCC activity in healthy donors and chemonaive mCRC patients and the specific contribution of CD56+ cells. ADCC activity against DLD1 CRC cell line is maintained in cancer patients and significantly declined after CD56+ cells depletion. In multivariate analysis, K-ras wild-type (HR: 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.3), p = 0.001) and tumor infiltrating CD56+ cells (HR: 2.6, (95%CI:1.14-6.0), p = 0.019) were independent favourable prognostic factors for PFS and response only in the cetuximab treatment group. By contrast CD56+ cells failed to predict PFS and response in the control group. CD56+ cells, mainly NK cells, may be the major effector of ADCC related-cetuximab activity. Assessment of CD56+ cells infiltrate in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma may provide additional information to K-ras status in predicting response and PFS in mCRC patients treated with first-line cetuximab-based chemotherapy

  6. Clinical Perspectives on Targeting of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana George Najjar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer (NK cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and their levels have been shown to correlate with prognosis and overall survival. Multiple methods of inhibiting MDSCs are currently under investigation. These can broadly be categorized into methods that a promote differentiation of MDSC into mature, non-suppressive cells (all trans retinoic acid, vitamin D, b decrease MDSC levels (sunitinib, gemcitabine, 5-FU, CDDO-Me, or c functionally inhibit MDSC (PDE-5 inhibitors, COX-2 inhibitors. Recently, several pre-clinical tumor models of combination therapy involving sunitinib plus vaccines and/or adoptive therapy have shown promise in MDSC inhibition and improved outcomes in the tumor bearing host. Current clinical trials are underway in RCC patients to assess not only the impact on clinical outcome, but how this combination can enhance anti-tumor immunity and reduce immune suppression. Decreasing immune suppression by MDSC in the cancer host may improve outcomes and prolong survival in this patient population.

  7. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  8. Clinical perspectives on targeting of myeloid derived suppressor cells in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Yana G; Finke, James H

    2013-01-01

    Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes, or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and their levels have been shown to correlate with prognosis and overall survival. Multiple methods of inhibiting MDSCs are currently under investigation. These can broadly be categorized into methods that (a) promote differentiation of MDSC into mature, non-suppressive cells (all trans retinoic acid, vitamin D), (b) decrease MDSC levels (sunitinib, gemcitabine, 5-FU, CDDO-Me), or (c) functionally inhibit MDSC (PDE-5 inhibitors, cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors). Recently, several pre-clinical tumor models of combination therapy involving sunitinib plus vaccines and/or adoptive therapy have shown promise in MDSC inhibition and improved outcomes in the tumor bearing host. Current clinical trials are underway in RCC patients to assess not only the impact on clinical outcome, but how this combination can enhance anti-tumor immunity and reduce immune suppression. Decreasing immune suppression by MDSC in the cancer host may improve outcomes and prolong survival in this patient population. PMID:23508517

  9. Transcriptome Profiling of Caco-2 Cancer Cell Line following Treatment with Extracts from Iodine-Biofortified Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta A Koronowicz

    Full Text Available Although iodization of salt is the most common method used to obtain iodine-enriched food, iodine deficiency disorders are still a global health problem and profoundly affect the quality of human life. Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which are crucial regulators of human metabolism, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and have been reported to be involved in carcinogenesis. In this study, for the first time, we evaluated the effect of iodine-biofortified lettuce on transcriptomic profile of Caco-2 cancer cell line by applying the Whole Human Genome Microarray assay. We showed 1326 differentially expressed Caco-2 transcripts after treatment with iodine-biofortified (BFL and non-fortified (NFL lettuce extracts. We analysed pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and protein classes based on comparison between BFL and NFL specific genes. Iodine, which was expected to act as a free ion (KI-NFL or at least in part to be incorporated into lettuce macromolecules (BFL, differently regulated pathways of numerous transcription factors leading to different cellular effects. In this study we showed the inhibition of Caco-2 cells proliferation after treatment with BFL, but not potassium iodide (KI, and BFL-mediated induction of mitochondrial apoptosis and/or cell differentiation. Our results showed that iodine-biofortified plants can be effectively used by cells as an alternative source of this trace element. Moreover, the observed differences in action of both iodine sources may suggest a potential of BFL in cancer treatment.

  10. High-Resolution Flow Cytometry: a Suitable Tool for Monitoring Aneuploid Prostate Cancer Cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Klaus; Ehemann, Volker; Wiessler, Manfred; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Didinger, Bernd; Mueller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2009-01-01

    If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents. Temozolomide (TMZ) as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising. Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progress...

  11. Outcome of surgical resection for brain metastases and radical treatment of the primary tumor in Chinese non–small-cell lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhenye; Zhang, Xiangheng; Jiang, Xiaobing; Guo, Chengcheng; Sai, Ke; Yang, Qunying; He, Zhenqiang; Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhongping; Li, Wei; Mou, Yonggao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastasis is the most common complication of brain cancer; nevertheless, primary lung cancer accounts for approximately 20%–40% of brain metastases cases. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for brain metastases. However, no studies have reported the outcome of surgical resection of brain metastases from non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the People’s Republic of China. Moreover, the optimal treatment for primary NSCLC in patients with synchronous brain metastases ...

  12. Physical treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trend of physical treatment and its outcome of lung cancer are described together with authors' experience. In locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC) at stages IIIA and B, radiotherapy, chemotherapy (CT) and their combined therapy (RCT) have been major mainly in US since 1980s. After phase I/II trials of RCT by Okayama Lung Cancer Study Group where 5-year survival with nondisease is shown to be 31% (2003), phase III trial has been performed with results to be reported in 2008. A similar study by West Japan Oncology Group is now in summary. The secondary carcinogenesis not by radiation post RCT has become a problem: 10 years after, reportedly 61% incidence. Concerning the choice and regimen of CT medicals, there are many discussions. In recurrent/advanced NSCC, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) (gefitinib and recently, erlotinib) will be further useful, and molecular target medicals like an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody (bevacizumab) and other novel RTK inhibitors will be also promising. In small cell lung cancer (SCC), efficacy 50% of amrubicin has been reported in a phase II trial recently. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in the extensive cases has been recognized effective also recently. CT studies with a large dose of anti-cancer drugs of SCC are still under progress. Along with the introduction of many molecular target drugs, physical treatment of lung cancer is to be bright in future. (R.T.)

  13. GRP78 Knockdown Enhances Apoptosis via the Down-Regulation of Oxidative Stress and Akt Pathway after Epirubicin Treatment in Colon Cancer DLD-1 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yu-Jia; HUANG, YI-PING; Li, Zih-Ling; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) is induced in the cancer microenvironment and can be considered as a novel predictor of responsiveness to chemotherapy in many cancers. In this study, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation were higher in GRP78 knockdown DLD-1 colon cancer cells compared with scrambled control cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Treatment with epirubicin i...

  14. Treatment decisions and survival for people with small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, H. A.; Tata, L J; Baldwin, D. R.; Potter, V A; Stanley, R. A.; Khakwani, A; Hubbard , R B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy improves survival for many patients with SCLC, and hence it is important to understand variations in practice and outcomes for this treatment strategy. Methods: We used the National Lung Cancer Audit and Hospital Episodes Statistics to determine the proportion of patients who received chemotherapy for SCLC, and assess the effects of patient and organisational factors on the odds of receiving chemotherapy and of completing four cycles. We calculated median survival and...

  15. Combination treatment with flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 reduces cancer stem cell traits by targeting STAT3 and telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seyung S; Oliva, Bryant; Dwabe, Sami; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. The malignant CRC that undergoes metastasis in the advanced stage is usually refractory to existing chemotherapy and shows a poor prognosis. However, to date, efficient targeted-therapy for metastatic CRC is ill-defined. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment of flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 may reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) traits. To characterize CSC phenotype, we performed the CD133/CD44 subpopulation profiling, tumorsphere formation assay, cell invasion assay and wound healing assay. We have examined the augmenting effects of the combined treatment of morin and MST‑312 for 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) efficacy in human colorectal cancer. Morin and MST‑312 combined treatment reduced CD133 (+) and CD44 (+) subpopulations in human colorectal and breast cancer cells, respectively. Tumorsphere formation and cell invasiveness were decreased with the morin and MST‑312 combination treatment. Consistent with these data, morin and MST‑312 treatment decreased the wound healing capacity of human breast cancer cells. Stress and apoptosis antibody arrays revealed that there were specific upregulated and downregulated proteins resulting from different treatments. Phosphorylation levels of BAD, p53 and Chk1 were enhanced upon morin/MST‑312 treatments in HT-29 cells, whereas caspase-3 cleavage level and expression of IκBα were downregulated by combined morin/MST‑312 treatment in SW620 cells. Finally, morin and MST‑312 co-treatment further augmented the 5-FU efficacy, chemosensitizing the 5-FU resistant human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study suggests that novel targeted-therapy can be implemented by using flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 for improved cancer prognosis. PMID:27279256

  16. Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25095295

  17. Advances in Treatment of Brain Metastases 
from Primary Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen LIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors involving the brain are an important complication in the overall management of non-small cell lung cancers. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy, however, the burgeoning knowledge of tumor biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. This review mainly summarizes the current applications of these data to surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  18. Treatment outcomes of female germ cell tumors: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute experience

    OpenAIRE

    Saber, Magdy M; Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Mosaad M. El Gammal; Salem E. Salem; Amira D. Darweesh; Alshaymaa A. Abdelaziz; Manar Monir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Female germ cell tumors (GCTS) are rare tumors that carry a good prognosis. Aim: To report the experience of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (ENCI) in managing female GCTs. Methods: This retrospective study included 19 females with ovarian GCTs presenting to the ENCI between 2006 and 2010. Results: The median age was 23 years. Ovaries were the primary site in all patients. Dysgerminoma and teratoma were the predominant pathologies followed by mixed GCT in females...

  19. Erlotinib for the treatment of relapsed non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C; Bagust, A; Boland, A; Hockenhull, J; Dundar, Y; Proudlove, C; Davis, H; Green, J; Macbeth, F; Stevenson, J; Walley, T; Dickson, R

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical and cost-effectiveness of erlotinib for the treatment of relapsed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to its licensed indication, based upon the evidence submission from Roche Products to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The submitted clinical evidence includes one randomised controlled trial (RCT) (BR21) investigating the effect of erlotinib versus placebo, which demonstrates that erlotinib significantly increases median overall survival, progression-free survival and response rate compared with placebo. The majority of patients in the trial experienced non-haematological drug-related adverse effects. Currently there are no trials that directly compare erlotinib with any other second-line chemotherapy agent. For the purposes of indirect comparison, the manufacturer's submission provides a narrative discussion of data from 11 RCTs investigating the use of docetaxel. From these data the manufacturer concludes that erlotinib has similar clinical efficacy levels to docetaxel but results in fewer serious haematological adverse events; however, it is difficult to compare the results of BR21 with those of the docetaxel trials or with current UK clinical practice because, for example, the BR21 patient population is younger than that expected to present in UK clinical practice and almost half of the BR21 participants received erlotinib as third-line chemotherapy, with third-line chemotherapy being rare in the UK. The manufacturer's submission included a three-state model comparing erlotinib with docetaxel, reporting an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 1764 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for erlotinib compared with docetaxel. Rerunning the manufacturer's economic model with varied parameters and assumptions increases the ICER to in excess of 52

  20. Direct electric current treatment modifies mitochondrial function and lipid body content in the A549 cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holandino, Carla; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; de Oliveira, Felipe Alves Gomes; Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Siqueira, Camila Monteiro; Messeder, Douglas Jardim; de Aguiar, Fernanda Silva; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Miranda, Kildare; Galina, Antonio; Capella, Marcia Alves Marques; Morales, Marcelo Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical therapy (EChT) entails treatment of solid tumors with direct electric current (DC). This work evaluated the specific effects of anodic flow generated by DC on biochemical and metabolic features of the A549 human lung cancer cell line. Apoptosis was evaluated on the basis of caspase-3 activity and mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation. Cell morphology was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, and lipid droplets were studied through morphometric analysis and X-ray qualitative elemental microanalysis. High-resolution respirometry was used to assess mitochondrial respiratory parameters. Results indicated A549 viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a prominent drop between 18 and 24h after treatment (pbodies' number, quantified by morphometrical analyses. Conversely, 24h after treatment, the cells presented a two-fold increase of residual oxygen consumption, accounting for 45.3% of basal oxygen consumption. These results show remarkable alterations promoted by anodic flow on human lung cancer cells which are possibly involved with the antitumoral effects of EChT. PMID:27243447

  1. Nutritional immunology: function of natural killer cells and their modulation by resveratrol for cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischner, Christian; Burkard, Markus; Pfeiffer, Matthias M; Lauer, Ulrich M; Busch, Christian; Venturelli, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells as part of the innate immune system represent the first line of defence against (virus-) infected and malignantly transformed cells. The emerging field of nutritional immunology focuses on compounds featuring immune-modulating activities in particular on NK cells, which e.g. can be exploited for cancer prevention and treatment. The plant-based nutrition resveratrol is a ternary hydroxylated stilbene, which is present in many foods and beverages, respectively. In humans it comprises a large variety of distinct biological activities. Interestingly, resveratrol strongly modulates the immune response including the activity of NK cells. This review will give an overview on NK cell functions and summarize the resveratrol-mediated modulation thereof. PMID:27142426

  2. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007 is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel. A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.Keywords: ABI-007, Abraxane, nab

  3. Oral squamous cell carcinoma proliferative phenotype is modulated by proanthocyanidins: a potential prevention and treatment alternative for oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapp Aaron

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recently reported drop in the overall death rate from cancer, the estimated survival rate and number of deaths from oral cancer remain virtually unchanged. Early detection efforts, in combination with strategies for prevention and risk-reduction, have the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. The identification of non-toxic, effective treatments, including complementary and alternative therapies, is critical if the survival rate is to be improved. Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect from certain plant-derived foods and extracts; however, it has been difficult to isolate and identify the compounds most responsible for these observations. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the response of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to proanthocyanidin (PAC, a plant-derived compound that may inhibit the progression of several other cancers. Methods Using a series of in vitro assays, we sought to quantify the effects of PAC on OSCC, cervical carcinoma, and non-cancerous cell lines, specifically the effects of PAC on cell proliferation. Recent data suggest that infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV may also modulate the proliferative potential of OSCC; therefore, we also measured the effects of PAC administration on HPV-transfected OSCC proliferation. Results Our results demonstrated that PAC administration was sufficient to significantly suppress cellular proliferation of OSCC in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the increased proliferation of OSCC after transfection with HPV 16 was reduced by the administration of PAC, as was the proliferation of the cervical cancer and non-cancerous cell lines tested. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that PAC administration may induce apoptosis in cervical and oral cancer cell lines, while acting merely to suppress proliferation of the normal cell line control. Conclusion These results signify that PAC may be

  4. RB1 status in triple negative breast cancer cells dictates response to radiation treatment and selective therapeutic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J W Robinson

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC includes basal-like and claudin-low subtypes for which only chemotherapy and radiation therapy are currently available. The retinoblastoma (RB1 tumor suppressor is frequently lost in human TNBC. Knockdown of RB1 in luminal BC cells was shown to affect response to endocrine, radiation and several antineoplastic drugs. However, the effect of RB1 status on radiation and chemo-sensitivity in TNBC cells and whether RB1 status affects response to divergent or specific treatment are unknown. Using multiple basal-like and claudin-low cell lines, we hereby demonstrate that RB-negative TNBC cell lines are highly sensitive to gamma-irradiation, and moderately more sensitive to doxorubicin and methotrexate compared to RB-positive TNBC cell lines. In contrast, RB1 status did not affect sensitivity of TNBC cells to multiple other drugs including cisplatin (CDDP, 5-fluorouracil, idarubicin, epirubicin, PRIMA-1(met, fludarabine and PD-0332991, some of which are used to treat TNBC patients. Moreover, a non-biased screen of ∼3400 compounds, including FDA-approved drugs, revealed similar sensitivity of RB-proficient and -deficient TNBC cells. Finally, ESA(+/CD24(-/low/CD44(+ cancer stem cells from RB-negative TNBC lines were consistently more sensitive to gamma-irradiation than RB-positive lines, whereas the effect of chemotherapy on the cancer stem cell fraction varied irrespective of RB1 expression. Our results suggest that patients carrying RB-deficient TNBCs would benefit from gamma-irradiation as well as doxorubicin and methotrexate therapy, but not necessarily from many other anti-neoplastic drugs.

  5. Gold nanorod stabilized by thiolated chitosan as photothermal absorber for cancer cell treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanorod (GNR) has great potential in the field of cancer therapy because of its photophysical property in converting near-infrared (NIR) laser light into heat. Fabrication of GNRs by seed-mediated growth method with the aid of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is a popular approach. However, due to high cytotoxicity of CTAB, it is necessary to modify the surface of CTAB-passivated GNRs for cell-related studies. In this study, thiolated chitosan was synthesized and harnessed to replace CTAB originally used to stabilize GNRs. The average size and morphological shape of CTAB-passivated GNRs (66.0 nm) and thiolated chitosan-modified GNRs (CGNRs) (84.9 nm) were determined by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to confirm the existence of Au–S binding energy at 162.4 eV. Cytotoxicity study revealed that CGNRs were much biocompatible than CTAB-stabilized GNRs. Our results showed that CGNRs functionalized with folic acid (FA) could be internalized by human colon HT-29 cancer cells via folate-mediated endocytosis. From the viability of CGNR-laden HT-29 cells irradiated with 808-nm NIR laser light, we demonstrated that CGNR is a potential photothermal nano-absorber for the ablation of malignant cells under NIR laser exposure.

  6. Changing paradigm in treatment of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sundaram Viswanath; Abhishek Pathak; Amul Kapoor; Anvesh Rathore; Bhupendra Nath Kapur

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest forms of cancer. It accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases and 19% of cancer-related deaths. In India, lung cancer constitutes 6.9% of all new cancer cases and 9.3% of all cancer cases. There has also been a dramatic rise worldwide in both the absolute and relative frequencies of lung cancer occurrence. In 1953 it became the most common cause of cancer mortality in men. By 1985, it became the leading cause of cancer deaths in women, causing almost twice as many deaths as breast cancer. The demographic proifle of lung cancer has changed greatly over the years; however, methods for diagnosing, screening, and managing lung cancer patients have improved. This is due to our growing understanding of the biology of lung cancer. It is now possible to further deifne lung cancer types beyond small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, new histology-based therapeutic modalities have been developed, and more new lung cancer biomarkers have been uncovered. Therefore, more detailed histological characterization of lung cancer samples is warranted in order to determine the best course of treatment for speciifc patients. This review article describes how these new molecular technologies are shaping the way lung cancer can be treated in future.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  8. Eribulin in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Swami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Halichondrin B is a complex, natural, polyether macrolide derived from marine sponges. Eribulin is a structurally-simplified, synthetic, macrocyclic ketone analogue of Halichondrin B. Eribulin was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration in 2010 as a third-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has a unique microtubule dynamics inhibitory action. Phase III studies have either been completed or are currently ongoing in breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Phase I and II studies in multiple cancers and various combinations are currently ongoing. This article reviews the available information on eribulin with respect to its clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, metabolism, preclinical studies, and with special focus on clinical trials.

  9. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are safe. DO NOT eat fish, eggs, or meat that is raw or undercooked. And DO NOT ... During or right after cancer treatment, call your health care provider right away if you have any of the signs of infection mentioned above. Getting ...

  10. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.)

  11. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  12. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govaert Stephanie LA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IMRT in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods and materials Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy or combined with (sequential or concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI after one year and 56% (±14% after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11% after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013 with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly combined with chemotherapy.

  13. Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy) or combined with (sequential or concurrent) chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI) after one year and 56% (±14%) after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11%) after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013) with no differences in pulmonary toxicity. This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly) combined with chemotherapy

  14. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  15. Treatment Success in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj; Soares, Heloisa P.; Hozo, Iztok; Bepler, Gerold; Clarke, Mike; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The evaluation of research output, such as estimation of the proportion of treatment successes, is of ethical, scientific, and public importance but has rarely been evaluated systematically. We assessed how often experimental cancer treatments that undergo testing in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) result in discovery of successful new interventions. Methods We extracted data from all completed (published and unpublished) phase 3 RCTs conducted by the National Cancer Institute cooperative groups since their inception in 1955. Therapeutic successes were determined by (1) assessing the proportion of statistically significant trials favoring new or standard treatments, (2) determining the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior to standard treatments according to the original researchers, and (3) quantitatively synthesizing data for main clinical outcomes (overall and event-free survival). Results Data from 624 trials (781 randomized comparisons) involving 216 451 patients were analyzed. In all, 30% of trials had statistically significant results, of which new interventions were superior to established treatments in 80% of trials. The original researchers judged that the risk-benefit profile favored new treatments in 41% of comparisons (316 of 766). Hazard ratios for overall and event-free survival, available for 614 comparisons, were 0.95 (99% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.98) and 0.90 (99% CI, 0.87- 0.93), respectively, slightly favoring new treatments. Breakthrough interventions were discovered in 15% of trials. Conclusions Approximately 25% to 50% of new cancer treatments that reach the stage of assessment in RCTs will prove successful. The pattern of successes has become more stable over time. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the ethical principle of equipoise defines limits of discoverability in clinical research and ultimately drives therapeutic advances in clinical medicine. PMID:18362256

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of paclitaxel + carboplatin vs. alternative combinations in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Eandi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer and its medical and economical burden represents a serious matter in Europe and Usa, due to its high mortality rates and drug costs. Lung cancer is responsible for about 30% of cancer death in men and women; in Europe only about 8 per cent of people with lung cancer survive for 5 years. At present combination chemotherapy based on cisplatin or carboplatin associated with paclitaxel, vinorelbine or gemcitabine is the state of the art for the treatment in patients with stage IIIb or IV NSCLC. Aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of paclitaxel/carboplatin (PCb, gemcitabine/cisplatin (GC and vinorelbine/cisplatin (VC in the perspective of the Italian National Health Service. Therefore we perfomed a semi-Markov decision model mainly based on clinical results from the Italian Lung Cancer Project. The model included differential direct medical costs registered for two years from starting chemotherapy, using tariffs valid for 2005. Benefits was measured by years of life saved (YOLs. The model also allowed to estimate only costs accrued over the period of time, performing a cost-minimisation analysis. According to cost-effectiveness analysis, VC is dominated because it’s more costly and less effective than GC. On the contrary, combination chemotherapy with GC is more inexpensive but less effective than paclitaxel/carboplatin (PCb: in this case we compared the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER with a maximum acceptable willingness-to-pay (WTP value. In the base scenario the ICER of PCb over GC treatment is 52,326 euro/ YOLs, which is definitely lower than the maximum acceptable WTP value. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results from cost-effectiveness analysis in the base scenario.

  17. Unmet Medical Needs in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment: How to Design Pre-Emptive Combination Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Karachaliou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding catalogue of human oncogenic mutations, coupled with difficulties in identifying the cellular targets of active compounds in phenotypic screens, has refocused drug discovery efforts on inhibitors of specific cellular proteins. This new ‘target-based’ approach has enjoyed some spectacular successes in several types of tumours, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations occur in 17% of NSCLC patients, with notable response to single agent therapy. Unfortunately, all patients eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, while complete remission rate to EGFR TKIs monotherapy is low. Priming BIM, a proapoptotic signalling BH3-only protein, induces sensitivity to erlotinib [Tarceva®] in EGFR-mutant cell lines. Synthetic lethal approaches and pre-emptive therapies based on the initial expression of BIM may significantly improve treatment outcomes. EGFR mutations result in transient pro-death imbalance of survival and apoptotic signalling in response to EGFR inhibition. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 is essential to the balance between extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide- 3-kinase/protein kinase B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity. Furthermore, stromal hepatocyte growth factor confers EGFR TKI resistance and induces inter-receptor crosstalk with Ephrin Type-A receptor 2, CDCP1, AXL, and JAK1. A better understanding of the complex cancer molecular biology of EGFR mutant lung cancer is crucial for development of effective treatment and design of successful future clinical studies.

  18. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  19. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  20. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  1. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and fort...

  2. Altered efficacy of AT1R-targeted treatment after spontaneous cancer cell-AT1R upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeting of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) reduces tumour growth in experimental models of cancer. We aimed to establish if combined targeting of the 'classical' and 'alternative' arms of the RAS could result in synergistic inhibition of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Immediately following induction of CRC liver metastases through intrasplenic injection of murine CRC cells, treatment with irbesartan (AT1R blocker; 50 mg/kg/day s.c.), captopril (ACE inhibitor; 750 mg/kg/day i.p.), CGP42112A (AT2R agonist; 0.6 μg/kg/hr i.p.), and/or ANG-(1-7) (24 μg/kg/hr i.p.) began and continued for 21 days. Liver to body weight ratio and/or stereology were used as a measure of tumour burden. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine AT1R and VEGF expression as well as proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (active caspase 3) and angiogenesis (CD34). Combined RAS therapies failed to improve upon single arm therapies. However, while irbesartan previously inhibited tumour growth in this model, in the current experiments irbesartan failed to affect tumour burden. Subsequent analysis showed a cancer-cell specific upregulation of the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) in irbesartan-insensitive compared to irbesartan-sensitive tumours. The upregulation of AT1R was associated with an increase in proliferation and VEGF expression by cancer cells. While animals bearing irbesartan-sensitive tumours showed a marked decrease in the number of proliferating cells in the liver and VEGF-expressing infiltrating cells in the tumour following AT1R treatment, these were unchanged by treatment in animals bearing irbesartan-insensitive (high AT1R expressing) tumours. Although the results do not support increased efficacy of combined treatment, they provide intriguing evidence of the importance of RAS expression in determining patient response and tumour growth potential and suggest that components of the RAS could be used as biomarkers to aid in patient selection

  3. Erlotinib treatment for persistent spontaneous pneumothorax in non-small cell lung cancer: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Sheng-xiang; ZHOU Song-wen; ZHANG Ling; ZHOU Cai-cun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) develops secondary to primary lung cancer. It has a very low incidence and accounts for less than 1% of all cases.1 Once SP develops, the prognosis is usually very poor, and majority of patients live no longer than 3 months.1,2Most patients with advanced stage can not undergo resection due to the poor general condition. Thus, chest tube drainage remains among the treatments of choice although it is not always completely effective in preventing recurrence. In refractory SP, patients would bear the chest tube for their whole life.3 Here we report a case of SP following chemotherapy in adenocarcinoma of the lung with multiple organs metastases. In this case, chest tube drainage was not effective in preventing recurrence of SP.However, the treatment was successful with oral erlotinib,an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI).

  4. Targeted therapies for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer-Recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguet, Joan; Smith, Katherine H; Bramlage, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most deadly cancers worldwide, with poor prognosis once the disease has progressed past the point at which surgery is a viable option. Whilst chemotherapy has improved survival over recent decades, there is still great need for improvements in treatments for patients with advanced disease. Over the last decade, a variety of such drugs have received market approval for treating NSCLC, with a variety of others in the pipeline. Here, we review the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced or metastatic NSCLC, including those already in clinical practice and those in early trials. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib; the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, crizotinib; and the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, are already providing improved survival for patients with NSCLC. Moreover, the discovery of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements has enabled the identification of patients who are more likely to benefit from a specific drug. The recent approval of the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, along with the designation of alectinib and MPDL3280A as breakthrough therapies by the FDA, demonstrates how rapidly this area of research is expanding. Over the last decade there has been significant progress made in the treatment of advanced NSCLC, and the large and varied selection of drugs currently undergoing trials provide great promise for improving the prognosis of this highly prevalent and deadly form of cancer. PMID:26537995

  5. Highly tumorigenic lung cancer CD133+ cells display stem-like features and are spared by cisplatin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolini, Giulia; Roz, Luca; Perego, Paola; Tortoreto, Monica; Fontanella, Enrico; Gatti, Laura; Pratesi, Graziella; Fabbri, Alessandra; Andriani, Francesca; Tinelli, Stella; Roz, Elena; Caserini, Roberto; Lo Vullo, Salvatore; Camerini, Tiziana; Mariani, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    The identification of lung tumor-initiating cells and associated markers may be useful for optimization of therapeutic approaches and for predictive and prognostic information in lung cancer patients. CD133, a surface glycoprotein linked to organ-specific stem cells, was described as a marker of cancer-initiating cells in different tumor types. Here, we report that a CD133+, epithelial-specific antigen-positive (CD133+ESA+) population is increased in primary nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ...

  6. Emerging treatment options in the management of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filosso PL

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pier Luigi Filosso1, Alberto Sandri1, Alberto Oliaro1, Andrea Riccardo Filippi2, Maria Carla Cassinis3, Umberto Ricardi2, Paolo Olivo Lausi1, Sofia Asioli4, Enrico Ruffini11Department of Thoracic Surgery, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Disciplines, Radiation Therapy Division, 3Department of Medical and Surgical Disciplines, Diagnostic-Imaging Division, 4Department of Oncology and Biomedical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, ItalyAbstract: Lung cancer (LC has become the leading cancer-related cause of death in the US and in developed European countries in the last decade. Its incidence is still growing in females and in smokers. Surgery remains the treatment of choice whenever feasible, but unfortunately, many patients have an advanced LC at presentation and one-third of potentially operable patients do not receive a tumor resection because of their low compliance for intervention due to their compromised cardiopulmonary functions and other comorbidities. For these patients the alternative therapeutic options are stereotactic radiotherapy or percutaneous radiofrequency. When surgery is planned, an anatomical resection (segmentectomy, lobectomy, bilobectomy, pneumonectomy, sleeve lobectomy is usually performed; wedge resection (considered as a nonanatomical one is generally the accepted option for unfit patients. The recent increase in discovering small and peripheral LCs and/or ground-glass opacities with screening programs has dramatically increased surgeons' interest in limited resections. The role of these resections is discussed. Also, recent improvements in molecular biology techniques have increased the chemotherapic options for neoadjuvant LC treatment. The role and the importance of targeted chemotherapy is also discussed.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, surgery, radiofrequency, radiotherapy, chemotherapy

  7. LKB1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to energetic stress induced by erlotinib treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells

    OpenAIRE

    Whang, Young Mi; Park, Serk In; Trenary, Irina A.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kaufman, Jacob M.; Carbone, David P.; Young, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11 or LKB1) is mutated in 20–30% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient tumors. Loss of LKB1-AMPK signaling confers sensitivity to metabolic inhibition or stress-induced mitochondrial insults. We tested the hypothesis that loss of LKB1 sensitizes NSCLC cells to energetic stress induced by treatment with erlotinib. LKB1-deficient cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib in vitro and in vivo that was associated with alterations...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Brain Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unknown Primary Treatment Colon Cancer Treatment Leukemia Home Page Melanoma Treatment Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Renal Cell Cancer Treatment Small Cell ...

  9. Effect of nimotuzumab targeted therapy combined with conventional chemotherapy in treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ping Xu; Hui-Juan Wu; Shang-Shuang Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the clinical efficacy of nimotuzumab targeted therapy combined with conventional chemotherapy in treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.Methods:Patients with non-small cell lung cancer were selected for study and randomly divided into targeted group and conventional group, efficacy of two groups after 2 and 4 treatment cycles was evaluated, tumor tissue was collected and activation of PI3K/AKT pathway, MAPK/ERK pathway and JAK2/STAT3 pathway was detected.Results:After 2 and 4 chemotherapy cycles, CR case number, PR case number and SD case number of targeted group were significantly more than those of conventional group (P<0.05); PD case number was significantly less than that of conventional group (P<0.05). Expression levels of PI3K, AKT, MAPK, ERK1, ERK2, JAK2 andSTAT3 in tumor tissue of targeted group were significantly lower than those of conventional group (P<0.05). Expression levels of FasL and Bim in tumor tissue of targeted group were significantly higher than those of conventional group (P<0.05), and expression levels ofBcl-2, Survivin, VEGF, HIF-1α andEPO were significantly lower than those of conventional group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Nimotuzumab targeted therapy combined with conventional chemotherapy can achieve more precise short-term efficacy and inhibit the activation of PI3K/AKT pathway, MAPK/ERK pathway and JAK2/STAT3 pathway, and it is a more ideal solution for treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cance...

  11. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta N; Hatoum H; Dy GK

    2013-01-01

    Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially availab...

  12. Data on cell cycle in breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231 with ferulic acid treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eunmi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition to repair DNA metabolism to respond to damaged DNA can lead to genetic instability, resulting in cancer cell death (Audeh et al., 2010; Bryant et al., 2005; Farmer et al., 2005; Lukas et al., 2003; Tutt et al., 2010) [1], [2], [6], [8], [11]. Despite of various studies demonstrating efficiency of combination therapy through down-regulation of DNA repair pathway, the suppression effects of DNA repair pathway by chemotherapeutic agents from natural bioactive compounds are less unders...

  13. Differences in cell cycle regulation after platinum derivatives treatment in sensitive and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Viktor; Souček, Karel; Šindlerová, Lenka; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Sova, Petr; Kozubík, Alois

    Quebec City, 2006. s. 133-133. [ISAC XXIII International Congress. 20.05.2006-24.05.2006, Québec City] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507; GA MPO(CZ) PZ-Z2/29 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : cell cycle * ovarian cancer * cisplatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa ePalange

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with Curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER– breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48 and 72h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02 and 47% (p = 0.001, respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231 and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings.

  15. Brain irradiation for metastasis prevention and radiation treatment of small cell lung cancer metastases into the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the results of cranial irradiation of 44 small cell lung cancer patients with clinically-identified intracranial metastases and 40 patients - for metastatic spread prevention. Whole brain irradiation was carried out with single doses of 2-4 Gy (total dose - 30-40 Gy) in both groups 5 times weekly. Patients irradiated for metastasis prevention revealed a 3.3 - fold decrease in intracranial metastasis frequency and a good post-treatment tolerance. In the other group, radiation failed to reach tumor lesions in 20%; treatment produced a poor effect in 30%. There was a correlation between survival time, initial expansion of process and tumor response to primary treatment. No relationship was observed between survival time and procedure and duration of cranial irradiation. Prophylactic irradiation may be beneficial in responders to therapy

  16. Non small-cell lung cancer and treatment options after tyrosine kinase inhibitors failure in the first line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Advanced non-small cell lung cancer with present epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) sensitising mutation is standardly treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). During treatment a resistance to TKI develops, disease progresses. We differ primary and secondary resistance. The most effective treatment after TKI failure is not definitively proven. Standard chemotherapy is usually introduced, eventually it is possible to use other TKI in the next lines. Case: The author presents a case of 60-year old patient with lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR sensitising mutation, where primary resistance to TKI was observed. Chemotherapy after progression was introduced. Planned therapy with afatnib was not carried out due to deterioration of patient´s condition. Conclusion: Presented case of EGFR mutation-positive patient represents an example of not very frequent primary resistance to TKI. Mechanisms of primary resistance are not well understood. Treatment after first line TKI failure in non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutation represents a challenge for medical research. (author)

  17. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Wieczorek; Jolanta Niewiarowska

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation proc...

  18. Role of erlotinib in first-line and maintenance treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Reguart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Noemí Reguart1, Andrés Felipe Cardona2, Rafael Rosell31Medical Oncology Service, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Clinical and Translational Oncology Group, Institute of Oncology, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia; 3Medical Oncology Service, Catalan Institute of Oncology, ICO, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva® is a member of a class of small molecule inhibitors that targets the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, with anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. Erlotinib represents a new-generation of agents known as “targeted therapies” designed to act upon cancer cells by interfering with aberrant specific activated pathways needed for tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell survival. Since its approval in November 2004 for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after the failure of at least one prior chemotherapy regimen and with a view to improving patients’ outcomes and prevent symptoms, the scientific community has evaluated the potential role of erlotinib in other scenarios such as in maintenance therapy and, in first-line setting for a selected population based on biological markers of response such as mutations of the EGFR. The convenient once-a-day pill administration and the good toxicity profile of erlotinib make it a reasonable candidate for testing in this context. This report provides a review of the role of erlotinib therapy in advanced NSCLC. It summarizes current data and perspectives of erlotinib in upfront treatment and maintenance for advanced NSCLC as well as looking at candidate biomarkers of response to these new targeted-agents.Keywords: erlotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, first line, maintenance, non-small-cell lung cancer

  19. Role of erlotinib in first-line and maintenance treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva®) is a member of a class of small molecule inhibitors that targets the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. Erlotinib represents a new-generation of agents known as “targeted therapies” designed to act upon cancer cells by interfering with aberrant specific activated pathways needed for tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell survival. Since its approval in November 2004 for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after the failure of at least one prior chemotherapy regimen and with a view to improving patients’ outcomes and prevent symptoms, the scientific community has evaluated the potential role of erlotinib in other scenarios such as in maintenance therapy and, in first-line setting for a selected population based on biological markers of response such as mutations of the EGFR. The convenient once-a-day pill administration and the good toxicity profile of erlotinib make it a reasonable candidate for testing in this context. This report provides a review of the role of erlotinib therapy in advanced NSCLC. It summarizes current data and perspectives of erlotinib in upfront treatment and maintenance for advanced NSCLC as well as looking at candidate biomarkers of response to these new targeted-agents

  20. Exploring a Novel Target Treatment on Breast Cancer: Aloe-emodin Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Induced Cell Apoptosis and Inhibited Cell Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Tian, Si; Zhu, Jing; Li, Kai-Ting; Yu, Ting-He; Yu, Le-Hua; Bai, Ding-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a clinical cancer therapy, is a mild therapy, which involves application of photosensitizers (PSs) located in target cells and then irradiated by corresponding wavelength. The activation of PSs generates radical oxygen species (ROS) to exert a selective cytotoxic activity for the target cells. Aloe-emodin (AE) has been found to be an anti-tumor agent in many studies, and has also been demonstrated as a photosensitizer, in the recent years. In order to study the mechanisms of aloe-emodin as a photosensitizer, we investigated the mechanisms of photo-cytotoxicity induced by aloe-emodin in breast cancer MCF-7 cells in the present study. Analysis of cell proliferation evidenced that there was a drastic depression after photodynamic treatment with a series of aloe-emodin concentrations and light doses. We observed changes in apoptosis and demonstrated that the mechanisms of apoptosis were involved in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum death pathways. The capacity of adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cells was measured using WST8 and transwell assay and demonstrated that AE-PDT significantly inhibited adhesion, migration and invasion of MCF-7cells. The expression of MMP2, MMP9, VEGF and Nrf2 demonstrated that the metastasis was related to oxidative stress. Analysis of changes in cytoskeleton components (F-actin) evidenced cytoskeleton disorganization after treatment with AE-PDT. Taken together, the present results indicated that PDT with aloe-emodin effectively suppressed cancer development in MCF-7cells, suggesting the potential of AE as a new photosensitizer in PDT which can provide a new modility for treating cancer. PMID:26295333

  1. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Schenberg, Eduardo E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of canc...

  2. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  3. Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells by IGF1R Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Combined with Conventional Systemic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  4. Treatment of breast cancer cells by IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with conventional systemic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boezen, H.M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  5. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may...

  6. Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Schmidt, Chris W.; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lopez, J. Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to...

  7. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  8. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  9. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  10. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  11. Low immunogenicity in non-small cell lung cancer; do new developments and novel treatments have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, R E; Jahangeer, S; Forde, P; Ariffin, A B; Bird, B; Soden, D; Hinchion, J

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 1.6 million new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed annually (Jemal et al. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 61, 69-90, 2011) and it remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite decades of bench and clinical research to attempt to improve outcome for locally advanced, good performance status patients, the 5-year survival remains less than 15 % (Molina et al. 2008). Immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICH) therapies have shown a significant promise in preclinical and clinical trails to date in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The idea of combining these systemic immune therapies with local ablative techniques is one that is gaining momentum. Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a unique atraumatic local therapy that has had very promising objective response rates and a number of advantages including but not limited to its immunostimulatory effects. ECT in combination with ICHs offers a novel approach for dealing with this difficult disease process. PMID:25726003

  12. New advances on critical implications of tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells in cancer progression, treatment resistance and disease recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, M; Batra, Surinder K.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that the malignant transformation of multipotent tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells into cancer stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal capacity and aberrant multilineage differentiation potential may be at origin of the most types of human aggressive and recurrent cancers. Based on new cancer stem/progenitor cell concepts of carcinogenesis, it is suggested that a small subpopulation of highly tumorigenic and mi...

  13. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  14. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  15. Protection of p53 wild type cells from taxol by nutlin-3 in the combined lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations within the tumor suppressor TP53 gene are one of the most common genetic alterations present at high frequency in human tumors and have been shown to be associated with resistance to radio-chemotherapy. The lack of the wild type TP53 gene in cancer cells could be exploited for therapeutic advantage using a sequence of two antagonistic drugs. The aim of this study was to selectively kill p53 deficient cells (FaDu and H1299) by taxol and to protect p53 wild type cells (A549) by the prior administration of nutlin-3 in comparison to certain known anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, camptothecin, roscovitine). Cytotoxic and cytostatic properties of 5-fluorouracil, camptothecin, roscovitine and nutlin-3 administrating alone or in combination with taxol were investigated in vitro by flow cytometry. It was found that nutlin-3 induced growth arrest and protected A549 cells from taxol. FaDu and H1299 cells responded to the same treatments with mitotic arrest and massive apoptosis. Other compounds (5-fluorouracil, camptothecin and roscovitine) revealed weaker selectivity and elevated toxicity in comparison to nutlin-3. We propose a therapeutic strategy protecting normal cells from taxol while increasing apoptosis selectively in p53-deficient cells using nutlin-3

  16. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  17. Role of stem cells in cancer therapy and cancer stem cells: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Sales Kevin; Chaib Boussad; Sagar Jayesh; Winslet Marc; Seifalian Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Abstract For over 30 years, stem cells have been used in the replenishment of blood and immune systems damaged by the cancer cells or during treatment of cancer by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Apart from their use in the immuno-reconstitution, the stem cells have been reported to contribute in the tissue regeneration and as delivery vehicles in the cancer treatments. The recent concept of 'cancer stem cells' has directed scientific communities towards a different wide new area of research fi...

  18. Chronic morphine treatment attenuates cell growth of human BT474 breast cancer cells by rearrangement of the ErbB signalling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Regine Weingaertner

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that opioid analgesics may interfere with tumour growth. It is currently thought that these effects are mediated by transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK-controlled ERK1/2 and Akt signalling. The growth of many breast cancer cells is dependent on hyperactive ErbB receptor networks and one of the most successful approaches in antineoplastic therapy during the last decade was the development of ErbB-targeted therapies. However, the response rates of single therapies are often poor and resistance mechanisms evolve rapidly. To date there is no information about the ability of opioid analgesics to interfere with the growth of ErbB-driven cancers.Here we demonstrate that ErbB2 overexpressing BT474 human breast cancer cells carry fully functional endogenous µ-opioid receptors. Most interestingly, the acute opioid effects on basal and Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation changed considerably during chronic Morphine treatment. Investigation of the underlying mechanism by the use of protein kinase inhibitors and co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that chronic Morphine treatment results in rearrangement of the ErbB signalling network leading to dissociation of ERK1/2 from Akt signalling and a switch from ErbB1/ErbB3 to ErbB1/ErbB2-dependent cell growth. In chronically Morphine-treated cells Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 signalling is redirected via a newly established PI3K- and metalloproteinase-dependent feedback loop. Together, these alterations result in apoptosis of BT474 cells. A similar switch in Heregulin-stimulated ERK1/2 signalling from an ErbB2-independent to an ErbB2-, PI3K- and metalloproteinase-dependent mechanism was also observed in κ-opioid receptor expressing SKBR3 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells.The present data demonstrate that the ErbB receptor network of human breast cancer cells represents a target for chronic Morphine treatment. Rearrangement of ErbB signalling by chronic

  19. Accelerated repopulation as a cause of radiation treatment failure in non-small cell lung cancer: review of current data and future clinical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-04-01

    Despite convincing evidence that the principles of accelerated repopulation would open up additional therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, this strategy has been generally underexplored. The implementation of accelerated radiotherapy schedules has been hampered by logistical barriers, concerns about acute toxicity, and the prioritization of integrating concurrent chemotherapy into the standard treatment platform. At present, it is unclear to what extent accelerated fractionation will influence future treatment paradigms in non-small cell lung cancer, although technical advances in radiotherapy, allowing higher dose delivery with reduced toxicity, could permit the development of more convenient and tolerable forms of accelerated schedules. PMID:25771413

  20. MUC1-positive circulating tumor cells and MUC1 protein predict chemotherapeutic efficacy in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ping Cheng; Ying Yan; Xiang-Yi Wang; Yuan-Li Lu; Yan-Hua Yuan; Jun Jia; Jun Ren

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. It is important to monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy, to find a simple and efficient tool to guide treatment, and to predict the efficacy of treatment in a timely and accurate manner. This study aimed to detect mucin-1 (MUC1) positive circulating tumor cells and MUC1 protein in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer and to investigate their relationship to chemotherapeutic efficacy. MUC1 mRNA was detected in the peripheral blood of 34 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The positive rates of MUC1 mRNA were 88.2% before chemotherapy and 70.6% after chemotherapy, without a significant difference (P = 0.564); MUC1 mRNA expression before chemotherapy had no correlation with treatment effectiveness (P = 0.281). The response rate of MUC1 mRNA-negative patients after first-cycle chemotherapy was significantly higher (P = 0.009) and the progression-free survival (PFS) was clearly longer than those of MUC1 mRNA-positive patients (P = 0.095). MUC1 protein in peripheral blood plasma was detected by an ELISA competitive inhibition assay. The patients with decreased MUC1 protein after chemotherapy had a significantly longer PFS than those with elevated MUC1 protein (P = 0.044). These results indicate that the outcomes of MUC1 mRNA negative patients after chemotherapy are better than those of MUC1 mRNA-positive patients. In addition, patients with decreased expression of MUC1 protein have a better PFS.

  1. Bevacizumab for the treatment of nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Portugal: a retrospective, multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. In patients with nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIB/IV treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab led to significant improvements in progression-free and median overall survival (OS). To report the experience of five Portuguese centers in treating patients with nonsquamous NSCLC in stage IIIB or IV with bevacizumab and chemotherapy regarding survival and toxicity outcomes. This was a retrospective, multicenter study on patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and chemotherapy from November 2007 to August 2010 through special use permits. We reviewed the medical records, registry of demographic characteristics, treatments provided, treatment responses, adverse events, and dates of death. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS statistics software. Median OS and event-free survival (EFS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. From an eligible population of 41 patients, 37 participants were registered. Study participants were predominantly male (78.4%) with a median age of 53 years (29–75 years). In total, 83.8% patients had stage IV disease (TNM, 6th Ed.). The OS was 21.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.6–30.5] and median EFS was 9.4 months (95% CI9: 7.1–11.7). Hematologic toxicity grade 3/4 occurred in 35.1% of patients, and nonhematologic toxicity in 24.3% patients. One fatal thromboembolic event was recorded (2.7%). The results of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC obtained from the daily clinical practice of the centers involved in this study were similar to those of published clinical trials. Collaboration between the different Portuguese centers is crucial for this kind of study

  2. Causal Effects of Time-Dependent Treatments in Older Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Akushevich, Igor; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kravchenko, Julia; Berry, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment selection for elderly patients with lung cancer must balance the benefits of curative/life-prolonging therapy and the risks of increased mortality due to comorbidities. Lung cancer trials generally exclude patients with comorbidities and current treatment guidelines do not specifically consider comorbidities, so treatment decisions are usually made on subjective individual-case basis. Methods Impacts of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy mono-treatment as well as combin...

  3. Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Physician and Patient Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the impact of patient age, comorbidity, and physician factors on treatment recommendations for locally advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We surveyed radiation oncologists regarding their recommendations for treatment (chemoradiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, or no therapy) for hypothetical patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC who varied by age (55 vs. 80 years) and comorbid illness (none, moderate, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the impact of physician and practice characteristics on radiation oncologists' treatment recommendations for three scenarios with the least agreement. Results: Of 214 radiation oncologists, nearly all (99%) recommended chemoradiation for a healthy 55 year old. However, there was substantial variability in recommendations for a 55 year old with severe COPD, an 80-year-old with moderate COPD, and an 80-year-old with severe COPD. Physicians seeing a lower volume of lung cancer patients were statistically less likely to recommend radiotherapy for younger or older patients with severe COPD (both p < 0.05), but the impact was modest. Conclusions: Nearly all radiation oncologists report following the evidence-based recommendation of chemoradiation for young, otherwise healthy patients with locally advanced, unresectable NSCLC, but there is substantial variability in treatment recommendations for older or sicker patients, probably related to the lack of clinical trial data for such patients. The physician and practice characteristics we examined only weakly affected treatment recommendations. Additional clinical trial data are necessary to guide recommendations for treatment of elderly patients and patients with poor pulmonary function to optimize their management.

  4. On the possible benefits of a hybrid VMAT technique in the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess, using clinical cases, the potential of a hybrid technique for the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-blending volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conformal radiation therapy (CRT) fields, and to consider potential issues with implementation of such a technique. Eight clinical cases already treated with CRT were used for a planning study comparing target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing between CRT and hybrid VMAT (VMATh). Quality assurance (QA) implications of the resultant hybrid plans are discussed. The hybrid technique resulted in superior target conformity or improved sparing of OAR or both. The hybrid technique shows promise, but the QA implications of motion at treatment need careful consideration

  5. Differences in cell cycle regulation after platinum derivatives treatment in sensitive and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Viktor; Souček, Karel; Šindlerová, Lenka; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Sova, P.; Kozubík, Alois

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 5 (2006), s. 383-384. ISSN 0009-2770. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /6./. 14.06.2006-17.06.2006, Milovy] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507; GA MPO(CZ) PZ-Z2/29 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ovarian cancer * cell cycle * cisplatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Focal adhesion signaling in breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Yafeng

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of survival and migratory pathways in cancer cells is essential to better comprehending cancer progression, metastasis formation and drug resistance, thereby benefiting the development of novel anticancer treatments. The overall goal of the work is to better un

  7. Combined treatment with vitamin C and sulindac synergistically induces p53- and ROS-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Shin, Yu Jin; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee; Hur, Dae Young; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Lee, Won Keun; Lee, Wang-Jae

    2016-09-01

    Sulindac has anti-neoplastic properties against colorectal cancers; however, its use as a chemopreventive agent has been limited due to toxicity and efficacy concerns. Combinatorial treatment of colorectal cancers has been attempted to maximize anti-cancer efficacy with minimal side effects by administrating NSAIDs in combination with other inhibitory compounds or drugs such as l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which is known to exhibit cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells at high concentrations. In this study, we evaluated a combinatorial strategy utilizing sulindac and vitamin C. The death of HCT116 cells upon combination therapy occurred via a p53-mediated mechanism. The combination therapeutic resistance developed in isogenic p53 null HCT116 cells and siRNA-mediated p53 knockdown HCT116 cells, but the exogenous expression of p53 in p53 null isogenic cells resulted in the induction of cell death. In addition, we investigated an increased level of intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species), which was preceded by p53 activation. The expression level of PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), but not Bim, was significantly increased in HCT116 cells in response to the combination treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that combination therapy with sulindac and vitamin C could be a novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy for p53 wild type colon cancers. PMID:27339904

  8. Differential profiling studies of N-linked glycoproteins in glioblastoma cancer stem cells upon treatment with γ-secretase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lan; Liu, Yashu; He, Jintang; Flack, Callie G; Talsma, Caroline E; Crowley, Jessica G; Muraszko, Karin M; Fan, Xing; Lubman, David M

    2011-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Notch pathway blockade by γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) depletes cancer stem cells (CSCs) in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) through reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanism by which the manipulation of Notch signal induces alterations on post-translational modifications such as glycosylation has not been investigated. Herein, we present a differential profiling work to detect the change of glycosylation pattern upon drug treatment in GBM CSCs. Rapid screening of differential cell surface glycan structures has been performed by lectin microarray on live cells followed by the detection of N-linked glycoproteins from cell lysates using multi-lectin chromatography and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 51 and 52 glycoproteins were identified in the CSC- and GSI-treated groups, respectively, filtered by a combination of decoy database searching and Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP) processing. Although no significant changes were detected from the lectin microarray experiment, 7 differentially expressed glycoproteins with high confidence were captured after the multi-lectin column including key enzymes involved in glycan processing. Functional annotations of the altered glycoproteins suggest a phenotype transformation of CSCs toward a less tumorigenic form upon GSI treatment. PMID:21898824

  9. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  10. Treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed 52 tongue cancer patients who received definitive treatment at Shiga University Hospital between January 1993 and August 2004. In cases of T1 and early T2 (early T2: ≤3 cm), partial glossectomy was performed. Radical operation followed by reconstructive surgery was performed after pre-operative chemotherapy in cases of advanced T2 (advanced T2: >3 cm), T3 and T4. Post-operative radiation was performed in some cases to prevent local and cervical recurrence. The 5-year survival rates by the Kaplan-Meier method were 92% in stage I, 88% in stage II, 73% in stage III, 55% in stage IV, and 72% overall, respectively. The 5-year survival rates by the size in T2 cases were 90% in early T2 and 46% in advanced T2. Twelve cases were relapsed. Locoregional recurrence occurred in 11 patients (5 cases at the primary site, 6 in the neck), and distant metastasis in 4 patients. Long-term survivors after secondary treatment were 3 of 11 cases with recurrence at the primary site. The results of salvage treatment for recurrent cases were discouraging. Adjuvant chemotherapy and post-operative radiotherapy are recommended for advanced tongue cancer. (author)

  11. High-dose radiation therapy alone for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Experience with prolonged overall treatment times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of overall treatment time on long-term survival after high-dose radiation therapy alone for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between 1978 and 1990, 229 patients with stage I-III disease and Karnofsky Performance Scores of 80-100 received a conventionally fractionated total dose of 70 Gy through a split-course technique. After a first treatment course of 40 or 50 Gy, a rest aging was performed and only patients without any contraindications, such as newly diagnosed distant metastases or serious deterioration of performance status, were given a second course. In 83% of patients this break lasted for 4-6 weeks. Overall treatment time ranged between 7 and 24 weeks (median 12 weeks). Median follow-up time was 6.6 years (range 4.0-9.3 years). Actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 28% and 7% respectively. Complete radiological tumor response was observed in 31% of patients, and was found to be the strongest positive predictor of survival with 2- and 5-year rates of 50% and 12% respectively compared with 17% and 4% for patients without complete response. Treatment duration was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in univariate or multivariate analysis. For overall treatment times of 7-11 weeks (n=50), 12 weeks (n=79) and >12 weeks (n=100), 5-year survival was 4%, 6%, and 8%, respectively (p=0.6). To conclude, in our experience and in contrast to other studies, prolonged overall treatment times in radiation therapy alone for inoperable NSCLC had no negative impact on long-term survival. It is hypothesized that accelerated tumor cell repopulation is absent in a significant number of these patients with the time-factor playing no apparent role for outcome of treatment. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of 2 Common Radiation Therapy Techniques for Definitive Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Two choices are widely used for radiation delivery, 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). No randomized comparisons have been conducted in the setting of lung cancer, but theoretical concerns suggest that IMRT may negatively impact disease control. We analyzed a large cohort of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) patients treated before and after institutional conversion from 3DCRT to IMRT to compare outcomes. Methods and Materials: Patients with LS-SCLC treated with definitive radiation at our institution between 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Both multivariable Cox regression and propensity score matching were used to compare oncologic outcomes of 3DCRT and IMRT in the context of other clinically relevant covariables. Acute and chronic toxicities associated with the 2 techniques were compared using Fisher exact and log–rank tests, respectively. Results: A total of 223 patients were treated during the study period, with 119 receiving 3DCRT and 104 receiving IMRT. Their median age was 64 years (range, 39-90 years). Median follow-up times for 3DCRT and IMRT were 27 months (range, 2-147 months) and 22 months (range, 4-83 months), respectively. Radiation modality was not associated with differences in overall survival or disease-free survival in either multivariable or propensity score-matched analyses. IMRT patients required significantly fewer percutaneous feeding tube placements (5% vs 17%, respectively, P=.005). Conclusions: IMRT was not associated with worse oncologic outcomes than those of 3DCRT. IMRT was associated with a lower rate of esophagitis-related percutaneous feeding tube placements

  13. Outcome of treatment of human HeLa cervical cancer cells with roscovitine strongly depends on the dosage and cell cycle status prior to the treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Borza, Andreea; Walzi, Eva; Krystof, Vladimir; Maurer, Margarita; Komina, Oxana; Wandl, Stefanie

    2009-04-01

    Exposure of asynchronously growing human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells to roscovitine (ROSC), a selective cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitor, arrests their progression at the transition between G(2)/M and/or induces apoptosis. The outcome depends on the ROSC concentration. At higher dose ROSC represses HPV-encoded E7 oncoprotein and initiates caspase-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of the site-specific phosphorylation of survivin and Bad, occurring at high-dose ROSC treatment, precedes the onset of apoptosis and seems to be a prerequisite for cell death. Considering the fact that in HeLa cells the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint is abolished by E7, we addressed the question whether the inhibition of CDKs by pharmacological inhibitors in synchronized cells would be able to block the cell-cycle in G(1) phase. For this purpose, we attempted to synchronize cells by serum withdrawal or by blocking of the mitotic apparatus using nocodazole. Unlike human MCF-7 cells, HeLa cells do not undergo G(1) block after serum starvation, but respond with a slight increase of the ratio of G(1) population. Exposure of G(1)-enriched HeLa cells to ROSC after re-feeding does not block their cell-cycle progression at G(1)-phase, but increases the ratio of S- and G(2)-phase, thereby mimicking the effect on asynchronously growing cells. A quite different impact is observed after treatment of HeLa cells released from mitotic block. ROSC prevents their cell cycle progression and cells transiently accumulate in G(1)-phase. These results show that inhibition of CDKs by ROSC in cells lacking the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint has different outcomes depending on the cell-cycle status prior to the onset of treatment. PMID:19180585

  14. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with pain To use the sharing features on this page, ... health care provider about your options. What Causes Pain The pain from cancer can have a few ...

  15. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  16. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  17. Electrochemical treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Y.L.; Xue, F.Z.; Ge, B.S.; Zhao, F.R.; Shi, B.; Zhang, W. [China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery

    1997-03-01

    A pilot study of electrochemical treatment (ECT) as a therapy for 386 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken. There were 103 stage 2 cases, 89 stage 3a cases, 122 stage 3b cases, and 72 stage 4 cases. Two ECT methods were used. For peripherally located lung cancer, platinum electrodes were inserted transcutaneously into the tumor under x-ray or CT guidance. For central type lung cancer or for those inoperable during thoracotomy, electrodes were inserted intraoperatively directly into the cancer. Voltage was 6--8 V, current was 40--100 mA, and electric charge was 100 coulombs per cm of tumor diameter. The number of electrodes was determined from the size of cancer mass, because the diameter of effective area around each electrode is approximately 3 cm. The short-term (6 months after ECT) results of the 386 lung cancer cases were: complete response (CR), 25.6% (99/386); partial response (PR), 46.4% (179/386); no change (NC), 15.3% (59/386); and progressive disease (PD), 12.7% (49/386). The total effective rate (CR + PR) was 72% (278/386). The 1, 3, and 5 year overall survival rates were 86.3% (333/386), 58.8% (227/386), and 29.5% (114/386), respectively. The main complication was traumatic pneumothorax, with an incidence rate of 14.8% (57/386). These clinical results show that ECT is simple, safe, effective, and minimally traumatic. ECT provides an alternative method for treating lung cancers that are conventionally inoperable, that are not responsive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or that cannot be resected after thoracotomy. Long-term survival rates suggest that ECT warrants further investigation.

  18. Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Timothy C Wang

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as the unique subpopulation in the tumors that possess the ability to initiate tumor growth and sustain self-renewal as well as metastatic potential. Accumulating evidence in recent years strongly indicate the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors of a wide variety of organs. In this review, we will discuss the possible existence of a gastric cancer stem cell. Our recent data suggest that a subpopulation with a defined marker shows spheroid colony format...

  19. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Pestell, Richard G.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Deter...

  20. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer ... factors affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  3. The bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells predicts the cell death response to treatment with 3-bromopyruvate, iodoacetate or 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuezva José M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic reprogramming resulting in enhanced glycolysis is a phenotypic trait of cancer cells, which is imposed by the tumor microenvironment and is linked to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATPase (β-F1-ATPase. The bioenergetic signature is a protein ratio (β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH, which provides an estimate of glucose metabolism in tumors and serves as a prognostic indicator for cancer patients. Targeting energetic metabolism could be a viable alternative to conventional anticancer chemotherapies. Herein, we document that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells provides a gauge to predict the cell-death response to the metabolic inhibitors, 3-bromopyruvate (3BrP and iodoacetate (IA, and the anti-metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Methods The bioenergetic signature of the cells was determined by western blotting. Aerobic glycolysis was determined from lactate production rates. The cell death was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular ATP concentrations were determined using bioluminiscence. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationship between the bioenergetic signature and the cell death response. In vivo tumor regression activities of the compounds were assessed using a xenograft mouse model injected with the highly glycolytic HCT116 colocarcinoma cells. Results We demonstrate that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic HCT116 cancer cells inversely correlates with the potential to execute necrosis in response to 3BrP or IA treatment. Conversely, the bioenergetic signature directly correlates with the potential to execute apoptosis in response to 5-FU treatment in the same cells. However, despite the large differences observed in the in vitro cell-death responses associated with 3BrP, IA and 5-FU, the in vivo tumor regression activities of these agents were comparable. Conclusions Overall, we suggest that the

  4. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Pokrywczyńska; Jan Adamowicz; Jakub Tworkiewicz; Zbigniew Wolski; Tomasz Drewa

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  5. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  6. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation betweenin vitroADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIaHalleles 131H/Hand 131H/Rhad significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/Ralleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with theValleles 158V/Vand 158V/Fdisplayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/Fgenotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158Vallele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F(P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients,in vitrocetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 366-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817995

  7. Comparison of treatment outcomes between involved-field and elective nodal irradiation in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was performed to assess the usefulness of involved-field irradiation and the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-based staging on treatment outcomes in limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Eighty patients who received definitive chemoradiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifty patients were treated with involved-field irradiation, which means that the radiotherapy portal includes only clinically identifiable tumors. The other 30 patients were irradiated with a comprehensive portal, including uninvolved mediastinal and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes, so-called elective nodal irradiation. No significant difference was seen in clinical factors between the two groups. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 5-75 months), no significant differences were observed in 3 year overall survival (44.6 vs. 54.1%, P=0.220) and 3 year progression-free survival (24.4 vs. 42.8%, P=0.133) between the involved-field irradiation group and the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. For patients who did not undergo positron emission tomography scans, 3 year overall survival (29.3 vs. 56.3%, P=0.022) and 3 year progression-free survival (11.0 vs. 50.0%, P=0.040) were significantly longer in the elective nodal irradiation group. Crude incidences of isolated nodal failure were 6.0% in the involved-field irradiation group and 0% in the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. All isolated nodal failures were developed in patients who had not undergone positron emission tomography scans in their initial work-ups. If patients did not undergo positron emission tomography-based staging, the omission of elective nodal irradiation resulted in impaired survival outcomes and raised the risk of isolated nodal failure. Therefore, involved-field irradiation for limited-stage small cell lung cancer might be reasonable only with positron emission tomography scan implementation. (author)

  8. Cancer Stem Cells: From Bench to Bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Richard J.; Matsui, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective clinical responses to anticancer treatments often do not translate into substantial improvements in overall survival. Recent data suggesting many cancers arise from rare self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells) that are biologically distinct from their more numerous differentiated progeny, may explain this paradox. Current anticancer therapies have been developed to target the bulk of the tumor mass (i.e., the differentiated cancer cells). Although treatments directed against the bul...

  9. Treatment Options by Type of Adult Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unknown Primary Treatment Colon Cancer Treatment Leukemia Home Page Melanoma Treatment Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Renal Cell Cancer Treatment Small Cell ...

  10. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation-induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation-induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell transplantation, bone marrow-derived cell mobilization, molecular regulation of parotid stem cells, stem cell sparing RT, and adaptive RT are promising techniques that are discussed in this study. PMID:26880659

  11. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  12. The impact of three-dimensional radiation on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with locally advanced unresectable disease have a grim prognosis. Radiotherapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the permanent eradication of thoracic disease. The poor results achieved with conventional external beam radiation therapy reflect in part, the inadequacy of such therapy in achieving its primary objective of achieving local control. The impact of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-DCRT) on local disease eradication and its potential role in improving survival is assessed. This review addresses aspects of the software and hardware technology of 3-DCRT, the clinical and technical aspects of target volume definition, the use of 3-DCRT to predict radiation pneumonitis, strategies for dose escalation in NSCLC, and analyses the clinical results to date. Initially investigators compared the best treatment techniques devised with conventional planning techniques to those devised with 3-DCRT. These analyses showed that 3-DCRT had the potential to deliver high dose radiation (>70 Gy) with minimal underdosing and with a concomitant relative sparing of normal tissues. This technical demonstration of enhanced therapeutic ratio is the basis for the evolving clinical utilization of 3-DCRT for NSCLC. Software and hardware developments continue to develop and have the potential to solve evolving clinical issues. Dose-volume-histograms have been used to accurately quantify lung dose and derived parameters have the potential to predict the risk of pneumonitis for individual patients before treatment. Initial clinical results have been promising and strategies for further dose escalation are emerging. Preliminary experience has resulted in promising survival following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone for locally advanced NSCLC. More follow-up and experience will determine late toxicity, maximum dose, and efficacy of dose escalation with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

  13. Treatment outcomes of female germ cell tumors: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Female germ cell tumors (GCTS) are rare tumors that carry a good prognosis. Aim: To report the experience of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute (ENCI) in managing female GCTs. Methods: This retrospective study included 19 females with ovarian GCTs presenting to the ENCI between 2006 and 2010. Results: The median age was 23 years. Ovaries were the primary site in all patients. Dysgerminoma and teratoma were the predominant pathologies followed by mixed GCT in females. Unilateral ovariectomy or ovarian tumorectomy were the classic surgical procedures with R0 resection being feasible in most cases. Surveillance was adopted in six patients with stage I disease. Chemotherapy was administered in 63% of ovarian GCTs with BEP being the commonest regimen with reasonable tolerability and good response rates. The median OS and EFS were not reached. The projected 5-year OS rate was 93.8%. Both OS and EFS were better in patients responding to chemotherapy than non-responders (p< 0.002). Stage of disease did not significantly affect OS or EFS. Conclusions: Female GCTs rarely affect Egyptian females. They have good prognosis.

  14. Role of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer: evolving strategies for non-small cell histologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer treatment has been considered to have made little progress except for advances in small cell carcinoma. For other histologies an attitude of nihilism has prevailed principally because of lack of effective systemic therapy and of no persuasive evidence that results could be improved by combined modality treatment. On the other hand, favorable results from surgery are confined to a small percent of all patients with this disease. This review emphasizes possibilities for progress in evolving new therapeutic strategies. Although improvement over other systemic therapies is modest, cisplatin-containing regimens yield more consistent response rates and apparent survival advantage relative to single agents. Immediate progression occurs in the minority of patients. In addition, regimens combining cisplatin with vinca alkaloids have no substantial deleterious effects on the lung, marrow or esophagus to aggravate radiation-induced complications. These features encourage the evolution of strategies which begin with chemotherapy and then use consolidation with radiation therapy. Clinical trials using these and newer strategies must be instituted if progress is to occur in the treatment of non-small cell histologies at all stages

  15. Role of chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer: evolving strategies for non-small cell histologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggia, F.M. (NYU Medical Center, New York); Blum, R.H.; Foreman, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Lung cancer treatment has been considered to have made little progress except for advances in small cell carcinoma. For other histologies an attitude of nihilism has prevailed principally because of lack of effective systemic therapy and of no persuasive evidence that results could be improved by combined modality treatment. On the other hand, favorable results from surgery are confined to a small percent of all patients with this disease. This review emphasizes possibilities for progress in evolving new therapeutic strategies. Although improvement over other systemic therapies is modest, cisplatin-containing regimens yield more consistent response rates and apparent survival advantage relative to single agents. Immediate progression occurs in the minority of patients. In addition, regimens combining cisplatin with vinca alkaloids have no substantial deleterious effects on the lung, marrow or esophagus to aggravate radiation-induced complications. These features encourage the evolution of strategies which begin with chemotherapy and then use consolidation with radiation therapy. Clinical trials using these and newer strategies must be instituted if progress is to occur in the treatment of non-small cell histologies at all stages.

  16. Detection and minimally invasive treatment of early squamous lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    DANIELS, JOHANNES M.A.; Sutedja, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The majority of patents presenting with NSCLC have advanced disease, which precludes curative treatment. Early detection and treatment might result in the identification of more patients with early central lung cancer and improve survival. In addition, the study of early lung cancer improves understanding of lung carcinogenesis and might also reveal new treatment targets for advanced lung cancer. Bronchosc...

  17. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  18. Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Treatment, and Survivorship

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Julian R.; Yang, Ping; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Schild, Steven E.; Adjei, Alex A.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality not only in the United States but also around the world. In North America, lung cancer has become more predominant among former than current smokers. Yet in some countries, such as China, which has experienced a dramatic increase in the cigarette smoking rate during the past 2 decades, a peak in lung cancer incidence is still expected. Approximately two-thirds of adult Chinese men are smokers, representing one-third of all smokers w...

  19. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  20. A novel and facile synthesis of porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles as a drug delivery nanoplatform for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xijian; Deng, Guoying; Wang, Yeying; Wang, Qian; Gao, Zhifang; Sun, Yangang; Zhang, Wenlong; Lu, Jie; Hu, Junqing

    2016-04-01

    A novel and facile synthetic route has been developed to fabricate porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles (Se@SiO2 nanospheres) as a drug delivery nanoplatform which combines Se quantum dots and doxorubicin (DOX) for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells.A novel and facile synthetic route has been developed to fabricate porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles (Se@SiO2 nanospheres) as a drug delivery nanoplatform which combines Se quantum dots and doxorubicin (DOX) for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02298g

  1. Substantially Modified Ratios of Effector to Regulatory T Cells During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Patients Return to Pre-Treatment Levels at Completion: Implications for Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancy. Despite improved detection and treatment options, relapse rates remain high. Combining immunotherapy with the current standard treatments may provide an improved prognosis, however, little is known about how standard chemotherapy affects immune potential (particularly T cells) over time, and hence, when to optimally combine it with immunotherapy (e.g., vaccines). Herein, we assess the frequency and ratio of CD8+ central memory and effector T cells as well as CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during the first 18 weeks of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients. In this pilot study, we observed increased levels of recently activated Tregs with tumor migrating ability (CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+CD127−CCR4+CD38+ cells) in patients when compared to controls. Although frequency changes of Tregs as well as the ratio of effector T cells to Tregs were observed during treatment, the Tregs consistently returned to pre-chemotherapy levels at the end of treatment. These results indicate T cell subset distributions associated with recurrence may be largely resistant to being “re-set” to healthy control homeostatic levels following standard treatments. However, it may be possible to enhance T effector to Treg ratios transiently during chemotherapy. These results suggest personalized immune monitoring maybe beneficial when combining novel immuno-therapeutics with standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients

  2. Substantially Modified Ratios of Effector to Regulatory T Cells During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer Patients Return to Pre-Treatment Levels at Completion: Implications for Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Anthony; Govindaraj, Chindu; Xiang, Sue D., E-mail: Sue.Xiang@monash.edu [Department of Immunology, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Halo, Julene; Quinn, Michael [Department of Oncology, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Plebanski, Magdalena, E-mail: Sue.Xiang@monash.edu [Department of Immunology, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia)

    2012-06-18

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancy. Despite improved detection and treatment options, relapse rates remain high. Combining immunotherapy with the current standard treatments may provide an improved prognosis, however, little is known about how standard chemotherapy affects immune potential (particularly T cells) over time, and hence, when to optimally combine it with immunotherapy (e.g., vaccines). Herein, we assess the frequency and ratio of CD8+ central memory and effector T cells as well as CD4+ effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during the first 18 weeks of standard chemotherapy for ovarian cancer patients. In this pilot study, we observed increased levels of recently activated Tregs with tumor migrating ability (CD4+CD25{sup hi}Foxp3+CD127−CCR4+CD38+ cells) in patients when compared to controls. Although frequency changes of Tregs as well as the ratio of effector T cells to Tregs were observed during treatment, the Tregs consistently returned to pre-chemotherapy levels at the end of treatment. These results indicate T cell subset distributions associated with recurrence may be largely resistant to being “re-set” to healthy control homeostatic levels following standard treatments. However, it may be possible to enhance T effector to Treg ratios transiently during chemotherapy. These results suggest personalized immune monitoring maybe beneficial when combining novel immuno-therapeutics with standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients.

  3. Image-guided tumor ablation for the treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer within the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The treatment options for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that recurs after irradiation are limited. Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is an effective option in treating NSCLC that may provide an alternative to reirradiation. The purpose of this paper is to determine the survival and palliative benefit of image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation in the treatment of NSCLC that recurred within the treatment field of prior external beam radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients, median age 70, who had NSCLC recurrences following irradiation were treated with image-guided thermal ablation. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess survival benefit and subjective pain reports were used to investigate pain relief. Results: The median survival time was 13.1 ± SE 1.4 months and the median survival time without local recurrence was 8.5 ± 1.6 months. Eight patients (40%) recurred locally after a median of 3.3 months. Seven out of ten patients (70%) presenting with significant pain had decreased pain at initial post-ablation evaluation. Following the 25 ablations, there were no Grade IV or V, 1 Grade III, 3 Grade II, and 23 Grade I complications. Conclusion: Thermal ablation offers a potential survival benefit compared with other available modalities for the treatment of NSCLC recurring within a previously irradiated field. This promising technique has a good safety profile and may also be useful in providing symptomatic relief.

  4. Maintenance or non-maintenance therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetta, D; Rossi, A; Pisconti, S; Millaku, A; Colucci, G

    2010-11-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, accounting for about 85% of all lung cancer types with most of the patients presenting with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. In this setting first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for no more than 4-6 cycles are recommended. After these cycles of treatment, non-progressing patients enter in the so called "watch and wait" period in which no further therapy is administered until there is disease progression. In order to improve the advanced NSCLC outcomes, the efficacy of further treatment in the "watch and wait" period was investigated. This is the "maintenance therapy". Recently, the results coming from randomized phase III trials investigating two new agents, pemetrexed and erlotinib, in this setting led to their registration for maintenance therapy. Here, we report and discuss these results. PMID:21129607

  5. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  6. Cancer Immunotherapy Using Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gschweng, Eric Hans

    2015-01-01

    Engineering the immune system against cancer ideally provides surgical precision against the antigen bearing target cell while avoiding the systemic, off-target toxicity of chemotherapy. Successful treatment of patients in the clinic has been achieved by the expression of anti-cancer T-cell receptors (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) in T cells followed by infusion of these cells into cancer patients. Unfortunately, while many patients initially respond showing anti-tumor efficacy, t...

  7. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cerebral Metastases From Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical and physico-dosimetric variables affecting clinical outcome of patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for brain metastases from non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2006, 373 patients (298 men and 75 women, median age 65 years) with brain metastases from NSCLC underwent GKRS. All of them had KPS ≥ 60%, eight or fewer brain metastases, confirmed histopathological diagnosis and recent work-up (3. Median marginal dose was 22.5 Gy at 50% isodose.; median 10 Gy and 12 Gy isodose volumes were 30.8 cm3 and 15.8 cm3, respectively. Follow-up with MRI was performed every 3 months. Overall survival data were collected from internal database, telephone interviews, and identifying registries. Results: Mean follow-up after GKRS was 51 months (range, 6 to 96 months); mean overall survival was 14.2 months. Of 373 patients, 29 were alive at time of writing, 104 had died of cerebral progression, and 176 had died of systemic progression. In 64 cases it was not possible to ascertain the cause. Univariate and multivariate analysis were adjusted for the following: RPA class, surgery, WBRT, age, gender, number of lesions, median tumor volume, median peripheral dose, and 10 Gy and 12 Gy volumes. Identified RPA class and overall tumor volume >5 cc were the only two covariates independently predictive of overall survival in patients who died of cerebral progression. Conclusions: Global volume of brain disease should be the main parameter to consider for performing GKRS, which is a first-line therapy for patient in good general condition and controlled systemic disease.

  8. Association of sarcopenia and observed physical performance with attainment of multidisciplinary team planned treatment in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Jemima T.; Noble, Simon; Chester, John; Davies, Helen E; Evans, William D.; Lester, Jason; Parry, Diane; Pettit, Rebecca J.; Byrne, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) frequently presents in advanced stages. A significant proportion of those with reportedly good ECOG performance status (PS) fail to receive planned multidisciplinary team (MDT) treatment, often for functional reasons, but an objective decline in physical performance is not well described. Sarcopenia, or loss of muscle mass, is an integral part of cancer cachexia. However, changes in both muscle mass and physical performance may predate clinically ...

  9. [Novel treatment for prostate cancer targeting prostaglandins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Naoki; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    PGE2 is highly expressed in the prostate, associating with prostate cancer progression. Targeting downstream signaling pathways of PGE2 may represent an attractive new strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. We have established a novel prostate cancer xenograft model, KUCaP-2. The expression of EP4, one of PGE2 receptors, was significantly up-regulated during the development of castration resistance. A specific EP4 antagonist, ONO-AE3-208, decelerated castration-resistant growth of KUCaP-2 tumors in vivo. Moreover, ONO-AE3-208 could in vitro inhibit the cell invasion and in vivo suppress the bone metastasis of prostate cancer cells. These results indicated that EP4 is a novel target for the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25518348

  10. SRC drives growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines and is a marker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine;

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms leading to antiestrogen resistance in estrogen-receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was therefore to identify biomarkers and novel treatments for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer. We performed a kinase inhibitor scr...

  11. High-Resolution Flow Cytometry: a Suitable Tool for Monitoring Aneuploid Prostate Cancer Cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Klaus; Ehemann, Volker; Wiessler, Manfred; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Didinger, Bernd; Mueller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2009-01-01

    If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents. Temozolomide (TMZ) as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising. Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). The reasons could be a low sensitivity against TMZ the short plasma half-life of TMZ, non-adapted application regimens and additionally, the aneuploid DNA content of prostate cancer cells suggesting different sensitivity against therapeutical interventions e.g. radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Considerations to improve this unsatisfying situation resulted in the realization of higher local TMZ concentrations, sufficient to kill cells regardless of intrinsic cellular sensitivity and cell DNA-index. Therefore, we reformulated the TMZ by ligation to a peptide-based carrier system called TMZ-BioShuttle for intervention. The modular-composed carrier consists of a transmembrane transporter (CPP), connected to a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) cleavably-bound, which in turn was coupled with TMZ. The NLS-sequence allows an active delivery of the TMZ into the cell nucleus after transmembrane passage of the TMZ-BioShuttle and intra-cytoplasm enzymatic cleavage and separation from the CPP. This TMZ-BioShuttle could contribute to improve therapeutic options exemplified by the hormone refractory prostate cancer. The next step was to syllogize a qualified method monitoring cell toxic effects in a high sensitivity under consideration of the ploidy status. The high-resolution flow cytometric analysis showed to be an appropriate system for a better detection and distinction of several cell populations dependent on their different DNA

  12. High-Resolution Flow Cytometry: a Suitable Tool for Monitoring Aneuploid Prostate Cancer Cells after TMZ and TMZ-BioShuttle Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Braun, Volker Ehemann, Manfred Wiessler, Ruediger Pipkorn, Bernd Didinger, Gabriele Mueller, Waldemar Waldeck

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available If metastatic prostate cancer gets resistant to antiandrogen therapy, there are few treatment options, because prostate cancer is not very sensitive to cytostatic agents. Temozolomide (TMZ as an orally applicable chemotherapeutic substance has been proven to be effective and well tolerated with occasional moderate toxicity especially for brain tumors and an application to prostate cancer cells seemed to be promising. Unfortunately, TMZ was inefficient in the treatment of symptomatic progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC. The reasons could be a low sensitivity against TMZ the short plasma half-life of TMZ, non-adapted application regimens and additionally, the aneuploid DNA content of prostate cancer cells suggesting different sensitivity against therapeutical interventions e.g. radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Considerations to improve this unsatisfying situation resulted in the realization of higher local TMZ concentrations, sufficient to kill cells regardless of intrinsic cellular sensitivity and cell DNA-index. Therefore, we reformulated the TMZ by ligation to a peptide-based carrier system called TMZ-BioShuttle for intervention. The modular-composed carrier consists of a transmembrane transporter (CPP, connected to a nuclear localization sequence (NLS cleavably-bound, which in turn was coupled with TMZ. The NLS-sequence allows an active delivery of the TMZ into the cell nucleus after transmembrane passage of the TMZ-BioShuttle and intra-cytoplasm enzymatic cleavage and separation from the CPP. This TMZ-BioShuttle could contribute to improve therapeutic options exemplified by the hormone refractory prostate cancer. The next step was to syllogize a qualified method monitoring cell toxic effects in a high sensitivity under consideration of the ploidy status. The high-resolution flow cytometric analysis showed to be an appropriate system for a better detection and distinction of several cell populations dependent on their

  13. The emerging role of histology in the choice of first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: implication in the clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Schettino, Clorinda; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Gridelli, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for about 85% of all lung cancers, includes squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated large cell carcinoma. The majority of patients have advanced disease at diagnosis, and medical treatment is the cornerstone of management. Several randomized trials comparing third-generation platinum-based doublets concluded that all such combinations are comparable in their clinical efficacy, failing to document a difference based on histology. However, recent evidences, arising from the availability of pemetrexed, have shown that histology represents an important variable in the decision making. The major progresses in the understanding cancer biology and mechanism of oncogenesis have allowed the development of several potential molecular targets for cancer treatment such as vascular growth factor and its receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor. Targeted drugs seem to be safer or more effective in a specific histology subtype. All of these data have led to choose the optimal first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC based on histologic diagnosis. However, this scenario raises a diagnostic issue: a specific diagnosis of NSCLC histologic subtype is mandatory. This review will discuss these new evidences in the first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC and their implication in the current clinical decision-making. PMID:20156162

  14. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Kim; John Chabot; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2011-01-01

    Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006) evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  15. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006 evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  16. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  17. Strategies of dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: image guidance and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose in the setting of chemo-radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been historically limited by the risk of normal tissue toxicity and this has been hypothesized to correlate with the poor results in regard to local tumor recurrences. Dose escalation, as a means to improve local control, with concurrent chemotherapy has been shown to be feasible with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in early phase studies with good clinical outcome. However, the potential superiority of moderate dose escalation to 74 Gy has not been shown in phase III randomized studies. In this review, the limitations in target volume definition in previous studies; and the factors that may be critical to safe dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, such as respiratory motion management, image guidance, intensity modulation, FDG-PET incorporation in the treatment planning process, and adaptive radiotherapy, are discussed. These factors, along with novel treatment approaches that have emerged in recent years, are proposed to warrant further investigation in future trials in a more comprehensive and integrated fashion.

  18. Clinical Observation of Erlotinib in the Treatment of Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report of 92 Eases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohui HAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, has been approved effective in local advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of erlotinib for the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Methods Ninety-two patients with advanced NSCLC who had failed or not tolerated or refused chemotherapy received 150 mg oral doses of erlotinib once daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 92 NSCLC patients, 2 patient got complete response (2.2%, 22 partial response (23.9%, 48 stable disease (52.2% and 20 progressive disease (21.7%. The overall response rate and the disease controlled rate of erlotinib was 26.1% (24/92 and 78.3% (72/92, respectively. The response rate of erlotinib were significantly higher in rash and ECOG 0-1 than no rash and ECOG ≥ 2. The disease controlled rate of erlotinib was significantly higher in female and non-smokers than male and smokers (P < 0.05. The response rate of erlotinib did not show significant differences within pathological type or previous treatment. The most common side effects were rash and diarrhea with 84.8% and 31.5%, respectively, but usually were mild. Conclusion Erlotinib is effective and safe in the treatment of advanced NSCLC patients.

  19. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lessening (palliation) of symptoms associated with an incurable cancer. If cure is unlikely, then potential risks associated with treatment ... plan is modified. However, if the likelihood of cure is significantly greater than the risk ... To detect recurrent cancer and possibly try further treatment, such as an ...

  20. Treatment Strategy for Recurrent and Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Efficacy of High-Dose Chemotherapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Toshinari; Shinozuka, Takao; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Tsukada, Hitomi; Maeda, Hironobu; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Masaru; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Masanori; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Mikami, Mikio

    2006-01-01

    According to population statistics in Japan, approximately 3,800 women die of ovarian ­cancer annually, and approximately 6,000 are affected by this disease. Ovarian cancer is ­referred to as a “silent tumor”, since patients have few subjective symptoms and by the time symptoms are observed, the cancer has progressed to Stage III or IV in about half of the patients. The basic treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is to remove as much of the tumor as possible, and subsequently to pe...

  1. Cytotoxic activity of Thai medicinal plants for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chawaboon Dechsukum; Pranee Ratanasuwan; Niwat Keawpradub; Chatchai Wattanapiromsakul; Arunporn Itharat; Athima Saetung

    2005-01-01

    Twelve Thai medicinal plants as the ingredients of a Southern Thai traditional formula for cancer treatment were selected to test cytotoxicity activity against two types of human cancer cell lines ; large cell lung carcinoma (CORL-23) and prostate cancer cell lines (PC3) and one type of normal human cell line, fibroblast cells (10FS). SRB assay was used to test cytotoxic activity against all the cell types. Two of the extracts (water and ethanolic extracts) procedures used were similar to tho...

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  3. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  4. Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  5. What Happens After Treatment for Liver Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Liver Cancer » Detailed Guide » Living as a liver cancer ... Lifestyle changes after liver cancer Living as a liver cancer survivor Completing treatment can be both stressful and ...

  6. Lack of relationship between TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity, treatment efficacy and prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a natural inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are proteolytic enzymes involved in degradation of extracellular matrix thereby favoring tumour cell invasion and metastasis. TIMP-1 activity in tumour tissue may therefore play an essential role in the progression of a malignant tumour. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate TIMP-1 protein immunoreactivity in tissue from primary ovarian cancer patients and associate these findings with the course of the disease including response to treatment in the individual patient. TIMP-1 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (in tissue micro arrays) in a total of 163 ovarian cancer specimens obtained from primary debulking surgery during 1991-1994 as part of a randomized clinical protocol. Positive TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was found in 12.3% of the tumours. The median survival time for the 143 patients with TIMP-1 negative tumours was 23.7 months [19.0-29.4] 95% CI, while the median survival time for the 20 patients with TIMP-1 positive tumours was 15.9 months [12.3-27.4] 95% CI. Although a difference of 7.8 months in median overall survival in favor of the TIMP-1 tumour negative patients was found, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.28, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test). Moreover, TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was not associated with CA125 response (p = 0.53) or response at second look surgery (p = 0.72). TIMP-1 immunoreactivity in tumour tissue from patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer did not correlate with patient survival or response to combination platinum/cyclophosphamide therapy

  7. A kinase inhibitor screen identifies Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as novel treatment targets in antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, S; Pedersen, A M; Thomsen, M B H; Kirkegaard, T; Rasmussen, B B; Duun-Henriksen, A K; Lænkholm, A V; Bak, M; Lykkesfeldt, A E; Yde, C W

    2015-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for antiestrogen resistance is crucial. In this study, we performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive MCF-7 cells and a panel of MCF-7-derived...

  8. Breast cancer cells can switch between estrogen receptor alpha and ErbB signaling and combined treatment against both signaling pathways postpones development of resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, Katrine; Norrie, Ida C; Emdal, Kristina Bennet; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Frogne, Thomas; Christiansen, Ib J; Kirkegaard, Tove; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2010-01-01

    The majority of breast cancers are estrogen responsive, but upon progression of disease other growth promoting pathways are activated, e.g., the ErbB receptor system. The present study focuses on resistance to the pure estrogen antagonist fulvestrant and strategies to treat resistant cells or eve...... with pan-ErbB inhibition may postpone or even prevent development of treatment resistance....

  9. Quantitative cell-free DNA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard; Jakobsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in relation to third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan and the quantitative relationship of cfDNA with tumor-specific mutations in plasma....

  10. RNAi nanomaterials targeting immune cells as an anti-tumor therapy: the missing link in cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Conde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available siRNA delivery targeting tumor cells and cancer-associated immune cells has been gaining momentum in the last few years. A combinatorial approach for silencing crucial factors essential for tumor progression in cancer-associated immune cells and in cancer cells simultaneously can effectively shift the tumor microenvironment from pro-oncogenic to anti-tumoral. Gene-therapy using RNAi nanomaterials can help shift this balance; however, fully utilizing the potential of RNAi relies on effective and specific delivery. RNAi nanomaterials can act as a Trojan horse which delivers siRNAs against immunosuppressive factors and reverses the regulatory activity of tumor immune cells residing in the tumor microenvironment. Here we review potential RNAi targets, means to activate and control the immune response, as well as ways to design delivery nanovehicles for successful RNAi immunotherapy.

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer ...

  12. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be ...

  13. Anal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  14. The evolving biology and treatment of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taichman, Russel S.; Loberg, Robert D; Mehra, Rohit; Kenneth J Pienta

    2007-01-01

    Since the effectiveness of androgen deprivation for treatment of advanced prostate cancer was first demonstrated, prevention strategies and medical therapies for prostate cancer have been based on understanding the biologic underpinnings of the disease. Prostate cancer treatment is one of the best examples of a systematic therapeutic approach to target not only the cancer cells themselves, but the microenvironment in which they are proliferating. As the population ages and prostate cancer pre...

  15. Antiproliferative effects of anastrozole on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro are significantly enhanced by combined treatment with testosterone undecanoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Cui, Junwei; Wang, Qinqin; Li, Peng; Liu, Xiaoling; Hu, Hui; Wei, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of aromatase inhibitor anastrozole and testosterone undecanoate, separately and in combination, on proliferation and apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells cultured in vitro. The effects of various concentrations of these drugs on the proliferation of MCF-7 cells were evaluated by CCK8 assay, the levels of cell apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry with Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining and androgen receptor (AR) protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. The results of the CCK8 assay indicated that greater antiproliferative activity was detected in the MCF-7 cells in the combined treatment groups, compared with those treated with anastrozole or testosterone undecanoate alone. Flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis revealed that treatment with a combination of the two drugs generated a higher percentage of apoptotic cells, particularly when the two drugs were applied for 48 h, compared with single drug treatment. Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease in AR protein expression in the combined treatment groups compared with MCF7 cells treated with single drugs. The results of the present study provided evidence supporting the potential of a combination of anastrozole and testosterone undecanoate as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the antiproliferative effects of anastrozole were significantly enhanced by combined treatment with testosterone undecanoate via the AR signaling pathway. PMID:25738971

  16. CLINICAL STUDY IN ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED IRRADIATION IN THE TREATMENT OF LOCAL ADVANCED NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚原; 吴国华; 陆冬青; 蒋马伟; 邬国琴; 翁霞

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation ( AHFI ) and conventional fractionated irradiation (CFI) for local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods The patients of AHFI group were irradiated to large-field target volume by a daily fraction of 2Gy , and small-field target volume by a daily fraction of 1Gy with more than 6h interval. The total dose of largefield target volume was 50Gy /25Fx/5W and of small-field target volume was 75Gy /50Fx/5W. The patients in CFI group were irradiated by a daily fraction of 2Gy to the total dose of 66Gy /33Fx/6. 6W. After 3 months of radiotherapy, the tumor response rates of complete recovery ( CR ), partial recovery ( PR ), and no change ( NC ) and 1- and 2- year survival rate in the two groups were observed. Results The tumor response rates of CR, PR, NC in AHFI group and CFI group were 22.9% (8/35), 60.0% (21/35), 17.1% (6/35) and 11.4% (4/35), 51.4% (18/35), 37.2% (13/35) respectively (P>0.05). All patients were followed up 2 years or more. The 1- and 2- year survival rates in AHFI group and CFI group were 62.9% (22/35 ), 31.4 % ( 11/35) and 42.9% (15/35) , 17.1% (6/35) respectively (P0.05). Conclusion In comparison with CFI, AHFI may increase 1- and 2- year survival rate after treatment of local advanced non-small cell lung cancer, while the radio-reactions, either early or late, did not increase significantly.

  17. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guocan; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wei, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of PCa. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of PCa could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with PCa. In this review article, ...

  18. Fentanyl inhibits cell viability in human pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell-transplanted mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Jianxia; Wang, Liangrong; Chen, Lei; Yang, Tao; Jin, Lida; Lin, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a kind of devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Fentanyl has been widely applied to anesthesia and analgesia in pancreatic cancer therapy, and is also demonstrated to inhibit the growth of some kinds of cancer cells in existed studies. To investigate the functions of fentanyl in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and fentanyl treatment. The cells were transplanted to BALB/c nude...

  19. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Research Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia ...

  1. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C; Anand, Atul; Cederkvist, Luise; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Mellemgaard, Anders; Østerlind, Kell; Friis, Søren; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27333030

  2. CD133: A cancer stem cells marker, is used in colorectal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Ren; Wei-Qi Sheng; Xiang Du

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. A model of cancer development involving cancer stem cells has been put forward because it provides a possible explanation of tumor hierarchy. Cancer stem cells are characterized by their proliferation, tumorigenesis, differentiation, and self-renewal capacities, and chemoradiotherapy resistance. Due to the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and treatment failure, studies of cancer stem cell markers, such as CD1...

  3. Bevacizumab for the treatment of nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Portugal: a retrospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevinho F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Estevinho1, Marta Soares2, Isabel Azevedo2, Henrique Queiroga3, Bárbara Parente4, Ulisses Brito5, Encarnação Teixeira6, Renato Sotto-Mayor7, António Araújo81Medical Oncology Resident, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 2Medical Oncology Assistant, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, Portugal; 3Coordinator of the Oncological Pneumology Consultation, Pneumology Departament of Hospital S João, Oporto, Portugal; 4Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Vila Nova de Gaia-Espinho Medical Center, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 5Director of Pneumology Department, Pneumology Department, Faro Hospital, Faro, Portugal; 6Pneumology assistant, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 7Head of Service of Pneumology, Pneumology Department I, Hospital Santa Maria – Lisbon North Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 8Coordinator of Lung Pathology Clinic, Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Institute of Oncology, Oporto Center, Oporto, PortugalIntroduction: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. In patients with nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC stage IIIB/IV treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab led to significant improvements in progression-free and median overall survival (OS.Aim: To report the experience of five Portuguese centers in treating patients with nonsquamous NSCLC in stage IIIB or IV with bevacizumab and chemotherapy regarding survival and toxicity outcomes.Materials and methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter study on patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and chemotherapy from November 2007 to August 2010 through special use permits. We reviewed the medical records, registry of demographic characteristics, treatments provided, treatment responses, adverse

  4. Computer model challenges breast cancer treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, M W; Swartzendruber, D E; Bame, P D; Wardwell, R H

    1994-01-01

    The breast cancer treatment failure rate remains unacceptably high. The current breast cancer treatment paradigm, based primarily on Gompertzian kinetics and animal models, advocates short-course, intensive chemotherapy subsequent to tumor debulking, citing drug resistance and host toxicity as the primary reasons for treatment failure. To better understand treatment failure, we have studied breast cancer from the perspective of computer modeling. Our results demonstrate breast cancers grow in an irregular fashion; this differs from the Gompertzian mode of animal models and thus challenges the validity of the current paradigm. Clinical and laboratory data support the concept of irregular growth rather than the common claim that human tumors grow in a Gompertzian fashion. Treatment failure mechanisms for breast cancer appear to differ from those for animal models, and thus treatments optimize on animal models may not be optimal for breast cancer. A failure mechanism consistent with our results involves temporarily dormant tumor cells in anatomical or pharmacological sanctuary, which eventually result in aggressive metastatic disease. PMID:7994590

  5. Antimitotic drugs in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, Rustelle Janse; Visagie, Michelle H; Theron, Anne E; Joubert, Annie M

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is a complex disease since it is adaptive in such a way that it can promote proliferation and invasion by means of an overactive cell cycle and in turn cellular division which is targeted by antimitotic drugs that are highly validated chemotherapy agents. However, antimitotic drug cytotoxicity to non-tumorigenic cells and multiple cancer resistance developed in response to drugs such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids are obstacles faced in both the clinical and basic research field to date. In this review, the classes of antimitotic compounds, their mechanisms of action and cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and other limitations of current antimitotic compounds are highlighted, as well as the potential of novel 17-β estradiol analogs as cancer treatment. PMID:26563258

  6. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 ∼ 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 ∼ 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m2 of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high response rate and low toxicity

  7. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Zy; Kim, Sung Whan; Shim, Byoung Yong [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 {approx} 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 {approx} 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m{sup 2} of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high

  8. Theophylline in the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanseli Efeoğlu Gönlügür

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theophylline is a drug used for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. It inhibits the enzyme phosphodiesterase, thereby preventing the intracellular break-down of cyclic AMP. Potentially beneficial therapeutic effects of theophylline include bronchial smooth-muscle relaxation, enhanced mucociliary transport, decrease in pulmonary hypertension, improved diaphragmatic contractility, and central stimulation of ventilation. On the other hand, theophylline evokes a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in DNA synthesis in human breast cancer cells. Theophylline-treated melanoma cells exhibit low adhesion to laminin/collagen type IV. Consequently, theophylline possesses the capacity to inhibit not only cell proliferation, but also the metastatic behaviour of melanoma cells. This drug prevents neovascularization of the tumor by blocking endothelial cell proliferation. The combination of theophylline with cytotoxic drugs may permit a reduction in the effective dose needed in chemotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients. It has also a prophylactic effect on the nephrotoxicity due to cisplatin. However, this drug may inhibit small cell lung cancer cells but stimulate pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells. It is necessary to perform large, prospective studies for the exact role of theophylline on each type of lung cancer.

  9. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  10. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with comorbiditie

  11. Safe eating during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pasteurized on the container. DO NOT eat raw honey. Eat only heat-treated honey. Avoid sweets that have creamy fillings. Cook Foods ... 2016. www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/appetite-loss/nutrition-hp-pdq . Accessed March 20, ...

  12. Microwave Ablation in Combination with Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo verify whether microwave ablation (MWA) used as a local control treatment had an improved outcome regarding advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) when combined with chemotherapy.MethodsThirty-nine patients with histologically verified advanced NSCLC and at least one measurable site other than the ablative sites were enrolled. Primary tumors underwent MWA followed by platinum-based doublet chemotherapy. Modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST) and RECIST were used to evaluate therapeutic response. Complications were assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (version 3.0).ResultsMWA was administered to 39 tumors in 39 patients. The mean and median diameters of the primary tumor were 3.84 cm and 3.30 cm, respectively, with a range of 1.00–9.00 cm. Thirty-three (84.6 %) patients achieved a partial response. No correlation was found between MWA efficacy and clinicopathologic characteristics. For chemotherapy, 11 patients (28.2 %) achieved a partial response, 18 (46.2 %) showed stable disease, and 10 (25.6 %) had progressive disease. The overall objective response rate and disease control rate were 28.2 and 74.4 %, respectively. The median progression-free survival time was 8.7 months (95 % CI 5.5–11.9). The median overall survival time was 21.3 months (95 % CI 17.0–25.4). Complications were observed in 22 (56.4 %) patients, and grade 3 adverse events were observed in 3 (7.9 %) patients.ConclusionsPatients with advanced NSCLC could benefit from MWA in combination with chemotherapy. Complications associated with MWA were common but tolerable

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarriage (premature birth of a fetus that cannot survive). Women who were exposed to DES before birth ... to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life . Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment of locally advanced ... NIH). NIH is the federal government’s center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an ...

  15. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy - dry mouth; Radiation therapy - dry mouth; Transplant - dry mouth; Transplantation - dry mouth ... Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you may have include: Mouth sores Thick ...

  16. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Sarah N., E-mail: shamilton7@bccancer.bc.ca [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Tan, King [Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Victoria (Canada); Gascoyne, Randy D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Pathology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Connors, Joseph M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group

  17. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate glandular formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative AR− status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade ther...

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast: Current Opinion and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Monville, Florence; Ginestier, Christophe; Dontu, Gabriela; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wicha, Max S.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis, which holds that cancers are driven by a cellular subcomponent that has stem cell properties, that is, self-renewal, tumorigenicity and multilineage differentiation capacity. The cancer stem cell hypothesis modifies our conceptual approach of oncogenesis and shall have implications in breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment, especially in metastatic breast cancer for which no curative treatment exists. Given the speci...

  19. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  20. Comparison of efficiency and toxicity of two chemotherapy protocols in treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mekić-Abazović Alma; Šišić Ibrahim; Kovčin Vladimir; Bečulić Hakija; Dervišević Senad; Musić Miralem

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. This study was aimed at comparing the efficiency and tolerability of two reference protocols Cisplatin and Etoposide and Cisplatin and Vinorelbine in advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Material and Methods. A total of 60 patients (two groups consisting of 30 patients) were treated for advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer during the period from January to December 2005 according to the reference protocols (Cisplatin 100mg/m2 D1; Vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 D1, D8 on 4 weeks) and ...

  1. Targeted Elimination of Breast Cancer Cells with Low Proteasome Activity is Sufficient for Tumor Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Lagadec, Chann; Chan, Mabel; Frohnen, Patricia; Jean McDonald, Alexandra; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancers are thought to be organized hierarchically with a small number of breast cancer stem cells, able to regrow a tumor after sublethal treatment while their progeny lack this feature. Furthermore, breast cancer stem cells are highly resistant to conventional anti-cancer treatments. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, all cancer stem cells in a tumor have to be eliminated to achieve cancer cure. In this study we tested if targeted elimination of breast cancer stem cells le...

  2. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  3. The combined treatment with novel platinum(II) complex and anti-MUC1 increases apoptotic response in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz, Agnieszka; Bielawska, Anna; Czarnomysy, Robert; Gabryel-Porowska, Halina; Muszyńska, Anna; Bielawski, Krzysztof

    2015-10-01

    New strategy of cancer's targeting treatment is combining monoclonal antibodies with chemotherapeutic agents. An important goal of targeted therapy appears to be a transmembrane glycoprotein type I-mucin 1 (MUC1), which is overexpressed in tumors of epithelial origin, especially in breast cancer. The goal of the study was to check the effect of monoclonal antibody against MUC1 with novel platinum(II) complex (Pt12) on selected aspects of apoptosis in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The number of apoptotic and necrotic cells was measured using annexin V binding assay. The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA fragmentation was analyzed. Finally, the influence of novel platinum(II) complex (Pt12) used with anti-MUC1 on the concentration of selected markers of apoptosis such as Bax, caspase-8, -9, and caspase-3 was performed using ELISA. The results from combined treatment were compared with those obtained using monotherapy. In our study, we proved that anti-MUC1 used in combination with Pt12 strongly induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. The effect was stronger than treatment with Pt12, cisplatin, anti-MUC1, and anti-MUC1 used with cisplatin. We also observed the highest decrease of MMP and the strongest DNA fragmentation after such a combined treatment. The results obtained from ELISA showed increased concentration of Bax, caspases-8, -9, -3 compared to monotherapy. Our study proved that Pt12 together with anti-MUC1 strongly induced apoptosis in estrogen-negative breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). The apoptosis may go through extrinsic pathway associated with caspase-8 as well as intrinsic pathway connected with caspase-9. PMID:26112902

  4. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cancer-related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, ... enough information to give patients good advice as far as what sort of treatments they need for ...

  5. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  6. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods and ... toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , wires, or catheters ...

  7. Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  8. Alternative treatments for melanoma: targeting BCL-2 family members to de-bulk and kill cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Schwan, Josianna V.; Fujita, Mayumi; Norris, David A.; Shellman, Yiqun G.

    2015-01-01

    For the first time new treatments in melanoma have produced significant responses in advanced diseases, but 30–90% of melanoma patients do not respond or eventually relapse after the initial response to the current treatments. The resistance of these melanomas is likely due to tumor heterogeneity, which may be explained by models such as the stochastic, hierarchical, and phenotype-switching models. This review will discuss the recent advancements in targeting BCL-2 family members for cancer t...

  9. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  10. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  11. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer

  12. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  13. Folate Conjugated Cellulose Nanocrystals Potentiate Irreversible Electroporation-induced Cytotoxicity for the Selective Treatment of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacino, Katelyn R; Arena, Christopher B; Dong, Shuping; Roman, Maren; Davalos, Rafael V; Lee, Yong W

    2015-12-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are rod-shaped, crystalline nanoparticles that have shown prom-ise in a number of industrial applications for their unique chemical and physical properties. However, investigations of their abilities in the biomedical field are limited. The goal of this study is to show the potential use of folic acid-conjugated cellulose nanocrystals in the potentiation of irreversible electroporation-induced cell death in folate receptor (FR)-positive cancers. We optimized key pulse parameters including pulse duration, intensity, and incubation time with nanoparticles prior to electroporation. FR-positive cancer cells, KB and MDA-MB-468, were preincubated with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) conjugated with the targeting molecule folic acid (FA), 10 and 20 min respectively, prior to application of the optimized pulse electric field (PEF), 600 and 500 V/cm respectively. We have shown cellulose nanocrystals' ability to potentiate a new technique for tumor ablation, irreversible electroporation. Pre-incubation with FA-conjugated CNCs (CNC-FA) has shown a significant increase in cytotoxicity induced by irreversible electroporation in FR-positive cancer cells, KB and MDA-MB-468. Non-targeted CNCs (CNC-COOH) did not potentiate IRE when preincubated at the same parameters as previously stated in these cell types. In addition, CNC-FA did not potentiate irreversible electroporation-induced cytotoxicity in a FR-negative cancer cell type, A549. Without changing irreversible electroporation parameters it is possible to increase the cytotoxic effect on FR-positive cancer cells by exploiting the specific binding of FA to the FR, while not causing further damage to FR-negative tissue. PMID:24750004

  14. 3'-Deoxy-3'-[{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine (FLT) uptake in breast cancer cells as a measure of proliferation after doxorubicin and docetaxel treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, Helmut [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany)], E-mail: helmut.dittmann@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Jusufoska, Ajnur [Department of Gynecology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Dohmen, Bernhard Matthias [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Smyczek-Gargya, Brigitte; Fersis, Nikos [Department of Gynecology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Pritzkow, Maren [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Kehlbach, Rainer [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Department of Medical Biometry, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany); Machulla, Hans Juergen; Bares, Roland [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tuebingen D-72076 (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: The nucleoside analogue [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine (FLT) has been designed as a marker of cell proliferation that can be imaged in vivo by positron emission tomography. Clinical pilot studies have demonstrated decreasing FLT uptake following antiproliferative chemotherapy of breast cancer. However, the significance of posttreatment FLT uptake has not been evaluated at the cell level. The aim of this study was to investigate whether FLT uptake detects proliferation inhibition induced by docetaxel or doxorubicin treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model. Methods: Breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were treated with docetaxel or doxorubicin for 24 h at drug doses inducing 25-99% inhibition of clonogenic survival (IC{sub 25} to IC{sub 99}). Cellular FLT uptake was estimated at 4 h and at 1, 3 and 5 days interval from chemotherapy. [{sup 3}H]Thymidine incorporation and S-phase fraction were measured for comparison. Analysis of variance and the Bland-Altman difference plot were employed for statistical analysis. Results: After treatment, FLT uptake was declined in dependence of the proliferation inhibition mediated by both chemotherapeutic agents (all P<.0001). The decrease of FLT was greater after doxorubicin treatment than after the corresponding docetaxel dose. With doxorubicin (IC{sub 99}), FLT accumulation was reduced by 70% as early as 4 h after treatment. FLT uptake was closely correlated to [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation and S-phase fraction (r=.84 to .93). Conclusions: Right after docetaxel or doxorubicin treatment, FLT uptake corresponds to the reduction of tumor cell proliferation induced. [{sup 18}F]FLT appears promising for monitoring chemosensitivity in breast cancer.

  15. Pediatric mature B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma treatment with LMB-96 protocol. The Children Cancer Hospital Egypt experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hany Abdel Rahman; Emad Moussa; Mohamed Sedky; Iman Gouda; Madiha El Wakeel; Omneya Hassanein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is the fastest growing human tumor. The outcome of childhood NHL has improved steadily over the past decades through the use of intensive sequential multi-agent chemotherapy regimens.Methods: A retrospective study having all patients 18 years old or younger diagnosed with mature B cell NHL and treated at Children Cancer Hospital Egypt (CCHE). All children were treated according to the modified (...

  16. Proteomic evaluation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after treatment with retinoic acid isomers: Preliminary insights

    OpenAIRE

    Flodrová, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The effects of 9-cis retinoic acid and all-trans retinoic acid in human MCF-7 breast cancer line have been investigated. The total cell proteins were extracted and separated on 1D SDS-PAGE. The proteins were subsequently in-gel digested by trypsin and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF.

  17. Cancer: repositioned to kill stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holyoake, Tessa; Vetrie, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells make it hard to cure many forms of the disease. Repositioning an existing drug to tackle this problem could significantly improve treatment for one form of leukaemia.

  18. Research Progress of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyou Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular target therapy has become a new approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The sensitivity of lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs has been found to be associated with gene mutationss in the tyrosine kinase domain of RGFR. However, not all EGFR gene mutationss are sensitive to EGFR-TKIs. The review was conducted to study the research progress of EGFR mutations and the sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs and the mechanism of resistance of molecular target therapy in NSCLC.

  19. Research Progress of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Molecular-Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaoyou; Feng Jifeng

    2014-01-01

    Molecular target therapy has become a new approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The sensitivity of lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) has been found to be associated with gene mutationss in the tyrosine kinase domain of RGFR. However, not all EGFR gene mutationss are sensitive to EGFR-TKIs. The review was conducted to study the research progress of EGFR mutations and the sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs and the mechanism of resistance of molecular target therapy in NSCLC.

  20. Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Performance of Nanosized Anatase TiO2 Doped with CdS Quantum Dots for Cancer-Cell Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kangqiang Huang; Li Chen; Jieguan Deng; Jianwen Xiong

    2012-01-01

    CdS quantum-dots-(QDs-)doped TiO2 nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using the sol-gel technique and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS, UV-Vis, and FS. They were then used as a new “photosensitizer” based on photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer-cell treatment. The photocatalytic activities of CdS-TiO2 on leukemia tumors were investigated by using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The ultrastructural morphology of treated cells was also studied by AFM. The experimental results in...

  1. Single agent- and combination treatment with two targeted suicide gene therapy systems is effective in chemoresistant small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe R; Christensen, Camilla L; Sehested, Maxwell;

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional targeted suicide gene (SG) therapy driven by the insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) promoter makes it possible to target suicide toxin production and cytotoxicity exclusively to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells and tumors. It remains to be determined whether acquired chemoresistance......, as observed in the majority of SCLC patients, desensitizes SCLC cells to INSM1 promoter-driven SG therapy....

  2. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aurelio Lorico; Eric Deutsch; Bo Lu; Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cells within tumors with capabilities of self-renewal, differentiation, and tumorigenicity when transplanted into an animal host. A number of cell surface markers such as CD44, CD24, and CD133 are often used to identify and enrich CSCs. A regulatory network consisting of microRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways controls the CSC properties. The clinical relevance of CSCs has been strengthened by emerging evidence,...

  3. Differential interference of vitamin D analogs PRI-1906, PRI-2191, and PRI-2205 with the renewal of human colon cancer cells refractory to treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarz, Agnieszka; Przybyszewska, Małgorzata; Swoboda, Paweł; Miłoszewska, Joanna; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Kutner, Andrzej; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether hypocalcemic analogs of active forms of vitamins D modulate expression of genes related to stem-like phenotype in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT-116 undergoing renewal after the treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Both lines express vitamin D receptor, but differ in differentiation stage and vitamin D sensitivity. Cells that resisted the 5-FU exposure were treated with synthetic analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (PRI-1906) and analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (PRI-2191 and PRI-2205). Proliferative activity was more profoundly affected by vitamin D analogs in HT-29/5-FU than in HCT-116/5-FU cells. In HT-29/5-FU cells, analogs PRI-1906 and PRI-2191 downregulated the expression of genes related to survival, re-growth, and invasiveness during renewal, while PRI-2205 increased expression of genes related to differentiation only. In HCT-116/5-FU cells, PRI-2191 decreased the expression of stemness- and angiogenesis-related genes, whereas PRI-1906 augmented their expression. The effects in HCT-116/5-FU cells were observed at higher concentrations of the analogs than those used for HT-29/5-FU cells. Out of the series of analogs studied, PRI-2191 might be used to counteract the renewal of both moderately and poorly differentiated cancer cells following conventional treatment. PMID:26511971

  4. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  5. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  6. A Preclinical Evaluation of Antrodia camphorata Alcohol Extracts in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Non-Invasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to provide a platform for the pre-clinical evaluation of anti-cancer properties of a unique CAM (complementary and alternative medicine agent, Antrodia camphorata alcohol extract (ACAE, in a mouse model with the advantageous non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence molecular imaging technology. In vitro analyses on the proliferation, migration/invasion, cell cycle and apoptosis were performed on ACAE-treated non-small cell lung cancer cells, H441GL and control CGL1 cells. In vivo, immune-deficient mice were inoculated subcutaneously with H441GL followed by oral gavages of ACAE. The effect of ACAE on tumor progression was monitored by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. The proliferation and migration/invasion of H441GL cells were inhibited by ACAE in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ACAE induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis in H441GL cells as shown by flow cytometric analysis, Annexin-V immunoflourescence and DNA fragmentation. In vivo bioluminescence imaging revealed that tumorigenesis was significantly retarded by oral treatment of ACAE in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on our experimental data, ACAE contains anti-cancer properties and could be considered as a potential CAM agent in future clinical evaluation.

  7. Treatment paradigms for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, squamous lung cancer: first, second and third-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PeterMichaelEllis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the treatment algorithm applied to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the same for all histologic subtypes. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular profiles of squamous and non-squamous NSCLC have changed this perspective. Histologic subtype and the presence of specific molecular abnormalities have predictive value for response to and toxicity from therapy, as well as overall survival. For patients with squamous NSCLC, a platinum agent plus gemcitabine, or paclitaxel is recommended as first-line therapy. The role of EGFR monoclonal antibodies is uncertain. Maintenance therapy is not widely recommended, although data exist for the use of erlotinib. The standard recommendation for second-line therapy is docetaxel and erlotinib should be considered as second or third-line therapy. There is ongoing research identifying molecular targets in squamous NSCLC and many agents are in early phase clinical trials. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting programmed death 1 receptor (PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1 appear promising.

  8. The roles of beta-adrenergic receptors in tumorigenesis and the possible use of beta-adrenergic blockers for cancer treatment: possible genetic and cell-signaling mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in the USA, and the incidence of cancer increases dramatically with age. Beta-adrenergic blockers appear to have a beneficial clinical effect in cancer patients. In this paper, we review the evidence of an association between β-adrenergic blockade and cancer. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine which proteins link β-adrenergic blockade to cancer pathology. In particular, this link involves the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the renin–angiotensin system, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Beta-adrenergic blockers also exert anticancer effects through non-genomic factors, including matrix metalloproteinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide synthase. In conclusion, β-adrenergic blockade may play a beneficial role in cancer treatment. Additional investigations that examine β-adrenergic blockers as cancer therapeutics are required to further elucidate this role

  9. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around it. Sometimes lymph nodes , half of the thyroid gland on the same side of the body as the cancer, and muscles, tissues , and a nerve in the neck are also removed. Tumor debulking : A surgical procedure in which as much ...

  10. Serum cytokine levels in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: correlation with clinical outcome of erlotinib treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-sheng; MIAO Li-yun; LIU Lu; CAI Hou-rong; DING Jing-jing; REN Sheng-xiang; ZHOU Cai-cun

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum expression of cytokines may provide information about the clinical outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum cytokine levels and the clinical outcome of erlotinib treatment in a second or third line setting in patients with advanced NSCLC.Methods A total of 162 patients with advanced NSCLC who received erlotinib as either second or third line therapy were enrolled in this study.Blood samples were collected before the initiation of erlotinib treatment,and the levels of IL-1,IL-2R,IL-6,and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Cutoff points were defined as the median levels of IL-1 (low (≤26.5 pg/ml) and high (>26.5 pg/ml)),IL-2R (low (≤115 pmol/L) and high (>15 pmol/L)),IL-6 (low (≤49.5 pg/ml) and high (>49.5 pg/ml)),and TNF-α (low (≤48.5 pg/ml) and high (>48.5 pg/ ml)).Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the survival time,and Cox regression analyses were used to correlate cytokines and baseline clinical characteristics with clinical outcomes,including time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS).Results Between January 2007 and May 2011,162 patients were enrolled.Their median age was 58 years.In this group,109 were males and 53 were females,74 were former or current smokers and 88 were non-smokers.A total of 122 patients had adenocarcinoma,27 had squamous cell carcinoma,and 13 had tumors with other types of histology.And 139 patients had an Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1,while 23 scored at 2-3.Expression of IL-1,IL-2R,and IL-6 was not significantly associated with age,gender,ECOG performance status,smoking status,or histology and stage of tumor.Only TNF-α was associated with smoking status (P=0.045).Survival analysis showed that patients with low levels of either IL-6 or TNF-α had a statistically longer TTp and OS than patients with high

  11. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumitaka Takeshita; Tomohiro Fujiwara; Takahiro Ochiya; Makiko Ono; Ryou-u Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is generally acknowledged as an important field of cancer research, not only as an academic matter but also as a crucial aspect of clinical practice. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells in self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes, and the utilization of common signaling pathways and the stem cell niche. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cel...

  12. A clinical trial on docetaxel and carboplatin therapy with or without nimotuzumab for the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Daliang Qi; Yan Cui; Qingsheng Wang; Chongbiao Huang; Jie Xu; Yanzhuo Yang; Liang Xin; Ye Tian; Xin Angelique Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the role of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through progress-free survival, changes in tumor marker expression and adverse drug reactions. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 NSCLC patients were randomized into two groups. The treatment group (n = 30) received nimotuzumab (200 mg) with docetaxel (60 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (area under curve = 5), whereas the control group (n = 29) received c...

  13. Effect of integrated Chinese medical treatment on the survival time of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘苓霜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe clinical effect of integrated Chinese medical(CM)treatment(as maintenance therapy)on the progression-free survival(PFS)and overall survival(OS)in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC)after first-line chemotherapy.Methods The study was a prospective,randomized,controlled clinical trial.Totally 69 non-progressive advanced NSCLC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy were

  14. Complete remission through icotinib treatment in Non-small cell lung cancer epidermal growth factor receptor mutation patient with brain metastasis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Tao; Wang Ruimin; Dong Zhouhuan; Liang Naichao; Chang Ping

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) has been universally recognized as a poor prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown efficacy in treating BM with an EGFR mutation. This paper reports a case of BM patient with EGFR-mutated NSCLC. According to the findings, a complete remission (CR) of the BM was achieved by icotinib treatment without conducting a radiotherapy, which was followed by a resection of the prima...

  15. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duursen, van M.B.M.; Smeets, E.E.J.W.; Rijk, J.C.W.; Nijmeijer, S.M.; Berg, M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, li

  16. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  17. Lung cancer-initiating cells: a novel target for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Morris, John C.; Steel, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major public health problem causing more deaths than any other cancer. A better understanding of the biology of this disease and improvements in treatment are greatly needed. Increasing evidence supports the concept that a rare and specialized population of cancer cells, so-called cancer-initiating cells with stem cell-like characteristics, is responsible for tumor growth, maintenance, and recurrence. Cancer-initiating cells also exhibit characteristics that render them resis...

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Treatment Strategies for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Methods and Materials: Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged ≥66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. Results: The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. Conclusions: In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations

  19. Differences in cell cycle regulation after platinum derivatives treatment in sensitive and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Viktor; Souček, Karel; Šindlerová, Lenka; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Sova, Petr; Kozubík, Alois

    Bratislava : Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2006 - (Boháčová, V.; Breier, A.; Zbyňovská, D.; Zliechovec, J.). s. 69-69 ISBN 80-969532-6-5. [Biochemický zjazd /20./. 12.09.2006-16.09.2006, Piešťany] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507; GA MPO(CZ) PZ-Z2/29 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ovarian cancer * cisplatin * resistance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  20. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Allum, William H; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the ...

  1. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that ... not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos More Videos ...

  2. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  3. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool

  4. Optimizing Treatment Risk and Benefit for Elderly Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Right Treatment for the Right Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Gross, Cary P; Lilenbaum, Rogerio C

    2016-05-01

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in theJournal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published inJournal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 78-year-old woman with a 40-pack-year smoking history has been referred for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. She presented with a persistent cough and worsening dyspnea on exertion. A chest x-ray followed by a chest computed tomography scan revealed a 3-cm right upper lobe mass along with a moderate-size pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was positive for adenocarcinoma. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan was negative. A reflex molecular profile, includingKRAS,EGFR,ALK,BRAF,HER2,RET,MET, andROS, did not reveal an actionable abnormality. Her past medical history includes diabetes, hypertension, and osteopenia. Her medications include a β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, oral antidiabetic agent, calcium, and vitamin D. The laboratory evaluation is notable for a hemoglobin of 10.8 g/dL and a creatinine clearance of 36 mL/min. The other laboratories are within normal limits. She is somewhat limited by the shortness of breath but maintains an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1. She is independent in all of her instrumental and basic activities of daily living and denies falls. She has been referred to discuss treatment options. PMID:27001591

  5. Radiation and SN38 treatments modulate the expression of microRNAs, cytokines and chemokines in colon cancer cells in a p53-directed manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Surajit; Meng, Wen-Jian; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Ping, Jie; Bisgin, Atil; Helmfors, Linda; Waldmann, Patrik; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2015-12-29

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs, cytokines and chemokines are involved in pathogenesis of colon cancer. However, the expression of p53 mediated miRNAs, cyto- and chemokines after radiation and SN38 treatment in colon cancer remains elusive. Here, human colon cancer cells, HCT116 with wild-type, heterozygous and a functionally null p53, were treated by radiation and SN38. The expression of 384 miRNAs was determined by using the TaqMan® miRNA array, and the expression of cyto- and chemokines was analyzed by Meso-Scale-Discovery instrument. Up- or down-regulations of miRNAs after radiation and SN38 treatments were largely dependent on p53 status of the cells. Cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, VEGF, and chemokines, IL-8, MIP-1α were increased, and IFN-γ expression was decreased after radiation, whereas, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, IL-8 were decreased, and VEGF and MIP-1α were increased after SN38 treatment. Bioinformatic analysis pointed out that the highly up-regulated miRNAs, let-7f-5p, miR-455-3p, miR-98, miR-155-5p and the down-regulated miRNAs, miR-1, miR-127-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-202-5p were associated with colon cancer pathways and correlated with cyto- or chemokine expression. These miRNAs have the potential for use in colon cancer therapy as they are related to p53, pro- or anti-inflammatory cyto- or chemokines after the radiation and SN38 treatment. PMID:26556872

  6. Unproven methods in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1993-07-01

    The nature-based and nontoxic image makes application of unproven methods in oncology attractive in contrast to application of a mechanized scientific medicine. The application frequency of these treatments ranges from 10% to greater than 60%. Increasingly, the promoters try to create a scientific impression through a pseudologic cancer theory, a harmless diagnostic test, and a holistic treatment of every cancer. Of the big variety of unproven methods, which are summarized in 11 groups in this review, the following are discussed: anthroposophic and other mistletoe preparations; homeopathy; Maharishi Ayur-Veda; unproven anticancer diets; orthomolecular medicine, including ascorbic acid; and methods supposedly stimulating unspecific and specific defense mechanisms. In conclusion, physicians should beware of and have knowledge of currently used unproven cancer treatments for epidemiologic, social, economic, and scientific reasons. PMID:8364081

  7. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is ...

  8. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38–93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2–16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  9. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  10. Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testicular Cancer Resource Center Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC) 95% of all testicular tumors are germ cell ... seen in young adults. Patients with mediastinal nonseminomatous EGC are typically classed as poor risk patients because ...

  11. Antimetabolite Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Malyn May Asuncion; Neidigh, Jonathan W.; Wall, Nathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly and aggressive disease. Less than 1% of diagnosed patients survive 5 years with an average survival time of only 4–8 months. The only option for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy where only the antimetabolites gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are used clinically. Unfortunately, efforts to improve chemotherapy regimens by combining, 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine with other drugs, such as cisplatin or oxaliplatin, have not increased cell killing or improve...

  12. 甲状腺肿瘤干细胞与甲状腺肿瘤治疗:理论与应用%Thyroid cancer stem cells and thyroid cancer treatment:theory and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赛恒; 毕力夫; 吴岩

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Thyroid cancer stem cells are one of the reasons for tumor resistance that promotes tumor development. The research of thyroid cancer stem cells has provides a new clinic means for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer. OBJECTIVE:To overview the discovery, identification, and correlation of thyroid cancer stem cells with thyroid cancer. METHODS:A computer-based online search of PubMed database and Wan Fang database between 1995-01/2014-01 was performed to search related articles with the key words of“thyroid cancer, cancer stem cell, stem cell, cancer suppressor gene”in English and Chinese, respectively. Literatures related to thyroid cancer stem cells were selected;in the same field, the articles published lately in authoritative journals were preferred. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:A total of 561 literatures were primarily selected, and 57 documents were involved for result analysis according to inclusion criteria. Cancer stem cells have become a focus in the study of carcinogenesis. Stem cells also exist in the thyroid gland and its tumor. At present, there are several ways to isolate and identify thyroid cancer stem cells. The tumor thyroid stem cells are closely related to the occurrence, transfer and treatment of tumors. But whether we can cure thyroid cancer through restraining or eliminating thyroid cancer stem cells is stil unknown that needs further studies.%背景:研究发现甲状腺肿瘤干细胞促进肿瘤的发生发展,是肿瘤耐药的原因之一。对甲状腺肿瘤干细胞的认识与研究,可以为甲状腺肿瘤的诊断与治疗提供一些新的思路。目的:对甲状腺肿瘤干细胞的发现、鉴定识别、与肿瘤的关系及其临床应用进行综述。方法:由作者应用计算机检索PubMed、万方数据库中1995年1月至2014年1月相关文献。在标题、、关键词中以“thyroid cancer,cancer stem cel ,stem cel ,cancer suppressor gene”或“甲状腺肿瘤、肿瘤干细

  13. Progress in the clinical treatment based on breast cancer stem cells%基于乳腺癌干细胞的临床治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任远; 李泽桂

    2011-01-01

    背景:肿瘤干细胞在肿瘤的发生、发展、转移和复发等方面发挥着重要的作用.由于常规疗法无法消灭乳腺癌干细胞,故乳腺癌干细胞已被假定为乳腺癌治疗失败的根源.目的:阐明乳腺癌干细胞的生物学特性及一些乳腺癌靶向治疗药物的疗效,为制定提高乳腺癌患者生存率的治疗方案提供一些建议.方法:应用计算机检索PubMed数据库2000-01/2010-08有关乳腺癌干细胞的标志物与鉴定、新型药物针对乳腺癌干细胞靶向治疗方面的相关文献,检索词为"breast cancer,cancer stem cells,therapy",限定文章语言种类为English.检索文献包括临床研究、基础研究及综述类文章,初检得到文献总计203篇,排除重复性研究,保留33篇文献进一步分析.结果与结论:乳腺癌干细胞是第一个在实体瘤中被鉴定的肿瘤干细胞,人们采用多种策略成功分离出乳腺癌干细胞,对其生物学行为的认识正逐渐深入.乳腺癌干细胞的自我更新、分化等特性受到微环境和许多信号转导通路的调控.如何靶向治疗乳腺癌干细胞,最终根治乳腺癌,正逐渐成为肿瘤靶向治疗研究的一个热点.%BACKGROUND: Tumor stem cell plays an important role in the occurrence, development, metastasis and recurrence of tumor.However, due to conventional treatment cannot eliminate breast cancer stem cells, breast cancer stem cells have been assumed to be the origin of treatment failure in breast cancer.OBJECTIVE:To clarify the biological characteristics of breast cancer stem cells and the curative effects of targeted therapy for breast cancer by some drugs targeting, and then provides some advice for developing treatment strategies that may improve survival rate of breast cancer patients.METHODS: The articles related to the maker of breast cancer stem cells and identification, new drug for the targeting treatment of breast cancer stem cell from PubMed database between January 2000

  14. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm3) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a combination

  15. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokobza, Sivan M.; Jiang, Yanyan; Weber, Anika M.; Devery, Aoife M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm{sup 3}) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a

  16. Pediatric mature B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma treatment with LMB-96 protocol. The Children Cancer Hospital Egypt experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Abdel Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Burkitt lymphoma (BL is a highly aggressive mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL and is the fastest growing human tumor. The outcome of childhood NHL has improved steadily over the past decades through the use of intensive sequential multi-agent chemotherapy regimens.Methods: A retrospective study having all patients 18 years old or younger diagnosed with mature B cell NHL and treated at Children Cancer Hospital Egypt (CCHE. All children were treated according to the modified (LMB 96 protocol during the period between July 2007 and December 2012. Patients were followed up till June 2013.Results: Three hundred and seventy-seven patients were diagnosed with mature B cell NHL and received the LMB96 treatment protocol. The majorities were males (76.4% with a median age of 5.3 years, and ranged from 0.1-18.0 years. The median follow-up period was 28.2 months (range 0.9-72 months. Burkitt lymphoma was the most predominant pathologic subtype (79.6%, n = 300, and abdominal mass as a primary site was the most common presentation (71.3%. Twenty seven patients (7.2% were treated as group A, 268 (71.0% as group B, and 82 (21.8% patients as high risk group C. Seventy-one (18.8% patients suffered adverse events. Major adverse events were early deaths in 17 patients (4.5%, death during induction chemotherapy seen in 18 patients (4.7%, and during maintenance therapy in 7 patients (1.8%, tumor progression in 19 patients (5.0%, and relapse in 10 patients (3.7%. Sixty-three patients (16.7% died during the study period. The main causes of death were tumor lysis syndrome (TLS in 25.3%, and severe sepsis during chemotherapy in 41.3% of the patients. The 3 years OS and EFS were 83.3% and 80.4% respectively for the whole groups of patients. OS and EFS were 100% for group A, and 87.5%±3.9% and 85.9±4.3% for group B. For group C BM+/CNS- patients, OS was 55.62%±15.8%, and EFS of 53.8%±15.6%. For BM+/CNS+ patients, OS and EFS were 63.2%±21.76% and 57.9%

  17. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  18. Cancer stem cells in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Moltzahn, Felix; Thalmann, George N

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (P-Ca) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Lately, increasing evidence for a hierarchically organized cancer stem cell (CSC) model emerged for different tumors entities, including P-Ca. CSCs are defined by several characteristics including self-renewal, pluripotency and tumorigenicity and are thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence, metastasis and cancer related death. In this review we discuss the recent research in the field of CSCs, its limitation...

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karl-Walter Jauch; Hendrik Seeliger; Hanno Niess; Qi Bao; Andrea Renner; Yue Zhao; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC t...

  20. [ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer: how to optimize treatment with crizotinib in routine practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigier-Valette, Clarisse; Girard, Nicolas; Cortot, Alexis B; Mennecier, Bertrand; Debieuvre, Didier; Planchard, David; Zalcman, Gérard; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Cadranel, Jacques; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    Crizotinib (XALKORI(™), Pfizer) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of ALK, MET, and ROS1, which is currently approved for the second line treatment for ALK-rearranged lung cancer. This work from an expert group, based on the review of the data from the Profile studies, aims to provide practical elements in order to optimize the tolerability of crizotinib. Specific major or frequent side effects of crizotinib are discussed: visual disturbances, cardiac effects, elevated transaminases, and hypogonadism. In the routine practice, patients should be advised about visual disturbances, especially with regard to driving in low brightness. Digestive disorders related to crizotinib are exceptionally persistent or severe. Dietary measures and symptomatic treatments usually control these disorders. It is recommended to perform an electrocardiogram before introduction of crizotinib, to identify prolonged QT interval. Torsades de pointes may produce dizziness or syncope. Hypogonadism should be considered in case of fatigue, decreased libido, and even depression, taking into account that these symptoms may be related to cancer; testosterone serum level should be measured to identify patients that may be eligible to receive a supplementation. Monitoring of liver function tests, including transaminases and bilirubin, is necessary. To conclude, these practical elements are helpful to optimize treatment with crizotinib in patients with ALK-rearranged lung cancer; in the future, academic initiatives should be taken to study these aspects, based on the monitoring of large cohorts of patients treated with crizotinib. PMID:25299566

  1. Maintenance treatment with chemotherapy and immunotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer:A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabella eLlanos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old woman was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma state IV (synchronous pleural involvement in April 2009. First-line systemic treatment included 6 cycles of Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Bevacizumab. Partial response was achieved. Maintenance therapy with Bevacizumab and Pemetrexed was given from September 2009 to February 2010. No response changes were observed. Immunotherapy was initiated, and then Pemetrexed was given with the same disease status. Both treatments were well tolerated. Immunotherapy toxicity included reaction at the site of injection grade 2. At present, the patient is still on this treatment. Given the poor prognosis of patients with advanced lung cancer, the combination of both treatments during the stable phase of the disease may improve progression-free survival.

  2. Nanoparticle Based Combination Treatments for Targeting Multiple Hallmarks of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDyke, D; Kyriacopulos, P; Yassini, B; Wright, A; Burkhart, E; Jacek, S; Pratt, M; Peterson, CR; Rai, P

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of cancer remains one of the most challenging tasks facing the healthcare system. Cancer affects the lives of millions of people and is often fatal. Current treatment methods include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapies or some combinations of these. However, recurrence is a major problem. These treatments can be invasive with severe side effects. Inefficacies in treatments are a result of the complex and variable biology of cancerous cells. Malignant tumor cells and normal functioning cells share many of the same biological characteristics but the main difference is that in cancer cells there is in an overuse and over expression of these biological characteristics. These pertinent characteristics can be grouped into eight hallmarks, as illustrated by Hanahan and Weinberg. These characteristics include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction. In order to provide a noninvasive, effective treatment, delivery methods must be explored in order to transport cytotoxic agents used for targeting the hallmarks of cancer in a safer and more effective fashion. The use of nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers provides an effective method in which multiple cytotoxic agents can be safely delivered to cancer tissue to simultaneously target multiple hallmarks. By targeting multiple hallmarks of cancer at once, the efficacy of cancer treatments could be improved drastically. This review explores the uses and efficacy of combination therapies using nanoparticles that can simultaneously target multiple hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27547592

  3. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis

  5. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells than in normal cells. For skin cancer, laser light is shined onto the skin and the drug becomes active and kills the cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy causes little damage to healthy tissue. Biologic therapy ...

  6. Folate Conjugated Cellulose Nanocrystals Potentiate Irreversible Electroporation-induced Cytotoxicity for the Selective Treatment of Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Colacino, Katelyn R.; Arena, Christopher B.; Dong, Shuping; Roman, Maren; Davalos, Rafael V.; Lee, Yong W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are rod-shaped, crystalline nanoparticles that have shown prom- ise in a number of industrial applications for their unique chemical and physical properties. However, investigations of their abilities in the biomedical field are limited. The goal of this study is to show the potential use of folic acid-conjugated cellulose nanocrystals in the potentiation of irreversible electroporation-induced cell death in folate receptor (FR)-positive cancers. We optimized key pulse ...

  7. Differential profiling studies of N-linked glycoproteins in glioblastoma cancer stem cells upon treatment with γ-secretase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lan; Liu, Yashu; He, Jintang; Flack, Callie G.; Talsma, Caroline E.; Crowley, Jessica G.; Muraszko, Karin M.; Fan, Xing; Lubman, David M

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Notch pathway blockade by γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) depletes cancer stem cells (CSCs) in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) through reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanism by which the manipulation of Notch signal induces alterations on post-translational modifications such as glycosylation has not been investigated. Herein, we present a differential profiling work to detect the change of glycosylation pattern upon drug trea...

  8. Successful treatment of EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer with reduced-dose gefitinib: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroko; TAMURA, TOMOHIRO; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; TAKAYASHIKI, NORIO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; Satoh, Hiroaki; HIZAWA, NOBUYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is a favorable prognostic factor of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the majority of patients with EGFR mutations, clinical benefits of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been reported. One of the TKIs, gefitinib, appears to be less toxic to the skin than other TKIs. The present study reports a case of NSCLC with EGFR mutation (exon 19 deletion) in which dose-reduced gefitinib was effective against recurrence. Due to development ...

  9. Economic evaluation of first-line and maintenance treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouaïd C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Christos Chouaïd,1 Perinne Crequit,2 Isabelle Borget,3 Alain Vergnenegre4 1Service de Pneumologie et de Pathologie Professionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal Créteil et Université de Paris Est Créteil, Paris, France; 2Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 3Service de Biostatistique et d’Epidémiologie, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 4Unité d’Oncologie Thoracique et Cutanée, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Limoges, Limoges, France Abstract: During these last years, there have been an increased number of new drugs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, with a growing financial effect on patients and society. The purpose of this article was to review the economics of first-line and maintenance NSCLC treatments. We reviewed economic analyses of NSCLC therapies published between 2004 and 2014. In first-line settings, in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC, the cisplatin gemcitabine doublet appears to be cost-saving compared with other platinum doublets. In patients with nonsquamous NSCLC, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs per life-year gained (LYG were $83,537, $178,613, and more than $300,000 for cisplatin-pemetrexed compared with, respectively, cisplatin-gemcitabine, cisplatin-carboplatin-paclitaxel, and carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab. For all primary chemotherapy agents, use of carboplatin is associated with slightly higher costs than cisplatin. In all the analysis, bevacizumab had an ICER greater than $150,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY. In epidermal growth factor receptor mutated advanced NSCLC, compared with carboplatin-paclitaxel doublet, targeted therapy based on testing available tissue yielded an ICER of $110,644 per QALY, and the rebiopsy strategy yielded an ICER of $122,219 per QALY. Compared with the triplet carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab, testing and rebiopsy strategies had ICERs of $25,547 and $44,036 per QALY

  10. Severe reversible cardiac failure after bortezomib treatment combined with chemotherapy in a non-small cell lung cancer patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giaccone Giuseppe

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bortezomib (Velcade®, a dipeptide boronate proteasome inhibitor, is a novel anti-cancer agent registered for multiple myeloma (MM. It has also shown promising clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Clinical experience with bortezomib so far indicates that overall incidence of cardiac failure associated with bortezomib therapy remains incidental. Nevertheless, acute development or exacerbation of congestive cardiac failure has been associated with bortezomib treatment. Case presentation We present here a case of severe, but reversible, congestive cardiac failure in a lung cancer patient who had no prior cardiac history, after receiving an experimental treatment of bortezomib combined with chemotherapy. Elevated levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as retrospectively measured in archived serum samples, were suggestive of pre-existent (sub-clinical left ventricular dysfunction. Conclusion Based on literature, we hypothesize that baseline presence of sub clinical cardiomyopathy, characterized by a dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, could have predisposed this patient for a cardiac side effect induced by systemic proteasome inhibition. Patients with heart disease or risk factors for it should be closely monitored when being submitted to treatment with proteasome inhibition therapy such as bortezomib. Caution is therefore warranted in lung cancer patients who often present with cardiac comorbidities.

  11. GRP78 knockdown enhances apoptosis via the down-regulation of oxidative stress and Akt pathway after epirubicin treatment in colon cancer DLD-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Chang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78 is induced in the cancer microenvironment and can be considered as a novel predictor of responsiveness to chemotherapy in many cancers. In this study, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear translocation were higher in GRP78 knockdown DLD-1 colon cancer cells compared with scrambled control cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with epirubicin in GRP78 knockdown DLD-1 cells enhanced apoptosis and was associated with decreased production of intracellular ROS. In addition, apoptosis was increased by the antioxidants propyl gallate (PG and dithiothreitol (DTT in epirubicin-treated scrambled control cells. Epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells resulted in more inactivated Akt pathway members, such as phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β, as well as downstream targets of β-catenin expression. Knockdown of Nrf2 with small interfering RNA (siRNA increased apoptosis in epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells, which suggested that Nrf2 may be a primary defense mechanism in GRP78 knockdown cells. We also demonstrated that epirubicin-treated GRP78 knockdown cells could decrease survival pathway signaling through the redox activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which is a serine/threonine phosphatase that negatively regulates the Akt pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that epirubicin decreased the intracellular ROS in GRP78 knockdown cells, which decreased survival signaling through both the Akt pathway and the activation of PP2A. Together, these mechanisms contributed to the enhanced level of epirubicin-induced apoptosis that was observed in the GRP78 knockdown cells.

  12. Epirubicin-Adsorbed Nanodiamonds Kill Chemoresistant Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Low, Xinyi Casuarine; Hou, Weixin; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Toh, Tan Boon; Mohd Abdul Rashid, Masturah; Ho, Dean; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Ep...

  13. Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Walsh, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), also known as kidney cancer, renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is a global burden. This article aims to provide a brief overview of RCC. It outlines epidemiology and presentation; invesitgation and staging; treatments and prognosis. The article also includes a focus on currently available drug treatments, and serves as an introduction to the topic.

  14. Personalized treatment strategies for non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: the role of crizotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu FY

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fei-Yu Niu,1,2 Yi-Long Wu2 1Graduate School, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangement is an oncogene targeted with approved drugs second to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in lung cancer. Crizotinib was developed and introduced into clinical practice rapidly and successfully after the discovery of ALK rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancer. Chinese and other Asian patients treated with crizotinib seem to have lower toxicity and higher efficacy compared with other ethnicities. Crizotinib showed potent antitumor activity and manageable toxicity in mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor (c-Met/ROS1-positive non-small-cell lung cancer patients, but prospective clinical trials are still needed to confirm its efficacy and safety. Crizotinib appears to be effective against tumors originating from various organs that harbor ALK abnormalities. In the near future, we would classify the tumors by their genetic information beyond organs, such as ALKoma, EGFRoma, and RAFoma, and a single compound could be used for many different types of cancer in different organs. The major challenge of the widespread use of crizotinib in clinical practice is establishing convenient diagnostic techniques for the detection of ALK/c-Met/ROS1. In the present study, we reviewed the application of crizotinib in Chinese patients. Keywords: NSCLC, crizotinib, ALK, c-Met, ROS1

  15. Protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with a cytotoxic daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative bioconjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Natalie Schreier

    Full Text Available Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a new approach for the treatment of cancer, which provides increased selectivity and decreased systemic toxicity. We have recently developed a promising drug delivery system, in which the anticancer drug daunorubicin (Dau was attached via oxime bond to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III derivative used as a targeting moiety (Glp-His-Trp-Lys(Ac-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(Da  = Aoa-Pro-Gly-NH2; Glp = pyroglutamic acid, Ac = acetyl; Aoa = aminooxyacetyl. This bioconjugate exerted in vitro cytostatic/cytotoxic effect on human breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, as well as significant in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effect on colon carcinoma bearing mice. In our previous studies, H-Lys(Dau = Aoa-OH was identified as the smallest metabolite produced in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, which was able to bind to DNA in vitro. To get a deeper insight into the mechanism of action of the bioconjugate, changes in the protein expression profile of HT-29 human colon cancer cells after treatment with the bioconjugate or free daunorubicin were investigated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our results indicate that several metabolism-related proteins, molecular chaperons and proteins involved in signaling are differently expressed after targeted chemotherapeutic treatment, leading to the conclusion that the bioconjugate exerts its cytotoxic action by interfering with multiple intracellular processes.

  16. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment. PMID:8066398

  17. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  18. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  19. Outcome of surgical resection for brain metastases and radical treatment of the primary tumor in Chinese non–small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Z

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zhenye Li,1,3,* Xiangheng Zhang,1,* Xiaobing Jiang,1 Chengcheng Guo,1 Ke Sai,1 Qunying Yang,1 Zhenqiang He,1 Yang Wang,1 Zhongping Chen,1 Wei Li,2 Yonggao Mou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this work Purpose: Brain metastasis is the most common complication of brain cancer; nevertheless, primary lung cancer accounts for approximately 20%–40% of brain metastases cases. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for brain metastases. However, no studies have reported the outcome of surgical resection of brain metastases from non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the People’s Republic of China. Moreover, the optimal treatment for primary NSCLC in patients with synchronous brain metastases is hitherto controversial. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the cases of NSCLC patients with brain metastases who underwent neurosurgical resection at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, and assessed the efficacy of surgical resection and the necessity of aggressive treatment for primary NSCLC in synchronous brain metastases patients. Results: A total of 62 patients, including 47 men and 15 women, with brain metastases from NSCLC were enrolled in the study. The median age at the time of craniotomy was 54 years (range 29–76 years. At the final follow-up evaluation, 50 patients had died. The median OS time was 15.1 months, and the survival rates were 70% and 37% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The median OS

  20. Restoration of tumor suppressor gene function by gene replacement or small molecule strategies for the treatment of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza

    2011-01-01

    as potential therapeutic strategies for SCLC. However, as mutant p53 proteins tend to accumulate in SCLC cells, reintroduction of wild-type p53 may not be effective due to dominant-negative effects of the mutant protein. Therefore, a more effective approach would be to reactivate the endogenous......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with no current satisfactory treatments. Identification of new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies are therefore in great demand for the improvement or replacement of current available treatment regimes. Molecular mechanisms...... altered in SCLC include loss of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), making restoration of normal TSG function a potential therapeutic strategy. One of the TSGs most frequently inactivated in SCLC is the transcription factor p53 (>90%). The majority of the mutations found in the p53 gene are in the DNA binding...

  1. Long-term clinical outcome in patients with stage-i nonseminomatous germ cell cancer: a critical review of own treatment modalities in a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Seseke

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The optimal management of patients with clinical stage I non-seminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT I was considered controversial until the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group determined unambiguous treatment strategies. In order to assess the long-term outcome we evaluated the data of patients with NSGCT I. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective evaluation, we included 52 patients with a mean age of 26 years (range 15-58 who were treated with different modalities at our department between 1989 and 2003. Mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range 2-14 years. After orchiectomy, 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, 7 patients underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and 6 men were managed using a surveillance strategy. Survival, recurrence rate and time of recurrence were evaluated. The histological staging and treatment modality was related to the relapse. RESULTS: Tumor specific overall mortality was 3.8%. The mortality and relapse rate of the surveillance strategy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and chemotherapy was 16.7% / 50%, 14.3% / 14.3% and 0% / 2.5% respectively. All relapsed patients in the surveillance group as well as in the RPLND group had at least one risk factor for developing metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Following the European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer in patients with NSGCT Stage I any treatment decision must be individually related to the patient according to prognostic factors and care capacity of the treating centre. In case of doubt, adjuvant chemotherapy should be the treatment of choice, as it provides the lowest risk of relapse or tumor related death.

  2. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung ... Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health ...

  4. The bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells predicts the cell death response to treatment with 3-bromopyruvate, iodoacetate or 5-fluorouracil

    OpenAIRE

    Cuezva José M; Sánchez-Aragó María

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Metabolic reprogramming resulting in enhanced glycolysis is a phenotypic trait of cancer cells, which is imposed by the tumor microenvironment and is linked to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATPase (β-F1-ATPase). The bioenergetic signature is a protein ratio (β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH), which provides an estimate of glucose metabolism in tumors and serves as a prognostic indicator for cancer patients. Targeting energetic metabolism could be a ...

  5. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  6. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, and, in fact, ... when detected, you know, and when patients get treatment. Okay. So it’s very important, you know, to ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  8. A CD44high/EGFRlow subpopulation within head and neck cancer cell lines shows an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype and resistance to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea La Fleur

    Full Text Available Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high/EGFR(low, CD44(high/EGFR(high and CD44(low cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high/EGFR(low population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high/EGFR(low population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high/EGFR(low cells in comparison to CD44(low cells. Moreover, CD44(high/EGFR(low cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high/EGFR(high and CD44(low counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high and EGFR (low cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  9. Update on the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on the cost-effectiveness of new agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnenègre A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A Vergnenègre,1,4 I Borget,2 C Chouaid3,4 1Service de Pathologie Respiratoire et d'Allergologie, CHU Dupuytren, Limoges, France; 2Etudes et Recherche en Économie de la Santé, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 3Service de Pneumologie, CHU Saint-Antoine, Paris, France; 4Inserm, U707, Paris, France Background: The incidence of lung cancer and the cost of drug treatment have increased dramatically in the last decade. This article examines the costs of new target agents, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and anti-angiogenic drugs. Methods: This study uses PubMed research to focus on the topics of lung cancer, economics, and new targeted therapies. Results: The published papers only addressed TKIs and anti-angiogenic antibodies. For gefitinib, the results favored a clinical-based selection, despite the low number of studies. Erlotinib was studied in second line and as a maintenance treatment (with the studies reaching opposite conclusions in terms of cost-effectiveness. Economic analyses were not in favor of bevacizumab, but the studies on this topic were very heterogeneous. Conclusion: The economic impact of a drug depends on the health care system organization. Future clinical trials must include economic analyses, particularly with TKIs in the first line. Keywords: lung cancer, new target agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, anti-angiogenic, bevacizumab

  10. Cancer stem cell subsets and their relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Yi-Fei; Yang Han; Chen Chong; Liu Hai-Guang; Zhang Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells account for the initiation and progression of cancer. While many types of cancer stem cells with specific markers have been isolated and identified, a variety of differences among them began to be appreciated. Cancer stem cells are hierarchical populations that consist of precancerous stem cells, primary cancer stem cells, migrating cancer stem cells and chemoradioresistant cancer stem cells, playing different roles in cancer initiati...

  11. Utility and translatability of mathematical modeling, cell culture and small and large animal models in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Pearce, John A.; Ryan, Thomas P.

    2015-03-01

    For more than 50 years, hyperthermia-based cancer researchers have utilized mathematical models, cell culture studies and animal models to better understand, develop and validate potential new treatments. It has been, and remains, unclear how and to what degree these research techniques depend on, complement and, ultimately, translate accurately to a successful clinical treatment. In the past, when mathematical models have not proven accurate in a clinical treatment situation, the initiating quantitative scientists (engineers, mathematicians and physicists) have tended to believe the biomedical parameters provided to them were inaccurately determined or reported. In a similar manner, experienced biomedical scientists often tend to question the value of mathematical models and cell culture results since those data typically lack the level of biologic and medical variability and complexity that are essential to accurately study and predict complex diseases and subsequent treatments. Such quantitative and biomedical interdependence, variability, diversity and promise have never been greater than they are within magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment. The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and, recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. The goal of this paper is to use proven concepts and current research to address the potential pathobiology, modeling and quantification of the effects of treatment as pertaining to the similarities and differences in energy delivered by known external delivery techniques and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  12. VINDESINE WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE-EPIRUBICIN-CISPLATIN IN THE TREATMENT LOCALLY ADVANCED NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yan-ping; KE Yu-hua; FU Xiao-yu

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the addition of vindesine to a cyclophosphamide-epirubicin-cisplatin (CAP) regimen for treating the patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: From May 1994to August 1998, 59 previously untreated patients with stage Ⅲa and Ⅲb non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled into this trial. Patients characteristics were the following: the median age was 52 years; the median performance status was 1; there were 19 stage Ⅲa and 40 stage Ⅲb; there were 47 adenocarcinoma, 10squamous cell carcinoma and 2 large cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with vindesine (2 mg/m2, on day 1and day 8), cyclophosphamide (0.6/m2, on day 1),epirubicin (40 mg/m2, on day 1) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2,on day 1) every 3 or 4 weeks. Results: Four achieved a complete response (6.8%), 29 achieved a partial response (49.2%), 15 had stable disease, and 10 had progressive disease. A clinical improvement was in 45 of 59 patients (76.3%). The most frequent major toxic effects were myelosuppression, nausea and vomiting.Conclusion: The vindesine with CAP regimen was active combination chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC accompanied by the limited side effects.

  13. 99mTc-sestamibi to monitor treatment with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to MRP mRNA in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) has been utilized to evaluate multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenomenon of malignant tumors and to predict chemotherapeutic effects on them. The current investigation examined the possibility of monitoring changes with respect to mRNA expression of multi-drug resistance associated protein (MRP) following antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN) treatment involving 99mTc-MIBI. The human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line and its MDR-induced MCF-7/VP cell line were employed. Cell suspensions of the two cell lines at 1 x 104 cells/ml were inoculated in 24-well plates (0.2 ml/well) and incubated for one day. Antisense (AS) 20-mer phosphorothioate ODN complementary to the coding region of MRP mRNA and its sense (S) ODN were administered at final concentrations up to 25 μM, followed by a 5-day incubation. 99mTc-MIBI solution was added to each well and incubated for 30 min. Cellular 99mTc-MIBI uptake was corrected for protein concentration. MRP mRNA expression levels were analyzed via the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cellular uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in MCF-7/VP cells was only 15% of that of MCF-7 cells. Following AS-ODN treatment at 25 μM for five days, 99mTc-MIBI uptake in MCF-7/VP cells increased 2.4-fold in comparison with non-treated control cells. 99mTc-MIBI uptake in MCF-7 cells was unaffected by AS-ODN administration. Sense ODN did not alter uptake in either cell line. RT-PCR confirmed reduction of MRP mRNA in MCF-7/VP cells following AS-ODN treatment. Effects of AS-ODN administration on MRP function can be monitored via assessment of cellular uptake of 99mTc-MIBI. (author)

  14. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  15. Treatment of Brain Metastasis from Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases are not only the most common intracranial neoplasm in adults but also very prevalent in patients with lung cancer. Patients have been grouped into different classes based on the presence of prognostic factors such as control of the primary tumor, functional performance status, age, and number of brain metastases. Patients with good prognosis may benefit from more aggressive treatment because of the potential for prolonged survival for some of them. In this review, we will comprehensively discuss the therapeutic options for treating brain metastases, which arise mostly from a lung cancer primary. In particular, we will focus on the patient selection for combined modality treatment of brain metastases, such as surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with whole brain irradiation; the use of radiosensitizers; and the neurocognitive deficits after whole brain irradiation with or without SRS. The benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) and its potentially associated neuro-toxicity for both small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are also discussed, along with the combined treatment of intrathoracic primary disease and solitary brain metastasis. The roles of SRS to the surgical bed, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, WBRT with an integrated boost to the gross brain metastases, as well as combining WBRT with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, are explored as well

  16. Urothelial Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Dimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence supporting the idea that tumors, similar to normal adult tissues, arise from a specific stem-like cell population, the cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are considered as the real driving force behind tumor growth, the ability to metastasize, as well as resistance to conventional antitumor therapy. The concept that cancer growth recapitulates normal proliferative and/or regenerative processes, even though in very dysfunctional ways, has tremendous implications for cancer therapy. The rapid development of the CSC field, shoulder to shoulder with powerful genome-wide screening techniques, has provided cause for optimism for the development of more reliable therapies in the future. However, several important issues still lie ahead. Recent identification of a highly tumorigenic stem-like compartment and existence of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs raised important questions about UCC initiation and development. This review examines the present knowledge on CSCs in UCCs regarding the similarities between CSCs and the adult urothelial stem cells, potential origin of urothelial CSCs, main regulatory pathways, surface markers expression, and the current state of CSC-targeting therapeutic strategies.

  17. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Hope, Andrew; Moseley, Douglas; Brink, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS AND...... MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...... markers to predict lung density changes induced by radiotherapy was investigated. RESULTS: Age and CBCT markers extracted at 10th, 20th, and 30th treatment fraction significantly predicted lung density changes in a multivariable analysis, and a set of response models based on these parameters were...

  18. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  19. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  20. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology.

  1. Combination Treatment of Hydrogen Peroxide and X-Rays Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer PC-3 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods and Materials: At 4h before the irradiation, PC-3 cells were exposed to 10mM ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) concentrations. Subsequently, cells were exposed to 0.1mM H2O2 just before the irradiations, which were administered with 10-MV X-rays at doses of 10Gy. Results: The percentage of apoptotic cells at 48h after X-irradiation alone, H2O2 alone, and combined X-irradiation and H2O2 was 1.85%, 4.85%, and 28.4%, respectively. With use of combined X-irradiation and H2O2, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred 4h after the irradiation. This resulted in lysosomal rupturing, mitochondrial fragmentation, and the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm from the mitochondria. In contrast, when cells were exposed to NH4Cl before the X-irradiation and H2O2 administration, apoptosis was almost completely suppressed, ROS production did not occur, lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial fragmentation were blocked, and cytochrome c was not released. Conclusions: Hydrogen peroxide strongly enhanced lysosome-dependent radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. A combined use of X-rays and H2O2 can also injure the mitochondrial cytoplasmic organelles and lead to the production of ROS that in and of itself might possibly induce apoptosis.

  2. Critical Appraisal of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Dose Calculation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: afc@iosi.ch [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical impact of the Acuros XB algorithm (implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment-planning system) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods and Materials: A CT dataset of 10 patients presenting with advanced NSCLC was selected and contoured for planning target volume, lungs, heart, and spinal cord. Plans were created for 6-MV and 15-MV beams using three-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity-modulated therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc. Calculations were performed with Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. To distinguish between differences coming from the different heterogeneity management and those coming from the algorithm and its implementation, all the plans were recalculated assigning Hounsfield Unit (HU) = 0 (Water) to the CT dataset. Results: Differences in dose distributions between the two algorithms calculated in Water were <0.5%. This suggests that the differences in the real CT dataset can be ascribed mainly to the different heterogeneity management, which is proven to be more accurate in the Acuros XB calculations. The planning target dose difference was stratified between the target in soft tissue, where the mean dose was found to be lower for Acuros XB, with a range of 0.4% {+-} 0.6% (intensity-modulated therapy, 6 MV) to 1.7% {+-} 0.2% (three-dimensional conformal therapy, 6 MV), and the target in lung tissue, where the mean dose was higher for 6 MV (from 0.2% {+-} 0.2% to 1.2% {+-} 0.5%) and lower for 15 MV (from 0.5% {+-} 0.5% to 2.0% {+-} 0.9%). Mean doses to organs at risk presented differences up to 3% of the mean structure dose in the worst case. No particular or systematic differences were found related to the various modalities. Calculation time ratios between calculation time for Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm were 7 for three-dimensional conformal therapy, 5 for intensity-modulated therapy, and 0.2 for volumetric modulated arc therapy

  3. Preventing Vomiting Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Cancer Treatment Request Permissions Print to PDF Preventing Vomiting Caused by Cancer Treatment November 2, 2015 ... Torisel) Topotecan (Hycamtin, Brakiva) Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Recommendations for preventing vomiting caused by chemotherapy and targeted therapy The ...

  4. Non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) using a new image-guided, enzyme-targeted, and breast cancer stem cell targeted radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for patients with stage I or II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor tissue can be re-oxygenated by inactivating peroxidase/catalase in the tumor tissue through application of hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide in turn is then degraded to produce oxygen. In this way, low-LET (linear energy transfer) radioresistant tumors can be transformed into radiosensitive ones (Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 12: 453-458, 845-850, 2003, Ogawa Y, et al: Int J Mol Med 14: 397-403, 2004, Kariya S, et al: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 75: 449-454, 2009). The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by utilizing a novel Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II) radiosensitization treatment. KORTUC I was shown to remarkably enhance radiotherapeutic effects in various types of superficially exposed and locally advanced neoplasms (Ogawa Y, et al: Oncol Rep 19: 1389-1394, 2008). Based on clinical experiences using KORTUC I, a new radiosensitizing agent containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate has been developed for intra-tumoral injection in various tumors which are not superficially exposed. The agent is composed of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (CD44 molecule). Sodium hyaluronate mixed with hydrogen peroxide attaches to CD44-positive tumor cells, which are generally reported to be breast cancer stem cells. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for treatment of advanced skin cancer (including malignant melanoma), bone/soft tissue malignant neoplasm, breast cancer and metastatic lymph node. A total of 39 early stage breast cancer patients (stage I: 12 patients and stage II: 27) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial upon fully informed consent. Mean age of the patients was 61.1 years old. All 39 patients were unable or unwilling to undergo surgery and therefore undertook non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) by KORTUC II. A maximum of 6 ml of the agent was

  5. What's New in Bile Duct Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bile duct cancer What’s new in bile duct cancer research and treatment? Bile duct cancer is an uncommon ... Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Bile Duct Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  6. What's New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources for testicular cancer What’s new in testicular cancer research and treatment? Important research into testicular cancer is ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Testicular Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  7. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources for anal cancer What’s new in anal cancer research and treatment? Important research into anal cancer is ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Anal Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  8. What's New in Endometrial Cancer Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources for endometrial cancer What`s new in endometrial cancer research and treatment? Molecular pathology of endometrial cancer For ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Endometrial Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  9. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Rebecca SY

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects.

  10. Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Performance of Nanosized Anatase TiO2 Doped with CdS Quantum Dots for Cancer-Cell Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangqiang Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS quantum-dots-(QDs-doped TiO2 nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using the sol-gel technique and characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS, UV-Vis, and FS. They were then used as a new “photosensitizer” based on photodynamic therapy (PDT for cancer-cell treatment. The photocatalytic activities of CdS-TiO2 on leukemia tumors were investigated by using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. The ultrastructural morphology of treated cells was also studied by AFM. The experimental results indicated that an obvious inhibition of tumor growth would be observed in groups treated with CdS-TiO2 nanocomposites, and the PDT efficiency in the presence of CdS-doped TiO2 was significantly higher than that of TiO2, revealing that the photocatalytic activities of TiO2 could be effectively enhanced by the modification of CdS QDs. Additionally, CdS- TiO2 can exhibit a very high photodynamic efficiency of 80.5% at a final concentration of 200 μg/mL under visible-light irradiation. CdS-TiO2 nanocomposites in this case were regarded as a promising application for cancer-cell treatment.

  11. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapasso S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal, giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division. A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on

  12. Treating cancer stem cells and cancer metastasis using glucose-coated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chenxia Hu,1 Martin Niestroj,2,3 Daniel Yuan,4 Steven Chang,5 Jie Chen5,6 1Faculty of Chinese Pharmaceutical Science, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 3Physics Department, Bonn University, Bonn, Germany; 4Biomedical Engineering Department, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 5Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 6Canadian National Research Council/National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Cancer ranks among the leading causes of human mortality. Cancer becomes intractable when it spreads from the primary tumor site to various organs (such as bone, lung, liver, and then brain. Unlike solid tumor cells, cancer stem cells and metastatic cancer cells grow in a non-attached (suspension form when moving from their source to other locations in the body. Due to the non-attached growth nature, metastasis is often first detected in the circulatory systems, for instance in a lymph node near the primary tumor. Cancer research over the past several decades has primarily focused on treating solid tumors, but targeted therapy to treat cancer stem cells and cancer metastasis has yet to be developed. Because cancers undergo faster metabolism and consume more glucose than normal cells, glucose was chosen in this study as a reagent to target cancer cells. In particular, by covalently binding gold nanoparticles (GNPs with thio-PEG (polyethylene glycol and thio-glucose, the resulting functionalized GNPs (Glu-GNPs were created for targeted treatment of cancer metastasis and cancer stem cells. Suspension cancer cell THP-1 (human monocytic cell line derived from acute monocytic leukemia patients was selected because it has properties similar to cancer stem cells and has been used as a metastatic cancer cell model for in vitro studies. To take advantage of cancer cells’ elevated glucose consumption

  13. Mortality and morbidity in two-year disease-free survivors of small cell lung cancer after treatment with combination chemotherapy with or without irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of 148 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) who had been entered into clinical trials of chemotherapy with or without thoracic and prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) between 1981 and 1987. Eighteen patients (12%) survived for 2 or more years. With a minimum follow-up of 4.5 years, 10 of the 18 patients who remained disease-free at 2 years are currently alive and free of SCLC. Seven of these 10 patients currently function as they did before diagnosis. However, three suffer from central nervous system changes of varying degrees in severity which appeared 2-3 years after PCI. Eight of the 18 patients who were disease-free at 2 years have died. Two died of isolated relapse in the brain at 3.6 and 4.2 years after initiation of chemotherapy. Five died of other malignancies while continuing their complete response to SCLC; two of non-small cell lung cancer, two of acute myelogenous leukemia, and one of hepatocellular carcinoma. Another patient died of unrelated disease without any evidence of SCLC. A small but substantial proportion of patients who underwent intensive treatment will achieve long-term survival; however, these patients remain at higher risk for second cancers and late toxicities. Therefore, attention must be directed to defining the safety way to employ such treatment in the management of SCLC. (author)

  14. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Thundimadathil

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to convent...

  15. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Millsop, Jillian W.; Sivamani, Raja K; Nasim Fazel

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other su...

  16. Tumor marker CYFRA 21-1 in assessment of radiation treatment efficacy at local non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radiation therapy (RT) at various fractionation modes with Etopiside and Cysplatin modification in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are analyzed. The objective effect of accelerated RT was accompanied by statistically significant reduction of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 level (an index of proteolytic tumor degradation). It was established that the dynamics of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 expression coincided with the clinical findings and could be used for prognosis and monitoring of chemoradiation therapy efficacy in patients with NSCLC.

  17. Randomized study of gefitinib versus pemetrexed as maintenance treatment in patients with advanced glandular non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Hua; Mei, Jing-Song; Zhou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib was compared with pemetrexed as maintenance therapy in Patients with Advanced Glandular Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, mainly regarding clinical effect and side effect. A randomized trial of pemetrexed as study group (500 mg/m2, dl) versus gefitinib as the control group [250 mg on night 1, 250 mg on morning 2 (every day)] was conducted in 188 patients, 94 cases in each group with a therapy cycle of 21 days. In addition, the study group was also treated with folic acid, vitB12 and dexam...

  18. Contemporary methods of treatment of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kozłowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most frequently diagnosed worldwide malignant cancer in males, and the second in females, with more than 1,200,000 new cases and more than 600,000 deaths, annually. Screening tests in oncology allow the detection of cancerous disease at an early, asymptomatic stage. The procedures most frequently performed in the case of colorectal cancer include: low anterior resection by the Dixon method (manual suture or staplers; abdominoperineal resection of the rectum by the Miles method; surgical procedure by the Hartmann method; local resection. Various techniques of preoperative radiotherapy are applied, aimed at tumour mass reduction (scheme I and/or obtaining local sterilisation (schemes I and II, which results in the reduction of local metastases (by approximately 50%, as well as an improvement with respect to long-term survival (by approximately 10%. At present, the following drugs for treatment of various forms of colorectal cancer have been registered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA: fluorouracil capecitabine irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab, and bevacizumab. The combination of complete cytoreductive surgery (CCS, the goal of which is the removal of all visible (macroscopically cancer foci, with a simultaneous intraperitoneal chemotherapy in hyperthermia – HIPEC, destroying microscopic remains of the disease, allows the curing of some patients with peritoneal cancer. The effect of the action of monoclonal antibodies – cetuximab and panitumumab – is the inhibition of proliferation of cancer cells, intensification of their apoptosis, as well as reduction of synthesis and secretion of pro-angiogenic factors, such as interleukin 8 (IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, antibodies targeted against EGFR impair the repair of DNA damage caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the cells of the malignant tumour.

  19. Targeted treatment of mutated EGFR-expressing non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on erlotinib with companion diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karachaliou N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Niki Karachaliou,1 Rafael Rosell21Translational Research Unit, Dr Rosell Oncology Institute, Quirón Dexeus University Hospital, 2Cancer Biology and Precision Medicine Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Deeper understanding of the pathobiology of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC has led to the development of small molecules that target genetic mutations known to play critical roles in the progression to metastatic disease. The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in 15%–20% of lung adenocarcinomas and the associated response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors have provided a successful avenue of attack in late-stage adenocarcinomas. Use of the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib is limited to patients who have adenocarcinomas with known activating EGFR mutations. However, the EGFR mutation testing landscape is varied and includes many screening and targeted methods, each with its own benefits and limitations. These tests can simplify the drug discovery process, make clinical trials more efficient and informative, and individualize cancer therapy. In practice, the choice of method should be determined by the nature of the sample to be tested, the testing laboratory's expertise and access to equipment, and whether the detection of only known activating EGFR mutations, or of all possible mutations, is required. Development of companion diagnostic tests for this identification is advancing; nevertheless, the use of such tests merits greater attention.Keywords: lung adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutations, companion diagnostics

  20. Novel Approaches to the Treatment of Cancer in London UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Black

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An intensive and in-depth two-day conference providing an advanced level updateKEY TOPICS TO BE COVERED:New paradigms for targeted therapiesNew anti-cancer agents ~ industry viewpointNovel approaches to the treatment of breast cancer, melanoma and pancreatic cancerDrug development and precision radiotherapyEuropean drug development initiativesMarket access to novel cancer drugsRegulatory issues in marketing authorisation of anti-cancer productsGene and cell therapies and trial endpointsDeveloping cancer vaccinesCLICK HERE for more information