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Sample records for cell anchorage-independent growth

  1. Protein disulfide isomerases in the endoplasmic reticulum promote anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells.

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    Wise, Randi; Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Qi, Yue; Zolkiewski, Michal; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer cells are exposed to stress of detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cultured breast cancer cells that survive this stress and are capable of anchorage-independent proliferation form mammospheres. The purpose of this study was to explore a link between mammosphere growth, ECM gene expression, and the protein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We compared the mRNA and protein levels of ER folding factors in SUM159PT and MCF10DCIS.com breast cancer cells grown as mammospheres versus adherent conditions. Publicly available gene expression data for mammospheres formed by primary breast cancer cells and for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were analyzed to assess the status of ECM/ER folding factor genes in clinically relevant samples. Knock-down of selected protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members was performed to examine their roles in SUM159PT mammosphere growth. We found that cells grown as mammospheres had elevated expression of ECM genes and ER folding quality control genes. CTC gene expression data for an index patient indicated that upregulation of ECM and ER folding factor genes occurred at the time of acquired therapy resistance and disease progression. Knock-down of PDI, ERp44, or ERp57, three members of the PDI family with elevated protein levels in mammospheres, in SUM159PT cells partially inhibited the mammosphere growth. Thus, breast cancer cell survival and growth under detachment conditions require enhanced assistance of the ER protein folding machinery. Targeting ER folding factors, in particular members of the PDI family, may improve the therapeutic outcomes in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27161215

  2. Downregulation of Akt1 Inhibits Anchorage-Independent Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

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    Xuesong Liu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine kinases, Akti/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ, and Akt3/PKBγ, play a critical role in preventing cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. However, the function of individual Akt isoforms in the tumorigenicity of cancer cells is still not well defined. In the current study, we used an AM antisense oligonucleotide (AS to specifically downregulate Akti protein in both cancer and normal cells. Our data indicate that AM AS treatment inhibits the ability of MiaPaCa-2, H460, HCT-15, and HT1080 cells to grow in soft agar. The treatment also induces apoptosis in these cancer cells as demonstrated by FRCS analysis and a caspase activity assay. Conversely, Akti AS treatment has little effect on the cell growth and survival of normal human cells including normal human fibroblast (NHF, fibroblast from muscle (FBM, and mammary gland epithelial 184135 cells. In addition, AM AS specifically sensitizes cancer cells to typical chemotherapeutic agents. Thus, Akti is indispensable for maintaining the tumorigenicity of cancer cells. Inhibition of AM may provide a powerful sensitization agent for chemotherapy specifically in cancer cells.

  3. Mouse Balb/c3T3 cell mutant with low epidermal growth factor receptor activity: induction of stable anchorage-independent growth by transforming growth factor β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutant clone (MO-5) was originally isolated as a clone resistant to Na+/K+ ionophoric antibiotic monensin from mouse Balb/c3T3 cells. MO-5 was found to show low receptor-endocytosis activity for epidermal growth factor (EGF):binding activity for EGF in MO-5 was less than one tenth of that in Balb/c3T3. Anchorage-independent growth of MO-5 was compared to that of Balb/c3T3 when assayed by colony formation capacity in soft agar. Coadministration of EGF and TGF-β efficiently enhanced anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, but neither factor alone was competent to promote the anchorage-independent growth. The frequency of colonies appearing in soft agar of MO-5 or Balb/c3T3 was significantly enhanced by TGF-β while EGF did not further enhance that of MO-5 or Balb/c3T3. Colonies of Balb/c3T3 formed in soft agar in the presence of TGF-β showed low colony formation capacity in soft agar in the absence of TGF-β. Colonies of MO-5 formed by TGF-β in soft agar, however, showed high colony formation capacity in soft agar in the absence of TGF-β. Pretreatment of MO-5 with TGF-β induced secretion of TGF-β-like activity from the cells, while the treatment of Balb/c3T3 did not induce the secretion of a significant amount of TGF-β-like activity. The loss of EGF-receptor activity in the stable expression and maintenance of the transformed phenotype in MO-5 is discussed

  4. Anchorage-independent growth of Ewing sarcoma cells under serum-free conditions is not associated with stem-cell like phenotype and function.

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    Leuchte, Katharina; Altvater, Bianca; Hoffschlag, Simeon; Potratz, Jenny; Meltzer, Jutta; Clemens, Dagmar; Luecke, Andrea; Hardes, Jendrik; Dirksen, Uta; Juergens, Heribert; Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Rossig, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Novel treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma aim to eliminate residual tumor cells that have maintained the capacity to reinitiate tumor growth after intensive conventional therapy. Preclinical models that more closely mimic in vivo tumor growth than standard monolayer cultures are needed. Sphere formation under anchorage-independent, serum-free conditions has been proposed to enrich for cells with tumor-initiating, stem cell-like properties in various solid cancers. In the present study, we assessed the phenotype and functional stem cell characteristics of Ewing sarcoma spheres. Spheres were generated under serum-free culture conditions from four Ewing sarcoma cell lines and four relapse tumor biopsies. Standard monolayer cultures were established as controls. Median levels of surface expression of the Ewing sarcoma marker CD99 as well as the supposed stem cell marker CD133 and the neural crest marker CD57 were comparable between spheres and monolayers. Ewing sarcoma spheres from individual tumors failed to continuously self-renew by secondary sphere formation. They contained variable proportions of side populations (SPs). Sphere culture did not enhance the in vivo tumorigenicity of Ewing sarcoma cells in a murine xenograft model. We conclude that sphere formation under serum-free conditions is not a reliable tool to enrich for cells with stem cell characteristics in Ewing sarcoma. By mimicking the anchorage-independent, multicellular growth of Ewing sarcoma micrometastases, in vitro sphere growth may still add value as a preclinical tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutics. PMID:24927333

  5. MicroRNA let-7b targets important cell cycle molecules in malignant melanoma cells and interferes with anchorage-independent growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Schultz; Peter Lorenz; Gerd Gross; Saleh Ibrahim; Manfred Kunz

    2008-01-01

    A microRNA expression screen was performed analyzing 157 different microRNAs in laser-microdissected tissues from benign melanocytic nevi (n=10) and primary malignant melanomas (n=10),using quantitative real-time PCR.Differential expression was found for 72 microRNAs.Members of the let-7 family of microRNAs were significantly downregulated in primary melanomas as compared with benign nevi,suggestive for a possible role of these molecules as tumor suppressors in malignant melanoma.Interestingly,similar findings had been described for lung and colon cancer.Overexpression of let-7b in melanoma cells in vitro downregulated the expression of cyclins D1,D3,and A,and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 4,all of which had been described to play a role in melanoma development.The effect oflet-7b on protein expression was due to targeting of 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of individual mRNAs,as exemplified by reporter gene analyses for cyclin DI.In line with its downmodulating effects on cell cycle regulators,let-7b inhibited cell cycle progression and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells.Taken together,these findings not only point to new regulatory mechanisms of early melanoma development,but also may open avenues for future targeted therapies of this tumor.

  6. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

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    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone. PMID:16187755

  7. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer

  8. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

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    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  9. Cigarette side-stream smoke lung and bladder carcinogenesis: inducing mutagenic acrolein-DNA adducts, inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing anchorage-independent-growth cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Chin, Chiu; Huang, William; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Rom, William N; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2015-10-20

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) is associated with 20-30% of cigarette-smoke related diseases, including cancer. Majority of SHS (>80%) originates from side-stream smoke (SSS). Compared to mainstream smoke, SSS contains more tumorigenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and acrolein (Acr). We assessed SSS-induced benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)- and cyclic propano-deoxyguanosine (PdG) adducts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung, heart, liver, and bladder-mucosa from mice exposed to SSS for 16 weeks. In SSS exposed mice, Acr-dG adducts were the major type of PdG adducts formed in BAL (p < 0.001), lung (p < 0.05), and bladder mucosa (p < 0.001), with no significant accumulation of Acr-dG adducts in heart or liver. SSS exposure did not enhance BPDE-DNA adduct formation in any of these tissues. SSS exposure reduced nucleotide excision repair (p < 0.01) and base excision repair (p < 0.001) in lung tissue. The levels of DNA repair proteins, XPC and hOGG1, in lung tissues of exposed mice were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) lower than the levels in lung tissues of control mice. We found that Acr can transform human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells in vitro. We propose that induction of mutagenic Acr-DNA adducts, inhibition of DNA repair, and induction of cell transformation are three mechanisms by which SHS induces lung and bladder cancers. PMID:26431382

  10. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of S-91 Cloudman murine melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc inhibited the colony formation of Cloudman S-91 murine melanoma cells in a dose dependent manner with an ID50 of 3.4 μg/ml. Total inhibition of the melanoma colony-forming units occurred at a zinc concentration of 4.42 μg/ml. In the presence of dexamethasone the ID50 for zinc inhibition was reduced by 49% and total inhibition of anchorage-independent growth occurred at the achievable in vivo zinc concentration of 3.0 μg/ml. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination effected a greater than additive inhibition of the murine melanoma colony-forming units. Statistical evaluation of these results showed that zinc and dexamethasone interacted synergistically to inhibit the formation of murine melanoma colonies. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  11. Molecular mechanisms of the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced inverted U-shaped dose responsiveness in anchorage independent growth and cell proliferation of human breast epithelial cells with stem cell characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a variety of carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects in experimental animals, its role in human carcinogenicity remain controversial. A simian virus 40-immortalized cell line from normal human breast epithelial cells with stem cells and luminal characteristics (M13SV1) was used to study whether TCDD can induce AIG positive colony formation and cause increased cell numbers in a inverted U-shaped dose-response manner. TCDD activated Akt, ERK2, and increased the expression of CYP1A1, PAI-2, IL-lb mRNA, and ERK2 protein levels. TCDD was able to increased phosphorylation and expression of ERK2 in same dose-response manner as AIG positive colony formation. Thus, TCDD induced tumorigenicity in M13SV1, possibly through the phosphorylation of ERK2 and/or Akt. Further, cDNA microarray with 7448 sequence-verified clones was used to profile various gene expression patterns after treatment of TCDD. Three clear patterns could be delineated: genes that were dose-dependently up-regulated, genes expressed in either U-shape and/or inverted U-shape. The fact that these genes are intrinsically related to breast epithelial cell proliferation and survival clearly suggests that they may be involved in the TCDD-induced breast tumorigenesis

  12. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1, GPER-1, Promotes Fibrillogenesis via a Shc-Dependent Pathway Resulting in Anchorage-Independent Growth

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    Magruder, Hilary T.; Quinn, Jeffrey A.; Schwartzbauer, Jean E.; Reichner, Jonathan; Huang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1, GPER-1, coordinates fibronectin (FN) matrix assembly and release of heparan-bound epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF). This mechanism of action results in the recruitment of FN-engaged integrin α5β1 to fibrillar adhesions and the formation of integrin α5β1-Shc adaptor protein complexes. Here, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of murine 4 T1 or human SKBR3 breast cancer cells with 17β-estradiol (E2β) promotes the formation of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers and results in increased cellular adhesion and haptotaxis on FN, but not collagen. These actions are also induced by the xenoestrogen, bisphenol A, and the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182, 780, but not the inactive stereoisomer, 17α-estradiol (E2α). In addition, we show that GPER-1 stimulation of breast cancer cells allows for FN-dependent, anchorage-independent growth and FN fibril formation in “hanging drop” assays, indicating that these GPER-1-mediated actions occur independently of adhesion to solid substrata. Stable expression of Shc mutant Y317F lacking its primary tyrosyl phosphorylation site disrupts E2β-induced focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation and abolishes E2β-enhanced haptotaxis on FN and anchorage-dependent growth. Collectively, these data demonstrate that E2β action via GPER-1 enhances cellular adhesivity and FN matrix assembly and allows for anchorage-independent growth, cellular events that may allow for cellular survival, and tumor progression. PMID:25096985

  13. Exposure to Bisphenol A Correlates with Early-Onset Prostate Cancer and Promotes Centrosome Amplification and Anchorage-Independent Growth In Vitro

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    Tarapore, Pheruza; Burke, Barbara; Bracken, Bruce; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is ubiquitous. Animal studies found that BPA contributes to development of prostate cancer, but human data are scarce. Our study examined the association between urinary BPA levels and Prostate cancer and assessed the effects of BPA on induction of centrosome abnormalities as an underlying mechanism promoting prostate carcinogenesis. The study, involving 60 urology patients, found higher levels of urinary BPA (creatinine-adjusted) in Prostate cancer patients (5.74 µg/g [95% CI; 2.63, 12.51]) than in non-Prostate cancer patients (1.43 µg/g [95% CI; 0.70, 2.88]) (p = 0.012). The difference was even more significant in patients <65 years old. A trend toward a negative association between urinary BPA and serum PSA was observed in Prostate cancer patients but not in non-Prostate cancer patients. In vitro studies examined centrosomal abnormalities, microtubule nucleation, and anchorage-independent growth in four Prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2, 22Rv1, PC-3) and two immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell lines (NPrEC and RWPE-1). Exposure to low doses (0.01–100 nM) of BPA increased the percentage of cells with centrosome amplification two- to eight-fold. Dose responses either peaked or reached the plateaus with 0.1 nM BPA exposure. This low dose also promoted microtubule nucleation and regrowth at centrosomes in RWPE-1 and enhanced anchorage-independent growth in C4-2. These findings suggest that urinary BPA level is an independent prognostic marker in Prostate cancer and that BPA exposure may lower serum PSA levels in Prostate cancer patients. Moreover, disruption of the centrosome duplication cycle by low-dose BPA may contribute to neoplastic transformation of the prostate. PMID:24594937

  14. Exposure to bisphenol A correlates with early-onset prostate cancer and promotes centrosome amplification and anchorage-independent growth in vitro.

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    Pheruza Tarapore

    Full Text Available Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA is ubiquitous. Animal studies found that BPA contributes to development of prostate cancer, but human data are scarce. Our study examined the association between urinary BPA levels and Prostate cancer and assessed the effects of BPA on induction of centrosome abnormalities as an underlying mechanism promoting prostate carcinogenesis. The study, involving 60 urology patients, found higher levels of urinary BPA (creatinine-adjusted in Prostate cancer patients (5.74 µg/g [95% CI; 2.63, 12.51] than in non-Prostate cancer patients (1.43 µg/g [95% CI; 0.70, 2.88] (p = 0.012. The difference was even more significant in patients <65 years old. A trend toward a negative association between urinary BPA and serum PSA was observed in Prostate cancer patients but not in non-Prostate cancer patients. In vitro studies examined centrosomal abnormalities, microtubule nucleation, and anchorage-independent growth in four Prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2, 22Rv1, PC-3 and two immortalized normal prostate epithelial cell lines (NPrEC and RWPE-1. Exposure to low doses (0.01-100 nM of BPA increased the percentage of cells with centrosome amplification two- to eight-fold. Dose responses either peaked or reached the plateaus with 0.1 nM BPA exposure. This low dose also promoted microtubule nucleation and regrowth at centrosomes in RWPE-1 and enhanced anchorage-independent growth in C4-2. These findings suggest that urinary BPA level is an independent prognostic marker in Prostate cancer and that BPA exposure may lower serum PSA levels in Prostate cancer patients. Moreover, disruption of the centrosome duplication cycle by low-dose BPA may contribute to neoplastic transformation of the prostate.

  15. Cellular Dichotomy Between Anchorage-Independent Growth Responses to bFGF and TA Reflects Molecular Switch in Commitment to Carcinogenesis

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    Waters, Katrina M.; Tan, Ruimin; Opresko, Lee K.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Chrisler, William B.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated gene expression patterns underlying reversible and irreversible anchorage-independent growth (AIG) phenotypes to identify more sensitive markers of cell transformation for studies directed at interrogating carcinogenesis responses. In JB6 mouse epidermal cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induces an unusually efficient and reversible AIG response, relative to 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced AIG which is irreversible. The reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes are characterized by largely non-overlapping global gene expression profiles. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes were identified as common to reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes, including genes regulated in a reciprocal fashion. Hepatic leukemia factor (HLF) and D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (DBP) were increased in both bFGF and TPA soft agar colonies and selected for functional validation. Ectopic expression of human HLF and DBP in JB6 cells resulted in a marked increase in TPA- and bFGF-regulated AIG responses. HLF and DBP expression were increased in soft agar colonies arising from JB6 cells exposed to gamma radiation and in a human basal cell carcinoma tumor tissue, relative to paired non-tumor tissue. Subsequent biological network analysis suggests that many of the differentially expressed genes that are common to bFGF- and TPA-dependent AIG are regulated by c-Myc, SP-1 and HNF-4 transcription factors. Collectively, we have identified a potential molecular switch that mediates the transition from reversible to irreversible AIG.

  16. Chlamydia induces anchorage independence in 3T3 cells and detrimental cytological defects in an infection model.

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    Andrea E Knowlton

    Full Text Available Chlamydia are gram negative, obligate intracellular bacterial organisms with different species causing a multitude of infections in both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection (STI Chlamydia, the most commonly acquired bacterial STI in the United States. Chlamydial infections have also been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in women co-infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV. We have previously shown chlamydial infection results in centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation leading to chromosomal instability. Many studies indicate that centrosome abnormalities, spindle defects, and chromosome segregation errors can lead to cell transformation. We hypothesize that the presence of these defects within infected dividing cells identifies a possible mechanism for Chlamydia as a cofactor in cervical cancer formation. Here we demonstrate that infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is able to transform 3T3 cells in soft agar resulting in anchorage independence and increased colony formation. Additionally, we show for the first time Chlamydia infects actively replicating cells in vivo. Infection of mice with Chlamydia results in significantly increased cell proliferation within the cervix, and in evidence of cervical dysplasia. Confocal examination of these infected tissues also revealed elements of chlamydial induced chromosome instability. These results contribute to a growing body of data implicating a role for Chlamydia in cervical cancer development and suggest a possible molecular mechanism for this effect.

  17. Aiolos Promotes Anchorage Independence by Silencing p66Shc Transcription in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xichuan; Xu, Zhao; Du, Wei; Zhang, Zhenfa; Wei, Yiliang; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Zhiyan; Qin, Litao; Wang, Lin; Niu, Qing; Zhao, Xiulan; Girard, Luc; Gong, Yimei; Ma, Zhenyi; Sun, Baocun

    2014-01-01

    Anchorage of tissue cells to their physical environment is an obligate requirement for survival which is lost in mature hematopoietic and in transformed epithelial cells. Here we find that a lymphocyte lineage-restricted transcription factor, Aiolos, is frequently expressed in lung cancers and predicts markedly reduced patient survival. Aiolos decreases expression of a large set of adhesion-related genes, disrupting cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Aiolos also reconfigures chromatin st...

  18. Association of ultraviolet-induced retrovirus expression with anchorage-independent survival in rat embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have shown in the AI assay that the nontransforming retrovirus increases the differential in enhanced survival response in infected cultures. To more fully understand this aspect of the system, they examined the effect of UV irradiation on infected and uninfected FRE cells. In this communication the authors report that UV irradiation induces AI survival in infected and uninfected cells;in uninfected cells there is a concomitant induction of endogenous retrovirus expression. The AI survival of both cell lines was determined using a previously described procedure. Anchorage-dependent media control and solvent control cells, when suspended in medium above an agar base layer, showed a rapid decline in cell survival;however, cells that had been treated with carcinogen did not undergo the destructive process that took place in control cells, indicating specificity

  19. A role for collagen XXIII in cancer cell adhesion, anchorage-independence, and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Spivey, Kristin A.; Chung, Ivy; Banyard, Jacqueline; Adini, Irit; Feldman, Henry A.; Bruce R Zetter

    2011-01-01

    Collagen XXIII is a transmembrane collagen previously shown to be upregulated in metastatic prostate cancer that has been used as a tissue and fluid biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. To determine whether collagen XXIII facilitates cancer cell metastasis in vivo and to establish a function for collagen XXIII in cancer progression, collagen XXIII knockdown cells were examined for alterations in in vivo metastasis as well as in vitro cell adhesion. In experimental and...

  20. Inhibition of Anchorage-Independent Proliferation and G0/G1 Cell-Cycle Regulation in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells by 4,7-Dimethoxy-5-Methyl-l,3-Benzodioxole Isolated from the Fruiting Body of Antrodia camphorate

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    Hsiu-Man Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 4,7-dimethoxy-5-methyl-l,3-benzodioxole (SY-1 was isolated from three different sources of dried fruiting bodies of Antrodia camphorate (AC. AC is a medicinal mushroom that grows on the inner heartwood wall of Cinnamomum kanehirai Hay (Lauraceae, an endemic species that is used in Chinese medicine for its anti-tumor and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we demonstrated that SY-1 profoundly decreased the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (COLO 205 through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest (50–150 μM and induction of apoptosis (>150 μM. Cell-cycle arrest induced by SY-1 was associated with a significant increase in levels of p53, p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1, and a decrease in cyclins D1, D3 and A. In contrast, SY-1 treatment did not induce significant changes in G0/G1 phase cell-cycle regulatory proteins in normal human colonic epithelial cells (FHC. The cells were cultured in soft agar to evaluate anchorage-independent colony formation, and we found that the number of transformed colonies was significantly reduced in the SY-1-treated COLO 205 cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time that SY-1 inhibits human colon cancer cell proliferation through inhibition of cell growth and anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar. However, the detailed mechanisms of these processes remain unclear and will require further investigation.

  1. Down-regulation of Survivin by Antisense Oligonucleotides Increases Apoptosis, Inhibits Cytokinesis and Anchorage-Independent Growth

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    Jun Chen

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family, is detected in most common human cancers but not in adjacent normal cells. Previous studies suggest that survivin associates with the mitotic spindle and directly inhibits caspase activity. To further investigate the function of survivin, we used a survivin antisense (AS oligonucleotide to downregulate survivin expression in normal and cancer cells. We found that inhibition of survivin expression increased apoptosis and polyploidy while decreasing colony formation in soft agar. Immunohistochemistry showed that cells without survivin can initiate the cleavage furrow and contractile ring, but cannot complete cytokinesis, thus resulting in multinucleated cells. These findings indicate that survivin plays important roles in a late stage of cytokinesis, as well as in apoptosis.

  2. KSHV MicroRNAs Repress Tropomyosin 1 and Increase Anchorage-Independent Growth and Endothelial Tube Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kieffer-Kwon, Philippe; Happel, Christine; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) is characterized by highly vascularized spindle-cell tumors induced after infection of endothelial cells by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). In KS tumors, KSHV expresses only a few latent proteins together with 12 pre-microRNAs. Previous microarray and proteomic studies predicted that multiple splice variants of the tumor suppressor protein tropomyosin 1 (TPM1) were targets of KSHV microRNAs. Here we show that at least two microRNAs of KSHV, miR-K2 and miR...

  3. Brefeldin A Reduces Anchorage-Independent Survival, Cancer Stem Cell Potential and Migration of MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Chao-Neng Tseng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a subset of cancer cells in tumors or established cancer cell lines that can initiate and sustain the growth of tumors in vivo. Cancer stem cells can be enriched in serum-free, suspended cultures that allow the formation of tumorspheres over several days to weeks. Brefeldin A (BFA is a mycotoxin that induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in eukaryotic cells. We found that BFA, at sub-microgram per milliliter concentrations, preferentially induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 suspension cultures (EC50: 0.016 µg/mL compared to adhesion cultures. BFA also effectively inhibited clonogenic activity and the migration and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9 activity of MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting analysis indicated that the effects of BFA may be mediated by the down-regulation of breast CSC marker CD44 and anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, as well as the reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, BFA also displayed selective cytotoxicity toward suspended MDA-MB-468 cells, and suppressed tumorsphere formation in T47D and MDA-MB-453 cells, suggesting that BFA may be effective against breast cancer cells of various phenotypes.

  4. Transformation of primary human embryonic kidney cells to anchorage independence by a combination of BK virus DNA and the Harvey-ras oncogene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells were transformed by a focus assay with BK virus (BKV) DNA molecularly cloned at its unique EcoRI site. Both viral DNA sequences and viral tumor antigens were present and expressed in all the foci that the authors examined. However, cells isolated from foci were incapable of growth in soft agar. They then examined the transformation of HEK cells after their transfection with a combination of BKV DNA and either the normal or the activated form of the human Ha-ras oncogene (EJ c-Ha-ras-1). Only the cells transfected with a combination of BKV DNA and the activated form of Ha-ras DNAs were present in the transformed colonies. BKV tumor antigens and the Ha-ras p21 protein were also expressed

  5. Suppression of autophagy by CUB domain-containing protein 1 signaling is essential for anchorage-independent survival of lung cancer cells.

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    Uekita, Takamasa; Fujii, Satoko; Miyazawa, Yuri; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Abe, Hitosi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2013-07-01

    CUB (C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor, BMP1) domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) has been implicated in promoting metastasis of cancer cells through several mechanisms, including the inhibition of anoikis, which is cell death triggered by the loss of extracellular matrix interactions. However, the mechanism inhibiting cell death regulated by CDCP1 remains elusive. Inhibition of CDCP1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced the cell death of suspended cancer cells without cleaving caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis; cell death was not inhibited by a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the loss of CDCP1 induces caspase-independent cell death. In contrast, knockdown of CDCP1 as well as protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), a downstream effector of CDCP1, in a suspension culture of lung cancer cells resulted in marked induction of membranous microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II protein, a hallmark of autophagy, and caused the formation of an autophagosome structure visualized using green fluorescent protein-tagged LC3-II. Expression and phosphorylation of exogenous CDCP1 by Fyn kinase reduced the formation of autophagosomes and inhibited phosphorylation of CDCP1 by PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor or inhibited PKCδ by rottlerin, stimulating autophagosome formation. Moreover, death of suspended lung cancer cells induced by CDCP1 siRNA or by PKCδ siRNA was reduced by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. These results indicate that CDCP1-PKCδ signaling plays a critical role in inhibiting autophagy, which is responsible for anoikis resistance of lung cancer cells. PMID:23510015

  6. Phellinus linteus suppresses growth, angiogenesis and invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells through the inhibition of AKT signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Sliva, D; Jedinak, A; Kawasaki, J.; Harvey, K; Slivova, V

    2008-01-01

    The antitumour activity of a medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus (PL), through the stimulation of immune system or the induction of apoptosis, has been recently described. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of invasive behaviour of cancer cells remain to be addressed. In the present study, we demonstrate that PL inhibits proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) as well as colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer ce...

  7. Disrupting the oncogenic synergism between nucleolin and Ras results in cell growth inhibition and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Schokoroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin are major contributors to malignant transformation. The pleiotropic protein nucleolin can bind to both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. Previously, we have demonstrated a crosstalk between Ras, nucleolin and the ErbB1 receptor. Activated Ras facilitates nucleolin interaction with ErbB1 and stabilizes ErbB1 levels. The three oncogenes synergistically facilitate anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used several cancer cell lines. The effect of Ras and nucleolin inhibition was determined using cell growth, cell death and cell motility assays. Protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. We found that inhibition of Ras and nucleolin reduces tumor cell growth, enhances cell death and inhibits anchorage independent growth. Our results reveal that the combined treatment affects Ras and nucleolin levels and localization. Our study also indicates that Salirasib (FTS, Ras inhibitor reduces cell motility, which is not affected by the nucleolin inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional avenue for inhibiting cancers driven by these oncogenes.

  8. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac Exchanger 1 (PREX1) Rac-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Activity Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth via Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng-Jia; Ooms, Lisa M; Srijakotre, Nuthasuda; Man, Joey; Vieusseux, Jessica; Waters, JoAnne E; Feng, Yue; Bailey, Charles G; Rasko, John E J; Price, John T; Mitchell, Christina A

    2016-08-12

    PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent Rac exchanger 1 (PREX1) is a Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) overexpressed in a significant proportion of human breast cancers that integrates signals from upstream ErbB2/3 and CXCR4 membrane surface receptors. However, the PREX1 domains that facilitate its oncogenic activity and downstream signaling are not completely understood. We identify that ERK1/2 MAPK acts downstream of PREX1 and contributes to PREX1-mediated anchorage-independent cell growth. PREX1 overexpression increased but its shRNA knockdown decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to EGF/IGF-1 stimulation, resulting in induction of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and p21(WAF1/CIP1) PREX1-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and cell migration were suppressed by inhibition of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling. PREX1 overexpression reduced staurosporine-induced apoptosis whereas its shRNA knockdown promoted apoptosis in response to staurosporine or the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen. Expression of wild-type but not GEF-inactive PREX1 increased anchorage-independent cell growth. In addition, mouse xenograft studies revealed that expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead PREX1 resulted in the formation of larger tumors that displayed increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but not AKT. The impaired anchorage-independent cell growth, apoptosis, and ERK1/2 signaling observed in stable PREX1 knockdown cells was restored by expression of wild-type but not GEF-dead-PREX1. Therefore, PREX1-Rac-GEF activity is critical for PREX1-dependent anchorage-independent cell growth and xenograft tumor growth and may represent a possible therapeutic target for breast cancers that exhibit PREX1 overexpression. PMID:27358402

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antisense transfection reduces the expression of EGFR and suppresses the malignant phenotype of a human ovarian cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, K R; Wolf, J K; Chakrabarty, S; Price, J E

    1998-01-01

    An EGFR-expressing clone of the human ovarian cancer line 2774 was transfected with an antisense construct of EGFR to test how suppression of this gene modulates the malignant phenotype. Transfected clones were screened for EGFR expression by Western blot and FACS analysis. Anchorage-independent growth was used to assess the effect of reduced EGFR on the malignant behavior of the cells. Several transfected clones with decreased EGFR (40-50% reduction) were identified. A correlation was noted between reduced EGFR and decreased anchorage-independent growth, with the transfected clones losing the ability to grow in agarose and responsiveness to exogenous EGF. These results suggest that EGFR may be an important factor in the malignant behavior of this ovarian cancer cell line. PMID:9683849

  10. Reactive Oxygen Generated by NADPH Oxidase 1 (Nox1) Contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Matrix Metalloprotease-9 Production and Cell Migration*

    OpenAIRE

    Shinohara, Masahiro; Adachi, Yoshifumi; Mitsushita, Junji; Kuwabara, Mitsuhiro; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Harada, Saori; Furuta, Shuichi; Zhang, Yugen; Seheli, Kajla; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Kamata, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    A mediating role of the reactive oxygen species-generating enzyme Nox1 has been suggested for Ras oncogene transformation phenotypes including anchorage-independent cell growth, augmented angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis. However, little is known about whether Nox1 signaling regulates cell invasiveness. Here, we report that the cell invasion activity was augmented in K-Ras-transformed normal rat kidney cells and attenuated by transfection of Nox1 small interference RNAs (siRNAs) into the cells...

  11. Reversible Adaptive Plasticity: A Mechanism for Neuroblastoma Cell Heterogeneity and Chemo-Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    AnthonyDSandler

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD) or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI) growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nest...

  12. Perturbation of Hyaluronan Interactions Inhibits Malignant Properties of Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Jeanine A; Huang, Lei; Guo, Huiming; Ghatak, Shibnath; Toole, Bryan P.

    2003-01-01

    Malignant progression of gliomas is characterized by acquisition of inappropriate growth and invasive properties. In vitro, these malignant properties are reflected in, and measured by, the ability to grow in an anchorage-independent manner and to invade artificial extracellular matrices. The results of numerous studies have suggested that the extracellular and pericellular matrix polysaccharide, hyaluronan, plays an important role in these attributes of malignant cancer cells. However, with ...

  13. The Tetraspanin CD151 Is Required for Met-dependent Signaling and Tumor Cell Growth*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Mélanie; Muratori, Claudia; Corso, Simona; Tenaglia, Enrico; Bertotti, Andrea; Capparuccia, Lorena; Trusolino, Livio; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Tamagnone, Luca

    2010-01-01

    CD151, a transmembrane protein of the tetraspanin family, is implicated in the regulation of cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration through physical and functional interactions with integrin receptors. In contrast, little is known about the potential role of CD151 in controlling cell proliferation and survival. We have previously shown that β4 integrin, a major CD151 partner, not only acts as an adhesive receptor for laminins but also as an intracellular signaling platform promoting cell proliferation and invasive growth upon interaction with Met, the tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Here we show that RNAi-mediated silencing of CD151 expression in cancer cells impairs HGF-driven proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, protection from anoikis, and tumor progression in xenograft models in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that CD151 is crucially implicated in the formation of signaling complexes between Met and β4 integrin, a known amplifier of HGF-induced tumor cell growth and survival. CD151 depletion hampered HGF-induced phosphorylation of β4 integrin and the ensuing Grb2-Gab1 association, a signaling pathway leading to MAPK stimulation and cell growth. Accordingly, CD151 knockdown reduced HGF-triggered activation of MAPK but not AKT signaling cascade. These results indicate that CD151 controls Met-dependent neoplastic growth by enhancing receptor signaling through β4 integrin-mediated pathways, independent of cell-substrate adhesion. PMID:20937830

  14. NIH 3T3 cells stably transfected with the gene encoding phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus acquire a transformed phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, T.; Bjørkøy, G; Overvatn, A; Diaz-Meco, M T; Traavik, T; Moscat, J

    1994-01-01

    In order to determine whether chronic elevation of intracellular diacylglycerol levels generated by hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by PC-hydrolyzing phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is oncogenic, we generated stable transfectants of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the gene encoding PC-PLC from Bacillus cereus. We found that constitutive expression of this gene (plc) led to transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, formation of transformed foci in tiss...

  15. Inhibition of testicular embryonal carcinoma cell tumorigenicity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ- and retinoic acid receptor-dependent mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Pei-Li; Chen, Li Ping; Dobrzański, Tomasz P.; Phillips, Dylan A.; Zhu, Bokai; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Frank J. Gonzalez; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has important physiological functions in control of cell growth, lipid and glucose homeostasis, differentiation and inflammation. To investigate the role of PPARβ/δ in cancer, stable human testicular embryonal carcinoma cell lines were developed that constitutively express PPARβ/δ. Expression of PPARβ/δ caused enhanced activation of the receptor, and this significantly decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, anchorage-independent ...

  16. The Neurofibromatosis 2 Tumor Suppressor Gene Product, Merlin, Regulates Human Meningioma Cell Growth by Signaling through YAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Striedinger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of schwannomas and meningiomas. Several studies have examined the ability of the NF2 gene product, merlin, to function as a tumor suppressor in diverse cell types; however, little is known about merlin growth regulation in meningiomas. In Drosophila, merlin controls cell proliferation and apoptosis by signaling through the Hippo pathway to inhibit the function of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. The Hippo pathway is conserved in mammals. On the basis of these observations, we developed human meningioma cell lines matched for merlin expression to evaluate merlin growth regulation and investigate the relationship between NF2 status and Yes-associated protein (YAP, the mammalian homolog of Yorkie. NF2 loss in meningioma cells was associated with loss of contact-dependent growth inhibition, enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation due to increased S-phase entry. In addition, merlin loss in both meningioma cell lines and primary tumors resulted in increased YAP expression and nuclear localization. Finally, siRNA-mediated reduction of YAP in NF2-deficient meningioma cells rescued the effects of merlin loss on cell proliferation and S-phase entry. Collectively, these results represent the first demonstration that merlin regulates cell growth in human cancer cells by suppressing YAP.

  17. mad—overexpression down regulates the malignant growth and p53 mediated apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL—7404 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANHUA; YONGHUAXU

    1999-01-01

    Mad protein has been shown as an antagonist of cMyc protein in some cell lines.The effect of Mad protein to the malignant phenotype of human hepatoma BEL-7404 cell line was investigated experimentally.An eukarryotic vector pCDNA Ⅲ containing full ORF fragment of mad cDNA was transfected into targeted cells.Under G418 selection,stable Mad-overexpressed cells were cloned.Studies on the effect of Mad over-expression in cell proliferation and cell cycle revealed that cell morphology of the Mad-overexpressed BEL-7404-M1 cells was significantly different from the parent and control vector transfected cells.DNA synthesis,cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in soft-agar of the madtransfected cells were partially inhibited in comparison to control cells.Flos cytometry analysis indicated that mad over-expression might block more transfectant cells at G0/G1 phase,resulting in the retardation of cell proliferation.RT-PCR detected a marked inhibition of the expression of cdc25A,an important regulator gene of G0/G1 to S phase in cell cycle.It was also found that Mad protein overexpression could greatly suppress p53-mediated apoptosis in BEL-74040M1 cells in the absence of serume.Thus,Mad proteins may function as a negative regulator antagonizing c-Myc activity in the control of cell growth and apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7404 cells.

  18. Involvement of Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and PPARβ/δ in Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwin Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5 delivers ligands from the cytosol directly to the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ and thus facilitates the ligation and enhances the transcriptional activity of the receptor. We show here that expression levels of both FABP5 and PPARβ/δ are correlated with the tumorigenic potential of prostate cancer cell lines. We show further that FABP5 comprises a direct target gene for PPARβ/δ and thus the binding protein and its cognate receptor are engaged in a positive feedback loop. The observations demonstrate that, similarly to effects observed in mammary carcinomas, activation of the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway induces PPARβ/δ target genes involved in cell survival and growth and enhances cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the data show that downregulation of either FABP5 or PPARβ/δ inhibits the growth of the highly malignant prostate cancer PC3M cells. These studies suggest that the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway may play a general role in facilitating tumor progression and that inhibition of the pathway may comprise a novel strategy in treatment of cancer.

  19. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:21347396

  20. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky M Tiang

    Full Text Available Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1 is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics.

  1. Suppression of cell growth and invasion by miR-205 in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailong Wu; Shoumin Zhu; Yin-Yuan Mo

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small, non-coding RNAs, which are capable of silencing gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we report that miR-205 is significantly underexpressed in breast tumor compared to the matched normal breast tissue. Similarly, breast cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, express a lower level miR-205 than the non-malignant MCF-10A cells. Of interest, ectopic expression of miR-205 significantly inhibits cell proliferation and anchorage independent growth, as well as cell invasion. Furthermore, miR-205 was shown to suppress lung metastasis in an animal model. Finally, western blot combined with the luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that ErbB3 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are direct targets for miR-205, and this miR-205-mediated suppression is likely through the direct interaction with the putative miR-205 binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of ErbB3 and VEGF-A. Together, these results suggest that miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

  2. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  3. Production of transforming growth factor α in human pancreatic cancer cells: evidence for a superagonist autocrine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work showed that cultured human pancreatic cancer cells overexpress the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. In the present study, the authors sought to determine whether some of these cell lines produce transforming growth factor α (TGF-α). Utilizing a radiolabeled TGF-α cDNA in hybridization experiments, they determined that ASPC-1, T3M4, PANC-1, COLO-357, and MIA PaCa-2 cell lines expressed TGF-α mRNA. Serum-free medium conditioned by T3M4 and ASPC-1 cells contained significant amounts of TGF-α protein. Although unlabeled TGF-α readily competed with 125I-labeled EGF for binding, each cell line exhibited lower surface binding and internalization of 125I-labeled TGF-α as compared to 125I-labeled EGF. Both TGF-α and EGF significantly enhanced the anchorage-independent growth of PANC-1, T3M4, and ASPC-1 cells. However, TGF-α was 10- to 100-fold more potent than EGF. These findings suggest that the concomitant overexpression of EGF receptors and production of TGF-α may represent an efficient mechanism for certain cancer cells to obtain a growth advantage

  4. Inhibitory Effect of CT120B, an Alternative Splice Variant of CT120A,on Lung Cancer Cell Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Ning PAN; Jin-Jun LI; Lin WEI; Ming YAO; Da-Fang WAN; Jian-Ren GU

    2005-01-01

    The expression product of ct120a, a novel gene isolated from human chromosome 17p13.3in our laboratory, was predicted to have seven transmembrane domains and could cause malignant transformation of mouse NIH3T3 cells. There existed an mRNA splicing variant of ct120a, namely ct120b,which had a 96-nucleotide deletion and produced an in-frame loss of 32 amino acids from codon 136 to codon 167 of CT120A. The CT120B protein was predicted to have six transmembrane domains. In this study, we observed that the green fluorescent protein-tagged CT120B was localized on plasma membrane and in cytoplasm in SPC-A-1 cells. The expression of CT120B/A in normal lung tissue and in lung cancer cells was also examined. Results showed that the stable CT120B overexpression in SPC-A-1 cells resulted in a reduction of cell growth rate, and inhibited tumorigenecity and anchorage-independent growth in nude mice. The functions of CT120A and CT120B for cell growth appeared antagonistic. We suggested that the delayed G1/S phase transition might contribute to the inhibitory activities of CT120B on cell growth and that the deleted 32 amino acids missing in CT120B might be essential for the oncogenetic activities of CT120A.

  5. Homotypic RANK signaling differentially regulates proliferation, motility and cell survival in osteosarcoma and mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Alexander G; Narala, Swami R; Di Grappa, Marco A; Khokha, Rama

    2012-02-15

    RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) is a crucial cytokine for regulating diverse biological systems such as innate immunity, bone homeostasis and mammary gland differentiation, operating through activation of its cognate receptor RANK. In these normal physiological processes, RANKL signals through paracrine and/or heterotypic mechanisms where its expression and function is tightly controlled. Numerous pathologies involve RANKL deregulation, such as bone loss, inflammatory diseases and cancer, and aberrant RANK expression has been reported in bone cancer. Here, we investigated the significance of RANK in tumor cells with a particular emphasis on homotypic signaling. We selected RANK-positive mouse osteosarcoma and RANK-negative preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and subjected them to loss- and gain-of-RANK function analyses. By examining a spectrum of tumorigenic properties, we demonstrate that RANK homotypic signaling has a negligible effect on cell proliferation, but promotes cell motility and anchorage-independent growth of osteosarcoma cells and preosteoblasts. By contrast, establishment of RANK signaling in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial NMuMG cells promotes their proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, but not motility. Furthermore, RANK activation initiates multiple signaling pathways beyond its canonical target, NF-κB. Among these, biochemical inhibition reveals that Erk1/2 is dominant and crucial for the promotion of anchorage-independent survival and invasion of osteoblastic cells, as well as the proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Thus, RANK signaling functionally contributes to key tumorigenic properties through a cell-autonomous homotypic mechanism. These data also identify the likely inherent differences between epithelial and mesenchymal cell responsiveness to RANK activation. PMID:22421365

  6. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  7. Downregulation of Cyclophilin A by siRNA diminishes non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and metastasis via the regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclophilin A (CypA is a cytosolic protein possessing peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity that was recently reported to be overexpressed in several cancers. Here, we explored the biology and molecular mechanism of CypA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The expression of CypA in human NSCLC cell lines was detected by real-time reverse transcription PCR. The RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CypA was established in two NSCLC cell lines (95C and A549. 239836 CypA inhibitor was also used to suppress CypA activity. Tumorigenesis was assessed based on cellular proliferation, colony formation assays, and anchorage-independent growth assays; metastasis was assessed based on wound healing and transwell assays. Results Suppression of CypA expression inhibited the cell growth and colony formation of A549 and 95C cells. CypA knockdown resulted in the inhibition of cell motility and invasion. Significantly, we show for the first time that CypA increased NSCLC cell invasion by regulating the activity of secreted matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9. Likewise, suppression of CypA with 239836 CypA inhibitor decreased cell proliferation and MMP9 activity. Conclusions The suppression of CypA expression was correlated with decreased NSCLC cell tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  8. Ectodomains of the LDL receptor-related proteins LRP1b and LRP4 have anchorage independent functions in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F Dietrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor gene family is a highly conserved group of membrane receptors with diverse functions in developmental processes, lipoprotein trafficking, and cell signaling. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor-related protein 1b (LRP1B was reported to be deleted in several types of human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer. Our group has previously reported that a distal extracellular truncation of murine Lrp1b that is predicted to secrete the entire intact extracellular domain (ECD is fully viable with no apparent phenotype. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have used a gene targeting approach to create two mouse lines carrying internally rearranged exons of Lrp1b that are predicted to truncate the protein closer to the N-terminus and to prevent normal trafficking through the secretary pathway. Both mutations result in early embryonic lethality, but, as expected from the restricted expression pattern of LRP1b in vivo, loss of Lrp1b does not cause cellular lethality as homozygous Lrp1b-deficient blastocysts can be propagated normally in culture. This is similar to findings for another LDL receptor family member, Lrp4. We provide in vitro evidence that Lrp4 undergoes regulated intramembraneous processing through metalloproteases and gamma-secretase cleavage. We further demonstrate negative regulation of the Wnt signaling pathway by the soluble extracellular domain. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results underline a crucial role for Lrp1b in development. The expression in mice of truncated alleles of Lrp1b and Lrp4 with deletions of the transmembrane and intracellular domains leads to release of the extracellular domain into the extracellular space, which is sufficient to confer viability. In contrast, null mutations are embryonically (Lrp1b or perinatally (Lrp4 lethal. These findings suggest that the extracellular domains of both proteins may function as a scavenger for

  9. ABI3 ectopic expression reduces in vitro and in vivo cell growth properties while inducing senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggins Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mounting evidence has indicated that ABI3 (ABI family member 3 function as a tumor suppressor gene, although the molecular mechanism by which ABI3 acts remains largely unknown. Methods The present study investigated ABI3 expression in a large panel of benign and malignant thyroid tumors and explored a correlation between the expression of ABI3 and its potential partner ABI3-binding protein (ABI3BP. We next explored the biological effects of ABI3 ectopic expression in thyroid and colon carcinoma cell lines, in which its expression was reduced or absent. Results We not only observed that ABI3 expression is reduced or lost in most carcinomas but also that there is a positive correlation between ABI3 and ABI3BP expression. Ectopic expression of ABI3 was sufficient to lead to a lower transforming activity, reduced tumor in vitro growth properties, suppressed in vitro anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumor formation while, cellular senescence increased. These responses were accompanied by the up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 WAF1 and reduced ERK phosphorylation and E2F1 expression. Conclusions Our result links ABI3 to the pathogenesis and progression of some cancers and suggests that ABI3 or its pathway might have interest as therapeutic target. These results also suggest that the pathways through which ABI3 works should be further characterized.

  10. ABI3 ectopic expression reduces in vitro and in vivo cell growth properties while inducing senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence has indicated that ABI3 (ABI family member 3) function as a tumor suppressor gene, although the molecular mechanism by which ABI3 acts remains largely unknown. The present study investigated ABI3 expression in a large panel of benign and malignant thyroid tumors and explored a correlation between the expression of ABI3 and its potential partner ABI3-binding protein (ABI3BP). We next explored the biological effects of ABI3 ectopic expression in thyroid and colon carcinoma cell lines, in which its expression was reduced or absent. We not only observed that ABI3 expression is reduced or lost in most carcinomas but also that there is a positive correlation between ABI3 and ABI3BP expression. Ectopic expression of ABI3 was sufficient to lead to a lower transforming activity, reduced tumor in vitro growth properties, suppressed in vitro anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumor formation while, cellular senescence increased. These responses were accompanied by the up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 WAF1 and reduced ERK phosphorylation and E2F1 expression. Our result links ABI3 to the pathogenesis and progression of some cancers and suggests that ABI3 or its pathway might have interest as therapeutic target. These results also suggest that the pathways through which ABI3 works should be further characterized

  11. WNT4 mediates the autocrine effects of growth hormone in mammary carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouyovitch, Cécile M; Perry, Jo K; Liu, Dong Xu; Bezin, Laurent; Vilain, Eric; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Lobie, Peter E; Mertani, Hichem C

    2016-07-01

    The expression of Wingless and Int-related protein (Wnt) ligands is aberrantly high in human breast cancer. We report here that WNT4 is significantly upregulated at the mRNA and protein level in mammary carcinoma cells expressing autocrine human growth hormone (hGH). Depletion of WNT4 using small interfering (si) RNA markedly decreased the rate of human breast cancer cell proliferation induced by autocrine hGH. Forced expression of WNT4 in the nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cell line MCF-12A stimulated cell proliferation in low and normal serum conditions, enhanced cell survival and promoted anchorage-independent growth and colony formation in soft agar. The effects of sustained production of WNT4 were concomitant with upregulation of proliferative markers (c-Myc, Cyclin D1), the survival marker BCL-XL, the putative WNT4 receptor FZD6 and activation of ERK1 and STAT3. Forced expression of WNT4 resulted in phenotypic conversion of MCF-12A cells, such that they exhibited the molecular and morphological characteristics of mesenchymal cells with increased cell motility. WNT4 production resulted in increased mesenchymal and cytoskeletal remodeling markers, promoted actin cytoskeleton reorganization and led to dissolution of cell-cell contacts. In xenograft studies, tumors with autocrine hGH expressed higher levels of WNT4 and FZD6 when compared with control tumors. In addition, Oncomine data indicated that WNT4 expression is increased in neoplastic compared with normal human breast tissue. Accordingly, immunohistochemical detection of WNT4 in human breast cancer biopsies revealed higher expression in tumor tissue vs normal breast epithelium. WNT4 is thus an autocrine hGH-regulated gene involved in the growth and development of the tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:27323961

  12. SB365, Pulsatilla saponin D, suppresses the growth of gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells with Met amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Park, Byoungduck; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Hong, Soon-Sun; Jeong, Chul-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Clinical treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) such as gefitinib or erlotinib has been applied in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Unfortunately, acquired drug resistance emerges in these patients due to the amplification of the Met proto-oncogene, which may be a compensatory mechanism of NSCLCs against EGFR inhibition. To overcome this resistance, identification of new small-molecule natural compounds is crucial for cancer therapeutics. In this regard, SB365, saponin D from the root of Pulsatilla koreana which has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea for several diseases, has attracted wide interest. In the present study, SB365 effectively suppressed the proliferation of gefitinib-resistant HCC827GR NSCLC cells with Met amplification. Notably, our data revealed that SB365 inhibited the phosphorylation of Met and the downstream signaling pathway required for growth and survival in the Met-amplified HCC827GR cells. Moreover, SB365 suppressed the anchorage-independent growth, migration and invasion along with induction of apoptosis in the HCC827GR cells. Therefore, these results suggest that SB365 is good candidate as a natural product for use in the treatment of Met-amplified NSCLCs. PMID:25310337

  13. Bcl-2 and N-Myc Coexpression Increases IGF-IR and Features of Malignant Growth in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Jasty

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bcl-2 and c-myc oncogenes cooperate to transform multiple cell types. In the pediatric malignancy NB2, Bcl2 is highly expressed. In tumors with a poor prognosis, N-Myc, a protein homologous to c-Myc, is overexpressed as a result of gene amplification. The present study was designed to determine whether Bcl-2 cooperates with N-Myc to bestow a tumorigenic phenotype to neuroblastoma (NB cells. NB cell lines that at baseline express neither Bcl-2 nor N-Myc were stably transfected to express these gene products. In this model, we found Bcl-2 rescues N-Myc-expressing cells from apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal. Coexpression of Bcl-2 and N-Myc supports growth in low serum conditions and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Similarly, in vivo tumorigenic and angiogenic activity was dependent on coexpression. Our data further suggests that the mechanism underlying these changes involves the receptor for insulin growth factor type I (IGF-IR.

  14. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    immunoreactivity. TGF-alpha was found to be widely distributed in cells of normal human tissues derived from all three germ layers, most often in differentiated cells. In epithelial cells, three different kinds of staining patterns were observed, either diffuse cytoplasmic, cytoplasmic in the basal parts of the...... anchorage-independent growth of normal cells and was, therefore, considered as an "oncogenic" growth factor. Later, its immunohistochemical presence in normal human cells as well as its biological effects in normal human tissues have been demonstrated. The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate...... the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical...

  15. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel

    2011-11-18

    Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers. PMID:22033405

  16. Depletion of OLFM4 gene inhibits cell growth and increases sensitization to hydrogen peroxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced-apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Rui-hua

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4 gene is a secreted glycoprotein more commonly known as the anti-apoptotic molecule GW112. OLFM4 is found to be frequently up-regulated in many types of human tumors including gastric cancer and it was believed to play significant role in the progression of gastric cancer. Although the function of OLFM4 has been indicated in many studies, recent evidence strongly suggests a cell or tissue type-dependent role of OLFM4 in cell growth and apoptosis. The aim of this study is to examine the role of gastric cancer-specific expression of OLFM4 in cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Methods OLFM4 expression was eliminated by RNA interference in SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells. Cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle and apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Tumorigenicity was analyzed in vivo. The apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF α were assessed in the presence or absence of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. Results The elimination of OLFM4 protein by RNA interference in SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells significantly inhibits tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo by induction of cell G1 arrest (all P 2O2 or TNF α-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activity (all P 2O2 or TNF α-induced apoptosis in OLFM4 knockdown cells (all P Conclusion Our study suggests that depletion of OLFM4 significantly inhibits tumorigenicity of the gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells. Blocking OLFM4 expression can sensitize gastric cancer cells to H2O2 or TNF α treatment by increasing caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. A combination strategy based on OLFM4 inhibition and anticancer drugs treatment may provide therapeutic potential in gastric cancer intervention.

  17. Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases characteristics associated with maintenance of cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early endosomal protein Rab5 is highly expressed in tumor samples, although a causal relationship between Rab5 expression and cell transformation has not been established. Here, we report the functional effects of targeting endogenous Rab5 with specific shRNA sequences in different tumor cell lines. Rab5 down-regulation in B16-F10 cells decreased tumor formation by subcutaneous injection into C57/BL6 mice. Accordingly, Rab5 targeting in B16-F10 and A549, but not MDA-MB-231 cells was followed by decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth. These findings suggest that Rab5 expression is required to maintain characteristics associated with cell transformation. - Highlights: • Rab5 is important to the maintenance of cell transformation characteristics. • Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in different cancer cells. • Rab5 is required for anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in-vivo

  18. Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases characteristics associated with maintenance of cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Patricio; Soto, Nicolás [Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Díaz, Jorge [Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICBM), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Mendoza, Pablo [Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Díaz, Natalia [Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICBM), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Quest, Andrew F.G. [Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICBM), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Torres, Vicente A., E-mail: vatorres@med.uchile.cl [Institute for Research in Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-08-21

    The early endosomal protein Rab5 is highly expressed in tumor samples, although a causal relationship between Rab5 expression and cell transformation has not been established. Here, we report the functional effects of targeting endogenous Rab5 with specific shRNA sequences in different tumor cell lines. Rab5 down-regulation in B16-F10 cells decreased tumor formation by subcutaneous injection into C57/BL6 mice. Accordingly, Rab5 targeting in B16-F10 and A549, but not MDA-MB-231 cells was followed by decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth. These findings suggest that Rab5 expression is required to maintain characteristics associated with cell transformation. - Highlights: • Rab5 is important to the maintenance of cell transformation characteristics. • Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in different cancer cells. • Rab5 is required for anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in-vivo.

  19. Human cell transformation in the study of sunlight-induced cancers in the skin of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human cell transformation provides a powerful approach to understanding - at the cellular and molecular levels - induction of cancers in the skin of man. A principal approach to this problem is the direct transformation of human skin cells by exposure to ultraviolet and/or near-UV radiation. The frequency of human cells transformed to anchorage independence increases with radiation exposure; the relative transforming efficiencies of different wavelengths implies that direct absorption by nucleic acids is a primary initial event. Partial reversal of potential transforming lesions by photoreactivation suggests that pyrimidine dimers, as well as other lesions, are important in UV transformation of human cells. Human cells can also be transformed by transfection with cloned oncogenes, or with DNAs from tumors or tumor cell lines. Cells treated by the transfection procedure (but without DNA) or cells transfected with DNAs from normal mammalian cells or tissues show only background levels of transformation. Human cells can be transformed to anchorage-independent growth by DNAs ineffective in transformation of NIH 3T3 cells (including most human skin cancers), permitting the analysis of oncogenic molecular changes even in tumor DNAs difficult or impossible to analyze in rodent cell systems. 29 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 table

  20. Monitoring cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  1. Chondromodulin-1 directly suppresses growth of human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondromodulin-1 (ChM1), an endogenous anti-angiogenic factor expressed in cartilage, has been suggested to inhibit invasion of endothelial cells into cartilage. In addition, the ectopic administration of ChM1 has been reported to suppress tumorigenesis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether the anti-tumor effect is due to not only the anti-vascularization effect of ChM1, but also its direct action against oncocytes. In the present study, we sought to determine whether ChM1 has a direct action on tumor cells. BrdU incorporation assay was performed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), HepG2 cells and HeLa cells in the presence or absence of recombinant human ChM1 (rhChM1). An adenovirus that expresses ChM1, Ad-ChM1, was established and applied to the tumor xenografted in vivo, and to in vitro tumor cells cultured on plates or in soft agar. Cell cycle-related proteins and the phosphorylation of Erk, Akt, and GSK3β, the downstream molecules of the extracellular matrix-integrin signaling pathways, in HepG2 cells treated with or without Ad-ChM1 were detected by western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter assays of STAT, GAS, and ISRE, which participate in another cytokine signaling pathway, ware performed in HepG2, HeLa, and HUVEC cells. ChM1 suppressed BrdU incorporation in HUVECs and in HepG2 cells dose-dependently, but did not suppress BrdU incorporation in NHDFs and HeLa cells cultured on plates. In soft agar, however, ChM1 suppressed the growth of HeLa cells, as well as HepG2 cells. Western blot analyses demonstrated that ChM1 decreased the levels of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and cdk6 and increased those of p21cip1 without affecting the phosphorylation levels of Erk, Akt, and GSK3β in HepG2 cells. The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that ChM1 suppressed the transcriptional activities of STAT and GAS but not of ISRE. ChM1 directly suppressed the proliferation of tumor cells in an anchorage-independent

  2. Establishment and characterization of a new feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Studies on tumours in domestic animals are believed to greatly contribute to a better understanding of similar diseases in humans. Comparative studies have shown that feline mammary carcinomas share important features with human breast cancers, including a similar biological behaviour and histological appearance. In the present study we have established and characterized at different cellular levels one feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp, derived from a cat mammary carcinoma. The FkMTp cell line revealed to be a promising resource and tool to study tumour microevolution and all the mechanisms and processes involved in carcinogenesis from the tumour (primary culture) to the immortalized cell line. Several assays were conducted to assess the growth behaviour, differentiated morphology, anchorage independent growth in soft agar, wound-healing invasion and migration of the cell line across time (from the primary culture until the 160th passage). FkMTp revealed increased levels of anchorage independence, migration and invasion according to the course of time as well as different numbers of ploidy. These results demonstrate and validate the in vitro tumorigenicity of the FkMTp cell line. During the cell line establishment, it was cryopreserved approximately every six passages, including the tumour primary culture, allowing now the possibility to access almost any specific momento of the tumour progression. PMID:26883919

  3. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  4. Human transforming growth factor type α coding sequence is not a directed-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A peptide secreted by some tumor cells in vitro imparts anchorage-independent growth to normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and has been termed transforming growth factor type α (TGF-α). To directly investigate the transforming properties of this factor, the human sequence coding for TGF-α was placed under the control of either a metallothionein promoter or a retroviral long terminal repeat. These constructs failed to induce morphological transformation upon transfection of NIH 3T3 cells, whereas viral oncogenes encoding a truncated form of its cognate receptor, the EGF receptor, or another growth factor, sis/platelet-derived growth factor 2, efficiently induced transformed foci. Binding assays were done using [125I]-EGF. When NIH 3T3 clonal sublines were selected by transfection of TGF-α expression vectors in the presence of a dominant selectable market, they were shown to secrete large amounts of TGF-α into the medium, to have downregulated EGF receptors, and to be inhibited in growth by TGF-α monoclonal antibody. These results indicated that secreted TGF-α interacts with its receptor at a cell surface location. Single cell-derived TGF-α-expressing sublines grew to high saturation density in culture. These and other results imply that TGF-α exerts a growth-promoting effect on the entire NIH 3T3 cell population after secretion into the medium but little, if any, effect on the individual cell synthesizing this factor. It is concluded that the normal coding sequence for TGF-α is not a direct-acting oncogene when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells

  5. Endothelial induced EMT in breast epithelial cells with stem cell properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Hilmarsdottir, Bylgja; Sigmundsdottir, Hekla;

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical event in cancer progression and is closely linked to the breast epithelial cancer stem cell phenotype. Given the close interaction between the vascular endothelium and cancer cells, especially at the invasive front, we asked whether...... endothelial cells might play a role in EMT. Using a 3D culture model we demonstrate that endothelial cells are potent inducers of EMT in D492 an immortalized breast epithelial cell line with stem cell properties. Endothelial induced mesenchymal-like cells (D492M) derived from D492, show reduced expression of...... keratins, a switch from E-Cadherin (E-Cad) to N-Cadherin (N-Cad) and enhanced migration. Acquisition of cancer stem cell associated characteristics like increased CD44(high)/CD24(low) ratio, resistance to apoptosis and anchorage independent growth was also seen in D492M cells. Endothelial induced EMT in D...

  6. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. ► CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. ► GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. ► GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes—ganoderic and lucidenic acids—the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  7. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Sliva, Daniel, E-mail: dsliva@iuhealth.org [Cancer Research Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  8. Effect of p27KIP1 on cell cycle and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Yong Zheng; Wei-Zhong Wang; Kai-Zong Li; Wen-Xian Guan; Wei Yan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the effect of p27KIP1 on cell cycle and apoptosis regulation in gastric carcinoma cells.METHODS: The whole length of p27KIP1 cDNA was transfected into human gastric cancer cell line SCG7901by lipofectamine. Expression of p27KIP1 protein or mRNA was analyzed by Western blot and RNA dot blotting,respectively. Effect of p27KIP1 on cell growth was observed by MTT assay and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Tumorigenicity in nude mice was used to assess the in vivo biological effect of p27KIP1. Flow cytometry,TUNEL, and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of p27KIP1 on cell cycle and apoptosis.RESULTS: Expression of p27KIP1 protein or mRNA increased evidently in SCG7901 cells transfected with p27KIP1. The cell growth was reduced by 31% at 48 h after induction with zinc determined by cell viability assay. The alteration of cell malignant phenotype was evidently indicated by the loss of anchorage-independent growth ability in soft agar. The tumorigenicity in nude mice was reduced evidently (0.55±0.14 cm vs 1.36±0.13crn, P<0.01). p27KIP1 overexpression caused cell arrest with 36% increase (from 33.7% to 69.3%,P<0.01) in G1 population. Prolonged p27KIP1 expression induced apoptotic cell death reflected by pre-G1 peak in the histogram of FACS, which was also confirmed by TUNEL assay and electron microscopy.CONCLUSION: p27KIP1 can prolong cell cycle in G1phase and lead to apoptosis. p27KIP1 may be a good candidate for cancer gene therapy.

  9. MCF-10A-NeoST: A New Cell System for Studying Cell-ECM and Cell-Cell Interactions in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zantek, Nicole Dodge; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Stewart, Jane; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Robinson, Daniel; Miao, Hui; Wang, Bingcheng; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bissell, Mina J.; Kinch, Michael S.

    2001-08-22

    There is a continuing need for genetically matched cell systems to model cellular behaviors that are frequently observed in aggressive breast cancers. We report here the isolation and initial characterization of a spontaneously arising variant of MCF-10A cells, NeoST, which provides a new model to study cell adhesion and signal transduction in breast cancer. NeoST cells recapitulate important biological and biochemical features of metastatic breast cancer, including anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness in threedimensional reconstituted membranes, loss of E-cadherin expression, and increased tyrosine kinase activity. A comprehensive analysis of tyrosine kinase expression revealed overexpression or functional activation of the Axl, FAK, and EphA2 tyrosine kinases in transformed MCF-10A cells. MCF-10A and these new derivatives provide a genetically matched model to study defects in cell adhesion and signaling that are relevant to cellular behaviors that often typify aggressive breast cancer cells.

  10. Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeudall, W Andrew; Wrighton, Katharine H; Deb, Sumitra

    2013-01-01

    Pro-oncogenic properties of mutant p53 were investigated with the aid of migration assays, adhesion assays, and soft agar growth assays using cells stably expressing gain-of-function p53 mutants. To determine cell migration, "wound-healing" (scratch) assays and haptotactic (chamber) assays were used. H1299 cells expressing mutant p53 were found to migrate more rapidly than cells transfected with empty vector alone. Results from both types of migration assay were broadly similar. Migratory ability differed for different p53 mutants, suggesting allele-specific effects. Cells expressing p53 mutants also showed enhanced adhesion to extracellular matrix compare to controls. Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. PMID:23150443

  11. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  12. Alterations in Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions during Progression of Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Jinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progression is a multistep process during which normal cells exhibit molecular changes that culminate into the highly malignant and metastatic phenotype, observed in cancerous tissues. The initiation of cell transformation is generally associated with genetic alterations in normal cells that lead to the loss of intercellular- and/or extracellular-matrix- (ECM- mediated cell adhesion. Transformed cells undergo rapid multiplication and generate more modifications in adhesion and motility-related molecules which allow them to escape from the original site and acquire invasive characteristics. Integrins, which are multifunctional adhesion receptors, and are present, on normal as well as transformed cells, assist the cells undergoing tumor progression in creating the appropriate environment for their survival, growth, and invasion. In this paper, we have briefly discussed the role of ECM proteins and integrins during cancer progression and described some unique conditions where adhesion-related changes could induce genetic mutations in anchorage-independent tumor model systems.

  13. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. → UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. → UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation (λ = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm2) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  14. Derivation and characterization of matched cell lines from primary and recurrent serous ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létourneau Isabelle J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell line models have proven to be effective tools to investigate a variety of ovarian cancer features. Due to the limited number of cell lines, particularly of the serous subtype, the heterogeneity of the disease, and the lack of cell lines that model disease progression, there is a need to further develop cell line resources available for research. This study describes nine cell lines derived from three ovarian cancer cases that were established at initial diagnosis and at subsequent relapse after chemotherapy. Methods The cell lines from three women diagnosed with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (1369, 2295 and 3133 were derived from solid tumor (TOV and ascites (OV, at specific time points at diagnosis and relapse (R. Primary treatment was a combination of paclitaxel/carboplatin (1369, 3133, or cisplatin/topotecan (2295. Second line treatment included doxorubicin, gemcitabine and topotecan. In addition to molecular characterization (p53, HER2, the cell lines were characterized based on cell growth characteristics including spheroid growth, migration potential, and anchorage independence. The in vivo tumorigenicity potential of the cell lines was measured. Response to paclitaxel and carboplatin was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Results All cell lines had either a nonsense or missense TP53 mutations. The ability to form compact spheroids or aggregates was observed in six of nine cell lines. Limited ability for migration and anchorage independence was observed. The OV3133(R cell line, formed tumors at subcutaneous sites in SCID mice. Based on IC50 values and dose response curves, there was clear evidence of acquired resistance to carboplatin for TOV2295(R and OV2295(R2 cell lines. Conclusion The study identified nine new high-grade serous ovarian cancer cell lines, derived before and after chemotherapy that provides a unique resource for investigating the evolution of this common histopathological subtype of ovarian

  15. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways.

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    Fernanda Leve

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC. We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR. Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways

  16. Redifferentiation of human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) induced by two new highly oxygenated bisabolane-type sesquiterpenes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruidong Miao; Juan Wei; Q I Zhang; Venkateswara Sajja; Jinbo Yang; Qin Wang

    2008-12-01

    Bisabolane-type sesquiterpenes are a class of biologically active compounds that has antitumour, antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant and antivenom properties. We investigated the effect of two new highly oxygenated bisabolane-type sesquiterpenes (HOBS) isolated from Cremanthodium discoideum (C. discoideum) on tumour cells. Our results showed that HOBS induced morphological differentiation and reduced microvilli formation on the cell surface in SMMC-7721 cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that HOBS could induce cell-cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Moreover, HOBS was able to increase tyrosine--ketoglutarate transaminase activity, decrease -foetoprotein level and -glutamyl transferase activity. In addition, we found that HOBS inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of SMMC-7721 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, all the above observations indicate that HOBS might be able to normalize malignant SMMC-7721 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing redifferentiation.

  17. Differential effects of miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p on SiHa cells proliferation apoptosis, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Jesus Adrian [Laboratorio de Terapia Genica, Departamento de Genetica y Biologia Molecular, CINVESTAV, Av. IPN 2508, Mexico 07360 D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat, E-mail: lalvarez@cinvestav.mx [Laboratorio de Terapia Genica, Departamento de Genetica y Biologia Molecular, CINVESTAV, Av. IPN 2508, Mexico 07360 D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we examine miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p functions in SiHa cells. {yields} We study miRNA effect on cell proliferation, anchorage independent growth, apoptosis, cell motility and invasion. {yields} We find that miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p inhibition of proliferation and anchorage independent growth are exclusive to SiHa cells. {yields} miR-34c-3p induces apoptosis and inhibits cell motility and invasion in SiHa cells. {yields} In this study we conclude that miR-34c-3p functions as a tumor suppressor differ from miR-34c-5p. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate expression of several genes associated with human cancer. Here, we analyzed the function of miR-34c, an effector of p53, in cervical carcinoma cells. Expression of either miR-34c-3p or miR-34c-5p mimics caused inhibition of cell proliferation in the HPV-containing SiHa cells but not in other cervical cells irrespective of tumorigenicity and HPV content. These results suggest that SiHa cells may lack of regulatory mechanisms for miR-34c. Monolayer proliferation results showed that miR-34c-3p produced a more pronounced inhibitory effect although both miRNAs caused inhibition of anchorage independent growth at similar extent. However, ectopic expression of pre-miR-34c-3p, but not pre-miR-34c-5p, caused S-phase arrest in SiHa cells triggering a strong dose-dependent apoptosis. A significant inhibition was observed only for miR-34c-3p on SiHa cells migration and invasion, therefore implying alternative regulatory pathways and targets. These results suggest differential tumor suppressor roles for miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p and provide new insights in the understanding of miRNA biology.

  18. Differential effects of miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p on SiHa cells proliferation apoptosis, migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → In this study we examine miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p functions in SiHa cells. → We study miRNA effect on cell proliferation, anchorage independent growth, apoptosis, cell motility and invasion. → We find that miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p inhibition of proliferation and anchorage independent growth are exclusive to SiHa cells. → miR-34c-3p induces apoptosis and inhibits cell motility and invasion in SiHa cells. → In this study we conclude that miR-34c-3p functions as a tumor suppressor differ from miR-34c-5p. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate expression of several genes associated with human cancer. Here, we analyzed the function of miR-34c, an effector of p53, in cervical carcinoma cells. Expression of either miR-34c-3p or miR-34c-5p mimics caused inhibition of cell proliferation in the HPV-containing SiHa cells but not in other cervical cells irrespective of tumorigenicity and HPV content. These results suggest that SiHa cells may lack of regulatory mechanisms for miR-34c. Monolayer proliferation results showed that miR-34c-3p produced a more pronounced inhibitory effect although both miRNAs caused inhibition of anchorage independent growth at similar extent. However, ectopic expression of pre-miR-34c-3p, but not pre-miR-34c-5p, caused S-phase arrest in SiHa cells triggering a strong dose-dependent apoptosis. A significant inhibition was observed only for miR-34c-3p on SiHa cells migration and invasion, therefore implying alternative regulatory pathways and targets. These results suggest differential tumor suppressor roles for miR-34c-3p and miR-34c-5p and provide new insights in the understanding of miRNA biology.

  19. Comparison of gene expression profiles in chromate transformed BEAS-2B cells.

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    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] is a potent human carcinogen. Occupational exposure has been associated with increased risk of respiratory cancer. Multiple mechanisms have been shown to contribute to Cr(VI induced carcinogenesis, including DNA damage, genomic instability, and epigenetic modulation, however, the molecular mechanism and downstream genes mediating chromium's carcinogenicity remain to be elucidated. METHODS/RESULTS: We established chromate transformed cell lines by chronic exposure of normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low doses of Cr(VI followed by anchorage-independent growth. These transformed cell lines not only exhibited consistent morphological changes but also acquired altered and distinct gene expression patterns compared with normal BEAS-2B cells and control cell lines (untreated that arose spontaneously in soft agar. Interestingly, the gene expression profiles of six Cr(VI transformed cell lines were remarkably similar to each other yet differed significantly from that of either control cell lines or normal BEAS-2B cells. A total of 409 differentially expressed genes were identified in Cr(VI transformed cells compared to control cells. Genes related to cell-to-cell junction were upregulated in all Cr(VI transformed cells, while genes associated with the interaction between cells and their extracellular matrices were down-regulated. Additionally, expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were also changed. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to report gene expression profiling of Cr(VI transformed cells. The gene expression changes across individual chromate exposed clones were remarkably similar to each other but differed significantly from the gene expression found in anchorage-independent clones that arose spontaneously. Our analysis identified many novel gene expression changes that may contribute to chromate induced cell transformation, and collectively this type of

  20. Antitumor activity of sorafenib in human cancer cell lines with acquired resistance to EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Morgillo

    Full Text Available Treatment of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and colorectal cancer (CRC have substantially changed in the last years with the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the clinical practice. The understanding of mechanisms which regulate cells sensitivity to these drugs is necessary for their optimal use.An in vitro model of acquired resistance to two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI targeting the EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, and to a TKI targeting EGFR and VEGFR, vandetanib, was developed by continuously treating the human NSCLC cell line CALU-3 and the human CRC cell line HCT116 with escalating doses of each drug. MTT, western blot analysis, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony forming assays were conducted in vitro and experiments with established xenografts in athymic nude mice were performed in vivo in sensitive, wild type (WT and TKI-resistant CALU-3 and HCT116 cell lines.As compared to WT CALU-3 and HCT116 human cancer cells, TKI-resistant cell lines showed a significant increase in the levels of activated, phosphorylated AKT, MAPK, and of survivin. Considering the role of RAS and RAF as downstream signals of both the EGFR and VEGFR pathways, we treated resistant cells with sorafenib, an inhibitor of C-RAF, B-RAF, c-KIT, FLT-3, RET, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, and PDGFR-β. Sorafenib reduced the activation of MEK and MAPK and caused an inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion, migration, anchorage-independent growth in vitro and of tumor growth in vivo of all TKI-resistant CALU-3 and HCT116 cell lines.These data suggest that resistance to EGFR inhibitors is predominantly driven by the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway and can be overcame by treatment with sorafenib.

  1. MicroRNA-195 inhibits the proliferation of human glioma cells by directly targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin E1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    Full Text Available Glioma proliferation is a multistep process during which a sequence of genetic and epigenetic alterations randomly occur to affect the genes controlling cell proliferation, cell death and genetic stability. microRNAs are emerging as important epigenetic modulators of multiple target genes, leading to abnormal cellular signaling involving cellular proliferation in cancers.In the present study, we found that expression of miR-195 was markedly downregulated in glioma cell lines and human primary glioma tissues, compared to normal human astrocytes and matched non-tumor associated tissues. Upregulation of miR-195 dramatically reduced the proliferation of glioma cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ectopic expression of miR-195 significantly decreased the percentage of S phase cells and increased the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells. Overexpression of miR-195 dramatically reduced the anchorage-independent growth ability of glioma cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-195 downregulated the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in glioma cells. Conversely, inhibition of miR-195 promoted cell proliferation, increased the percentage of S phase cells, reduced the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells, enhanced anchorage-independent growth ability, upregulated the phosphorylation of pRb and PCNA in glioma cells. Moreover, we show that miR-195 inhibited glioma cell proliferation by downregulating expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1, via directly targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 mRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-195 plays an important role to inhibit the proliferation of glioma cells, and present a novel mechanism for direct miRNA-mediated suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 in glioma.

  2. Human cell culture models for investigating molecular and cytogenetic changes in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cultures of human epithelial cells have proved difficult to transform because of the inherent short duration that these cells can be cultured. However, primary cultures of human cells can be immortalised using the catalytic sub-unit of telomerase (hTERT). Radiation carcinogenesis has been investigated using a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (340RPE-T53 hTERT). Transformants can be selected using anchorage independent growth and cell lines derived from these are tumourigenic in immunosupressed mice. Molecular cytogenetic changes using CGH, SKY and FISH with breakpoint-specific YAC- and BAC- probes revealed a high level amplification on 10p11.2 in several clones which has been identified as an atypical protein kinase C binding protein using FISH gene-specific PCR products. Patterns of gene expression were studied using HuGen Human cDNA arrays using indirect labelling. The control parent RPE cell line could then be compared with cloned radiation-induced tumour cell lines derived from it following fractionated doses of gamma irradiation. Osteonectin was down regulated in 4 different tumour lines. This gene maps to a region of chromosome 5q that is commonly deleted in leukaemia. Nexin and p105 were down regulated in 3 lines and tumour suppressing subtransferable candidate 1 in I line. Further hTERT immortalised cell lines have been derived from primary cultures of human mammary epithelial cells. The breast epithelium contains a number of different cell types and the lines have been characterised using immunocytochemical techniques. The cells are cytokeratin 19 negative but CD10, cytokeratin 5 and p63 positive indicating a basal cell phenotype. Following exposure to fractionated doses of gamma irradiation anchorage independent colonies are formed. Thus human cell lines immortalised with hTERT are providing a useful model system for investigating radiation carcinogenesis and the molecular and cytogenetic changes induced. Supported by EC Nuclear Fission

  3. HOXA1 is overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOX genes encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during embryogenesis. However, members of this family demonstrated oncogenic properties in some malignancies. The present study investigated whether genes of the HOXA cluster play a role in oral cancer. In order to identify differentially expressed HOXA genes, duplex RT-PCR in oral samples from healthy mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma was used. The effects of HOXA1 on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and anchorage-independent growth were assessed in cells with up- and down-regulation of HOXA1. Immunohistochemical analysis using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 127 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) was performed to determine the prognostic role of HOXA1 expression. We showed that transcripts of HOXA genes are more abundant in OSCC than in healthy oral mucosa. In particular, HOXA1, which has been described as one of the HOX members that plays an important role in tumorigenesis, was significantly more expressed in OSCCs compared to healthy oral mucosas. Further analysis demonstrated that overexpression of HOXA1 in HaCAT human epithelial cells promotes proliferation, whereas downregulation of HOXA1 in human OSCC cells (SCC9 cells) decreases it. Enforced HOXA1 expression in HaCAT cells was not capable of modulating other events related to tumorigenesis, including apoptosis, adhesion, invasion, EMT and anchorage-independent growth. A high number of HOXA1-positive cells was significantly associated with T stage, N stage, tumor differentiation and proliferative potential of the tumors, and was predictive of poor survival. In multivariate analysis, HOXA1 was an independent prognostic factor for OSCC patients (HR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.59-2.97; p = 0.026). Our findings indicate that HOXA1 may contribute to oral carcinogenesis by increasing tumor cell proliferation, and suggest that HOXA1

  4. Annexin A6 contributes to the invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells by influencing the organization and localization of functional focal adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of annexin A6 (AnxA6) with membrane phospholipids and either specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components or F-actin suggests that it may influence cellular processes associated with rapid plasma membrane reorganization such as cell adhesion and motility. Here, we examined the putative roles of AnxA6 in adhesion-related cellular processes that contribute to breast cancer progression. We show that breast cancer cells secrete annexins via the exosomal pathway and that the secreted annexins are predominantly cell surface-associated. Depletion of AnxA6 in the invasive BT-549 breast cancer cells is accompanied by enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth but cell-cell cohesion, cell adhesion/spreading onto collagen type IV or fetuin-A, cell motility and invasiveness were strongly inhibited. To explain the loss in adhesion/motility, we show that vinculin-based focal adhesions in the AnxA6-depleted BT-549 cells are elongated and randomly distributed. These focal contacts are also functionally defective because the activation of focal adhesion kinase and the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway were strongly inhibited while the MAP kinase pathway remained constitutively active. Compared with normal human breast tissues, reduced AnxA6 expression in breast carcinoma tissues correlates with enhanced cell proliferation. Together this suggests that reduced AnxA6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression by promoting the loss of functional cell-cell and/or cell-ECM contacts and anchorage-independent cell proliferation.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor α (TGF-α), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-α in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-β. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-α on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that over-express EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here the authors report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which were named HER3/ERRB3. The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. They have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth

  6. Urinary transforming growth factors in neoplasia: separation of 125I-labeled transforming growth factor-alpha from epidermal growth factor in human urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) from urine promotes anchorage-independent cell growth in soft agar medium. This growth is enhanced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and is specifically inhibited by hEGF antiserum. Transforming growth factors of the alpha type (TGF-alpha), potentially present in normal human urine or urine from tumor-bearing patients, also promote anchorage-independent cell growth and compete with EGF for membrane receptor binding. Consequently, TGF-alpha cannot be distinguished from urinary hEGF by these two functional assays. Therefore, a technique for separation of TGF-alpha and related peptides from urinary EGF based on biochemical characteristics would be useful. Radioiodination of characterized growth factors [mouse EGF (mEGF), hEGF, and rat TGF-alpha (rTGF-alpha)], which were then separately added to human urine, was used to evaluate a resolution scheme that separates TGF-alpha from the high level of background hEGF present in human urine. Methyl bonded microparticulate silica efficiently adsorbed the 125I-labeled mEGF, 125I-labeled hEGF, and 125I-labeled rTGF-alpha that were added to 24-h human urine samples. Fractional elution with acetonitrile (MeCN) of the adsorbed silica released approximately 70 to 80% of the 125I-labeled mEGF and 125I-labeled hEGF between 25 and 30% MeCN, and over 80% of the 125I-labeled rTGF-alpha between 15 and 25% MeCN, with retention after dialysis of less than 0.2 and 1.7% of the original urinary protein, respectively. A single-step enrichment of about 400-fold for mEGF and hEGF, and 50-fold for rTGF-alpha were achieved rapidly. 125I-labeled mEGF and 125I-labeled hEGF eluted later than would be predicted on the basis of their reported molecular weight of approximately 6000, whereas 125I-labeled rTGF-alpha eluted from Bio-Gel P-10 at an approximate molecular weight of 8000 to 9000

  7. Inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 expression by RNA interference suppresses invasion through inducing anoikis in human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Fan; You-Li Zhang; Ying Wu; Wei Zhang; Yin-Huan Wang; Zhao-Ming Cheng; Hua Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles and mechanism of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in invasion of human colon cancer cells by RNA interference. METHODS: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was transfected into HT29 colon cancer cells. STAT3 protein level and DNA-binding activity of STAT3 was evaluated by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively. We studied the anchorage-independent growth using colony formation in soft agar, and invasion using the boyden chamber model, anoikis using DNA fragmentation assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Western blot assay was used to observe the protein expression of Bcl-xL and survivin in colon cancer HT29 cells. RESULTS: RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by siRNA leads to suppression of STAT3 expression in colon cancer cell lines. Suppression of STAT3 expression by siRNA could inhibit anchorage-independent growth, and invasion ability, and induces anoikis in the colon cancer cell line HT29. It has been shown that knockdown of STAT3 expression by siRNA results in a reduction in expression of Bcl-xL and survivin in HT29 cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that STAT3 siRNA can inhibit the invasion ability of colon cancer cells through inducing anoikis, which antiapoptotic genes survivin and Bcl-xL contribute to regulation of anoikis. These studies indicate STAT3 siRNA could be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of colon cancer.

  8. Purification of melanoma growth stimulatory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hs0294 human malignant melanoma cell line produces a monolayer mitogen that stimulates the serum free growth of low-density cultures of Hs0294 cells. This report describes the purification of that mitogen, termed MGSA for melanoma growth stimulatory activity, from serum-free conditioned medium from the Hs0294 cultures. MGSA has been purified from acetic acid extracts of lyophilized conditioned medium by gel filtration, reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and preparative electrophoresis, resulting in a >400,000-fold purification. MGSA bioactivity resides in acid- and heat-stable polypeptides of high and low molecular weight. However, the majority of the activity is reproducibly associated with the ∼16-kd moiety eluting from RP-HPLC at ∼35% acetonitrile. Reduction with dithiothreitol or B-mercaptoethanol results in a loss of biological activity but does not convert the 24-28-kd moieties to the 125I-MGSA that has been purified by preparative electrophoresis (16 kd) specifically binds to Hs0294 melanoma cells and retains 100% of the growth-stimulatory activity. The 16-kd MGSA stimulates the proliferation of Hs0294 cells at concentrations of 0.3-30 pM. Purified MGSA does not enable anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells and is therefore different from the previously described transforming growth factors. The amino acid composition of MGSA differs from that of other previously described growth factors. These data demonstrate that MGSA represents a separate class of growth factors with biological and biochemical properties different from other growth factors

  9. CYB5D2 requires heme-binding to regulate HeLa cell growth and confer survival from chemotherapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bruce

    Full Text Available The cytochrome b5 domain containing 2 (CYB5D2; Neuferricin protein has been reported to bind heme, however, the critical residues responsible for heme-binding are undefined. Furthermore, the relationship between heme-binding and CYB5D2-mediated intracellular functions remains unknown. Previous studies examining heme-binding in two cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain-containing proteins, damage-associated protein 1 (Dap1; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, have revealed that conserved tyrosine (Y 73, Y79, aspartic acid (D 86, and Y127 residues present in human CYB5D2 may be involved in heme-binding. CYB5D2 binds to type b heme, however, only the substitution of glycine (G at D86 (D86G within its cytochrome b5 heme-binding (cyt-b5 domain abolished its heme-binding ability. Both CYB5D2 and CYB5D2(D86G localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Ectopic CYB5D2 expression inhibited cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth of HeLa cells. Conversely, CYB5D2 knockdown and ectopic CYB5D2(D86G expression increased cell proliferation and colony growth. As PGRMC1 has been reported to regulate the expression and activities of cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs, we examined the role of CYB5D2 in regulating the activities of CYPs involved in sterol synthesis (CYP51A1 and drug metabolism (CYP3A4. CYB5D2 co-localizes with cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR, while CYB5D2 knockdown reduced lanosterol demethylase (CYP51A1 levels and rendered HeLa cells sensitive to mevalonate. Additionally, knockdown of CYB5D2 reduced CYP3A4 activity. Lastly, CYB5D2 expression conferred HeLa cell survival from chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin, with its ability to promote survival being dependent on its heme-binding ability. Taken together, this study provides evidence that heme-binding is critical for CYB5D2 in regulating HeLa cell growth and survival, with endogenous CYB5D2 being required to

  10. CAPC negatively regulates NF-κB activation and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X-F; Xiang, L; Zhang, Y; Becker, K G; Bera, T K; Pastan, I

    2012-03-29

    CAPC, also known as LRRC26, is expressed in normal prostate and salivary gland. We developed a mAb to CAPC and used it to characterize the protein and study its function. CAPC protein was detected in normal prostate and salivary gland, in several human breast cancer cell lines and in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Knockdown of CAPC by siRNA in LNCaP cells enhanced anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Conversely, overexpression of CAPC in MDA-231 breast cancer cells and A431 epidermoid cancer cells inhibited growth in soft agar and tumorigenesis in nude mice, and suppressed the metastasis of MDA-231 cells to the lung. Overexpression of CAPC downregulated NF-κB activity and its target genes, including GM-CSF (CSF2), CXCL1, IL8 and LTB1. It also suppressed genes encoding the serine protease mesotrypsin (PRSS3) and cystatin SN (CST1). CAPC expressing tumors showed a decrease in the number of proliferating cells and a large increase in ECM. The role of CAPC in the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis may be through its alteration of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21822313

  11. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories, Biokatu 4, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Kallioniemi, Anne, E-mail: anne.kallioniemi@uta.fi [Institute of Biomedical Technology, FIN-33014 University of Tampere and BioMediTech, Biokatu 6, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories, Biokatu 4, 33520 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  12. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy

  13. Survivin inhibits anti-growth effect of p53 activated by aurora B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genomic instability and apoptosis evasion are hallmarks of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms governing these processes remain elusive. Here, we found that survivin, a member of the apoptosis-inhibiting gene family, and aurora B kinase, a chromosomal passenger protein, were co-overexpressed in the various glioblastoma cell lines and tumors. Notably, exogenous introduction of the aurora B in human BJ cells was shown to decrease cell growth and increase the senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity by activation of p53 tumor suppressor. However, aurora B overexpression failed to inhibit cell proliferation in BJ and U87MG cells transduced with dominant-negative p53 as well as in p53-/- mouse astrocytes. Aurora B was shown to increase centrosome amplification in the p53-/- astrocytes. Survivin was shown to induce anchorage-independent growth and inhibit anti-proliferation and drug-sensitive apoptosis caused by aurora B. Overexpression of both survivin and aurora B further accelerated the proliferation of BJ cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that survivin should accelerate tumorigenesis by inhibiting the anti-proliferative effect of p53 tumor suppressor that is activated by aurora B in normal and glioblastoma cells containing intact p53

  14. Characterization of HGF/Met Signaling in Cell Lines Derived From Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young H. [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Agarwal, Piyush K.; Bottaro, Donald P., E-mail: dbottaro@helix.nih.gov [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-11-25

    There is mounting evidence of oncogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. The effects of three kinase inhibitors, cabozantinib, crizotinib and EMD1214063, on HGF-driven signaling and cell growth, invasion and tumorigenicity were analyzed in cultured UC cell lines. SW780 xenograft growth in SCID and human HGF knock-in SCID (hHGF/SCID) mice treated with cabozantinib or vehicle, as well as tumor levels of Met and pMet, were also determined. Met content was robust in most UC-derived cell lines. Basal pMet content and effector activation state in quiescent cells were low, but significantly enhanced by added HGF, as were cell invasion, proliferation and anchorage independent growth. These HGF-driven effects were reversed by Met inhibitor treatment. Tumor xenograft growth was significantly higher in hHGF/SCID mice vs. SCID mice and significantly inhibited by cabozantinib, as was tumor phospho-Met content. These studies indicate the prevalence and functionality of the HGF/Met signaling pathway in UC cells, suggest that paracrine HGF may contribute to UC tumor growth and progression, and that support further preclinical investigation of Met inhibitors for the treatment of UC is warranted.

  15. Pinin interacts with C-terminal binding proteins for RNA alternative splicing and epithelial cell identity of human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Kwok, Jamie Sui-Lam; Choi, Pui-Wah; Liu, Minghua; Yang, Junzheng; Singh, Margit; Ng, Shu-Kay; Welch, William R.; Muto, Michael G.; Tsui, Stephen KW; Sugrue, Stephen P.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Unlike many other human solid tumors, ovarian tumors express many epithelial markers at a high level for cell growth and local invasion. The phosphoprotein Pinin plays a key role in epithelial cell identity. We showed that clinical ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines express a high level of Pinin when compared with normal ovarian tissues and immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. Pinin co-localized and physically interacted with transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding proteins, CtBP1 and CtBP2, in the nuclei of cancer cells. Knockdown of Pinin in ovarian cancer cells resulted in specific reduction of CtBP1 protein expression, cell adhesion, anchorage-independent growth, and increased drug sensitivity. Whole transcriptomic comparison of next-generation RNA sequencing data between control ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer cell lines with respective knockdown of Pinin, CtBP1, and CtBP2 expression also showed reduced expression of CtBP1 mRNA in the Pinin knockdown cell lines. The Pinin knockdown cell lines shared significant overlap of differentially expressed genes and RNA splicing aberrations with CtBP1 knockdown and in a lesser degree with CtBP2 knockdown cancer cells. Hence, Pinin and CtBP are oncotargets that closely interact with each other to regulate transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing and promote cell adhesion and other epithelial characteristics of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26871283

  16. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie M; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Eismann, Thorsten; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Kruse, Petra; Winkler, Eva; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Schrader, Mark; Mertens, Daniel; Sültmann, Holger; Wittig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox)-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases. PMID:21750652

  17. Matrix-Dependent Regulation of AKT in Hepsin-Overexpressing PC3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Wittig-Blaich

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The serine-protease hepsin is one of the most prominently overexpressed genes in human prostate carcinoma. Forced expression of the enzyme in mice prostates is associated with matrix degradation, invasive growth, and prostate cancer progression. Conversely, hepsin overexpression in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines was reported to induce cell cycle arrest and reduction of invasive growth in vitro. We used a system for doxycycline (dox-inducible target gene expression in metastasis-derived PC3 cells to analyze the effects of hepsin in a quantitative manner. Loss of viability and adhesion correlated with hepsin expression levels during anchorage-dependent but not anchorage-independent growth. Full expression of hepsin led to cell death and detachment and was specifically associated with reduced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, which was restored by growth on matrix derived from RWPE1 normal prostatic epithelial cells. In the chorioallantoic membrane xenograft model, hepsin overexpression in PC3 cells reduced the viability of tumors but did not suppress invasive growth. The data presented here provide evidence that elevated levels of hepsin interfere with cell adhesion and viability in the background of prostate cancer as well as other tissue types, the details of which depend on the microenvironment provided. Our findings suggest that overexpression of the enzyme in prostate carcinogenesis must be spatially and temporally restricted for the efficient development of tumors and metastases.

  18. On size and growth of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Boudaoud, A

    2002-01-01

    Understanding how growth induces form is a longstanding biological question. Many studies concentrated on the shapes of plant cells, fungi or bacteria. Some others have shown the importance of the mechanical properties of bacterial walls and plant tissues in pattern formation. Here I sketch a simple physical picture of cell growth. The study is focussed on isolated cells that have walls. They are modeled as thin elastic shells containing a liquid, which pressure drives the growth as generally admitted for bacteria or plant cells. Requiring mechanical equilibrium leads to estimations of typical cell sizes, in quantitative agreement with compiled data including bacteria, cochlear outer hair, fungi, yeast, root hair and giant alga cells.

  19. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Akrap; Daniel Andersson; Eva Bom; Pernilla Gregersson; Anders Ståhlberg; Göran Landberg

    2016-01-01

    Summary The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in b...

  20. Involvement of deregulated epiregulin expression in tumorigenesis in vivo through activated Ki-Ras signaling pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, I; Shirasawa, S; Iwamoto, R; Okumura, K; Tsunoda, T; Nishioka, M; Fukuyama, K; Yamamoto, K; Mekada, E; Sasazuki, T

    2000-12-15

    To identify the genes located downstream of the activated Ki-Ras signaling pathways in human colon cancer cells, a PCR-based cDNA subtraction library was constructed between HCT116 cells and HCT116-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted cells (HKe3). One of the genes in HCT116 that was evidently up-regulated was epiregulin, a member of the epidermal growth factor family that is expressed in many kinds of human cancer cells. HKe3-stable transfectants expressing activated Ki-Ras regained over-expression of epiregulin. To further elucidate the biochemical structure and significance of epiregulin expression in tumorigenesis, HKe3-stable transfectants expressing epiregulin (e3-pSE cells) were established. Epiregulin existed as highly glycosylated membrane-bound forms, and TPA rapidly induced ectodomain shedding of epiregulin. Furthermore, the conditioned medium of e3-pSE cells showed more DNA synthesis for 32D cells expressing epidermal growth factor receptor (DER) cells than that of HKe3. Although anchorage-independent growth in soft agar was not observed for e3-pSE cells, tumorigenicity in nude mice was observed evidently, and their growth rate was correlated with each amount of exogenous epiregulin expression. These results suggested that activated Ki-Ras will be one of the factors contributing to the overexpression of epiregulin in human colon cancer cells, and that epiregulin will play a critical role in human tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:11156386

  1. Reversible adaptive plasticity: A mechanism for neuroblastoma cell heterogeneity and chemo-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eChakrabarti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  2. CSR1 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoying; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan Ping; Gavel, Tim; Nelson, Joel; Wells, Alan; Michalopoulos, George; Kokkinakis, Demetrius; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is frequent among men over 45 years of age, but it generally only becomes lethal with metastasis. In this study, we identified a gene called cellular stress response 1 (CSR1) that was frequently down-regulated and methylated in prostate cancer samples. Survival analysis indicated that methylation of the CSR1 promoter, and to a lesser extent down-regulation of CSR1 protein expression, was associated with a high rate of prostate cancer metastasis. Forced expression of CSR1 in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 resulted in a two- to threefold decrease in colony formation and a 10-fold reduction in anchorage-independent growth. PC3 cells stably expressing CSR1 had an average threefold decrease in their ability to invade in vitro. Expression of CSR1 in PC3 cell xenografts produced a dramatic reduction (>8-fold) in tumor size, rate of invasion (0 versus 31%), and mortality (13 versus 100%). The present findings suggest that CSR1 is a potent tumor sup-pressor gene. PMID:16436673

  3. Thermodynamics of irreversible plant cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The time-irreversible cell enlargement of plant cells at a constant temperature results from two independent physical processes, e.g. water absorption and cell wall yielding. In such a model cell growth starts with reduction in wall stress because of irreversible extension of the wall. The water absorption and physical expansion are spontaneous consequences of this initial modification of the cell wall (the juvenile cell vacuolate, takes up water and expands. In this model the irreversible aspect of growth arises from the extension of the cell wall. Such theory expressed quantitatively by time-dependent growth equation was elaborated by Lockhart in the 60's.The growth equation omit however a very important factor, namely the environmental temperature at which the plant cells grow. In this paper we put forward a simple phenomenological model which introduces into the growth equation the notion of temperature. Moreover, we introduce into the modified growth equation the possible influence of external growth stimulator or inhibitor (phytohormones or abiotic factors. In the presence of such external perturbations two possible theoretical solutions have been found: the linear reaction to the application of growth hormones/abiotic factors and the non-linear one. Both solutions reflect and predict two different experimental conditions, respectively (growth at constant or increasing concentration of stimulator/inhibitor. The non-linear solution reflects a common situation interesting from an environmental pollution point of view e.g. the influence of increasing (with time concentration of toxins on plant growth. Having obtained temperature modified growth equations we can draw further qualitative and, especially, quantitative conclusions about the mechanical properties of the cell wall itself. This also concerns a new and interesting result obtained in our model: We have calculated the magnitude of the cell wall yielding coefficient (T [m3 J-1•s-1] in

  4. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Narumol Bhummaphan; Pithi Chanvorachote

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent ...

  5. Melatonin decreases estrogen receptor binding to estrogen response elements sites on the OCT4 gene in human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Juliana; Arnosti, David; Trosko, James E.; Tai, Mei-Hui; Zuccari, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a challenge in cancer treatment, as these cells can drive tumor growth and are resistant to chemotherapy. Melatonin exerts its oncostatic effects through the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway in cancer cells, however its action in CSCs is unclear. Here, we evaluated the effect of melatonin on the regulation of the transcription factor OCT4 (Octamer Binding 4) by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The cells were grown as a cell suspension or as anchorage independent growth, for the mammospheres growth, representing the CSCs population and treated with 10 nM estrogen (E2) or 10 μM of the environmental estrogen Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 mM of melatonin. At the end, the cell growth as well as OCT4 and ERα expression and the binding activity of ERα to the OCT4 was assessed. The increase in number and size of mammospheres induced by E2 or BPA was reduced by melatonin treatment. Furthermore, binding of the ERα to OCT4 was reduced, accompanied by a reduction of OCT4 and ERα expression. Thus, melatonin treatment is effective against proliferation of BCSCs in vitro and impacts the ER pathway, demonstrating its potential therapeutic use in breast cancer. PMID:27551335

  6. Molecular probes for imaging cell growth and cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes PET/SPECT probes for the in vivo imaging of cell behavior such as cell growth, differentiation, migration, adhesion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. These probes may be indispensable for the fundamental research of regenerative medicine. (author)

  7. Resistance to ursodeoxycholic acid-induced growth arrest can also result in resistance to deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis and increased tumorgenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a large body of evidence which suggests that bile acids increase the risk of colon cancer and act as tumor promoters, however, the mechanism(s) of bile acids mediated tumorigenesis is not clear. Previously we showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a tumorogenic bile acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a putative chemopreventive agent, exhibited distinct biological effects, yet appeared to act on some of the same signaling molecules. The present study was carried out to determine whether there is overlap in signaling pathways activated by tumorogenic bile acid DCA and chemopreventive bile acid UDCA. To determine whether there was an overlap in activation of signaling pathways by DCA and UDCA, we mutagenized HCT116 cells and then isolated cell lines resistant to UDCA induced growth arrest. These lines were then tested for their response to DCA induced apoptosis. We found that a majority of the cell lines resistant to UDCA-induced growth arrest were also resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis, implying an overlap in DCA and UDCA mediated signaling. Moreover, the cell lines which were the most resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis also exhibited a greater capacity for anchorage independent growth. We conclude that UDCA and DCA have overlapping signaling activities and that disregulation of these pathways can lead to a more advanced neoplastic phenotype

  8. Functional inhibition of Ubiquitin conjugating Enzyme (UBE2C) reduces proliferation and sensitizes cervical and breast cancer cells to radiation, doxorubicin, tamoxifen and letrozole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women, worldwide. About 80% of cervical cancer cases occur in developing countries. Breast cancer has overtaken cervical cancer in most of the urban centers in India. In recent years, interest in the role of Ubiquitin conjugating Enzyme E2C (UBE2C) in cancer has shown a dramatic increase. Several studies have reported UBE2C as a potential oncogene and therapeutic target. The objective of the study was to elucidate radiation and chemo-sensitivity in response to functional inhibition of UBE2C in cervical and breast cancer cell lines. Taqman Real time PCR was performed to measure UBE2C levels in cervical and breast cancer cell lines. A dominant negative form of UBE2C (DN-UBE2C) was used to functionally inhibit wild type UBE2C. Cell proliferation and anchorage independent growth were measured by colorimetric assay and soft agar assay respectively. Radiation and chemo response of cell lines were assessed by colorimetric assay and clonogenic assay. Difference in sensitivity to radiation was observed among the cervical cancer cell lines studied. The growth rate of SiHa and HeLa transfected with DN- UBE2C was significantly reduced compared to vector control. Further, DN-UBE2C mediated radio-sensitivity was correlated with a significant decrease in resistance to radiation by SiHa and HeLa cells after transfection when compared to control cultures. Similarly, both the growth rate and the anchorage independent growth of MCF7 and MDAMB231 cells transfected with DN-UBE2C were significantly reduced compared to cells transfected with vector alone. MCF7 and MDAMB231 cells expressing DN-UBE2C were significantly more sensitive to different doses of radiation and doxorubicin compared to controls. In addition, DN-UBE2C transfected MCF7 cells were more sensitive to inhibition by tamoxifen and letrozole compared to vector controls. These results suggest that UBE2C can be used as a potential therapeutic target for cervical and breast

  9. The effect pathway of retinoic acid through regulation of retinoic acid receptor in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Qiao Wu; Zheng-Ming Chen; Wen-Jin Su

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of RARa gene in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of ail-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)on gastric cancer cells.``METHODS The expression levels of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in gastric cancer cells were detected by Northern blot. Transient transfection and chlorophenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assay were used to show the transcriptional activity of β retinoic acid response element (βRARE) and AP-l activity. Cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT assay and anchorage-independent growth assay, respectively. Stable transfection was performed by the method of Lipofectamine, and the cells were screened by G418.``RESULTS ATRA could induce expression level of RARα in MGC80-3, BGCC8823 and SGC-7901 cells obviously,resulting in growth inhibition of these cell lines. After sense RARa gene was transfected into MKN-45 cells that expressed rather Iow level of RARα and could not be induced by ATRA, the cell growth was inhibited by ATRA markedly. In contrast, when antisense RARα gene was transfected into BGC-825 cells, a little inhibitory effect by ATRA was seen, compared with the parallel BGC-823cells. In transient transfection assay, ATRA effectively induced transcriptional activity of βRARE in MGC80-3,BGC.823, SGC-7902 and MKN/RARa cell lines, but not in MKN-45 and BGC/aRARa cell lines. Similar results were observed in measuring anti-AP-l activity by ATRA in these cancer cell lines.``CONCLUSION ATRA inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells by up-regulating the level of RARa; RARa is the major mediator of ATRA action in gastric cancer cells; and adequate level of RAPa is required for ATRA effect on gastric cancer cells.``

  10. The contribution of heavy metals in cigarette smoke condensate to malignant transformation of breast epithelial cells and in vivo initiation of neoplasia through induction of a PI3K–AKT–NFκB cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoking is a crucial factor in the development and progression of multiple cancers including breast. Here, we report that repeated exposure to a fixed, low dose of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) prepared from Indian cigarettes is capable of transforming normal breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A, and delineate the biochemical basis for cellular transformation. CSC transformed cells (MCF-10A-Tr) were capable of anchorage-independent growth, and their anchorage dependent growth and colony forming ability were higher compared to the non-transformed MCF-10A cells. Increased expression of biomarkers representative of oncogenic transformation (NRP-1, Nectin-4), and anti-apoptotic markers (PI3K, AKT, NFκB) were also noted in the MCF-10A-Tr cells. Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of MCF-10A and MCF-10A-Tr cells revealed that transformed cells acquired allelic variation during transformation, and had become genetically distinct. MCF-10A-Tr cells formed solid tumors when implanted into the mammary fat pads of Balb/c mice. Data revealed that CSC contained approximately 1.011 μg Cd per cigarette equivalent, and Cd (0.0003 μg Cd/1 × 107 cells) was also detected in the lysates from MCF-10A cells treated with 25 μg/mL CSC. In similar manner to CSC, CdCl2 treatment in MCF-10A cells caused anchorage independent colony growth, higher expression of oncogenic proteins and increased PI3K–AKT–NFκB protein expression. An increase in the expression of PI3K–AKT–NFκB was also noted in the mice xenografts. Interestingly, it was noted that CSC and CdCl2 treatment in MCF-10A cells increased ROS. Collectively, results suggest that heavy metals present in cigarettes of Indian origin may substantially contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing intercellular ROS accumulation and increased expression of PI3K, AKT and NFκB proteins. - Highlights: • Repeated exposure of CSC causes malignant transformation in MCF-10A. • MCF-10A-Tr cells showed a distinct STR profile and

  11. The contribution of heavy metals in cigarette smoke condensate to malignant transformation of breast epithelial cells and in vivo initiation of neoplasia through induction of a PI3K–AKT–NFκB cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, Purusottam; Preet, Ranjan; Das, Dipon; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan [Cancer Biology Division, KIIT School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Campus-11, Patia, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751024 (India); Siddharth, Sumit [Cancer Biology Division, KIIT School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Campus-11, Patia, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751024 (India); Department of Infection Biology, Institute of Life Science, Nalco Square, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751021 (India); Choudhuri, Tathagata [Department of Infection Biology, Institute of Life Science, Nalco Square, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751021 (India); Wyatt, Michael D. [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Kundu, Chanakya Nath, E-mail: cnkundu@gmail.com [Cancer Biology Division, KIIT School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Campus-11, Patia, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751024 (India)

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a crucial factor in the development and progression of multiple cancers including breast. Here, we report that repeated exposure to a fixed, low dose of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) prepared from Indian cigarettes is capable of transforming normal breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A, and delineate the biochemical basis for cellular transformation. CSC transformed cells (MCF-10A-Tr) were capable of anchorage-independent growth, and their anchorage dependent growth and colony forming ability were higher compared to the non-transformed MCF-10A cells. Increased expression of biomarkers representative of oncogenic transformation (NRP-1, Nectin-4), and anti-apoptotic markers (PI3K, AKT, NFκB) were also noted in the MCF-10A-Tr cells. Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of MCF-10A and MCF-10A-Tr cells revealed that transformed cells acquired allelic variation during transformation, and had become genetically distinct. MCF-10A-Tr cells formed solid tumors when implanted into the mammary fat pads of Balb/c mice. Data revealed that CSC contained approximately 1.011 μg Cd per cigarette equivalent, and Cd (0.0003 μg Cd/1 × 10{sup 7} cells) was also detected in the lysates from MCF-10A cells treated with 25 μg/mL CSC. In similar manner to CSC, CdCl{sub 2} treatment in MCF-10A cells caused anchorage independent colony growth, higher expression of oncogenic proteins and increased PI3K–AKT–NFκB protein expression. An increase in the expression of PI3K–AKT–NFκB was also noted in the mice xenografts. Interestingly, it was noted that CSC and CdCl{sub 2} treatment in MCF-10A cells increased ROS. Collectively, results suggest that heavy metals present in cigarettes of Indian origin may substantially contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing intercellular ROS accumulation and increased expression of PI3K, AKT and NFκB proteins. - Highlights: • Repeated exposure of CSC causes malignant transformation in MCF-10A. • MCF-10A-Tr cells showed a distinct

  12. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumol Bhummaphan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As cancer stem cells (CSCs contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth and survival of the cancer cells. Importantly, gigantol significantly reduced the ability of the cancer cells to form tumor spheroids, a critical hallmark of CSCs. Concomitantly, the treatment of the compound was shown to reduce well-known lung CSCs markers, including CD133 and ALDH1A1. Moreover, we revealed that gigantol decreased stemness in the cancer cells by suppressing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt signal which in turn decreased the cellular levels of pluripotency and self-renewal factors Oct4 and Nanog. In conclusion, gigantol possesses CSCs suppressing activity which may facilitate the development of this compound for therapeutic approaches by targeting CSCs.

  13. Establishment and transformation of telomerase-immortalized human small airway epithelial cells by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a number of causally linked genes including the novel tumor suppressor Betaig-h3 that were differentially expressed in radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells. To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line, we show here that ectopic expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells resulted in the generation of several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal. Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings. The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice. These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression. Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV/nucleon of 56Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium. These findings indicate that hTERT-immortalized cells, being diploid and chromosomal stable, should be a useful model in assessing mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis.

  14. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development

  15. Assessment of potential anti-cancer stem cell activity of marine algal compounds using an in vitro mammosphere assay

    OpenAIRE

    de la Mare, Jo-Anne; Sterrenberg, Jason N; Sukhthankar, Mugdha G; Chiwakata, Maynard T; Denzil R. Beukes; Blatch, Gregory L.; Edkins, Adrienne L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory proposes that tumours arise from and are sustained by a subpopulation of cells with both cancer and stem cell properties. One of the key hallmarks of CSCs is the ability to grow anchorage-independently under serum-free culture conditions resulting in the formation of tumourspheres. It has further been reported that these cells are resistant to traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Methods In this study, the tumoursphere assay was validated in MCF-7 ...

  16. Autophagy and cellular senescence mediated by Sox2 suppress malignancy of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeon Cho

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a critical cellular process required for maintaining cellular homeostasis in health and disease states, but the molecular mechanisms and impact of autophagy on cancer is not fully understood. Here, we found that Sox2, a key transcription factor in the regulation of the "stemness" of embryonic stem cells and induced-pluripotent stem cells, strongly induced autophagic phenomena, including intracellular vacuole formation and lysosomal activation in colon cancer cells. The activation occurred through Sox2-mediated ATG10 gene expression and resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth ex vivo and tumor growth in vivo. Further, we found that Sox2-induced-autophagy enhanced cellular senescence by up-regulating tumor suppressors or senescence factors, including p16(INK4a, p21 and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15. Notably, knockdown of ATG10 in Sox2-expressing colon cancer cells restored cancer cell properties. Taken together, our results demonstrated that regulation of autophagy mediated by Sox2 is a mechanism-driven novel strategy to treat human colon cancers.

  17. HOXA1 is overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitu Carolina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HOX genes encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during embryogenesis. However, members of this family demonstrated oncogenic properties in some malignancies. The present study investigated whether genes of the HOXA cluster play a role in oral cancer. Methods In order to identify differentially expressed HOXA genes, duplex RT-PCR in oral samples from healthy mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma was used. The effects of HOXA1 on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and anchorage-independent growth were assessed in cells with up- and down-regulation of HOXA1. Immunohistochemical analysis using a tissue microarray (TMA containing 127 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC was performed to determine the prognostic role of HOXA1 expression. Results We showed that transcripts of HOXA genes are more abundant in OSCC than in healthy oral mucosa. In particular, HOXA1, which has been described as one of the HOX members that plays an important role in tumorigenesis, was significantly more expressed in OSCCs compared to healthy oral mucosas. Further analysis demonstrated that overexpression of HOXA1 in HaCAT human epithelial cells promotes proliferation, whereas downregulation of HOXA1 in human OSCC cells (SCC9 cells decreases it. Enforced HOXA1 expression in HaCAT cells was not capable of modulating other events related to tumorigenesis, including apoptosis, adhesion, invasion, EMT and anchorage-independent growth. A high number of HOXA1-positive cells was significantly associated with T stage, N stage, tumor differentiation and proliferative potential of the tumors, and was predictive of poor survival. In multivariate analysis, HOXA1 was an independent prognostic factor for OSCC patients (HR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.59-2.97; p = 0.026. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HOXA1 may contribute to oral carcinogenesis

  18. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  19. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  20. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein contributes to renal cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Lu, X; Man, X; Zhou, W; Jiang, L Q; Knyazev, P; Lei, L; Huang, Q; Ullrich, A; Zhang, Z; Chen, Z

    2009-09-17

    C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-binding protein (Cbp) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that localizes exclusively in lipid rafts, where it regulates Src family kinase (SFK) activities through recruitment of Csk. Although SFKs are well known for their involvement in cancer, the function of Cbp in carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported overexpression of Cbp in more than 70% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens and in the majority of tested RCC cell lines. Depletion of Cbp in RCC cells by RNA interference led to remarkable inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth as well as tumorigenicity in nude mice. Strikingly, silencing of Cbp negatively affected the sustaining of Erk1/2 activation but not c-Src activation induced by serum. Besides, the RhoA activity in RCC cells was remarkably impaired when Cbp was knocked down. Overexpression of wild-type Cbp, but not its mutant Cbp/DeltaCP lacking C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, significantly enhanced RhoA activation and cell migration of RCC cells. These results provided new insights into the function of Cbp in modulating RhoA activation, by which Cbp might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis. PMID:19581936

  1. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  2. Growth and form of melanoma cell colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Baraldi, Massimiliano Maria; Alemi, Alexander A.; Sethna, James P.; Caracciolo, Sergio; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of melanoma cell colonies grown in vitro by analyzing the results of crystal violet assays at different concentrations of initial plated cells and for di?erent growth times. The distribution of colony sizes is described well by a continuous time branching process. To characterize the shape fluctuations of the colonies, we compute the distribution of eccentricities. The experimental results are compared with numerical results for models of random division of...

  3. Downregulation of TRAF2 mediates NIK-induced pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Döppler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased levels of NF-κB are hallmarks of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and both classical and alternative NF-κB activation pathways have been implicated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that activation of the alternative pathway is a source for the high basal NF-κB activity in PDAC cell lines. Increased activity of the p52/RelB NF-κB complex is mediated through stabilization and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK. We identify proteasomal downregulation of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2 as a mechanism by which levels of active NIK are increased in PDAC cell lines. Such upregulation of NIK expression and activity levels relays to increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, but not migration or survival of PDAC cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rapid growth is one characteristic of pancreatic cancer. Our data indicates that the TRAF2/NIK/NF-κB2 pathway regulates PDAC cell tumorigenicity and could be a valuable target for therapy of this cancer.

  4. Cell Transformation and Proteome Alteration in QSG7701 Cells Transfected with Hepatitis C Virus Non-structural Protein 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongqiong HE; Deyun FENG; Ruixue CHENG; Zhuchu CHEN; Xuxian XIAO; Zhiqiang XIAO; Cui LI; Bo LI; Pengfei ZHANG; Hui ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-structural protein 3 (NS3), an important part of HCV, has been implicated in the life cycle of the virus and interacts with host cellular proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of NS3 protein on cell tranformation and related protein alteration in human hepatocyte QSG7701 cells. The results indicated that stable expression of the NS3 protein in QSG7701 cells induced transformed characters with reduced population doubling time, anchorage-independent growth and tumor development. Fifteen differentially-expressed proteins were separated and identified using 2-D electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Western blot analysis confirmed that the increase of phospho-p44/42 and phospho-p38 proteins was associated with transformed cells. These results supported the view that HCV NS3 protein plays a transforming role and provided some clues to elucidate the carcinogenesis mechanism of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Silencing of CD44 gene expression in human 143-B osteosarcoma cells promotes metastasis of intratibial tumors in SCID mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gvozdenovic

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most frequent primary malignant bone cancer in children and adolescents with a high propensity for lung metastasis. Therefore, it is of great importance to identify molecular markers leading to increased metastatic potential in order to devise more effective therapeutic strategies that suppress metastasis, the major cause of death in OS. CD44, the principal receptor for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA, is frequently found overexpressed in tumor cells and has been implicated in metastatic spread in various cancer types. Here, we investigated the effects of stable shRNA-mediated silencing of CD44 gene products on in vitro and in vivo metastatic properties of the highly metastatic human 143-B OS cell line. In vitro, CD44 knockdown resulted in a 73% decrease in the adhesion to HA, a 57% decrease in the migration rate in a trans-filter migration assay, and a 28% decrease in the cells' capacity for anchorage-independent growth in soft agar compared to the control cells, implicating that CD44 expression contributes to the metastatic activity of 143-B cells. However, making use of an orthotopic xenograft OS mouse model, we demonstrated that reduced CD44 expression facilitated primary tumor growth and formation of pulmonary metastases. The enhanced malignant phenotype was associated with decreased adhesion to HA and reduced expression of the tumor suppressor merlin in vivo. In conclusion, our study identified CD44 as a metastasis suppressor in this particular experimental OS model.

  6. Canine tracheal epithelial cells are more sensitive than rat tracheal epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta induced growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) markedly inhibited growth of canine tracheal epithelial (CTE) cells. Reduced responsiveness to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition accompanied neoplastic progression of these cells from primary to transformed to neoplastic. This was similar to the relationship between neoplastic progression and increased resistance to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition seen for rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells. The canine cells were more sensitive than rat cells to TGFβ-induced growth inhibition at all stages in the neoplastic process. (author)

  7. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease. PMID:27173014

  8. c-Jun/AP-1 pathway-mediated cyclin D1 expression participates in low dose arsenite-induced transformation in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen associated with skin carcinogenesis. Our previous work reveals that arsenite exposure is able to induce cell transformation in mouse epidermal cell JB6 Cl41 through the activation of ERK, rather than JNK pathway. Our current studies further evaluate downstream pathway in low dose arsenite-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells. Our results showed that treatment of cells with low dose arsenite induced activation of c-Jun/AP-1 pathway, and ectopic expression of dominant negative mutant of c-Jun (TAM67) blocked arsenite-induced transformation. Furthermore, our data indicated that cyclin D1 was an important downstream molecule involved in c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure, because inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by its specific siRNA in the JB6 Cl41 cells resulted in impairment of anchorage-independent growth of cells induced by low dose arsenite. Collectively, our results demonstrate that c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cyclin D1 expression is at least one of the key events implicated in cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure

  9. The oncogenic properties of EWS/WT1 of desmoplastic small round cell tumors are unmasked by loss of p53 in murine embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is characterized by the presence of a fusion protein EWS/WT1, arising from the t (11;22) (p13;q12) translocation. Here we examine the oncogenic properties of two splice variants of EWS/WT1, EWS/WT1-KTS and EWS/WT1 + KTS. We over-expressed both EWS/WT1 variants in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) of wild-type, p53+/- and p53-/- backgrounds and measured effects on cell-proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, clonogenicity after serum withdrawal, and sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and gamma irradiation in comparison to control cells. We examined gene expression profiles in cells expressing EWS/WT1. Finally we validated our key findings in a small series of DSRCT. Neither isoform of EWS/WT1 was sufficient to transform wild-type MEFs however the oncogenic potential of both was unmasked by p53 loss. Expression of EWS/WT1 in MEFs lacking at least one allele of p53 enhanced cell-proliferation, clonogenic survival and anchorage-independent growth. EWS/WT1 expression in wild-type MEFs conferred resistance to cell-cycle arrest after irradiation and daunorubicin induced apoptosis. We show DSRCT commonly have nuclear localization of p53, and copy-number amplification of MDM2/MDMX. Expression of either isoform of EWS/WT1 induced characteristic mRNA expression profiles. Gene-set enrichment analysis demonstrated enrichment of WNT pathway signatures in MEFs expressing EWS/WT1 + KTS. Wnt-activation was validated in cell lines with over-expression of EWS/WT1 and in DSRCT. In conclusion, we show both isoforms of EWS/WT1 have oncogenic potential in MEFs with loss of p53. In addition we provide the first link between EWS/WT1 and Wnt-pathway signaling. These data provide novel insights into the function of the EWS/WT1 fusion protein which characterize DSRCT

  10. CD147 overexpression promotes tumorigenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yu-Le; Liao, Cheng-Gong; Wei, Ding; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2016-04-01

    CD147 overexpresses in many epithelium-originated tumors and plays an important role in tumor migration and invasion. Most studies aim at the role of CD147 in tumor progression using tumor cell models. However, the influence of abnormal overexpression of CD147 on neoplastic transformation of normal cells is unknown. Here, the role of CD147 in malignant phenotype transformation in CHO cells was investigated. Three CHO cell lines that stably overexpressed CD147 (CHO-CD147), EGFP-CD147 (CHO-EGFP-CD147), and EGFP (CHO-EGFP) were generated by transfection of plasmids containing human CD147, EGFP-human CD147, and EGFP genes into CHO cells. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing and transwell matrix penetration assay. Trypan blue exclusion, MTT, cell cycle analysis, and BrdU cell proliferation assay were used to detect cell viability and cell proliferation. Annexin V-FITC analysis was performed to detect apoptosis. We found that CD147 overexpression promoted the migration and invasion of CHO cells. CD147 accelerated the G1 to S phase transition and enhanced the CHO cell proliferation. Overexpression of CD147 inhibited both early- and late-stages of apoptosis of CHO-CD147 cells, which is caused by serum deprivation. CHO-EGFP-CD147 cells showed an increased anchorage-independent growth compared with CHO-EGFP cells as detected by soft-agar colony formation assay. The tumors formed by CHO-CD147 cells in nude mice were larger and coupled with higher expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 than that of CHO cells. In conclusion, human CD147 overexpression induces malignant phenotype in CHO cells. PMID:26676266

  11. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that coll...... cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology......The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that...

  12. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  13. MiR-595 targeting regulation of SOX7 expression promoted cell proliferation of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu; Zhang, Shubao; Sun, Shaojun; Zhu, Jianxin; Xiao, Yilei

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicated that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) were involved with human disease including cancer. Recently, miR-595 was reported as a tumor promoter in malignant mesothelioma. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-595 in human glioblastoma (GBM) cells have not been well elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of miR-595 in human GBM. MiR-595 expression was significantly upregulated in GBM tissues and cells. We modified miR-595 levels in GBM cells and investigated their effects on the cell proliferation by MTT, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth assays. We found that miR-595 significantly increased GBM cell proliferation. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that miR-595 may target the 3'-UTR of SOX7and suppressed its translation, and further confirmed by luciferase assay. In sum, these observations together indicated that miR-595 played a critical role in carcinogenesis by suppression of SOX7, and may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM. PMID:27133048

  14. Bounds on bacterial cell growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    Landy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that rod-like bacteria in nutrient-rich media grow in length at an exponential rate. Here, I point out that it is the elongated shape of these bacteria that allows for this behavior. Further, I show that when a bacterium's growth is limited by some nutrient -- taken in by the cell through a diffusion-to-capture process -- its growth is suppressed: In three-dimensional geometries, the length $L$ is bounded by $\\log L \\lesssim t^{1/2}$, while in two dimensions the length is bounded by a power-law form. Fits of experimental growth curves to these predicted, sub-exponential forms could allow for direct measures of quantities relating to cellular metabolic rates.

  15. Bakuchiol suppresses proliferation of skin cancer cells by directly targeting Hck, Blk, and p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jae Hwan; Lee, Younghyun; Yang, Hee; Heo, Yong-Seok; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2016-03-22

    Bakuchiol is a meroterpene present in the medicinal plant Psoralea corylifolia, which has been traditionally used in China, India, Japan and Korea for the treatment of premature ejaculation, knee pain, alopecia spermatorrhea, enuresis, backache, pollakiuria, vitiligo, callus, and psoriasis. Here, we report the chemopreventive properties of bakuchiol, which acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. Bakuchiol also decreased viability and inhibited anchorage-independent growth of A431 human epithelial carcinoma cells. Bakuchiol reduced A431 xenograft tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. Using kinase profiling, we identified Hck, Blk and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) as targets of bakuchiol, which directly bound to each kinase in an ATP-competitive manner. Bakuchiol also inhibited EGF-induced signaling pathways downstream of Hck, Blk and p38 MAPK, including the MEK/ERKs, p38 MAPK/MSK1 and AKT/p70S6K pathways. This report is the first mechanistic study identifying molecular targets for the anticancer activity of bakuchiol and our findings indicate that bakuchiol exhibits potent anticancer activity by targeting Hck, Blk and p38 MAPK. PMID:26910280

  16. Growth and form of melanoma cell colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the statistical properties of melanoma cell colonies grown in vitro by analyzing the results of crystal violet assays at different concentrations of initial plated cells and for different growth times. The distribution of colony sizes is described well by a continuous time branching process. To characterize the shape fluctuations of the colonies, we compute the distribution of eccentricities. The experimental results are compared with numerical results for models of random division of elastic cells, showing that experimental results are best reproduced by restricting cell division to the outer rim of the colony. Our results serve to illustrate the wealth of information that can be extracted by a standard experimental method such as the crystal violet assay. (paper)

  17. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  18. B-cell lymphoma 6 protein stimulates oncogenicity of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) protein, an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger transcription factor, showed to be highly expressed in various human cancers in addition to malignancies in the lymphoid system. This study investigated the role of BCL6 expression in breast cancer and its clinical significance in breast cancer patients. Expression of BCL6 protein was assessed using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in 127 breast cancer patients and 50 patients with breast benign disease as well as in breast cell lines. Expression of BCL6 was restored or knocked down in two breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and T47D) using BCL6 cDNA and siRNA, respectively. The phenotypic change of these breast cancer cell lines was assessed using cell viability MTT, Transwell invasion, colony formation, and flow cytometry assays and in a xenograft mice model. Luciferase reporter gene, immunoblot, and qRT-PCR were used to investigate the molecular events after manipulated BCL6 expression in breast cancer cells. BCL6 protein was highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and expression of BCL6 protein was associated with disease progression and poor survival of breast cancer patients. In vitro, the forced expression of BCL6 results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and survival of breast cancer cell lines, whereas knockdown of BCL6 expression reduced these oncogenic properties of breast cancer cells. Moreover, forced expression of BCL6 increased tumor growth and invasiveness in a nude mouse xenograft model. At the gene level, BCL6 was a target gene of miR-339-5p. Expression of BCL6 induced expression of CXCR4 and cyclinD1 proteins. The current study demonstrated the oncogenic property of BCL6 in breast cancer and further study could target BCL6 as a novel potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer

  19. URG11 promotes gastric cancer growth and invasion by activation of β-catenin signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Sun, Shiren; Lian, Zhaorui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Juan; Xie, Huahong; Fan, Rui; Song, Jiugang; Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Jie; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), a new gene upregulated by Heptatitis B Virus X protein (HBx), was previously shown to activate β-catenin and promote hepatocellular growth and tumourigenesis. Although the oncogenic role of URG11 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma has been well documented, its relevance to other human malignancies and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we reported a novel function of URG11 to promote gastric cancer growth and metastasis. URG11 was found to be highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent nontumourous ones by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Knockdown of URG11 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively attenuated the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness and metastatic potential of gastric cancer cells. URG11 inhibition led to decreased expression of β-catenin and its nuclear accumulation in gastric cancer cells and extensive costaining between URG11 and β-catenin was observed in gastric cancer tissues. Transient transfection assays with the β-catenin promoter showed that it was inhibited by URG11-specific small inhibitory RNA. Moreover, suppression of endogenous URG11 expression results in decreased activation of β-catenin/TCF and its downstream effector genes, cyclinD1 and membrane type 1 matrix metallopeptidase (MT1-MMP), which are known to be involved in cell proliferation and invasion, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest that URG11 contributes to gastric cancer growth and metastasis at least partially through activation of β-catenin signalling pathway. These findings also propose a promising target for gene therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:19413886

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. ► Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. ► MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  1. Phosphatase PTP4A3 Promotes Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Growth and Predicts Poor Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Petra; Rawls, Kathryn; Tsimelzon, Anna; Shepherd, Jonathan; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Hill, Jamal; Fuqua, Suzanne A W; Chang, Jenny C; Osborne, C Kent; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Mills, Gordon B; Brown, Powel H

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of all breast cancers, and women diagnosed with TNBC currently lack targeted treatment options. To identify novel targets for TNBC, we evaluated phosphatase expression in breast tumors and characterized their contributions to in vitro and in vivo growth of TNBC. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of 102 breast cancers, we identified 146 phosphatases that were significantly differentially expressed in TNBC compared with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Of these, 19 phosphatases were upregulated (0.66-fold; FDR = 0.05) in TNBC compared with ER-positive breast cancers. We knocked down 17 overexpressed phosphatases in four triple-negative and four ER-positive breast cancer lines using specific siRNAs and found that depletion of six of these phosphatases significantly reduced growth and anchorage-independent growth of TNBC cells to a greater extent than ER-positive cell lines. Further analysis of the phosphatase PTP4A3 (also known as PRL-3) demonstrated its requirement for G1-S cell-cycle progression in all breast cancer cells, but PTP4A3 regulated apoptosis selectively in TNBC cells. In addition, PTP4A3 inhibition reduced the growth of TNBC tumors in vivo Moreover, in silico analysis revealed the PTP4A3 gene to be amplified in 29% of basal-like breast cancers, and high expression of PTP4A3 could serve as an independent prognostic indicator for worse overall survival. Collectively, these studies define the importance of phosphatase overexpression in TNBC and lay the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies directed against phosphatases or their respective signaling pathways for TNBC patients. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1942-53. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921331

  2. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-01

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes. PMID:7845668

  3. Disruption of insulin receptor function inhibits proliferation in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J Y; LaPara, K; Yee, D

    2016-08-11

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is a well-studied growth regulatory pathway implicated in breast cancer biology. Clinical trials testing monoclonal antibodies directed against the type I IGF receptor (IGF1R) in combination with estrogen receptor-α (ER) targeting have been completed, but failed to show benefits in patients with endocrine-resistant tumors compared to ER targeting alone. We have previously shown that the closely related insulin receptor (InsR) is expressed in tamoxifen-resistant (TamR) breast cancer cells. Here we examined if inhibition of InsR affected TamR breast cancer cells. InsR function was inhibited by three different mechanisms: InsR short hairpin RNA, a small InsR-blocking peptide, S961 and an InsR monoclonal antibody (mAb). Suppression of InsR function by these methods in TamR cells successfully blocked insulin-mediated signaling, monolayer proliferation, cell cycle progression and anchorage-independent growth. This strategy was not effective in parental cells likely because of the presence of IGFR /InsR hybrid receptors. Downregulation of IGF1R in conjunction with InsR inhibition was more effective in blocking IGF- and insulin-mediated signaling and growth in parental cells compared with single-receptor targeting alone. Our findings show TamR cells were stimulated by InsR and were not sensitive to IGF1R inhibition, whereas in tamoxifen-sensitive parental cancer cells, the presence of both receptors, especially hybrid receptors, allowed cross-reactivity of ligand-mediated activation and growth. To suppress the IGF system, targeting of both IGF1R and InsR is optimal in endocrine-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer. PMID:26876199

  4. Loss of interactions between p53 and survivin gene in mesenchymal stem cells after spontaneous transformation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liu; Zhao, Fangyu; Zheng, Yong; Wan, Yu; Song, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from various animals undergo a spontaneous transformation in long-term culture. The transformed MSCs are highly tumorigenic and are likely to be the tumor-initiating cells of sarcoma. To explain why the transformed MSCs become tumorigenic, the present study investigated the characteristics of rat MSCs before and after spontaneous transformation. It was shown that although the transformed MSCs maintained typical surface markers of MSC, they exhibited some cancer stem cell-like characteristics such as loss of contact inhibition and multi-potency to mesenchymal lineages, and acquirement of ability of anchorage-independent growth. The expression of a key senescence regulator p16 almost disappeared, but the other one, p53 abnormally increased in the transformed MSCs. ChIP assay demonstrated that a normal negative regulation of p53 on survivin gene disappeared in the transformed cells due to a lack of p53 binding to the promoter of survivin gene. DNA sequencing revealed that the p53 gene in transformed MSCs was not a wild-type, but a 942C>T mutant with the mutation located in the sequence coding p53 protein's DNA-binding domain. These findings indicate that the transformed MSCs express high levels of a p53 mutant that loses the ability to bind survivin gene, leading to an abnormally upregulated expression of survivin, which is a key reason for the cell's unlimited proliferation. PMID:27046449

  5. Arsenicals produce stable progressive changes in DNA methylation patterns that are linked to malignant transformation of immortalized urothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, and alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome.

  6. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....

  7. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Medical Academy of the German Armed Forces, Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit {beta}1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the {beta}1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  8. INHIBITION OF PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN BREAST CANCER MCF-7 CELLS BY SMALL INTERFERENCE RNA AGAINST LRP16 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩为东; 赵亚力; 李琦; 母义明; 李雪; 宋海静; 陆祖谦

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Our previous studies have firstly demonstrated that 17(-E2 up-regulates LRP16 gene expression in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and ectopic expression of the LRP16 gene promotes MCF-7 cells proliferation. Here, the effects of the LRP16 gene expression on growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and the mechanism were further studied by establishing two stably LRP16-inhibitory MCR-7 cell lines. Methods: Hairpin small interference RNA (siRNA) strategy, by which hairpin siRNA was released by U6 promoter and was mediated by pLPC-based retroviral vector, was adopted to knockdown endogenous LRP16 level in MCF-7 cells. And the hairpin siRNA against green fluorescence protein (GFP) was used as the negative control. The suppressant efficiency of the LRP16 gene expression was confirmed by Nothern blot. Cell proliferation assay and soft agar colony formation assay were used to determine the status of the cells proliferation. Cell cycle checkpoints including cyclin E and cyclin D1 were examined by Western blot. Results: The results from cell proliferation assays suggested that down-regulation of LRP16 gene expression is capable of inhibiting MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth and down-regulation of the LRP16 gene expression is able to inhibit anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells in soft agar. We also demonstrated that cyclin E and cyclin D1 proteins were much lower in the LRP16-inhibitory cells than in the control cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that LRP16 gene play an important role in MCF-7 cells proliferation by regulating the pathway of the G1/S transition and may function as an important modulator in regulating the process of tumorigenesis in human breast.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olah, Z; Olivera, A; Pirianov, G; Thomas, D M; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J R; Wang, F

    1998-06-19

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, nerve growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP, and consequent regulation of different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK), is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9668339

  11. Oct4-induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells enhance functional recovery in spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Lee, Hyunah; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Hwang, Kyujin; Nam, Donggyu; Park, Myung Rae; Zaehres, Holm; Park, Kook In; Lee, Seok-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The generation of patient-specific oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) holds great potential as an expandable cell source for cell replacement therapy as well as drug screening in spinal cord injury or demyelinating diseases. Here, we demonstrate that induced OPCs (iOPCs) can be directly derived from adult mouse fibroblasts by Oct4-mediated direct reprogramming, using anchorage-independent growth to ensure high purity. Homogeneous iOPCs exhibit typical small-bipolar morphology, maintain their self-renewal capacity and OPC marker expression for more than 31 passages, share high similarity in the global gene expression profile to wild-type OPCs, and give rise to mature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Notably, transplanted iOPCs contribute to functional recovery in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model without tumor formation. This study provides a simple strategy to generate functional self-renewing iOPCs and yields insights for the in-depth study of demyelination and regenerative medicine. PMID:26497893

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signaling blockade combined with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory W; Saba, Corey; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyh-Min; Benavente, Sergio; Ludwig, Dale L; Hicklin, Daniel J; Harari, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    Signaling through the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is implicated in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies. Targeted disruption of IGF-IR signaling combined with cytotoxic therapy may therefore yield improved anticancer efficacy over conventional treatments alone. In this study, a fully human anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 (ImClone Systems, Inc., New York, NY) is examined as an adjunct to radiation therapy. IGF-IR expression is shown for a diverse cohort of cell lines, whereas targeted IGF-IR blockade by A12 inhibits IGF-IR phosphorylation and activation of the downstream effectors Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Anchorage-dependent proliferation and xenograft growth is inhibited by A12 in a dose-dependent manner, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer lines. Clonogenic radiation survival of H226 and H460 cells grown under anchorage-dependent conditions is impaired by A12, demonstrating a radiation dose-enhancing effect for IGF-IR blockade. Postradiation anchorage-independent colony formation is inhibited by A12 in A549 and H460 cells. In the H460 xenograft model, combining A12 and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone. These effects may be mediated by promotion of radiation-induced, double-stranded DNA damage and apoptosis as observed in cell culture. In summary, these results validate IGF-IR signal transduction blockade as a promising strategy to improve radiation therapy efficacy in human tumors, forming a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:17283150

  13. The microtubule binding drug EM011 inhibits the growth of paediatric low grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeawung, Norbert F; Joshi, Harish C; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2013-07-10

    Low grade gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours representing the most common form of neoplasms in the central nervous system among children. Although gross total resection remains the principal treatment, it is often impractical especially for the resection of tumours within eloquent regions of the brain. Instead Radiotherapy is utilised in such cases, but because of its associated toxicities, it is refrained from use among younger children. These limitations coupled with hypersensitivity and toxicities associated with some commonly used chemotherapeutic agents, have ignited the need to search for safer and more effective treatments for paediatric low grade gliomas. In this study, we investigated the EM011 drug on the growth of two pilocytic and one diffuse paediatric astrocytoma cell lines, using an assortment of cancer assays. We discovered that treatments of low grade gliomas with EM011 abrogated cell viability by inducing a decrease in cell proliferation and an arrest in the S and G2M cell cycle phases, followed by a converse increase in apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell migratory and invasion indices, as well as anchorage independent growth in soft agarose, were significantly attenuated. These findings were mechanistically associated with a transient release of AIF, a disruption of microtubule architecture, and a decline in the expression of key genes which drive cancer progression including EGFR, mTORC1, JUN and multiple MMPs. In fact, the activity of MMP2 was also perturbed by EM011. These findings, in conjunction with the insignificant adverse side effects established from other studies, make EM011 an appealing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of paediatric low grade gliomas. PMID:23402815

  14. Aberrant Activation of Notch Signaling Inhibits PROX1 Activity to Enhance the Malignant Behavior of Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongwon; Ramu, Swapnika; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Yang, Sara; Jung, Wonhyeuk; Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Kim, Kyu Eui; Seong, Young Jin; Hong, Mingu; Daghlian, George; Kim, Daniel; Shin, Eugene; Seo, Jung In; Khatchadourian, Vicken; Zou, Mengchen; Li, Wei; De Filippo, Roger; Kokorowski, Paul; Chang, Andy; Kim, Steve; Bertoni, Ana; Furlanetto, Tania Weber; Shin, Sung; Li, Meng; Chen, Yibu; Wong, Alex; Koh, Chester; Geliebter, Jan; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although multiple studies have contributed to a better understanding of the genetic alterations underlying this frequently arising disease, the downstream molecular effectors that impact PTC pathogenesis remain to be further defined. Here, we report that the regulator of cell fate specification, PROX1, becomes inactivated in PTC through mRNA downregulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization. Expression studies in clinical specimens revealed that aberrantly activated NOTCH signaling promoted PROX1 downregulation and that cytoplasmic mislocalization significantly altered PROX1 protein stability. Importantly, restoration of PROX1 activity in thyroid carcinoma cells revealed that PROX1 not only enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling but also regulated several genes known to be associated with PTC, including thyroid cancer protein (TC)-1, SERPINA1, and FABP4. Furthermore, PROX1 reexpression suppressed the malignant phenotypes of thyroid carcinoma cells, such as proliferation, motility, adhesion, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and polyploidy. Moreover, animal xenograft studies demonstrated that restoration of PROX1 severely impeded tumor formation and suppressed the invasiveness and the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of PTC cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that NOTCH-induced PROX1 inactivation significantly promotes the malignant behavior of thyroid carcinoma and suggest that PROX1 reactivation may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to attenuate disease progression. PMID:26609053

  15. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133+ cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  16. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation. PMID:25411331

  17. Decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in radiation-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced hepatomas of B6C3F1 mice. In northern blot analysis, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 gene were shown in radiation-induced mouse hepatomas compared to normal livers. In hepatoma cell lines established from these hepatomas, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 were strongly related to the grade of anchorage-independent growth. In cell lines which were transfected with IGFBP-rP1cDNA, the doubling time of cell growth was increased, and the number and the size of colony formation in soft agar culture were decreased. In tumor formation assay by injecting these cells to B6C3F1 mice subcutaneously, the volume of tumors were decreased. Furthermore, the decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 gene was observed in human hepatomas by northern blot analysis. These results may suggest that the suppression of IGFBP-rP1 is related to development and progression of mouse and human hepatomas. (author)

  18. Decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in radiation-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teishima, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced hepatomas of B6C3F1 mice. In northern blot analysis, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 gene were shown in radiation-induced mouse hepatomas compared to normal livers. In hepatoma cell lines established from these hepatomas, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 were strongly related to the grade of anchorage-independent growth. In cell lines which were transfected with IGFBP-rP1cDNA, the doubling time of cell growth was increased, and the number and the size of colony formation in soft agar culture were decreased. In tumor formation assay by injecting these cells to B6C3F1 mice subcutaneously, the volume of tumors were decreased. Furthermore, the decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 gene was observed in human hepatomas by northern blot analysis. These results may suggest that the suppression of IGFBP-rP1 is related to development and progression of mouse and human hepatomas. (author)

  19. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27375275

  20. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes. PMID:22043817

  1. NIH 3T3 cells malignantly transformed by mot—2 show inactivation and cytoplasmic sequestration of the p53 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WADHWA; SYUICHITAKANO; 等

    1999-01-01

    In previous studies we have reported that a high level of expression of mot-2 protein results in malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as analyzed by anchorage independent growth and nude mice assays [Kaul et al.,Oncogene,17,907-11,1998].Mot-2 was found to interact with tumor suppressor protein p53.The transient overexpression of mot-2 was inhibitory to transcriptional activation function of p53 [Wadhwa et al.,J.Biol.Chem.,273,2958691,1998].We demonstrate here that mot-2 transfected stable clone of NIH 3T3 that showed malignant properties indeed show inactivation of p53 function as assayed by exogenous p53 dependent reporter.The expression level of p53 in response to UV-irradiation was lower in NIH 3T3/mot-2 as compared to NIH 3T3 cells and also exhibited delay in reachingpeak.Furthermore,upon serum starvation p53 was seen to translocate to the nucleus in NIH 3T3,but not in its mot-3 derivative.The data suggests that mot-2 mediated cytoplasmic sequestration and inactivation of p53 may operate,at least in part,for malignant phenotype of NIH 3T3/mot-2 cells.

  2. Epigenetic reprogramming of breast cancer cells with oocyte extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a disease characterised by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes is an early event in breast carcinogenesis and reversion of gene silencing by epigenetic reprogramming can provide clues to the mechanisms responsible for tumour initiation and progression. In this study we apply the reprogramming capacity of oocytes to cancer cells in order to study breast oncogenesis. Results We show that breast cancer cells can be directly reprogrammed by amphibian oocyte extracts. The reprogramming effect, after six hours of treatment, in the absence of DNA replication, includes DNA demethylation and removal of repressive histone marks at the promoters of tumour suppressor genes; also, expression of the silenced genes is re-activated in response to treatment. This activity is specific to oocytes as it is not elicited by extracts from ovulated eggs, and is present at very limited levels in extracts from mouse embryonic stem cells. Epigenetic reprogramming in oocyte extracts results in reduction of cancer cell growth under anchorage independent conditions and a reduction in tumour growth in mouse xenografts. Conclusions This study presents a new method to investigate tumour reversion by epigenetic reprogramming. After testing extracts from different sources, we found that axolotl oocyte extracts possess superior reprogramming ability, which reverses epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. Therefore this system can be extremely valuable for dissecting the mechanisms involved in tumour suppressor gene silencing and identifying molecular activities capable of arresting tumour growth. These applications can ultimately shed light on the contribution of epigenetic alterations in breast cancer and advance the development of epigenetic therapies.

  3. Lipid metabolism enzyme ACSVL3 supports glioblastoma stem cell maintenance and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeting cell metabolism offers promising opportunities for the development of drugs to treat cancer. We previously found that the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase VL3 (ACSVL3) is elevated in malignant brain tumor tissues and involved in tumorigenesis. This study investigates the role of ACSVL3 in the maintenance of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cell self-renewal and the capacity of GBM stem cells to initiate tumor xenograft formation. We examined ACSVL3 expression during differentiation of several GBM stem cell enriched neurosphere cultures. To study the function of ACSVL3, we performed loss-of-function by using small interfering RNAs to target ACSVL3 and examined stem cell marker expression, neurosphere formation and tumor initiation properties. ACSVL3 expression levels were substantially increased in GBM stem cell enriched neurosphere cultures and decreased after differentiation of the neurospheres. Down-regulating ACSVL3 with small inhibiting RNAs decreased the expression of markers and regulators associated with stem cell self-renewal, including CD133, ALDH, Musashi-1 and Sox-2. ACSVL3 knockdown in neurosphere cells led to increased expression of differentiation markers GFAP and Tuj1. Furthermore, ACSVL3 knockdown reduced anchorage-independent neurosphere cell growth, neurosphere-forming capacity as well as self-renewal of these GBM stem cell enriched neurosphere cultures. In vivo studies revealed that ACSVL3 loss-of-function substantially inhibited the ability of neurosphere cells to propagate orthotopic tumor xenografts. A link between ACSVL3 and cancer stem cell phenotype was further established by the findings that ACSVL3 expression was regulated by receptor tyrosine kinase pathways that support GBM stem cell self-renewal and tumor initiation, including EGFR and HGF/c-Met pathways. Our findings indicate that the lipid metabolism enzyme ACSVL3 is involved in GBM stem cell maintenance and the tumor-initiating capacity of GBM stem cell enriched-neurospheres in

  4. In vitro transformation of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B induced by radon and cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a model of malignant transformation of human cells in vitro to study the lung cancer induced by radon and cigarette smoke. Methods: The immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B were divided into control group (C), radon group (Rn), cigarette smoke group (Sm) and combined group (Rn-Sm). Cells were planted onto transwell membrane one day before exposure and were directly exposed to radon and cigarette smoke pumped in a gas inhalation box. After the exposure cells were trypsinized into dishes for further growth and malignancy transformation phenotype was detected in order to compare the effects due to radon and cigarette smoke exposure. Results: BEAS-2B cells showed malignantly transformed phenotype by exposure to radon and cigarette smoke. A series of sequential steps emerged among transformed cells, including altered growth kinetics, resistance to serum has changed from 0. 31 ± 0. 18 to 1.92 ± 0. 27,2. 03 ± 0. 14,2.95 ± 0. 60, and anchorage-independence growth increased from (0.01 ±0.02)% to (4.89 ±0.30)%,(8.36 ±0.50)%,(11.74 ±0.69)%.After being subculture for 20 generations, cell apoptosis of the fifth generation cells exposed to radon,cigarette smoke and both was significant decreased from ( 11.76 ± 0. 17 ) % to (4. 62 ± 0. 42 ) %, ( 8.63 ±0. 15 )%, (3.68 ± 0. 33 )%. Conclusions: BEAS-2B cells could be malignancy transformed by radon and cigarette smoke in vitro, which could be used as a cell model in lung bronchial carcinogenesis. (authors)

  5. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  6. A role for PAX8 in the tumorigenic phenotype of ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAX8 is a member of the paired box (Pax) multigene family of transcription factors, which are involved in the developmental and tissue-specific control of the expression of several genes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Previously, several studies reported that PAX8 is expressed at high levels in specific types of tumors. In particular, PAX8 has been recently reported to be conspicuously expressed in human ovarian cancer, but the functional role of PAX8 in the carcinogenesis of this type of tumor has not been addressed. In this study, we investigated the contribution of PAX8 in ovarian cancer progression. Stable PAX8 depleted ovarian cancer cells were generated using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs. PAX8 mRNA and protein were detected by RT-PCR, immunoblot and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation, motility and invasion potential of PAX8 silenced cells were analyzed by means of growth curves, wound healing and Matrigel assays. In addition, PAX8 knockdown and control cells were injected into nude mice for xenograft tumorigenicity assays. Finally, qPCR was used to detect the expression levels of EMT markers in PAX8-overexpressing and control cells. Here, we show that PAX8 plays a critical role in the migration, invasion and tumorigenic ability of ovarian cancer cells. Our results show that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PAX8 expression in SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells produces a significant reduction of cell proliferation, migration ability and invasion activity compared with control parental SKOV-3 cells. Moreover, PAX8 silencing strongly suppresses anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Notably, tumorigenesis in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft model is also significantly inhibited. Overall, our results indicate that PAX8 plays an important role in the tumorigenic phenotype of ovarian cancer cells and identifies PAX8 as a potential new target for the treatment of ovarian cancer

  7. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Relan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. METHODS: Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. RESULTS: Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. CONCLUSION: These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of

  8. Combination of carmustine and selenite effectively inhibits tumor growth by targeting androgen receptor, androgen receptor-variants, and Akt in preclinical models: New hope for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2016-10-01

    Despite established androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, AR/AR-variants signaling remain a major obstacle for the successful treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition, CRPC cells adapt to survive via AR-independent pathways to escape next generation therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for drugs that can target these signaling pathways in CRPC. In this study, we sought to determine whether carmustine and selenite in combination could induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of CRPC in-vitro and in-vivo. CRPC (22Rv1, VCaP, and PC-3) cell lines in culture and xenograft mouse were used. Combination of carmustine and selenite treatment significantly increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and growth inhibition in CRPC cells with down regulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) and proliferative proteins (c-Myc and cyclin-D1). This effect was associated with complete reduction of AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA and significant induction of p27Kip1. Combination treatment substantially abolished phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β, and anchorage-independent growth in AR-positive and AR-negative cells. Consistent with in-vitro results, combination treatment effectively induced apoptosis and completely inhibited xenograft tumor growth and markedly reduced AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA, and Bcl-2 in xenograft tumors without causing genotoxicity in host mice. Individual agent treatment showed only partial effect. The combination treatment showed a significant synergistic effect. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the combination of carmustine and selenite treatment completely suppressed CRPC tumor growth by reducing AR/AR-variants and Akt signaling. Our findings suggest that the combination of carmustine and selenite could constitute a promising next-generation therapy for successful treatment of patients with CRPC. PMID:27198552

  9. Modulation of the BRCA1 Protein and Induction of Apoptosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Lines by the Polyphenolic Compound Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica L. Rowe

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we sought to examine the effects of curcumin in a specific type of breast cancer called triple negative breast cancer. These cancers lack expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors and do not over-express HER2. Current treatment for triple negative breast cancers is limited to cytotoxic chemotherapy, and upon relapse, there are not any therapies currently available. We demonstrate here that the bioactive food compound curcumin induces DNA damage in triple negative breast cancer cells in association with phosphorylation, increased expression, and cytoplasmic retention of the BRCA1 protein. In addition, curcumin promotes apoptosis and prevents anchorage-independent growth and migration of triple negative breast cancer cells. Apoptosis and BRCA1 modulation were not observed in non-transformed mammary epithelial cells, suggesting curcumin may have limited non-specific toxicity. This study suggests that curcumin and potentially curcumin analogues should be tested further in the context of triple negative breast cancer. These results are novel, having never been previously reported, and suggest that curcumin could provide a novel, non-toxic therapy, which could lead to improved survival for patients with triple negative breast cancer. Curcumin should be studied further in this subset of breast cancer patients, for whom treatment options are severely limited.

  10. Up-regulation of METCAM/MUC18 promotes motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conflicting research has identified METCAM/MUC18, an integral membrane cell adhesion molecule (CAM) in the Ig-like gene super-family, as both a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor in the development of breast cancer. To resolve this, we have re-investigated the role of this CAM in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Three breast cancer cell lines were used for the tests: one luminal-like breast cancer cell line, MCF7, which did not express any METCAM/MUC18, and two basal-like breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, which expressed moderate levels of the protein. MCF7 cells were transfected with the human METCAM/MUC18 cDNA to obtain G418-resistant clones which expressed the protein and were used for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro motility and invasiveness, and in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis. Both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells already expressed METCAM/MUC18. They were directly used for in vitro tests in the presence and absence of an anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody. In MCF7 cells, enforced METCAM/MUC18 expression increased in vitro motility, invasiveness, anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenesis), and in vivo tumorigenesis. In both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody inhibited both motility and invasiveness. Though both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells established a disorganized growth in 3D basement membrane culture assay, the introduction of the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody completely destroyed their growth in the 3D culture. These findings support the notion that human METCAM/MUC18 expression promotes the progression of human breast cancer cells by increasing their motility, invasiveness and tumorigenesis

  11. Up-regulation of METCAM/MUC18 promotes motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Shao-xi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting research has identified METCAM/MUC18, an integral membrane cell adhesion molecule (CAM in the Ig-like gene super-family, as both a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor in the development of breast cancer. To resolve this, we have re-investigated the role of this CAM in the progression of human breast cancer cells. Methods Three breast cancer cell lines were used for the tests: one luminal-like breast cancer cell line, MCF7, which did not express any METCAM/MUC18, and two basal-like breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468, which expressed moderate levels of the protein. MCF7 cells were transfected with the human METCAM/MUC18 cDNA to obtain G418-resistant clones which expressed the protein and were used for testing effects of human METCAM/MUC18 expression on in vitro motility and invasiveness, and in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis. Both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells already expressed METCAM/MUC18. They were directly used for in vitro tests in the presence and absence of an anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody. Results In MCF7 cells, enforced METCAM/MUC18 expression increased in vitro motility, invasiveness, anchorage-independent colony formation (in vitro tumorigenesis, and in vivo tumorigenesis. In both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody inhibited both motility and invasiveness. Though both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells established a disorganized growth in 3D basement membrane culture assay, the introduction of the anti-METCAM/MUC18 antibody completely destroyed their growth in the 3D culture. Conclusion These findings support the notion that human METCAM/MUC18 expression promotes the progression of human breast cancer cells by increasing their motility, invasiveness and tumorigenesis.

  12. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization. (paper)

  13. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Yu; Huang, Ji-Jer; Huang, Yu-Jie; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization.

  14. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  15. IGF-IR promotes prostate cancer growth by stabilizing α5β1 integrin protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aejaz Sayeed

    Full Text Available Dynamic crosstalk between growth factor receptors, cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix is essential for cancer cell migration and invasion. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix proteins and enable cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization. They also mediate signal transduction to regulate cell proliferation and survival. The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR mediates tumor cell growth, adhesion and inhibition of apoptosis in several types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that β1 integrins regulate anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer (PrCa cells by regulating IGF-IR expression and androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional functions. Furthermore, we have recently reported that IGF-IR regulates the expression of β1 integrins in PrCa cells. We have dissected the mechanism through which IGF-IR regulates β1 integrin expression in PrCa. Here we report that IGF-IR is crucial for PrCa cell growth and that β1 integrins contribute to the regulation of proliferation by IGF-IR. We demonstrate that β1 integrin regulation by IGF-IR does not occur at the mRNA level. Exogenous expression of a CD4 - β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain chimera does not interfere with such regulation and fails to stabilize β1 integrin expression in the absence of IGF-IR. This appears to be due to the lack of interaction between the β1 cytoplasmic domain and IGF-IR. We demonstrate that IGF-IR stabilizes the β1 subunit by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. The α5 subunit, one of the binding partners of β1, is also downregulated along with β1 upon IGF-IR knockdown while no change is observed in the expression of the α2, α3, α4, α6 and α7 subunits. Our results reveal a crucial mechanistic role for the α5β1 integrin, downstream of IGF-IR, in regulating cancer growth.

  16. Effect of nerve growth factor and fibroblast growth factor on PC12 cells: inhibition by orthovanadate

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, causes increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation and blocks, at noncytotoxic concentrations, the differentiative response of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to beta-nerve growth factor (beta NGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a reversible manner. It also prevents growth factor-induced neurite proliferation in primed cells and causes the retraction of previously formed neurites, even in the presence of bet...

  17. Constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity substitutes for p53 loss, or MYC or oncogenic RAS expression in the transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Junk

    Full Text Available Cancer develops following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that inactivate tumor suppressor genes and activate proto-oncogenes. Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK activity has oncogenic potential in breast cancer due to its ability to inactivate key tumor suppressor networks and drive aberrant proliferation. Accumulation or over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1 occurs in a majority of breast cancers and over-expression of CCND1 leads to accumulation of activated CCND1/CDK2 complexes in breast cancer cells. We describe here the role of constitutively active CCND1/CDK2 complexes in human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation. A genetically-defined, stepwise HMEC transformation model was generated by inhibiting p16 and p53 with shRNA, and expressing exogenous MYC and mutant RAS. By replacing components of this model, we demonstrate that constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity effectively confers anchorage independent growth by inhibiting p53 or replacing MYC or oncogenic RAS expression. These findings are consistent with several clinical observations of luminal breast cancer sub-types that show elevated CCND1 typically occurs in specimens that retain wild-type p53, do not amplify MYC, and contain no RAS mutations. Taken together, these data suggest that targeted inhibition of constitutive CCND1/CDK2 activity may enhance the effectiveness of current treatments for luminal breast cancer.

  18. Delivery of Therapeutics Targeting the mRNA-Binding Protein HuR Using 3DNA Nanocarriers Suppresses Ovarian Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Peng, Weidan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Gerhart, Jacquelyn; Rhodes, Kelly; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Jimbo, Masaya; Gonye, Gregory E; Brody, Jonathan R; Getts, Robert C; Sawicki, Janet A

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence shows that cancer cells use mRNA-binding proteins and miRNAs to posttranscriptionally regulate signaling pathways to adapt to harsh tumor microenvironments. In ovarian cancer, cytoplasmic accumulation of mRNA-binding protein HuR (ELAVL1) is associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we observed high HuR expression in ovarian cancer cells compared with ovarian primary cells, providing a rationale for targeting HuR. RNAi-mediated silencing of HuR in ovarian cancer cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, and impaired migration and invasion. In addition, HuR-depleted human ovarian xenografts were smaller than control tumors. A biodistribution study showed effective tumor-targeting by a novel Cy3-labeled folic acid (FA)-derivatized DNA dendrimer nanocarrier (3DNA). We combined siRNAs against HuR with FA-3DNA and found that systemic administration of the resultant FA-3DNA-siHuR conjugates to ovarian tumor-bearing mice suppressed tumor growth and ascites development, significantly prolonging lifespan. NanoString gene expression analysis identified multiple HuR-regulated genes that function in many essential cellular and molecular pathways, an attractive feature of candidate therapeutic targets. Taken together, these results are the first to demonstrate the versatility of the 3DNA nanocarrier for in vivo-targeted delivery of a cancer therapeutic and support further preclinical investigation of this system adapted to siHuR-targeted therapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:26921342

  19. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Gong

    Full Text Available Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency, hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  20. Can Insulin Production Suppress β Cell Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vas, Matias; Ferrer, Jorge

    2016-01-12

    While insulin has mitogenic effects in many cell types, its effects on β cells remain elusive. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Szabat et al. (2015) genetically block insulin production in adult β cells and show that this leads to a relief of ER stress, AKT activation, and increased β cell proliferation. PMID:26771111

  1. Downregulation of COMMD1 by miR-205 promotes a positive feedback loop for amplifying inflammatory- and stemness-associated properties of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, D-W; Chen, Y-S; Lai, C-Y; Liu, Y-L; Lu, C-H; Lo, J-F; Chen, L; Hsu, L-C; Luo, Y; Xiang, R; Chuang, T-H

    2016-05-01

    Sustained activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in cancer cells has been shown to promote inflammation, expansion of cancer stem cell (CSC) population, and tumor development. In contrast, recent studies reveal that CSCs exhibit increased inflammation due to constitutive NF-κB activation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, the analysis of microarray data revealed upregulation of NF-κB-regulated pro-inflammatory genes and downregulation of copper metabolism MURR1 domain-containing 1 (COMMD1) during the enrichment for stemness in SAS head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The 3'-UTR of COMMD1 mRNA contains microRNA (miR)-205 target site. Parallel studies with HNSCC and NSCLC cells indicated that miR-205 is upregulated upon NF-κB activation and suppresses COMMD1 expression in stemness-enriched cancer cells. COMMD1 negatively regulates the inflammatory responses induced by TLR agonists, IL-1β, and TNF-α by targeting RelA for degradation. The shRNA-mediated downregulation of COMMD1 in cancer cells enhanced inflammatory response, generating favorable conditions for macrophage recruitment. In addition, genes associated with stemness were also upregulated in these cells, which exhibited increased potential for anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, COMMD1 downregulation promoted in vivo tumorigenesis and tumor growth, and tumors derived from COMMD1-knockdown cells displayed elevated level of NF-κB activation, increased expression of inflammatory- and stemness-associated genes, and contain expanded population of tumor-associated leukocytes and stemness-enriched cancer cells. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulation by miR-205 promotes tumor development by modulating a positive feedback loop that amplifies inflammatory- and stemness-associated properties of cancer cells. PMID:26586569

  2. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  3. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  4. Characterization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 overexpression in the human breast cancer cell line SUM-52PE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    three times more transformed foci in soft agar than C1 variants (both IIIb), whereas full length FGFR2 and FGFR1 (both IIIc variants) showed no transforming activity [4]. Previous studies [5,6] have found amplification and overexpression of FGFR2 in 5-10% of primary breast cancer specimens. A recent study [7] done using a tissue array consisting of 372 primary breast cancer specimens found a 5% incidence of FGFR2 amplification. To our knowledge, none of the HBC cell lines studied thus far have an FGFR2 gene amplification, although overexpression of FGFR2 message and protein has been documented for some breast cancer cell lines [6,8,9]. SUM-52PE is a breast cancer cell line previously isolated in our laboratory that grows under serum-free and epidermal growth factor-free conditions, has high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated membrane proteins, and has the capacity to invade and grow under anchorage-independent conditions [10,11,12]. This cell line exhibits all of the important hallmarks of transformed, highly malignant cells. Therefore, SUM-52PE was used as a model to study the diversity of FGFR2 expression in a breast cancer cell line that has true amplification and overexpression of FGFR2. This study was conducted to examine the degree of FGFR2 amplification and overexpression in the breast cancer cell line SUM-52PE. Subsequent sequencing and characterization of individual FGFR2 variants cloned from the SUM-52PE cell line was completed to determine the complexity of FGFR2 alternative splicing in the context of a highly metastatic breast cancer cell line. Southern, Northern and Western blot analyses were done in order to determine the degree of FGFR2 amplification and overexpression in the breast cancer cell line SUM-52PE. Individual FGFR2 variants were cloned out of SUM-52PE using FGFR2-specific primers in a reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). FGFR2 cDNAs were characterized by restriction fragment analysis, sequencing and transient transfection

  5. Cytochrome c oxidase is activated by the oncoprotein Ras and is required for A549 lung adenocarcinoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telang Sucheta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of Ras in immortalized bronchial epithelial cells increases electron transport chain activity, oxygen consumption and tricarboxylic acid cycling through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that members of the Ras family may stimulate respiration by enhancing the expression of the Vb regulatory subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX. Results We found that the introduction of activated H-RasV12 into immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells increased eIF4E-dependent COX Vb protein expression simultaneously with an increase in COX activity and oxygen consumption. In support of the regulation of COX Vb expression by the Ras family, we also found that selective siRNA-mediated inhibition of K-Ras expression in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells reduced COX Vb protein expression, COX activity, oxygen consumption and the steady-state concentration of ATP. We postulated that COX Vb-mediated activation of COX activity may be required for the anchorage-independent growth of A549 cells as soft agar colonies or as lung xenografts. We transfected the A549 cells with COX Vb small interfering or shRNA and observed a significant reduction of their COX activity, oxygen consumption, ATP and ability to grow in soft agar and as poorly differentiated tumors in athymic mice. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that the activation of Ras increases COX activity and mitochondrial respiration in part via up-regulation of COX Vb and that this regulatory subunit of COX may have utility as a Ras effector target for the development of anti-neoplastic agents.

  6. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  7. miR-181a shows tumor suppressive effect against oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by downregulating K-ras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → MicroRNA-181a (miR-181a) was frequently downregulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). → Overexpression of miR-181a suppressed OSCC growth. → K-ras is a novel target of miR-181a. → Decreased miR-181a expression is attributed to its lower promoter activity in OSCC. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators of gene expression, and their deregulation plays an important role in human cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recently, we found that miRNA-181a (miR-181a) was upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human oral keratinocytes. Since senescence is considered as a tumor suppressive mechanism, we thus investigated the expression and biological role of miR-181a in OSCC. We found that miR-181a was frequently downregulated in OSCC. Ectopic expression of miR-181a suppressed proliferation and anchorage independent growth ability of OSCC. Moreover, miR-181a dramatically reduces the growth of OSCC on three dimensional organotypic raft culture. We also identified K-ras as a novel target of miR-181a. miR-181a decreased K-ras protein level as well as the luciferase activity of reporter vectors containing the 3'-untranslated region of K-ras gene. Finally, we defined a minimal regulatory region of miR-181a and found a positive correlation between its promoter activity and the level of miR-181a expression. In conclusion, miR-181a may function as an OSCC suppressor by targeting on K-ras oncogene. Thus, miR-181a should be considered for therapeutic application for OSCC.

  8. Dihydroartemisinin is an inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang JIAO; Chun-min GE; Qing-hui MENG; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer activity of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a deriva-tive of antimalaria drug artemisinin in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods: Cell growth was determined by the MTT viability assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle progression were evaluated by a DNA fragmentation gel electro-phoresis, flow cytometry assay, and TUNEL assay; protein and mRNA expression were analyzed by Western blotting and RT-PCR assay. Results: Artemisinin and its derivatives, including artesunate, arteether, artemether, arteannuin, and DHA, exhibit anticancer growth activities in human ovarian cancer cells. Among them, DHA is the most effective in inhibiting cell growth. Ovarian cancer cell lines are more sensitive (5-10-fold) to DHA treatment compared to normal ovarian cell lines. DHA at micromolar dose levels exhibits a dose- and time-dependent cyto-toxicity in ovarian cancer cell lines. Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest, accompanied by a decrease of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 and an increase of Bax and Bad. Conclusion: The promising results show for the first time that DHA inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells. The selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth, apoptosis induction, and G2 arrest provide in vitro evidence for further studies of DHA as a possible anticancer drug in the clinical treatment of ovarian cancer.

  9. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  10. Establishment and characterization of two primary breast cancer cell lines from young Indian breast cancer patients: mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandrangi, Santhi Latha; Raju Bagadi, Sarangadhara Appala; Sinha, Navin Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Dada, Rima; Lakhanpal, Meena; Soni, Abha; Malvia, Shreshtha; Simon, Sheeba; Chintamani, Chintamani; Mohil, Ravindar Singh; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Saxena, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Two novel triple negative breast cancer cell lines, NIPBC-1 and NIPBC-2 were successfully established from primary tumors of two young breast cancer patients aged 39 and 38 years respectively, diagnosed as infiltrating duct carcinoma of breast. Characterization of these cell lines showed luminal origin with expression of epithelial specific antigen and cytokeratin 18 and presence of microfilaments and secretary vesicles, microvilli, tight junctions and desmosomes on ultra-structural analysis. Both the cell lines showed anchorage independent growth and invasion of matrigel coated membranes. Karyotype analysis showed aneuploidy, deletions and multiple rearrangements in chromosomes 7, 9, X and 11 and isochromosomes 17q in both the cell lines. P53 mutational analysis revealed no mutation in the coding region in both the cell lines; however NIPBC-2 cell line showed presence of heterozygous C/G polymorphism, g.417 C > G (NM_000546.5) resulting in Arg/Pro allele at codon 72 of exon 4. Screening for mutations in BRCA1&2 genes revealed presence of three heterozygous polymorphisms in exon 11 of BRCA1 and 2 polymorphisms in exons 11, and14 of BRCA2 gene in both the cell lines. Both the cell lines showed presence of CD 44+/24-breast cancer stem cells and capability of producing mammosphere on culture. The two triple negative breast cancer cell lines established from early onset breast tumors can serve as novel invitro models to study mechanisms underlying breast tumorigenesis in younger age group patients and also identification of new therapeutic modalities targeting cancer stem cells. PMID:24502646

  11. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  12. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette;

    1999-01-01

    Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood litt...

  13. Unregulated miR-96 induces cell proliferation in human breast cancer by downregulating transcriptional factor FOXO3a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanxin Lin

    Full Text Available FOXO transcription factors are key tumor suppressors in mammalian cells. Until now, suppression of FOXOs in cancer cells was thought to be mainly due to activation of multiple onco-kinases by a phosphorylation-ubiquitylation-mediated cascade. Therefore, it was speculated that inhibition of FOXO proteins would naturally occur through a multiple step post-translational process. However, whether cancer cells may downregulate FOXO protein via an alternative regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we report that expression of miR-96 was markedly upregulated in breast cancer cells and breast cancer tissues compared with normal breast epithelial cells (NBEC and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of miR-96 induced the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells, while inhibition of miR-96 reduced this effect. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-96 in breast cancer cells resulted in modulation of their entry into the G1/S transitional phase, which was caused by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors, p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1, and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-96 downregulated FOXO3a expression by directly targeting the FOXO3a 3'-untranslated region. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-96 may play an important role in promoting proliferation of human breast cancer cells and present a novel mechanism of miRNA-mediated direct suppression of FOXO3a expression in cancer cells.

  14. Identification and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Liu, Boping; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Jing Tai, Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than 1 year. Although canonical Wnt pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-catenin, or Axin proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated Wnt signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of Wnt signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to Wnt inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical Wnt signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here, we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced Axin stabilization, increased β-catenin phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized Wnt signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small-molecule-mediated inhibition of Wnt signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  15. Identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Boping, Liu; Mee, Ng Fui; Wen, Then Siew; Jing, Tai Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than one year. Although canonical WNT pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-CATENIN or AXIN proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated WNT signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of WNT signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to WNT inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical WNT signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical WNT signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced AXIN stabilization, increased β-CATENIN phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized WNT signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small molecule-mediated inhibition of WNT signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  16. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  17. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  18. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  19. Cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ion-implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane surface were investigated. Ions of Na+, N2+, O2+, Ar+ and Kr+ were implanted to the polymer surface with ion fluences between 1 x 1015 and 3 x 1017 ions/cm2 at energy of 150 KeV at room temperature. Ion-implanted polymers were characterized by FT-IR-ATR an Raman spectroscopies. The adhesion and proliferation of bovine aorta endothelial cells on ion-implanted polymer surface were observed by an optical microscope. The rate of growth of BAECs on ion-implanted PSt was faster than that on non-implanted PSt. Complete cell adhesion and growth were observed on ion-implanted SPU, whereas the adhesion and growth of BAECs on the non-implanted SPU was not observed. It was attempted to control the cell culture on the ion-implanted domain fabricated using a mask. (author)

  20. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  1. Adaptation to optimal cell growth through self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-18

    A simple cell model consisting of a catalytic reaction network is studied to show that cellular states are self-organized in a critical state for achieving optimal growth; we consider the catalytic network dynamics over a wide range of environmental conditions, through the spontaneous regulation of nutrient transport into the cell. Furthermore, we find that the adaptability of cellular growth to reach a critical state depends only on the extent of environmental changes, while all chemical species in the cell exhibit correlated partial adaptation. These results are in remarkable agreement with the recent experimental observations of the present cells. PMID:23003193

  2. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  3. Peptide immobilized on gold particles enhances cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jiansheng; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    A multivalent ligand of thrombopoietin (TPO) was prepared by immobilization of mimetic peptides on gold particles. An effective peptide ligand containing cysteine was designed to enhance the growth of TPO-sensitive cells. The peptide was then immobilized on gold particles by self assembly. The multivalent ligand enhanced the growth of TPO-dependent cells and its activity was more than that of the monovalent ligand.

  4. Fibronectin promotes rat Schwann cell growth and motility

    OpenAIRE

    Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne; Kleinman, Hinda K.; Seppa, H. E.; Rentier, Bernard; Dubois-Dalcq, Monique

    1982-01-01

    Techniques are now available for culturing well characterized and purified Schwann cells. Therefore, we investigated the role of fibronectin in the adhesion, growth, and migration of cultured rat Schwann cells. Double-immunolabeling shows that, in primary cultures of rat sciatic nerve, Schwann cells (90%) rarely express fibronectin, whereas fibroblasts (10%) exhibit a granular cytoplasmic and fibrillar surface-associated fibronectin. Secondary cultures of purified Schwann cells do not express...

  5. Effect of antisense gene of type Ⅱ insulin-like growth factor receptor on malignant phenotype of human hepatoma cells in vitro%人胰岛素样生长因子Ⅱ型受体反义基因对肝癌细胞恶性表型的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文生; 刘为纹; 顾健人; 周筱梅; 周子成; 房殿春; 杨建民

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the reverse effect on the malignant phenotypeof human hepatoma cells transfected with typeⅡ insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-ⅡR) antisense gene. Methods After the recombinant plasmids containing IGF-ⅡR sense and antisense genes which could be expressed in eukaryotic cells were constructed, they were transferred into human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 with calcium phosphate co-precipitation, and selected in DMEM supplemented with 500 μg/ml G418 (Geneticin) for 2~3 weeks and the total number of formed colonies was counted. The effect of IGF-ⅡR antisense gene transfection on endogenous IGF-ⅡR mRNA levels was examined with Northern blot, and the effects on the cell growth rate, the colony formation of the transfected cells in soft agar medium and the tumorigenic capacity in nude mice were also examined. Results The hepatoma cells transfected with IGF-ⅡR antisense gene exhibited a significant reduction in endogenous IGF-ⅡR mRNA levels and a loss of their ability for anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Their tumorigenicity in nude mice was also decreased. The IGF-ⅡR antisense gene suppressed the colony formation of 7721 cells resistant to G418 without alteration on cell growth curve. Conclusion The IGF-ⅡR antisense gene effectively blocks the autocrine and/or paracrine signal transduction pathway of IGF-Ⅱ to IGF-ⅡR and inhibit the cell malignant phenotype to some extent.%目的 研究人胰岛素样生长因子Ⅱ型受体(IGF-ⅡR)反义基因对SMMC-7721人肝癌细胞恶性表型的逆转作用。方法构建IGF-ⅡR正、反义基因真核表达质粒,用磷酸钙-DNA共沉淀的方法,导入SMMC-7721人肝癌细胞株,经G418培养基筛选稳定的抗性细胞。采用Northern杂交检测对转染细胞内源性IGF-ⅡR基因转录的抑制,观察转染细胞克隆形成率,细胞生长曲线,软琼脂生长及裸鼠致瘤能力的变化。结果 IGF-ⅡR反义基因转染肝癌细胞的

  6. 17β-estradiol exerts anticancer effects in anoikis-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines by targeting IL-6/STAT3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seulki; Lee, Minjong; Kim, Jong Bin; Jo, Ara; Cho, Eun Ju; Yu, Su Jong; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2016-05-13

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been proven to exert protective effects against HCC; however, its mechanism on HCC proliferation and suppression of invasion remains to be further explored. Because HCC up-regulates serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), molecular agents that attenuate IL-6/STAT3 signaling can potentially suppress HCC development. In this study, we examined involvement of E2 in anoikis resistance that induces invasion capacities and chemo-resistance. Huh-BAT and HepG2 cells grown under anchorage-independent condition were selected. The anoikis-resistant (AR) cells showed stronger chemo-resistance against sorafenib, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin compared to adherent HCC cells. AR HCC cells exhibited decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the N-cadherin and vimentin compared to adherent HCC cells. We then demonstrated that E2 suppressed cell proliferation in AR HCC cells. IL-6 treatment enhanced invasive characteristics, and E2 reversed it. Regarding mechanism of E2, it decreased in the phosphorylation of STAT3 that overexpressed on AR HCC cells. The inhibitory effect of E2 on cell growth was accompanied with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and caspase-3/9/PARP activation through c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings suggested that E2 inhibited the proliferation of AR HCC cells through down-regulation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Thus, E2 can be a potential therapeutic drug for treatment of metastatic or chemo-resistant HCC. PMID:27091428

  7. Establishment and characterization of a human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line derived from an Italian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalloni, Giuliana; Peraldo-Neia, Caterina; Varamo, Chiara; Casorzo, Laura; Dell'Aglio, Carmine; Bernabei, Paola; Chiorino, Giovanna; Aglietta, Massimo; Leone, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Biliary tract carcinoma is a rare malignancy with multiple causes, which underlie the different genetic and molecular profiles. Cancer cell lines are affordable models, reflecting the characteristics of the tumor of origin. They represent useful tools to identify molecular targets for treatment. Here, we established and characterized from biological, molecular, and genetic point of view, an Italian intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line (ICC), the MT-CHC01. MT-CHC01 cells were isolated from a tumor-derived xenograft. Immunophenotypical characterization was evaluated both at early and after stabilization passages. In vitro biological, genetic, and molecular features were also investigated. In vivo tumorigenicity was assessed in NOD/SCID mice. MT-CHC01cells retain epithelial cell markers, EPCAM, CK7, and CK19, and some stemness and pluripotency markers, i.e., SOX2, Nanog, CD49f/integrin-α6, CD24, PDX1, FOXA2, and CD133. They grow as a monolayer, with a population double time of about 40 h; they show a low migration and invasion potential. In low attachment conditions, they are able to form spheres and to growth in anchorage-independent manner. After subcutaneous injection, they retain in vivo tumorigenicity; the expression of biliary markers as CA19-9 and CEA were maintained from primary tumor. The karyotype is highly complex, with a hypotriploid to hypertriploid modal number (3n+/-) (52 to 77 chromosomes); low level of HER2 gene amplification, TP53 deletion, gain of AURKA were identified; K-RAS G12D mutation were maintained from primary tumor to MT-CHC01 cells. We established the first ICC cell line derived from an Italian patient. It will help to study either the biology of this tumor or to test drugs both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26486326

  8. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  9. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  10. REG Iα gene expression is linked with the poor prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients via discrete mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    KIMURA, MICHITAKA; NAITO, HIROSHI; Tojo, Takashi; ITAYA-HIRONAKA, ASAKO; Dohi, Yoshiko; YOSHIMURA, MAMIKO; NAKAGAWARA, KAN-ICHI; Takasawa, Shin; Taniguchi, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the REG Iα and REG Iβ genes on lung cancer cell lines, and thereafter, the expression of REG family genes (REG Iα, REG Iβ, REG III, HIP/PAP and REG IV) in lung cancer in relation to patient prognosis was evaluated. Lung adenocarcinoma (AD) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines expressing REG Iα or REG Iβ (HLC-1 REG Iα/Iβ and EBC-1 REG Iα/Iβ) were established, and cell number, cell invasive activity, and anchorage-independent c...

  11. Cytogenetic characterization and H-ras associated transformation of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larivee Siobhan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Immortalization is a key step in malignant transformation, but immortalization alone is insufficient for transformation. Human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation is a complex process that requires additional genetic changes beyond immortalization and can be accomplished in vitro by accumulation of genetic changes and expression of H-ras. Methods HMEC were immortalized by serial passaging and transduction with the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase gene (hTERT. The immortalized cells were passaged in vitro and studied by a combination of G- banding and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY. H-ras transduced, hTERT immortalized cells were cloned in soft agar and injected into nude mice. Extensive analysis was performed on the tumors that developed in nude mice, including immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Results Immortal HMEC alone were not tumorigenic in γ-irradiated nude mice and could not grow in soft agar. Late passage hTERT immortalized HMEC from a donor transduced with a retroviral vector containing the mutant, autoactive, human H-ras61L gene acquired anchorage independent growth properties and the capacity for tumorigenic growth in vivo. The tumors that developed in the nude mice were poorly differentiated epithelial carcinomas that continued to overexpress ras. These cells were resistant to doxorubicin mediated G1/S phase arrest but were sensitive to treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Conclusion Some of the cytogenetic changes are similar to what is observed in premalignant and malignant breast lesions. Despite these changes, late passage immortal HMEC are not tumorigenic and could only be transformed with overexpression of a mutant H-ras oncogene.

  12. Combined drug action of 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives on cancer cells according to their oncogenic molecular signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Furlan

    Full Text Available The development of targeted molecular therapies has provided remarkable advances into the treatment of human cancers. However, in most tumors the selective pressure triggered by anticancer agents encourages cancer cells to acquire resistance mechanisms. The generation of new rationally designed targeting agents acting on the oncogenic path(s at multiple levels is a promising approach for molecular therapies. 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives have been highlighted for their properties of targeting oncogenic Met receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signaling. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism of action of one of the most active imidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazol-2-ylphenyl moiety-based agents, Triflorcas, on a panel of cancer cells with distinct features. We show that Triflorcas impairs in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis of cancer cells carrying Met mutations. Moreover, Triflorcas hampers survival and anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells characterized by "RTK swapping" by interfering with PDGFRβ phosphorylation. A restrained effect of Triflorcas on metabolic genes correlates with the absence of major side effects in vivo. Mechanistically, in addition to targeting Met, Triflorcas alters phosphorylation levels of the PI3K-Akt pathway, mediating oncogenic dependency to Met, in addition to Retinoblastoma and nucleophosmin/B23, resulting in altered cell cycle progression and mitotic failure. Our findings show how the unusual binding plasticity of the Met active site towards structurally different inhibitors can be exploited to generate drugs able to target Met oncogenic dependency at distinct levels. Moreover, the disease-oriented NCI Anticancer Drug Screen revealed that Triflorcas elicits a unique profile of growth inhibitory-responses on cancer cell lines, indicating a novel mechanism of drug action. The anti-tumor activity elicited by 2-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]benzothiazole derivatives through combined inhibition of distinct effectors in

  13. Nerve growth factor-induced alteration in the response of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells to epidermal growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, K; End, D; Guroff, G

    1981-01-01

    PC12 cells, which differentiate morphologically and biochemically into sympathetic neruonlike cells in response to nerve growth fact, also respond to epidermal growth factor. The response to epidermal growth factor is similar in certain respects to the response to nerve growth fact. Both peptides produce rapid increases in cellular adhesion and 2-deoxyglucose uptake and both induce ornithine decarboxylase. But nerve growth factor causes a decreased cell proliferation and a marked hypertrophy ...

  14. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  15. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A functions to repress FoxO transcription factors to allow cell cycle progression in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huanjie; Mohamed, Esraa M; Xu, Guoyan G; Waters, Michael; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Zhang, Yan; Spiegel, Sarah; Idowu, Michael O; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-26

    Cancer cells rely on hyperactive de novo lipid synthesis for maintaining malignancy. Recent studies suggest involvement in cancer of fatty acid oxidation, a process functionally opposite to lipogenesis. A mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to oncogenic processes is yet to be established. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) that catalyzes the transfer of long-chain acyl group of the acyl-CoA ester to carnitine, thereby shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPT1A was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian serous carcinomas. Overexpression of CPT1A correlated with a poor overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. Inactivation of CPT1A decreased cellular ATP levels and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, suggesting that ovarian cancer cells depend on or are addicted to CPT1A-mediated FAO for cell cycle progression. CPT1A deficiency also suppressed anchorage-independent growth and formation of xenografts from ovarian cancer cell lines. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 (p21) was identified as most consistently and robustly induced cell cycle regulator upon inactivation of CPT1A. Furthermore, p21 was transcriptionally upregulated by the FoxO transcription factors, which were in turn phosphorylated and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK and p38. Our results established the oncogenic relevance of CPT1A and a mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to cell cycle regulation, suggesting that CPT1A could be a prognostic biomarker and rational target for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:26716645

  16. In vivo overexpression of tumstatin domains by tumor cells inhibits their invasive properties in a mouse melanoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies demonstrated that a synthetic peptide encompassing residues 185-203 of the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen, named tumstatin, inhibits in vitro melanoma cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, B16F1 melanoma cells were stably transfected to overexpress the complete tumstatin domain (Tum 1-232) or its C-terminal part, encompassing residues 185-203 (Tum 183-232). Tumstatin domain overexpression inhibited B16F1 in vitro cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasive properties. For studying the in vivo effect of overexpression, representative clones were subcutaneously injected into the left side of C57BL6 mice. In vivo tumor growth was decreased by -60% and -56%, respectively, with B16F1 cells overexpressing Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 compared to control cells. This inhibitory effect was associated with a decrease of in vivo cyclin D1 expression. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of Tum 1-232 or Tum 183-232 induced an in vivo down-regulation of proteolytic cascades involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially the production or activation of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13, as well as MMP-14. The plasminogen activation system was also altered in tumors with a decrease of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and a strong increase of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumstatin or its C-terminal antitumor fragment, Tum 183-232, inhibits in vivo melanoma progression by triggering an intracellular transduction pathway, which involves a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent mechanism

  17. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both 125I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product

  18. In vitro effects of recombinant human growth hormone on growth of human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yong Chen; Dao-Ming Liang; Ping Gan; Yi Zhang; Jie Lin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth of human gastric cancer cell line in vitro.METHODS: Experiment was divided into control group,rhGH group, oxaliplatin (L-OHP) group and rhGH+L-OHP group. Cell inhibitory rate, cell cycle, cell proliferation index (PI) and DNA inhibitory rate of human gastric cancer line BGC823, at different concentrations of rhGH treatment were studied by cell culture, MTT assay and flow cytometry.RESULTS: The distinctly accelerated effects of rhGH on multiplication of BGC823 cell line were not found in vitro.There was no statistical significance between rhGH group and control group, or between rhGH+L-OHP group and LOHP group (P>0.05). The cell growth curve did not rise.Cell inhibitory rate and cells arrested in G0-G1 phase were obviously increased. Meanwhile, cells in S phase and PI were distinctly decreased and DNA inhibitory rate was obviously increased in rhGH+L-OHP group in comparison with control group and rhGH group, respectively (P<0.01).Cell inhibitory rate showed an increasing trend and PI showed a decreasing trend in rhGH+L-OHP group compared with L-OHP group.CONCLUSION: In vitro rhGH does not accelerate the multiplication of human gastric cancer cells. It may increase the therapeutic efficacy when it is used in combination with anticancer drugs.

  19. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    ammonium malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities...

  20. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75NTR, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75NTR. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75NTR. This latter signaling through p75NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  1. Preparing T Cell Growth Factor from Rat Splenocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Beeton, Christine; Chandy, K. George

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance of antigen-specific T cell lines or clones in culture requires rounds of antigen-induced activation separated by phases of cell expansion 1,2. Addition of interleukin 2 to the culture media during the expansion phase is necessary to prevent cell death and sufficient to maintain short-term T cell lines but has been shown to increase Th1 polarization 3. Replacement of interleukin 2 by T cell growth factor (TCGF) which contains a mix of cytokines is more effective than interleukin 2...

  2. Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin [DDP, cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II)], a strong cytostatic and antineoplastic agent, was tested on seedlings of cucumber Cucumis sativus L. for its general effect on root development and its particular effects on root cell division and cell growth. DDP was characterized as a radiomimetic compound since both DDP (1·3 × 10-5 M) and γ-irradiation (2·5-10 kGy) drastically and irreversibly stopped development of embryonic lateral root primordia (LRPs) in the radicle by inhibiting both mitotic activity and cell growth. In 20% of the LRPs of DDP-treated roots, cells did not divide at all. Dividing cells completed no more than two cell cycles. These effects were specific because when DDP was available to the roots only at the onset of cell division, cell proliferation and cell growth were similar to that produced by constant incubation. Neither DDP nor γ-irradiation affected non-meristematic cell elongation. It was concluded that cell growth of meristematic cells is closely related to cell division. However, non-meristematic cell growth is independent of DNA damage. This suggests DDP as a tool to reveal these autonomous processes in plants development and to detect tissue compartments in mature plant embryos which contain potentially non-meristematic cells. (author)

  3. Meloxicam inhibits the growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A P; Williams, C S; Sheng, H; Lamps, L W; Williams, V P; Pairet, M; Morrow, J D; DuBois, R N

    1998-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 has been reported to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The effects of meloxicam (a COX-2 inhibitor) on the growth of two colon cancer cell lines that express COX-2 (HCA-7 and Moser-S) and a COX-2 negative cell line (HCT-116) were evaluated. The growth rate of these cells was measured following treatment with meloxicam. HCA-7 and Moser-S colony size were significantly reduced following treatment with meloxicam; however, there was no significant change in HCT-116 colony size with treatment. In vivo studies were performed to evaluate the effect of meloxicam on the growth of HCA-7 cells when xenografted into nude mice. We observed a 51% reduction in tumor size after 4 weeks of treatment. Analysis of COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels in HCA-7 tumor lysates revealed a slight decrease in COX-2 expression levels in tumors taken from mice treated with meloxicam and no detectable COX-1 expression. Here we report that meloxicam significantly inhibited HCA-7 colony and tumor growth but had no effect on the growth of the COX-2 negative HCT-116 cells. PMID:9886578

  4. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  5. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Mollet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed.

  6. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Labuda, Tord; Zhang, Qian; Mathiesen, Anne-Merethe; Geisler, Carsten; Svejgaard, Arne; Wasik, Mariusz A; Odum, Niels

    2007-01-01

    malignant CTCL cells express MHC class II molecules that are high-affinity receptors for SE. Although treatment with SE has no direct effect on the growth of the malignant CTCL cells, the SE-treated CTCL cells induce vigorous proliferation of the SE-responsive nonmalignant T cells. In turn, the nonmalignant......-promoting effect depends on direct cell-cell contact and soluble factors such as interleukin-2. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SE triggers a bidirectional cross talk between nonmalignant T cells and malignant CTCL cells that promotes growth of the malignant cells. This represents a novel mechanism by which...

  7. The chromaffin cell: paradigm in cell, developmental and growth factor biology.

    OpenAIRE

    Unsicker, K

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews the chromaffin cell in relation to studies that have elucidated fundamental phenomena in cell biology (the molecular anatomy of exocytosis) and developmental neuroscience (the principle of neuropoiesis in the development of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage). A final section addresses growth factor synthesis and storage in chromaffin cells and their implications for the treatment of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

  8. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N. (Merck)

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  9. The role of stem cells in midgut growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R S; Baldwin, K M; Loeb, M

    2001-06-01

    The Manduca sexta (L.) [Lepidoptera: Sphingidae] and Heliothis virescens (F.) [Lepidoptera: Noctuidae] midguts consist of a pseudostratified epithelium surrounded by striated muscle and tracheae. This epithelium contains goblet, columnar, and basal stem cells. The stem cells are critically important in that they are capable of massive proliferation and differentiation. This growth results in a fourfold enlargement of the midgut at each larval molt. The stem cells are also responsible for limited cell replacement during repair. While the characteristics of the stem cell population vary over the course of an instar, stem cells collected early in an instar and those collected late can start in vitro cultures. Cultures of larval stem, goblet, and columnar cells survive in vitro for several mo through proliferation and differentiation of the stem cells. One of the two polypeptide differentiation factors which have been identified and characterized from the culture medium has now been shown to be present in midgut in vivo. Thus the ability to examine lepidopteran midgut stem cell growth in vitro and in vivo is proving to be effective in determining the basic features of stem cell action and regulation. PMID:11515964

  10. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  11. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Bretlau, P

    1993-01-01

    Forty oral squamous cell carcinomas have been investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). The same cases were recently characterized for the expression of EGF-receptors. TGF-alpha was detected with a...... monoclonal mouse antibody and EGF with polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Thirty-five of the tumours were positive for TGF-alpha and 26 of the tumours for EGF. None of the poorly differentiated tumours was positive for EGF, but they all were for TGF-alpha. In sections including normal differentiated oral mucosa......, the cells above the basal cell layer were positive for both TGF-alpha and EGF. The same staining pattern was observed in oral mucosa obtained from healthy persons. In moderately to well differentiated carcinomas, the immunoreactivity was mainly confined to the cytologically more differentiated cells...

  12. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Haiwei Zhang; Kaiming Zhang; Xinyu Wang; Shipu Li; Yixia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Sc hwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more signiifcantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not signiifcantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

  13. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable ef...

  14. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  15. The RUNX2 Transcription Factor Negatively Regulates SIRT6 Expression to Alter Glucose Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Moran; Brusgard, Jessica L; Chumsri, Saranya; Bhandary, Lekhana; Zhao, Xianfeng Frank; Lu, Song; Goloubeva, Olga G; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary M; Girnun, Geoffrey D; Kim, Myoung Sook; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Activation of genes promoting aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The RUNX2 transcription factor mediates breast cancer (BC) metastasis to bone and is regulated by glucose availability. But, the mechanisms by which it regulates glucose metabolism and promotes an oncogenic phenotype are not known. RUNX2 expression in luminal BC cells correlated with lower estrogen receptor-α (ERα) levels, anchorage-independent growth, expression of glycolytic genes, increased glucose uptake, and sensitivity to glucose starvation, but not to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Conversely, RUNX2 knockdown in triple-negative BC cells inhibited mammosphere formation and glucose dependence. RUNX2 knockdown resulted in lower LDHA, HK2, and GLUT1 glycolytic gene expression, but upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase-A1 (PDHA1) mRNA and enzymatic activity, which was consistent with lower glycolytic potential. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, SIRT6, a known tumor suppressor, was a critical regulator of these RUNX2-mediated metabolic changes. RUNX2 expression resulted in elevated pAkt, HK2, and PDHK1 glycolytic protein levels that were reduced by ectopic expression of SIRT6. RUNX2 also repressed mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCR), a measure of oxidative phosphorylation (respiration). Overexpression of SIRT6 increased respiration in RUNX2-positive cells, but knockdown of SIRT6 in cells expressing low RUNX2 decreased respiration. RUNX2 repressed SIRT6 expression at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels and endogenous SIRT6 expression was lower in malignant BC tissues or cell lines that expressed high levels of RUNX2. These results support a hypothesis whereby RUNX2-mediated repression of the SIRT6 tumor suppressor regulates metabolic pathways that promote BC progression. PMID:25808624

  16. Morphological and Cell Growth Assessment in Near Dense Hydroxyapatite Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Florencia Edith Wiria; Bee Yen Tay; Elaheh Ghassemieh

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results on the morphology of low porosity hydroxyapatite scaffold and its compatibility as a substrate for osteoblast cells. Although having low porosity, the hydroxyapatite scaffold was found to be capable of sustaining cell growth and thus assisting bone ingrowth. Due to the low porosity nature, the scaffold provides higher strength and therefore more suitable for applications with load-bearing requirements such as spinal spacer. The hydroxyapatite scaffol...

  17. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  18. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  19. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  20. Distribution and number of epidermal growth factor receptors in skin is related to epithelial cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Basketter, D A; Couchman, J R;

    1983-01-01

    EGF. EGF receptors are detected on the epithelial cells overlying the basement membranes of the epidermis, sebaceous gland, and regions of the hair follicle all of which have proliferative capacity. In marked contrast, tissues which have started to differentiate and lost their growth potential, carry...... in the spatial and temporal control of epithelial proliferation....

  1. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Telomerase Activity in Osteosarcoma Cells by DN-hTERT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; RAO Yaojian; ZHU Wentao; GUO Fengjin

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effects of dominant negative human telomerase reverse transcriptase (DN-hTERT) on cell growth and telomerase activity in osteosarcoma cell line MG63, MG63 cells were transfected with DN-hTERT-IRES2-EGFP9 (DN) or IRES2-EGF (I, blank vector) with lipofectamine 2000. The stably transfected cells were selected with G-418. Cell growth properties were examined under a fluorescence microscope. The hTERT mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Telomerase activities were measured by TRAP-ELISE. The tumorigenicity was studied with tumor xenografts by subcutaneous injection of cancer cells into nude mice. The results showed that cell growth was suppressed in MG63 cells transfected with DN-hTERT. The hTERT mRNA was increased in N-hTERT transfected-MG63 cells (MG63/DN). The telomerase activity was 2.45±0.11 in MG63/DN cells, while 3.40±0.12 in the cells transfected with blank vector (MG63/I), (P<0.05); DN-hTERT-expressing clones did not form tumors in 2 weeks, but the ratio of tumorigenesis was 30 % in nude mice bearing MG63/I (P<0.01). It was concluded that DN-hTERT could specifically inhibit the cell growth and telomerase activity in MG63 cells.

  2. STAMP alters the growth of transformed and ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steroid receptors play major roles in the development, differentiation, and homeostasis of normal and malignant tissue. STAMP is a novel coregulator that not only enhances the ability of p160 coactivator family members TIF2 and SRC-1 to increase gene induction by many of the classical steroid receptors but also modulates the potency (or EC50) of agonists and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids. These modulatory activities of STAMP are not limited to gene induction but are also observed for receptor-mediated gene repression. However, a physiological role for STAMP remains unclear. The growth rate of HEK293 cells stably transfected with STAMP plasmid and overexpressing STAMP protein is found to be decreased. We therefore asked whether different STAMP levels might also contribute to the abnormal growth rates of cancer cells. Panels of different stage human cancers were screened for altered levels of STAMP mRNA. Those cancers with the greatest apparent changes in STAMP mRNA were pursued in cultured cancer cell lines. Higher levels of STAMP are shown to have the physiologically relevant function of reducing the growth of HEK293 cells but, unexpectedly, in a steroid-independent manner. STAMP expression was examined in eight human cancer panels. More extensive studies of ovarian cancers suggested the presence of higher levels of STAMP mRNA. Lowering STAMP mRNA levels with siRNAs alters the proliferation of several ovarian cancer tissue culture lines in a cell line-specific manner. This cell line-specific effect of STAMP is not unique and is also seen for the conventional effects of STAMP on glucocorticoid receptor-regulated gene transactivation. This study indicates that a physiological function of STAMP in several settings is to modify cell growth rates in a manner that can be independent of steroid hormones. Studies with eleven tissue culture cell lines of ovarian cancer revealed a cell line-dependent effect of reduced STAMP mRNA on cell growth rates. This cell

  3. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews Justen; Przytycka Teresa M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  4. Toxicology across scales: Cell population growth in vitro predicts reduced fish growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnicka-Michalak, Julita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2015-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is essential but often relies on ethically controversial and expensive methods. We show that tests using cell cultures, combined with modeling of toxicological effects, can replace tests with juvenile fish. Hundreds of thousands of fish at this developmental stage are annually used to assess the influence of chemicals on growth. Juveniles are more sensitive than adult fish, and their growth can affect their chances to survive and reproduce. Thus, to reduce the number of fish used for such tests, we propose a method that can quantitatively predict chemical impact on fish growth based on in vitro data. Our model predicts reduced fish growth in two fish species in excellent agreement with measured in vivo data of two pesticides. This promising step toward alternatives to fish toxicity testing is simple, inexpensive, and fast and only requires in vitro data for model calibration. PMID:26601229

  5. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  6. Human papillomavirus 18 E6 inhibits phosphorylation of p53 expressed in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Amrendra K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In HPV infected cells p53 function is abrogated by E6 and even ectopically expressed p53 is unable to perform tumor suppressor functions. In addition to facilitating its degradation, E6 may also inhibit p53 transactivity, though the mechanisms are still poorly understood. It has been reported that inhibition of p300, an acetyltransferase responsible for p53 acetylation is inactivated by E6. Activation of overexpressed p53 to cause cell growth inhibition is facilitated by its phosphorylation. Previously, we reported that non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 in HeLa cells needs to be phosphorylated to perform its cell growth inhibitory functions. Since over expressed p53 by itself was not activated, we hypothesized an inhibitory role for E6. Results Majority of reports proposes E6 mediated degradation of p53 as a possible reason for its inactivation. However, results presented here for the first time demonstrate that overexpressed p53 is not directly associated with E6 and therefore free, yet it is not functionally active in HPV positive cells. Also, the stability of overexpressed p53 does not seem to be an issue because inhibition of proteasomal degradation did not increase the half-life of overexpressed p53, which is more than endogenous p53. However, inhibition of proteasomal degradation prevents the degradation of endogenous p53. These findings suggest that overexpressed p53 and endogenous p53 are differentially subjected to proteasomal degradation and the reasons for this discrepancy remain unclear. Our studies demonstrate that p53 over expression has no effect on anchorage independent cell-growth and E6 nullifies its cell growth inhibitory effect. E6 overexpression abrogates OA induced p53 occupancy on the p21 promoter and cell death as well. E6 did not decrease p53 protein but phospho-p53 level was significantly reduced. Conclusion We report for the first time that E6 de-activates p53 by inhibiting its phosphorylation

  7. Deregulation of histone lysine methyltransferases contributes to oncogenic transformation of human bronchoepithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoda Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in the processing of the genetic information in carcinogenesis result from stable genetic mutations or epigenetic modifications. It is becoming clear that nucleosomal histones are central to proper gene expression and that aberrant DNA methylation of genes and histone methylation plays important roles in tumor progression. To date, several histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs have been identified and histone lysine methylation is now considered to be a critical regulator of transcription. However, still relatively little is known about the role of HKMTs in tumorigenesis. Results We observed differential HKMT expression in a lung cancer model in which normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells expressing telomerase, SV40 large T antigen, and Ras were immortal, formed colonies in soft agar, and expressed specific HKMTs for H3 lysine 9 and 27 residues but not for H3 lysine 4 residue. Modifications in the H3 tails affect the binding of proteins to the histone tails and regulate protein function and the position of lysine methylation marks a gene to be either activated or repressed. In the present study, suppression by siRNA of HKMTs (EZH2, G9A, SETDB1 and SUV39H1 that are over-expressed in immortalized and transformed cells lead to reduced cell proliferation and much less anchorage-independent colony growth. We also found that the suppression of H3-K9, G9A and SUV39H1 induced apoptosis and the suppression of H3-K27, EZH2 caused G1 arrest. Conclusion Our results indicate the potential of these HKMTs in addition to the other targets for epigenetics such as DNMTs and HDACs to be interesting therapeutic targets.

  8. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  9. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs

  10. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  12. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Edouard A.; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected.

  13. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  14. Investigation of the in vitro therapeutic efficacy of nilotinib in immortalized human NF2-null vestibular schwannoma cells.

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    Nesrin Sabha

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas (VS are a common posterior fossa brain tumor, and though benign can cause significant morbidity, particularly loss of hearing, tinnitus, vertigo and facial paralysis. The current treatment options for VS include microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery or close surveillance monitoring, with each treatment option carrying associated complications and morbidities. Most importantly, none of these options can definitively reverse hearing loss or tinnitus. Identification of a novel medical therapy, through the use of targeted molecular inhibition, is therefore a highly desirable treatment strategy that may minimize complications arising from both tumor and treatment and more importantly be suitable for patients whose options are limited with respect to surgical or radiosurgical interventions. In this study we chose to examine the effect of Nilotinib on VS. Nilotinib (Tasigna® is a second-generation receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor with a target profile similar to that of imatinib (Gleevec®, but increased potency, decreased toxicity and greater cellular and tissue penetration. Nilotinib targets not only the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, but also platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptor signalling. In this preclinical study, the human NF2-null schwannoma cell line HEI-193 subjected to nilotinib inhibition demonstrated decreased viability, proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, and increased apoptosis. A daily dose of nilotinib for 5 days inhibited HEI-I93 proliferation at a clinically-relevant concentration in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50 3-5 µmol/L in PDGF-stimulated cells. These anti-tumorigenic effects of nilotinib were correlated to inhibited activation of PDGFR-α and PDGFR-β and major downstream signalling pathways. These experiments support a therapeutic potential for Nilotinib in VS.

  15. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu MY

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Yao Wu,1,* Rong-Rui Liang,1,* Kai Chen,1 Meng Shen,1 Ya-Li Tian,1,2 Dao-Ming Li,1 Wei-Ming Duan,1 Qi Gui,1 Fei-Ran Gong,3 Lian Lian,1,2 Wei Li,1,6 Min Tao1,4–61Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 2Department of Oncology, Suzhou Xiangcheng People’s Hospital, 3Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 4Jiangsu Institute of Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 5Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Soochow University, Suzhou, 6PREMED Key Laboratory for Precision Medicine, Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer.Keywords: pancreatic cancer, FH535, β-catenin, metastasis, growth

  16. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  17. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  18. miR-526a regulates apoptotic cell growth in human carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Cui; Xu, Changzhi; Yan, Zhifeng; Wei, Congwen; Guan, Kai; Ma, Shengli; Cao, Ye; Liu, Liping; Zou, Deyong; He, Xiang; Zhang, Buchang; Ma, Qingjun; Zheng, Zirui

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the regulation of cell cycle, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Our previous studies showed that miR-526a positively regulated innate immune response by suppressing CYLD expression, however, the functional relevance of miR-526a expression and cell growth remains to be evaluated. In this study, miR-526a overexpression was found to promote cancer cell proliferation, migration, and anchor-independent colony formation. The molecular mechanism(s) of miR-526a-mediated growth stimulation is associated with rapid cell cycle progression and inhibition of cell apoptosis by targeting CYLD. Taken together, these results provide evidence to show the stimulatory role of miR-526a in tumor migration and invasion through modulation of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26002288

  19. The in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities of a standardized quassinoids composition from Eurycoma longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kind Leng Tong

    Full Text Available Quassinoids are a group of diterpenoids found in plants from the Simaroubaceae family. They are also the major bioactive compounds found in Eurycoma longifolia which is commonly used as traditional medicine in South East Asia to treat various ailments including sexual dysfunction and infertility. These uses are attributed to its ability to improve testosterone level in men. Chronic consumption of E. longifolia extracts has been reported to increase testosterone level in men and animal model but its effect on prostate growth remains unknown. Therefore, the present study investigates the effects of a standardized total quassinoids composition (SQ40 containing 40% of the total quassinoids found in E. longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. SQ40 inhibited LNCaP cell growth at IC50 value of 5.97 μg/mL while the IC50 on RWPE-1 human prostate normal cells was 59.26 μg/mL. SQ40 also inhibited 5α-dihydrotestosterone-stimulated growth in LNCaP cells dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of SQ40 in anchorage-independent growth of LNCaP cells was also demonstrated using soft agar assay. SQ40 suppressed LNCaP cell growth via G0/G1 phase arrest which was accompanied by the down-regulation of CDK4, CDK2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3 and up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 protein levels. SQ40 at higher concentrations or longer treatment duration can cause G2M growth arrest leading to apoptotic cell death as demonstrated by the detection of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage in LNCaP cells. Moreover, SQ40 also inhibited androgen receptor translocation to nucleus which is important for the transactivation of its target gene, prostate-specific antigen (PSA and resulted in a significant reduction of PSA secretion after the treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal injection of 5 and 10 mg/kg of SQ40 also significantly suppressed the LNCaP tumor growth on mouse xenograft model. Results from the present study suggest that the standardized total quassinoids

  20. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  1. Autoradiographic investigations on cell shape-mediated growth regulation of lens epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic method is described which is well suited for the determination of the labelling index in flattened as well as rounded cells. Using this method DNA synthesis of lens epithelial cells in culture was found to be dependent on cell attachment, cell flattening and intact microfilaments. Thus previous results on cell shape-mediated growth regulation could be confirmed. Moreover, considering the labelling index it was possible to conclude that cell rounding or a disintegration of microfilaments did not impair ongoing DNA synthesis but did prevent cells from entering the S-phase of the cycle. (author)

  2. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  3. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK

  4. 42% 500X Bi-Facial Growth Concentrator Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczuk, S.; Chiu, P.; Zhang, X.; Pulver, D.; Harris, C.; Siskavich, B.

    2011-12-01

    Data are presented from three-junction concentrator photovoltaic cells using a new cell architecture (1.9 eV InGaP top cell lattice-matched to a 1.42 eV GaAs middle cells on one side of a infrared-transparent GaAs wafer with a lattice-mismatched 0.95 eV InGaAs bottom cell grown isolated on the wafer backside). The cell uses a new epitaxial bifacial growth (BFG) technique. The impetus is to replace the 0.67 eV Ge bottom cell in the standard three junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems with a higher bandgap 0.95 eV InGaAs cell that boosts the bottom cell voltage by about 40% while maintaining a simple high-yield cell process without use of complex large area epitaxial liftoff or wafer bonding steps used to make similar cell stacks. Efficiency was independently-verified by NREL for a 1 cm×1 cm cell (42.3% at 406 suns, with Voc 3.452V, 87.1% FF and 1xJsc of 14.07 mA/cm2, at 25 °C AM1.5D, 100 mW/cm2), which was the world record at the time of the CPV-7 conference. No degradation was seen during concentrated solar operation after a 2000 hr 165C burn-in and PbSn solder tests. Average efficiency of 1 cm2 cells designed for 500 suns at 1018 suns was 40.5% (Spire test, 25 °C, spectrally corrected flash simulator). Measured efficiency temperature coefficient for gen2 cells is -0.06%/°C, similar to InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems.

  5. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  6. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  7. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijter, de, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cell growth takes place, a new cell is formed by cell division. The orientation of the division plane most often predicts the orientation of cell expansion, and a correct positioning of the division p...

  8. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  9. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  10. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment

  11. Cell Growth on Different Types of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Auciello

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Unique functional materials provide a platform as scaffolds for cell/tissue regeneration. Investigation of cell-materials’ chemical and biological interactions will enable the application of more functional materials in the area of bioengineering, which provides a pathway to the novel treatment for patients who suffer from tissue/organ damage and face the limitation of donation sources. Many studies have been made into tissue/organ regeneration. Development of new substrate materials as platforms for cell/tissue regeneration is a key research area. Studies discussed in this paper focus on the investigation of novel ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films as substrate/scaffold materials for developmental biology. Specially designed quartz dishes have been coated with different types of UNCD films and cells were subsequently seeded on those films. Results showed the cells’ growth on UNCD-coated culture dishes are similar to cell culture dishes with little retardation, indicating that UNCD films have no or little inhibition on cell proliferation and are potentially appealing as substrate/scaffold materials. The mechanisms of cell adhesion on UNCD surfaces are proposed based on the experimental results. The comparisons of cell cultures on diamond-powder-seeded culture dishes and on UNCD-coated dishes with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization—time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analyses provided valuable data to support the mechanisms proposed to explain the adhesion and proliferation of cells on the surface of the UNCD platform.

  12. Methyl Jasmonate Represses Growth and Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Cultured Taxus Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Rohan A.; Lenka, Sangram K.; Normanly, Jennifer; Walker, Elsbeth L.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation is an effective strategy to induce and enhance synthesis of the anticancer agent paclitaxel (Taxol®) in Taxus cell suspension cultures; however, concurrent decreases in growth are often observed, which is problematic for large scale bioprocessing. Here, increased accumulation of paclitaxel in Taxus cuspidata suspension cultures with MeJA elicitation was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in cell growth, evident within the first three days post-elicitatio...

  13. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26648333

  14. Molecular and Functional Characterizations of the Association and Interactions between Nucleophosmin-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase and Type I Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Shi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK is aberrantly expressed in a subset of T cell lymphoma that commonly affects children and young adults. NPM-ALK possesses significant oncogenic potential that was previously documented using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. The exact mechanisms by which NPM-ALK induces its effects are poorly understood. We have recently demonstrated that NPM-ALK is physically associated with type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR. A positive feedback loop appears to exist between NPM-ALK and IGF-IR through which these two kinases interact to potentiate their effects. We have also found that a single mutation of the Tyr644 or Tyr664 residue of the C terminus of NPM-ALK to phenylalanine decreases significantly, but does not completely abolish, the association between NPM-ALK and IGF-IR. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the dual mutation of Tyr644 and Tyr664 abrogates the association and interactions between NPM-ALK and IGF-IR. We also examined the impact of this dual mutation on the oncogenic potential of NPM-ALK. Our results show that NPM-ALKY644,664F completely lacks association with IGF-IR. Importantly, we found that the dual mutation of Tyr644 and Tyr664 diminishes the oncogenic effects of NPM-ALK, including its ability to induce anchorage-independent colony formation and to sustain cellular transformation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, the association between NPM-ALK and IGF-IR through Tyr644 and Tyr664 appears to contribute to maintaining the stability of NPM-ALK protein. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which NPM-ALK induces its oncogenic effects through interactions with IGF-IR in this aggressive lymphoma.

  15. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  16. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas;

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation of...... the GH receptor. Two mutated cDNAs encoding truncated GH receptors, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454, respectively, were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected into the RIN cells. Both receptor mutants were expressed on the cell surface and displayed normal GH binding affinity. Whereas GH-R1......-638 had a molecular mass of about 110 kDa, GH-R1-294 and GH-R1-454 showed molecular masses of 49 and 80 kDa, respectively. Cells expressing GH-R1-454 internalized GH to a similar extent as cells transfected with the full length receptor and the parent cell line, but GH-R1-294-expressing cells showed a...

  17. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norstedt, G; Enberg, B; Francis, S;

    1994-01-01

    of cellular function that mimic those of the endogenous GHR. GHR cDNA transfected cells also offer a system where the mechanism of GH action can be studied. Such a system has been used to demonstrate that the GHR itself becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and that further phosphorylation of downstream...... proteins is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance......The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration...

  18. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  19. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  20. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  1. radiochemical studies on the growth of myeloma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    cancer is a disease of unregulated cell growth. humans of all ages develop cancer, and a wide variety of organs are affected. multiple myeloma is a cancer in which antibody-producing plasma cells grow in an uncontrolled and invasive (malignant) manner. melphalan (DNA cross-linker), is one of the most widely used and effective drugs in the treatment of multiple myeloma. thalidomide as an immunomodulatory agent is clinically useful in a number of cancers. antitumor activity may be related to a number of known properties, including antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and T-cell costimulatory and antiangiogenic effect. however, it may also involve direct antitumor effects. radiotherapy is an important modality in the treatment of cancer. the aim of radiotherapy is to deliver radiation doses and schedules that kill cancer cells, while preserving normal tissue function. the aim of these studies was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of some chemical substances (chemotherapy)such as melphalan and thalidomide and γ-radiation (radiotherapy)on the growth of myeloma cells. also some confirmatory tests such as β2-microglobulin, caspases enzymes 8 and 9 and flow cytometric analyses were performed for the obtained optimum doses.

  2. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in canine transitional cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    HANAZONO, Kiwamu; Fukumoto, Shinya; KAWAMURA, Yoshio; ENDO, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; IWANO, Hidetomo; UCHIDE, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), a urinary bladder tumor with high mortality, is encountered commonly in dogs. Whereas overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with development of human urinary bladder cancer, information on EGFR expression in canine TCC is lacking. In this study, EGFR protein and mRNA expression in canine normal bladder (n=5), polypoid cystitis (n=5) and TCC (n=25) were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction....

  4. Systems-biology dissection of eukaryotic cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Justen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent article in BMC Biology illustrates the use of a systems-biology approach to integrate data across the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of budding yeast in order to dissect the relationship between nutrient conditions and cell growth. See research article http://jbiol.com/content/6/2/4 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/68

  5. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies. PMID:27575162

  6. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  7. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.

  8. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  9. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  10. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the

  11. Cell responses to FGFR3 signalling: growth, differentiation and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FGFR3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the FGF receptor family, known to have a negative regulatory effect on long bone growth. Fgfr3 knockout mice display longer bones and, accordingly, most germline-activating mutations in man are associated with dwarfism. Somatically, some of the same activating mutations are associated with the human cancers multiple myeloma, cervical carcinoma and carcinoma of the bladder. How signalling through FGFR3 can lead to either chondrocyte apoptosis or cancer cell proliferation is not fully understood. Although FGFR3 can be expressed as two main splice isoforms (IIIb or IIIc), there is no apparent link with specific cell responses, which may rather be associated with the cell type or its differentiation status. Depending on cell type, differential activation of STAT proteins has been observed. STAT1 phosphorylation seems to be involved in inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation while activation of the ERK pathway inhibits chondrocyte differentiation and B-cell proliferation (as in multiple myeloma). The role of FGFR3 in epithelial cancers (bladder and cervix) is not known. Some of the cell specificity may arise via modulation of signalling by crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Recently, inhibition of the ERK pathway in achondroplastic mice has provided hope for an approach to the treatment of dwarfism. Further understanding of the ability of FGFR3 to trigger different responses depending on cell type and cellular context may lead to treatments for both skeletal dysplasias and cancer

  12. Overexpression of TTRAP inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caihong Zhou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available TTRAP is a multi-functional protein that is involved in multipleaspects of cellular functions including cell proliferation,apoptosis and the repair of DNA damage. Here, we demonstratedthat the lentivirus-mediated overexpression of TTRAPsignificantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis inosteosarcoma cells. The ectopic TTRAP suppressed the growthand colony formation capacity of two osteosarcoma cell lines,U2OS and Saos-2. Cell apoptosis was induced in U2OS cellsand the cell cycle was arrested at G2/M phase in Saos-2 cells.Exogenous expression of TTRAP in serum-starved U2OS andSaos-2 cells induced an increase in caspase-3/-7 activity and adecrease in cyclin B1 expression. In comparison with wild-typeTTRAP, mutations in the 5'-tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesteraseactivity of TTRAP, in particular TTRAPE152A, showed decreasedinhibitory activity on cell growth. These results may aid inclarifying the physiological functions of TTRAP, especially itsroles in the regulation of cell growth and tumorigenesis. [BMBReports 2013; 46(2: 113-118

  13. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  14. Role of CaECM25 in cell morphogenesis, cell growth and virulence in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TingTing; LI WanJie; LI Di; WANG Yue; SANG JianLi

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prominent opportunistic fungal pathogen in humans. Multiple factors are associated with the virulence of C. albicans, including morphogenesis, cell wall organization and growth rate. Here, we describe the identification and functional characterization of CaECM25, a gene that has not been reported before. We constructed Caecm25△/△ mutants and investigated the role of the gene In morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence. CaECM25 deletion resulted in defects in cell separation, a slower growth rate, reduced filamentous growth and attenuated adherence to plastic surfaces. The Caecm25△/△ mutant was also significantly less virulent than wild type when tested for systemic infection in mice. Therefore, CaECM25 plays important roles in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence.

  15. Role of CaECM25 in cell morphogenesis, cell growth and virulence in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prominent opportunistic fungal pathogen in humans. Multiple factors are associated with the virulence of C. albicans, including morphogenesis, cell wall organization and growth rate. Here, we describe the identification and functional characterization of CaECM25, a gene that has not been reported before. We constructed Caecm25?/? mutants and investigated the role of the gene in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence. CaECM25 deletion resulted in defects in cell separation, a slower growth rate, reduced filamentous growth and attenuated adherence to plastic surfaces. The Caecm25?/? mutant was also significantly less virulent than wild type when tested for systemic infection in mice. Therefore, CaECM25 plays important roles in morphogenesis, cell wall organization and virulence.

  16. A conundrum in molecular toxicology: molecular and biological changes during neoplastic transformation of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, G E; Shuler, C F; Lee, H; Casto, B C

    1995-12-01

    The process of multistage carcinogenesis lends itself to the concept that the effects of carcinogens are mediated through dose-related, multi-hit, linear changes. Multiple in vitro model systems have been developed that are designed to examine the cellular changes associated with the progression of cells through the different stages in the process; however, these systems may have inherent limitations due to the cell lines used for these studies, the manner of assessing the effects of the carcinogens, and the subsequent growth and differentiation of the exposed cells. Each of these variables results in increasing levels of uncertainty relative to the correlation of the events with the actual process of human tumor development. Therefore, the prediction of the ultimate effect of any carcinogen is difficult. Moreover, relationships between individual biological endpoints resulting from carcinogen treatment appear at best to be approximations. The presence of an activated carcinogen inside the cell can give rise to multiple outcomes, only some of which may be critical events. For example, site-specific modification of the 12th and 13th codons of H-ras is different than that in the adjacent 14th and 15th codons. It is interesting to speculate what effect these differences might have on a biological outcome, e.g., transformation to anchorage-independent growth. The use of different model systems to examine the effects of activated carcinogens also creates additional problems. Comparisons of in vitro transformed cells with similar cells isolated from human tumors indicate that the culture environment appears to influence the expression of a particular phenotype, in that human tumor cells in culture express many of the same parameters as those found in cells transformed with carcinogens in vitro. If the process of transformation is linear, then less aggressive phenotypes should progress to a more aggressive transformed stage. However, in carcinogen-transformed human cells

  17. Human keloid cell characterization and inhibition of growth with human Wharton's jelly stem cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Subramanian, Arjunan; Srinivasan, Akshaya; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-05-01

    Keloids are firm rubbery growths that grow beyond the boundaries of human wounds and their treatment has met with limited success. Their properties and growth behavior have not been properly characterized and it has been suggested that a benign neoplastic stem cell-like phenotype in an altered cytokine microenvironment drives their uncontrolled cell proliferation. Modification of the stem cell niche may be an attractive approach to its prevention. We studied the growth behavior, stemness, and tumorigenic characteristics of keloid cells in prolonged culture. Since human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) secrete high levels of cytokines and have anti-tumorigenic properties we explored its role on the inhibition of keloid growth in vitro. Keloid cells grew readily in both adherent and sphere culture and expressed high levels of mesenchymal CD and tumor-associated fibroblast (TAF) markers up to passage 10. When they were exposed to repeat doses of hWJSC conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) and lysate (hWJSC-CL) every 72 h up to 9 days their growth was inhibited with a reduction in CD and TAF marker expression. On Days 3, 6, and 9 treated keloid cells showed linear decreases in cell proliferation (BrdU), increases in Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL-positive cells, interruptions of the cell cycle and inhibition of migration in scratch-wound assays. Immunocytochemistry and qRT-PCR confirmed a significant downregulation of TAF and anti-apoptotic-related gene (SURVIVIN) expression and upregulation of autophagy-related (BAX, ATG5, ATG7, BECLIN-1) gene expression. The results suggest that hWJSCs or molecules secreted by them may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of keloids. PMID:24265231

  18. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  19. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and sup...

  20. Adrenomedullin as a Growth and Cell Fate Regulatory Factor for Adult Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Martínez-Herrero; Ignacio M Larráyoz; Laura Ochoa-Callejero; Josune García-Sanmartín; Alfredo Martínez

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cells as a strategy for tissue repair and regeneration is one of the biomedical research areas that has attracted more interest in the past few years. Despite the classic belief that the central nervous system (CNS) was immutable, now it is well known that cell turnover occurs in the mature CNS. Postnatal neurogenesis is subjected to tight regulation by many growth factors, cell signals, and transcription factors. An emerging molecule involved in this process is adrenomedullin...

  1. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  2. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the ef...

  3. Entrainability of cell cycle oscillator models with exponential growth of cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Enkhkhudulmur, Tsog-Erdene; Katayama, Norihiro; Karashima, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Among various aspects of cell cycle, understanding synchronization mechanism of cell cycle is important because of the following reasons. (1)Cycles of cell assembly should synchronize to form an organ. (2) Synchronizing cell cycles are required to experimental analysis of regulatory mechanisms of cell cycles. (3) Cell cycle has a distinct phase relationship with the other biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm. However, forced as well as mutual entrainment mechanisms are not clearly known. In this study, we investigated entrainability of cell cycle models of yeast cell under the periodic forcing to both of the cell mass and molecular dynamics. Dynamics of models under study involve the cell mass growing exponentially. In our result, they are shown to allow only a limited frequency range for being entrained by the periodic forcing. In contrast, models with linear growth are shown to be entrained in a wider frequency range. It is concluded that if the cell mass is included in the cell cycle regulation, its entrainability is sensitive to a shape of growth curve assumed in the model. PMID:25571564

  4. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  5. Loss of Expression of Reprimo, a p53-induced Cell Cycle Arrest Gene, Correlates with Invasive Stage of Tumor Progression and p73 Expression in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Saavedra

    Full Text Available Reprimo (RPRM, a downstream effector of p53-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M, has been proposed as a putative tumor suppressor gene (TSG and as a potential biomarker for non-invasive detection of gastric cancer (GC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epigenetic silencing of RPRM gene by promoter methylation and its tumor suppressor function in GC cell lines. Furthermore, clinical significance of RPRM protein product and its association with p53/p73 tumor suppressor protein family was explored. Epigenetic silencing of RPRM gene by promoter methylation was evaluated in four GC cell lines. Protein expression of RPRM was evaluated in 20 tumor and non-tumor matched cases. The clinical significance of RPRM association with p53/p73 tumor suppressor protein family was assessed in 114 GC cases. Tumor suppressor function was examined through functional assays. RPRM gene expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation (Spearman rank r = -1; p = 0.042. RPRM overexpression inhibited colony formation and anchorage-independent growth. In clinical samples, RPRM gene protein expression was detected in 75% (15/20 of non-tumor adjacent mucosa, but only in 25% (5/20 of gastric tumor tissues (p = 0.001. Clinicopathological correlations of loss of RPRM expression were significantly associated with invasive stage of GC (stage I to II-IV, p = 0.02 and a positive association between RPRM and p73 gene protein product expression was found (p<0.0001 and kappa value = 0.363. In conclusion, epigenetic silencing of RPRM gene by promoter methylation is associated with loss of RPRM expression. Functional assays suggest that RPRM behaves as a TSG. Loss of expression of RPRM gene protein product is associated with the invasive stage of GC. Positive association between RPRM and p73 expression suggest that other members of the p53 gene family may participate in the regulation of RPRM expression.

  6. Primary microcephaly gene MCPH1 shows signatures of tumor suppressors and is regulated by miR-27a in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    Full Text Available Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1 gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72% informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22% and 19/25 (76% OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10% tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3'-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a.

  7. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  8. Cloning and analysis of genes regulating plant cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this work are to identify, clone and analyze genes involved in the regulation of plant cell growth. To do this, we have induced tumors on Arabidopsis thaliana by exposing seed or germinating seedlings to ionizing radiation. The tumors which developed on the plants derived from these seed were excised and established in culture. Unlike normal tissue explants, the tumors are able to grow on hormone-free medium suggesting changes in growth control (either hormonal or other) induced by the radiation exposure. This progress report describes work aimed at characterizing these tumors at the physiological and cellular levels and at determining the molecular basis of the changes leading to the tumorous phenotype

  9. Sesquiterpene lactones isolated from indigenous Middle Eastern plants inhibit tumor promoter-induced transformation of JB6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikali Melody

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpene lactones (SL are plant secondary metabolites that are known for their anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor properties. Considering that several SL-derived drugs are currently in cancer clinical trials, we have tested two SL molecules, 3-β-methoxy-iso-seco-tanapartholide (β-tan isolated from Achillea falcata and salograviolide A (Sal A isolated from Centaurea ainetensis, for their anti-tumor properties. We used the mouse epidermal JB6P + cells as a model for tumor promotion and cellular transformation. Key players that are involved in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis are the AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors; therefore, we assessed how β-tan and Sal A modulate their signaling pathways in JB6P + cells. Methods The effects of β-tan and Sal A on the growth of normal and neoplastic keratinocytes and on the tumor promotion-responsive JB6P + cells were determined using the MTT assay. Anchorage-independent cell growth transformation assays were used to evaluate the anti-tumor promoting properties of these SL molecules in JB6P + cells and dual luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis were used to investigate their effects on tumor promoter-induced AP-1 and NF-κB activities and protein levels of key AP-1 and NF-кB target genes. Results β-tan and Sal A selectively inhibited tumor promoter-induced cell growth and transformation of JB6P + cells at concentrations that do not affect JB6P + and primary keratinocytes basal cell growth. In addition, both molecules reduced basal and tumor promoter-induced NF-κB transcriptional activities, differentially regulated basal and tumor promoter-induced AP-1 transcriptional activities, and modulated key players of the AP-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways. Conclusions These results highlight the anti-tumor promoting properties of β-tan and Sal A. These SL molecules isolated from two plant species native to

  10. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Micera, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate. PMID:27439311

  12. Growth and radiosensitivity of irradiated human glioma cell progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Li; Li Li; Changshao Xu; Juying Zhou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progenitors of the immortalized human glioma cell line, SHG-44, are significantly less sensitive to irradiation. Two hypotheses regarding the mechanism of this effect exist: several studies have suggested that there is a subgroup with different radiosensitivities in identical cell group, and the progenitors of irradiate is a adaptive response subgroup, so its radiosensitivity is descend. A second hypothesis suggests that irradiated glioma progeny have a stronger ability to repair DNA damage. This would suggest that when progeny are continuously irradiated, resistance to irradiation-induced DNA increases, and radiosensitivity decreases.OBJECTIVE: To investigate radiosensitivity and growth features after irradiation to progeny of the human glioma cell line SHG-44.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled experiment, which was performed at the Department of Radiology Laboratory, the First Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, between September 2004 and January 2006.MATERIALS: The glioma cell line SHG-44 was provided by the Institute of Neuroscience, First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University. Propidium iodide reagent was provided by Coulter Corporation. A linear accelerator, KD-2 type, was provided by Siemens, Germany. The flow cytometer EPICS-XL was provided by Coulter Corporation.METHODS: Brain glioma SHG-44 cells were divided into four groups: SHG-44, SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10. The SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10 cells were vertically irradiated with varying doses of 2,6 and 10 Gy by a linear accelerator (6 MVX). The cells were passaged for 15 generations and cultured in RPMI-1640 culture media.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Community re-double time, mean lethal dose (D0), extrapolation number (N), fraction surviving fraction irradiated by 2 Gy dose (SF2), quasi-threshold dose (Dq), and cell cycle.RESULTS: The Population doubling time (PDT) of SHG-44-2, SHG-44-6, and SHG-44-10 cell groups was not significant (P=0.052). Compared to

  13. Physical growth of children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Malay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometric measurements were used to study the physical growth of 58 sickle cell disease(SS children with severe clinical manifestations and compared with 86 normal(AA children from Nagpur district of Maharashtra. Both sickle cell disease male and female children were shown to have statistically significant lower weights, heights, sitting heights, mid arm circumferences, skin fold thickness and body mass indexes but not upper/ lower segment ratio as compared to normal children with comparable sex and ages. No significant differences were observed between the male and female children with sickle cell disease or normal for any of the anthropometric measurements. A significant lower values of all the measurements except U/L ratio was observed in the age group of 11-14 years than the earlier age among the sickle cell disease children as compared to the normal children of the same age and sex groups. Thus, these results indicate that as a group, children with sickle cell disease weigh less, are shorter and undernourished as compared to normal children.

  14. Centriole Age Underlies Asynchronous Primary Cilium Growth in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Charles T; Stearns, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that are present in most mammalian tissues and play important roles in development and disease [1]. They are required for the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) [2-4] and PDGF [5] signalling pathways. Primary cilia grow from the older of the two centrioles of the centrosome, referred to as the mother centriole. In cycling cells the cilium typically grows in G1 and is lost before mitosis, but the regulation of its growth is poorly understood. Centriole ...

  15. Cell-cell adhesion mediated by binding of membrane-anchored transforming growth factor α to epidermal growth factor receptors promotes cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precursor for transforming growth factor α, pro-TGF-α, is a cell surface glycoprotein that can establish contact with epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on adjacent cells. To examine whether the pro-TGF-α/EGF receptor pair can simultaneously mediate cell adhesion and promote cell proliferation, the authors have expressed pro-TGF-α in a bone marrow stromal cell line labeled with [35S] cysteine. Expression of pro-TGF-α allows these cells to support long-term attachment of an EGF/interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line that expresses EGF receptors but is unable to adhere to normal stroma. This interaction is inhibited by soluble EGF receptor ligands. Further, the hematopoietic progenitor cells replicate their DNA while they are attached to the stromal cell layer and become foci of sustained cell proliferation. Thus, pro-TGF-α and the EGF receptor can function as mediators of intercellular adhesion and this interaction may promote a mitogenic response. They propose the term juxtacrine to designate this form of stimulation between adjacent cells

  16. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  17. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Deng, Tianzheng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Yongjie [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Feng Feng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Yan [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)], E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 {mu}m) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering.

  18. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  19. Why Cells Grow and Divide? General Growth Mechanism and How it Defines Cells’ Growth, Reproduction and Metabolic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2015-02-01

    We consider a general growth mechanism, which acts at cellular level and above (organs, systems and whole organisms). Using its mathematical representation, the growth equation, we study the growth and division mechanisms of amoeba and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show how this mechanism, together with biomolecular machinery, governs growth and reproduction of cells, and these organisms in particular. This mechanism provides revealing answers to fundamental questions of biology, like why cells grow and divide, why and when cells’ growth stops. It also sheds light on questions like why and how life originated and developed. Solving the growth equation, we obtain analytical expression for the growth curve of fission yeast as a function of geometrical characteristics and nutrient influxes for RNA and protein synthesis, and compare the computed growth curves with 85 experiments. Statistical evaluation shows that these growth curves correspond to experimental data significantly better than all previous approximations. Also, using the general growth mechanism, we show how metabolic characteristics of cells, their size and evolutionary traits relate, considering fission yeast. In particular, we found that fission yeast S. pombe consumes about 16-18 times more nutrients for maintenance needs than for biomass synthesis.

  20. The role of Rac1 in the regulation of NF-kB activity, cell proliferation, and cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastonguay, Adam; Berg, Tracy; Hauser, Andrew D.; Schuld, Nathan; Lorimer, Ellen; Williams, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 regulates many cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and survival. Additionally, Rac1 plays a major role in activating NF-κB-mediated transcription. Both Rac1 and NF-κB regulate many properties of the malignant phenotype, including anchorage-independent proliferation and survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Despite these findings, the roles of Rac1and NF-κB in non-small cell lung carcinoma, a leading cause of cancer deaths, have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we compared the effects of Rac1 siRNA to that of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 on multiple features of the NSCLC malignant phenotype, including NF-κB activity. We show that the siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in lung cancer cells results in decreased cell proliferation and migration. The decrease in proliferation was observed in both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent assays. Furthermore, cells with decreased Rac1 expression have a slowed progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These effects induced by Rac1 siRNA correlated with a decrease in NF-κB transcriptional activity. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB signaling with BAY 11–7082 inhibited proliferation; indicating that the loss of cell proliferation and migration induced by the silencing of Rac1 expression may be attributed in part to loss of NF-κB activity. Interestingly, treatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 strongly inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and NF-κB activity in lung cancer cells, to an even greater extent than the inhibition induced by Rac1 siRNA. These findings indicate that Rac1 plays an important role in lung cancer cell proliferation and migration, most likely through its ability to promote NF-κB activity, and highlight Rac1 pathways as therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:22549160

  1. Effects of different Helicobacter pylori culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Guo Yan; Gang Zhao; Jin-Ping Ma; Shi-Rong Cai; Wen-Hua Zhan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of different Helicobacter pylori (H py/orl) culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: Broth culture filtrates of H pylori were prepared. Gastric epithelial cells were treated with the filtrates, and cell growth was determined by growth curve and flow cytometry. DNA damage of gastric epithelial cells was measured by single-cell microgel electrophoresis.RESULTS: Gastric epithelial cells proliferated actively when treated by CagA-gene-positive broth culture filtrates, and colony formation reached 40%. The number of cells in S phase increased compared to controls. Comet assay showed 41.2% comet cells in GES-1 cells treated with CagA-positive filtrates (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CagA-positive filtrates enhance the changes in morphology and growth characteristics of human gastric epithelial tumor cells. DNA damage maybe one of the mechanisms involved in the growth changes.

  2. Nerve Growth Factor Modulate Proliferation of Cultured Rabbit Corneal Endothelial Cells and Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF.MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did.Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  3. Pyramidal cell development: postnatal spinogenesis, dendritic growth, axon growth, and electrophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eElston

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we review recent findings related to postnatal spinogenesis, dendritic and axon growth, pruning and electrophysiology of neocortical pyramidal cells in the developing primate brain. Pyramidal cells in sensory, association and executive cortex grow dendrites, spines and axons at different rates, and vary in the degree of pruning. Of particular note is the fact that pyramidal cells in primary visual area (V1 prune more spines than they grow during postnatal development, whereas those in inferotemporal (TEO and TE and granular prefrontal cortex (gPFC; Brodmann’s area 12 grow more than they prune. Moreover, pyramidal cells in TEO, TE and the gPFC continue to grow larger dendritic territories from birth into adulthood, replete with spines, whereas those in V1 become smaller during this time. The developmental profile of intrinsic axons also varies between cortical areas: those in V1, for example, undergo an early proliferation followed by pruning and local consolidation into adulthood, whereas those in area TE tend to establish their territory and consolidate it into adulthood with little pruning. We correlate the anatomical findings with the electrophysiological properties of cells in the different cortical areas, including membrane time constant, depolarizing sag, duration of individual action potentials, and spike-frequency adaptation. All of the electrophysiological variables ramped up before 7 months of age in V1, but continued to ramp up over a protracted period of time in area TE. These data suggest that the anatomical and electrophysiological profiles of pyramidal cells vary among cortical areas at birth, and continue to diverge into adulthood. Moreover, the data reveal that the use it or lose it notion of synaptic reinforcement may speak to only part of the story, use it but you still might lose it may be just as prevalent in the cerebral cortex.

  4. PNMA1 promotes cell growth in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; He, Ping; Ma, Ming-Ze; Wang, Yang; Li, Rong-Kun; Fang, Fang; Fu, Ying; Tian, Guang-Ang; Qin, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Ma1 (PNMA1) is a member of an expanding family of 'brain/testis' proteins involved in an autoimmune disorder defined as paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS). Although it is widely studied in PNS, little is known about the underlying clinical significance and biological function of PNMA1 in tumors. Here, we find that elevated PNMA1 expression is more commonly observed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines, compared with normal pancreatic cell and tissues from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient. Besides, higher PNMA1 expression is closely correlated with large tumor size. Suppression of endogenous PNMA1 expression decreases cell viability and promotes cell apoptosis. Subsequent studies reveal that the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathway and members of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family may be involved in the pro-survival and anti-apoptotic effect of PNMA1 on PDAC. Taken together, this study provides evidence that PNMA1 is involved in tumor growth of pancreatic carcinoma and PNMA1-related pathways might represent a new treatment strategy. PMID:25120759

  5. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ► Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ► Si

  6. Unique aspects of mda-7/IL-24 antitumor bystander activity: establishing a role for secretion of MDA-7/IL-24 protein by normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaozhong; Emdad, Luni; Sauane, Moira; Lebedeva, Irina V; Sarkar, Devanand; Gupta, Pankaj; James, C David; Randolph, Aaron; Valerie, Kirstoffer; Walter, Mark R; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Paul B

    2005-11-17

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7) was cloned using subtraction hybridization from terminally differentiated human melanoma cells. Based on structural and functional properties, mda-7 is now recognized as interleukin-24 (IL-24), a new member of the expanding IL-10 gene family. Unique properties of mda-7/IL-24 include its ability to selectively induce growth suppression, apoptosis and radiosensitization in diverse human cancer cells, without causing similar effects in normal cells. The utility of mda-7/IL-24, administered by means of a replication-incompetent adenovirus, as a gene therapy for cancer has recently received validation in patients, highlighting an important phenomenon initially observed in pancreatic tumor cells, namely a 'potent bystander apoptosis-inducing effect' in adjacent tumor cells not initially receiving this gene product. We presently investigated the contribution of mda-7/IL-24 secreted by normal cells in mediating this 'bystander effect', and document that normal cells induced to produce mda-7/IL-24 following infection with recombinant adenoviruses expressing this cytokine secrete mda-7/IL-24, which modifies the anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness, survival and sensitivity to radiation of cancer cells that contain functional IL-20/IL-22 receptors, but not in cancer cells that lack a complete set of receptors. Moreover, the combination of secreted mda-7/IL-24 and radiation engenders a 'bystander antitumor effect' not only in inherently mda-7/IL-24 or radiation-sensitive cancer cells, but also in tumor cells overexpressing the antiapoptotic proteins bcl-2 or bcl-x(L) and displaying resistance to either treatment alone. The present studies provide definitive evidence that secreted mda-7/IL-24 from normal cells can induce direct antitumor and radiation-enhancing effects that are dependent on the presence of canonical receptors for this cytokine on tumor cells. Moreover, we now describe a novel means of enhancing mda-7/IL

  7. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cheng-Chia [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yu-Chao, E-mail: cyc@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ► Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ► Si

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Melatonin on the Growth of H22 Hepatocarcinoma Cells by Inducing Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    泰莉; 王西明; 段秋红; 陈蓓蓓; 何善述

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Whether melatonin not only inhibits the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells but also induces apoptosis in vitro was assessed. The anti-proliferative effects of melatonin on tumor cells was observed by MTT assay and tumor cells growth curve assay. And the apoptosis of the cells was studied by acridine orange fluorescence assay and flow cytometry. The cell cycle of the tumor cells was also observed by flow cytometry. It was found that melatonin could significantly inhibit the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells. Incubated with melatonin, chromatin condensation of the tumor cells was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Compared with control, the percentage of apoptotic cells was increased, and the proportion of G0/S increased but that of G2/M decreased. It was suggested that melatonin could directly inhibit the growth of H22 hepatocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis and extending the length of cell cycle of the tumor cells.

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 regulates multiple myeloma cell growth and bortezomib-induced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colpo Anna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3 α and β are two serine-threonine kinases controlling insulin, Wnt/β-catenin, NF-κB signaling and other cancer-associated transduction pathways. Recent evidence suggests that GSK-3 could function as growth-promoting kinases, especially in malignant cells. In this study, we have investigated GSK-3α and GSK-3β function in multiple myeloma (MM. Methods GSK-3 α and β expression and cellular localization were investigated by Western blot (WB and immunofluorescence analysis in a panel of MM cell lines and in freshly isolated plasma cells from patients. MM cell growth, viability and sensitivity to bortezomib was assessed upon treatment with GSK-3 specific inhibitors or transfection with siRNAs against GSK-3 α and β isoforms. Survival signaling pathways were studied with WB analysis. Results GSK-3α and GSK-3β were differently expressed and phosphorylated in MM cells. Inhibition of GSK-3 with the ATP-competitive, small chemical compounds SB216763 and SB415286 caused MM cell growth arrest and apoptosis through the activation of the intrinsic pathway. Importantly, the two inhibitors augmented the bortezomib-induced MM cell cytotoxicity. RNA interference experiments showed that the two GSK-3 isoforms have distinct roles: GSK-3β knock down decreased MM cell viability, while GSK-3α knock down was associated with a higher rate of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. GSK-3 inhibition caused accumulation of β-catenin and nuclear phospho-ERK1, 2. Moreover, GSK-3 inhibition and GSK-3α knockdown enhanced bortezomib-induced AKT and MCL-1 protein degradation. Interestingly, bortezomib caused a reduction of GSK-3 serine phosphorylation and its nuclear accumulation with a mechanism that resulted partly dependent on GSK-3 itself. Conclusions These data suggest that in MM cells GSK-3α and β i play distinct roles in cell survival and ii modulate the sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors.

  10. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 regulates multiple myeloma cell growth and bortezomib-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) α and β are two serine-threonine kinases controlling insulin, Wnt/β-catenin, NF-κB signaling and other cancer-associated transduction pathways. Recent evidence suggests that GSK-3 could function as growth-promoting kinases, especially in malignant cells. In this study, we have investigated GSK-3α and GSK-3β function in multiple myeloma (MM). GSK-3 α and β expression and cellular localization were investigated by Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence analysis in a panel of MM cell lines and in freshly isolated plasma cells from patients. MM cell growth, viability and sensitivity to bortezomib was assessed upon treatment with GSK-3 specific inhibitors or transfection with siRNAs against GSK-3 α and β isoforms. Survival signaling pathways were studied with WB analysis. GSK-3α and GSK-3β were differently expressed and phosphorylated in MM cells. Inhibition of GSK-3 with the ATP-competitive, small chemical compounds SB216763 and SB415286 caused MM cell growth arrest and apoptosis through the activation of the intrinsic pathway. Importantly, the two inhibitors augmented the bortezomib-induced MM cell cytotoxicity. RNA interference experiments showed that the two GSK-3 isoforms have distinct roles: GSK-3β knock down decreased MM cell viability, while GSK-3α knock down was associated with a higher rate of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. GSK-3 inhibition caused accumulation of β-catenin and nuclear phospho-ERK1, 2. Moreover, GSK-3 inhibition and GSK-3α knockdown enhanced bortezomib-induced AKT and MCL-1 protein degradation. Interestingly, bortezomib caused a reduction of GSK-3 serine phosphorylation and its nuclear accumulation with a mechanism that resulted partly dependent on GSK-3 itself. These data suggest that in MM cells GSK-3α and β i) play distinct roles in cell survival and ii) modulate the sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors

  11. Silencing NOTCH signaling causes growth arrest in both breast cancer stem cells and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, S; Das, T P; Damodaran, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are characterized by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity and are refractory to current treatment modalities, show a higher risk for metastasis, and influence the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to a shorter time to recurrence and death. In this study, we focused on examination of the mechanism of action of a small herbal molecule, psoralidin (Pso) that has been shown to effectively suppress the growth of BSCSs and breast cancer cells (BCCs), in breast cancer (BC) models. Methods: ALDH− and ALDH+ BCCs were isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells, and the anticancer effects of Pso were measured using cell viability, apoptosis, colony formation, invasion, migration, mammosphere formation, immunofluorescence, and western blot analysis. Results: Psoralidin significantly downregulated NOTCH1 signaling, and this downregulation resulted in growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Molecularly, Pso inhibited NOTCH1 signaling, which facilitated inhibition of EMT markers (β-catenin and vimentin) and upregulated E-cadherin expression, resulting in reduced migration and invasion of both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Conclusion: Together, our results suggest that inhibition of NOTCH1 by Pso resulted in growth arrest and inhibition of EMT in BCSCs and BCCs. Psoralidin appears to be a novel agent that targets both BCSCs and BCCs. PMID:24129237

  12. NK4, an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), inhibits growth of multiple myeloma cells: molecular targeting of angiogenic growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenlin; Hattori, Yutaka; Yamada, Taketo; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Sagawa, Morihiko; Otsuki, Takemi; Niikura, Takako; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2007-04-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes cell growth and motility and also increases neovascularization. Multiple myeloma (MM) cells produce HGF, and the plasma concentration of HGF is significantly elevated in patients with clinically active MM, suggesting that HGF might play a role in the pathogenesis of MM. NK4, an antagonist of HGF, is structurally homologous to angiostatin, and our previous report showed that NK4 inhibited the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells induced by HGF stimulation. The purposes of this study were to elucidate the contribution of HGF to the growth of MM cells as well as to investigate the possibility of the therapeutic use of NK4. In vitro study showed that NK4 protein stabilized the growth of MM cell lines and regulated the activation of c-MET, ERK1/2, STAT3, and AKT-1. Recombinant adenovirus containing NK4 cDNA (AdCMV.NK4) was injected intramuscularly into Icr/scid mice bearing tumors derived from HGF-producing MM cells. AdCMV.NK4 significantly inhibited the growth of these tumors in vivo. Histologic examination revealed that AdCMV.NK4 induced apoptosis of MM cells, accompanied by a reduction in neovascularization in the tumors. Thus, NK4 inhibited the growth of MM cells via antiangiogenic as well as direct antitumor mechanisms. The molecular targeting of HGF by NK4 could be applied as a novel therapeutic approach to MM. PMID:17179234

  13. Influence of different ammonium, lactate and glutamine concentrations on CCO cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Slivac, Igor; Blajić, Višnja; Radošević, Kristina; Kniewald, Zlatko; Gaurina Srček, Višnja

    2010-01-01

    In this study the effects of ammonium and lactate on a culture of channel catfish ovary (CCO) cells were examined. We also made investigation on the influence of glutamine, since our previous research revealed that this amino acid stimulated CCO cell growth more than glucose in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ammonium in cell culture included the considerable decrease in cell growth rate with eventual growth arrest as well as the retardation of glucose consumption. At ammonium...

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Tumor Growth through the Enhancement of Neovascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Sun, Ruowen; Origuchi, Makoto; Kanehira, Masahiko; Takahata, Takenori; ITOH, JUGOH; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kijima, Hiroshi; FUKUDA, SHINSAKU; SAIJO, YASUO

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also called mesenchymal stem cells, migrate and function as stromal cells in tumor tissues. The effects of MSCs on tumor growth are controversial. In this study, we showed that MSCs increase proliferation of tumor cells in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo. We also further analyzed the mechanisms that underlie these effects. For use in in vitro and in vivo experiments, we established a bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cell line from cells isolated...

  15. RASSF1A expression inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hong-geng; XUE Wan-jiang; QIAN Hai-xin; ZHOU Xiao-jun; QIN Lei; LAN Jing

    2009-01-01

    Background The antitumor role of Ras association domain family 1A (RASSFIA) gene and its potential molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to observe the antitumor ability of RASSFIA in hepatoceliular carcinoma, and study the mechanisms of cell apoptosis induced by RASSFIA.Methods After stably transfecting a RASSF1A (wild-type or mutant) expression vector into the BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, RT-PCR and Westem blotting was used to detect the RASSF1A expression levels in recombinant cells. The effects of wild-type RASSF1A on cell growth were observed in vitro by analyzing cell proliferation rate, cell colony formation, and in vivo by analyzing tumorigenesis in nude mice. In addition, the effect of RASSF1A gene expression on the chemosensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to antitumor drugs was examined by inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells.Results Wild-type RASSF1A, not the mutant, suppressed cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of wild-type RASSF1A could enhance the inhibition of cell proliferation and the percentage of apoptotic cells following cell treatment with mitomycin, but had no significant effect when combined with adriamycin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatJn treatment.Conclusion Wild-type RASSF1A inhibits cell growth and enhances cell chemosensitivity to mitomycin in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that RASSF1A may serve as a new target for gene therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

  16. Fentanyl inhibits cell viability in human pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell-transplanted mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Jianxia; Wang, Liangrong; Chen, Lei; Yang, Tao; Jin, Lida; Lin, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a kind of devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Fentanyl has been widely applied to anesthesia and analgesia in pancreatic cancer therapy, and is also demonstrated to inhibit the growth of some kinds of cancer cells in existed studies. To investigate the functions of fentanyl in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and fentanyl treatment. The cells were transplanted to BALB/c nude...

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells with rhBMP-2 inhibits the growth of canine osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassi Rici Rose

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs belong to a unique group of proteins that includes the growth factor TGF-β. BMPs play important roles in cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and inhibition of cell growth. They also participate in the maturation of several cell types, depending on the microenvironment and interactions with other regulatory factors. Depending on their concentration gradient, the BMPs can attract various types of cells and act as chemotactic, mitogenic, or differentiation agents. BMPs can interfere with cell proliferation and the formation of cartilage and bone. In addition, BMPs can induce the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into various cell types, including chondroblasts and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of treatment with rhBMP-2 on the proliferation of canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs and the tumor suppression properties of rhBMP-2 in canine osteocarcoma (OST cells. Osteosarcoma cell lines were isolated from biopsies and excisions of animals with osteosarcoma and were characterized by the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute. The mesenchymal stem cells were derived from the bone marrow of canine fetuses (cMSCs and belong to the University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine (FMVZ-USP stem cell bank. After expansion, the cells were cultured in a 12-well Transwell system; cells were treated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with rhBMP2. Expression of the intracytoplasmic and nuclear markers such as Caspase-3, Bax, Bad, Bcl-2, Ki-67, p53, Oct3/4, Nanog, Stro-1 were performed by flow citometry. Results We evaluated the regenerative potential of in vitro treatment with rhBMP-2 and found that both osteogenic induction and tumor regression occur in stem cells from canine bone marrow. rhBMP-2 inhibits the proliferation capacity of OST cells by mechanisms of apoptosis and tumor suppression mediated by p

  18. Upregulation of miR-27a contributes to the malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by SV40 small T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Li, D-C; Li, Z-F; Liu, C-X; Xiao, Y-M; Zhang, B; Li, X-D; Zhao, J; Chen, L-P; Xing, X-M; Tang, S-F; Lin, Y-C; Lai, Y-D; Yang, P; Zeng, J-L; Xiao, Q; Zeng, X-W; Lin, Z-N; Zhuang, Z-X; Zhuang, S-M; Chen, W

    2011-09-01

    The introduction of the Simian virus 40 (SV40) early region, the telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) and an oncogenic allele of H-Ras directly transforms primary human cells. SV40 small T antigen (ST), which forms a complex with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and inhibits PP2A activity, is believed to have a critical role in the malignant transformation of human cells. Recent evidence has shown that aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns are correlated with cancer development. Here, we identified miR-27a as a differentially expressed miRNA in SV40 ST-expressing cells. miR-27a is upregulated in SV40 ST-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBERST). Suppression of miR-27a expression in HBERST cells or lung cancer cell lines (NCI-H226 and SK-MES-1) that exhibited high levels of miR-27a expression lead to cell growth arrested in the G(0)-G(1) phase. In addition, suppression of miR-27a in HBERST cells attenuated the capacity of such cells to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. We also found that suppression of the PP2A B56γ expression resulted in upregulation of miR-27a similar to that achieved by the introduction of ST, indicating that dysregulation of miR-27a expression in ST-expressing cells was mediated by the ST-PP2A interaction. Moreover, we discovered that Fbxw7 gene encoding F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7 was a potential miR-27a target validated by dual-luciferase reporter system analysis. The inverse correlation between miR-27a expression levels and Fbxw7 protein expression was further confirmed in both cell models and human tumor samples. Fbxw7 regulates cell-cycle progression through the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of a set of substrates, including c-Myc, c-Jun, cyclin E1 and Notch 1. Thus, promotion of cell growth arising from the suppression of Fbxw7 by miR-27a overexpression might be responsible for the viral oncoprotein ST-induced malignant transformation. These observations demonstrate that miR-27a functions as an oncogene

  19. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Manjun; Jiang, Lei; Cong, Wei; Ouyang, Fan

    2002-04-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage. PMID:18763074

  20. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵曼君; 姜蕾; 丛威; 欧阳藩

    2002-01-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage.

  1. Growth hormone promotes skeletal muscle cell fusion independent of insulin-like growth factor 1 up-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Ohanna, Mickaël; Kedzia, Cécile; Menon, Ram K.; Kopchick, John J.; Kelly, Paul A; Pende, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) participates in the postnatal regulation of skeletal muscle growth, although the mechanism of action is unclear. Here we show that the mass of skeletal muscles lacking GH receptors is reduced because of a decrease in myofiber size with normal myofiber number. GH signaling controls the size of the differentiated myotubes in a cell-autonomous manner while having no effect on size, proliferation, and differentiation of the myoblast precursor cells. The GH hypertrophic action ...

  2. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  3. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  4. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  5. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  6. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  7. DUSP10 regulates intestinal epithelial cell growth and colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C W; Weerasooriya, M; Guo, J; James, S J; Poh, H M; Osato, M; Flavell, R A; Dong, C; Yang, H; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-14

    Dual specificity phosphatase 10 (DUSP10), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 5 (MKP5), negatively regulates the activation of MAP kinases. Genetic polymorphisms and aberrant expression of this gene are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans. However, the role of DUSP10 in intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis is not clear. Here, we showed that DUSP10 knockout (KO) mice had increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and migration and developed less severe colitis than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) treatment, which is associated with increased ERK1/2 activation and Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) expression in IEC. In line with increased IEC proliferation, DUSP10 KO mice developed more colon tumours with increased severity compared with WT mice in response to administration of DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Furthermore, survival analysis of CRC patients demonstrated that high DUSP10 expression in tumours was associated with significant improvement in survival probability. Overexpression of DUSP10 in Caco-2 and RCM-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation. Our study showed that DUSP10 negatively regulates IEC growth and acts as a suppressor for CRC. Therefore, it could be targeted for the development of therapies for colitis and CRC. PMID:25772234

  8. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-lin Xiong; Zhi-wei Chen; Ting-hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promotein vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, lfuorescence mi-croscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These ifndings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  9. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... lung cancer cell lines express the EGF receptor....... demonstrated that the cells bound between 3 and 52 fmol/mg protein with a KD ranging from 0.5 x 10(-10) to 2.7 x 10(-10) M. EGF binding to the receptor was confirmed by affinity-labeling EGF to the EGF receptor. The cross-linked complex had a M(r) of 170,000-180,000. Northern blotting showed the expression of...

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand...... the expression pattern of various FGFR isoforms determines the cell context-specific effects of NCAM signaling through FGFR....

  11. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cel

  12. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  13. Control by fibroblast growth factor of differentiation in the BC3H1 muscle cell line

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) expression by polypeptide growth factors has been examined in the clonal mouse muscle BC3H1 cell line. After arrest of cell growth by exposure to low concentrations of serum, BC3H1 cells accumulate high levels of muscle- specific proteins including CPK. The induction of this enzyme is reversible in the presence of high concentrations of fetal calf serum, which cause quiescent, differentiated cells to reenter the cell cycle. Under these conditions...

  14. Growth suppression by transforming growth factor beta 1 of human small-cell lung cancer cell lines is associated with expression of the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K;

    1994-01-01

    observed in two cell lines expressing only type III receptor and in TGF-beta-r negative cell lines. In two cell lines expressing all three receptor types, growth suppression was accompanied by morphological changes. To evaluate the possible involvement of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in mediating the...

  15. TP508 accelerates fracture repair by promoting cell growth over cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TP508 is a synthetic 23-amino acid peptide representing a receptor-binding domain of human thrombin. We have previously shown that a single injection of TP508 accelerates fracture healing in a rat femoral fracture model. To understand how TP508 acts at the protein level during fracture healing, we compared the translational profiles between saline-control and fractured femur at six time points after TP508 treatment using the second generation of BD ClontechTM Antibody Microarray. Here, we demonstrate that TP508 accelerates fracture healing by modulating expression levels of proteins primarily involved in the functional categories of cell cycle, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. The majority of those proteins are physically interrelated and functionally overlapped. The action of those proteins is highlighted by a central theme of promoting cell growth via balance of cell survival over cell death signals. This appears to occur through the stimulation of several bone healing pathways including cell cycle-G1/S checkpoint regulation, apoptosis, JAK/STAT, NF-κB, PDGF, PI3K/AKT, PTEN, and ERK/MAPK

  16. Transcriptional repression of the APC/C activator CCS52A1 promotes active termination of cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, Christian; Morohashi, Kengo; Kawamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Naoki; Ishida, Takashi; Umeda, Masaaki; Grotewold, Erich; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and temporal control of cell growth is central for the morphogenesis of multicellular organisms. For some cell types that undergo extensive post-mitotic cell growth, such as neurons and hair cells, orchestrating the extent of post-mitotic cell growth with development is vital for their physiology and function. Previous studies suggested that the extent of cell growth is linked with an increase in ploidy by endoreduplication but how developmental signals control endocycling and cell gr...

  17. Transforming Growth Factor–β–Induced Differentiation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Is Inhibited by Fibroblast Growth Factor–2

    OpenAIRE

    Schuliga, Michael; Javeed, Aqeel; Harris, Trudi; Xia, Yuxiu; Qin, Chengxue; Wang, Zhexing; Zhang, Xuehua; Lee, Peter V. S.; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2013-01-01

    In asthma, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) plays an important (patho)physiological role. This study examines the effects of FGF-2 on the transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β)–stimulated differentiation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in vitro. The differentiation of human ASM cells after incubation with TGF-β (100 pM) and/or FGF-2 (300 pM) for 48 hours was assessed by increases in contractile protein expression, actin-cytoskeleton reorganization, enhancements in cell stiffness, and ...

  18. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco A, H.; Cardona, W. [Universidad Andres Bello, Vina del Mar (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Quimicas]. E-mail: hcarrasco@unab.cl; Espinoza C, L.; Gallardo, C.; Catalan M, K. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Quimica; Cardile, V.; Lombardo, L. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Physiological Sciences; Cuellar F, M. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile). Facultad de Farmacia; Russo, A. [University of Catania (Italy). Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Medical Chemistry and Molecular Biology

    2008-07-01

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p < 0,001) more active than eugenol, with IC{sub 50} values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10{sup -6} and 21.5 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10{sup -6} and 21.26 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  19. Eugenol and its synthetic analogues inhibit cell growth of human cancer cells (Part I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) (1) has been reported to possess antioxidant and anticancer properties. In an attempt to enhance intrinsic activity of this natural compound, some derivatives were synthesized. Eugenol was extracted from cloves oil and further, the eugenol analogues (2-6) were obtained through acetylation and nitration reactions. Eugenol (1) and its analogues (2-6) were examined by in vitro model of cancer using two human cancer cell lines: DU-145 (androgeninsensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells). Cell viability, by tetrazolium salts assay, was measured. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also investigated to evaluate the presence of cell toxicity as a result of cell disruption, subsequent to membrane rupture. In the examined cancer cells, all compounds showed cell-growth inhibition activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds 5-allyl-3-nitrobenzene-1,2-diol (3) and 4-allyl- 2-methoxy-5-nitrophenyl acetate (5) were significantly (p 50 values in DU-145 cells of 19.02 x 10-6 and 21.5 x 10-6 mol L-1, respectively, and in KB cells of 18.11 x 10-6 and 21.26 x 10-6 mol L-1, respectively, suggesting that the presence of nitro and hydroxyl groups could be important in the activity of these compounds. In addition, our results seem to indicate that apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in KB and DU-145 cells. In fact, in our experimental conditions, no statistically significant increase in LDH release was observed in cancer cells treated with eugenol and its analogues. (author)

  20. Chimeric toxins inhibit growth of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachran, Christopher; Heisler, Iring; Bachran, Diana; Dassler, Katrin; Ervens, Jürgen; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2008-02-01

    Treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is currently based on surgery and radiotherapy. Prolongation of the survival time of patients with progressing tumors is infrequently achieved. To improve the therapeutic options, targeted therapies are a favorable alternative. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of a chimeric toxin (CT) named SE consisting of the epidermal growth factor and the plant protein toxin saporin from Saponaria officinalis. A second construct (SA2E) additionally contains a peptidic adapter designed to enhance efficacy of the CT in vivo and to reduce side effects. The IC(50) values for an OSCC cell line (BHY) were 0.27 nM and 0.73 nM for SE and SA2E, respectively, while fibroblasts remained unaffected. To investigate primary tumor cells, we developed a technique to analyze freshly prepared OSCC cells of 28 patients in a stem cell assay directly after surgery. Cells were treated for 1 h with the CTs, subsequently seeded into soft agar and colony growth determined after 1-2 weeks In spite of the short time of CT incubation, the amount of colonies was reduced to about 78% by 10 nM and to 69% by 100 nM of either toxin. A combined application of 10 nM SA2E with a saponin from Gypsophila paniculata reduced the amount of surviving cells to 68%. The results demonstrate the impact of the CTs on OSCC cells and depict that the stem cell assay is suitable to determine the potential of anti-tumor drugs before studies in vivo will be initiated. PMID:18059188

  1. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted...... antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors...

  2. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25858017

  3. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P.; Mathews, L S; Norstedt, G; Nielsen, J H

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and t...

  4. Study of wavy laminar growth of human urinary bladder cancer cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Guo-hong; CONG Yan-guang; LIU Jun-kang; XU Qi-wang; YUAN Ze-tao

    2001-01-01

    To observe the ordered growth behavior of human urinary bladder cancer cell line (BIU) under culture in vitro. Methods: The suspension of BIU cells was spread locally in a culture container. When the cells grew along the wall to form a cellular colony, macroscopic and microscopic observations complemented with measurements of the parameters including expanding diameter, expanding rate, cell shape, average cell density, average cell size, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH were conducted dynamically. Results: During cell culture, obvious laminar characteristics appeared in localized growing BIU cell colonies and there was difference between the cells of different zones in shape, size, density, dehydrogenase activity and sensitivity to pH. Conclusion: Space closing and bio-dissipation result in self-organization of BIU cells with ordered growth behavior. The present experiment offers a simple, controllable model for the study of wavy growth of human cells.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of ErbB signalling in mammary luminal epithelial cells - interplay of ErbB and IGF1 signalling through IGFBP3 regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    enhanced in ErbB2-overexpressing cells, whilst loss of ErbB2 expression by siRNA silencing reduced IGF1 signalling. Furthermore, IGFBP3 knockdown resulted in basal ERK and Akt activation in luminal epithelial cells and increased invasiveness and anchorage-independent colony formation in SKBR3 cells. These data show IGFBP3 as a negative regulator of transformation and that its down-regulation enhances IGF1-dependent signalling. They also show that ErbB2 can up-regulate IGF1-dependent signalling, possibly via the regulated expression of IGFBP3

  6. Heparin Binds Endothelial Cell Growth Factor, the Principal Endothelial Cell Mitogen in Bovine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciag, Thomas; Mehlman, Tevie; Friesel, Robert; Schreiber, Alain B.

    1984-08-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF), an anionic polypeptide mitogen, binds to immobilized heparin. The interaction between the acidic polypeptide and the anionic carbohydrate suggests a mechanism that is independent of ion exchange. Monoclonal antibodies to purified bovine ECGF inhibited the biological activity of ECGF in crude preparations of bovine brain. These data indicate that ECGF is the principal mitogen for endothelial cells from bovine brain, that heparin affinity chromatography may be used to purify and concentrate ECGF, and that the affinity of ECGF for heparin may have structural and perhaps biological significance.

  7. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  8. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  9. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine eFeillet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumour growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer.

  10. Changes in responsiveness of rat tracheal epithelial cells to growth factors during preneoplastic transformation in cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cell lines require fewer growth factors for clonal proliferation in culture than normal cells. Serum-free media missing various combinations of growth factors (e.g., cholera toxin, serum albumin, epidermal growth factor, hydrocortisone) required for proliferation of normal, but not preneoplastic, RTE cells can be used to select for carcinogen-induced preneoplastic variants having an increased proliferative potential in culture. These results suggest that reductions in growth factor requirements are primary events in the carcinogenic process. (author)

  11. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  12. An experimental platform for studying growth and invasiveness of tumor cells within teratomas derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tzukerman, Maty; Rosenberg, Tzur; Ravel, Yael; Reiter, Irena; Coleman, Raymond; Skorecki, Karl

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (e.g., tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. When implanted into immunocompromised mice, human embryonic stem cells develop teratomas containing complex structures comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germ line-derive...

  13. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  15. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  16. Inducing effects of hepatocyte growth factor on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human colorectal carcinoma cells through MEK and PI3K signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-hua; WEI Wei; XU Hao; WANG Yan-yan; WU Wen-xi

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a key role in human colorectal carcinoma invasion and metastasis. However, the regulation mechanism remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that several cytokines can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor cells. In this study, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Methods Hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in human serum were measured by ELISA.The mRNA level of vascular endothelial growth factor was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. Western blot assay was performed to evaluate levels of c-Met and several other proteins involved in the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in colorectal carcinoma cells.Results Serum hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly increased in colorectal carcinoma subjects. In vitro extraneous hepatocyte growth factor markedly increased protein and mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells. Hepatocyte growth factor induced phosphorylation of c-Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in a dose-dependent manner. Specific inhibitors on MEK and PI3K inhibited the hepatocyte growth factor-induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Conclusion This present study indicates that hepatocyte growth factor upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells via the MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways.

  17. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors

  18. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  19. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor), HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3) were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1). The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml), with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D). HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab

  20. Transfection of gene Livin α/β into A549 cells and separate effect on the cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian-guo; LIAO Rong-xia; CHEN Zheng-tang; WANG Zhi-xin; ZHANG Qing; HU Yi-de; WANG Dong-lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To express two Livin isoforms (Livin α & β genes) with transfection techniques in A549 cell line respectively in order to observe their effect on growth of cell line. Methods:Two eukaryotic expression vectors of Livin, pcDNA3.1-Livin α & β, were transfected into A549 cell line by electroporation. Then G418-resistant clones were screened. RT-PCR, Northern blot and immunofluorescence cytochemistry were used to detect Livin α & β expression level in the transfected cells. Finally, observation of cell morphology, growth curve assay and colony formation analysis were performed to explore the effect of Livin on growth of the cells. Results:Livin α & β were expressed in transfected A549 cells, and induced a faster cell growth, shorter doubling time and stronger cell colony forming ability, yet had no morphology change.Conclusion:Both isoforms can accelerate the growth of A549 cells, indicating a close relationship between Livin expression and the genesis and development of lung cancer. The expression of Livin α & β in A549 cells provides basis for further study of their different biological functions of anti-apoptosis and of their role in lung cancer cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  1. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  2. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  3. Ca-alginate hydrogel mechanical transformations--the influence on yeast cell growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajić-Lijaković, Ivana; Plavsić, Milenko; Bugarski, Branko; Nedović, Viktor

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe yeast cell growth within the Ca-alginate microbead during air-lift bioreactor cultivation. Model development was based on experimentally obtained data for the intra-bead cell concentration profile, after reached the equilibrium state, as well as, total yeast cell concentration per microbed and microbead volume as function of time. Relatively uniform cell concentration in the carrier matrix indicated that no internal nutrient diffusion limitations, but microenvironmental restriction, affected dominantly the dynamics of cell growth. Also interesting phenomenon of very different rates of cell number growth during cultivation is observed. After some critical time, the growth rate of cell colonies decreased drastically, but than suddenly increased again under all other experimental condition been the same. It is interpreted as disintegration of gel network and opening new free space for growth of cell clusters. These complex phenomena are modeled using the thermodynamical, free energy formalism. The particular form of free energy functional is proposed to describe various kinds of interactions, which affected the dynamics of cell growth and cause pseudo-phase transition of hydrogel. The good agreement of experimentally obtained data and model predictions are obtained. In that way the model provides both, the quantitative tools for further technological optimization of the process and deeper insight into dynamics of cell growth mechanism. PMID:17331608

  4. Evidence for osmoregulation of cell growth and buoyant density in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kubitschek, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The buoyant density of cells of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 increased with the osmolarity of the growth medium. Growth rate and its variability were also dependent upon the osmolarity of the medium. Maximum growth rates and minimum variability of these rates were obtained in Luria broth by addition of NaCl to a concentration of about 0.23 M.

  5. Rice Coleoptile Growth under Water and in Air-Possible Effect of Buoyancy on Growth and Cell Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Kah-Siew, Tan; Takayuki, Hoson; Seiichiro, Kamisaka; Yoshio, Masuda

    1992-01-01

    Maximum growth was achieved in rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L. cv. Sasanishiki) grown under water; they reached maximum length of 81.2 mm on day 5. The maximum length of coleoptiles grown in air or under water with air bubbling was 12.4 mm and 23.5 mm in day 5,respectively. Differences in coleoptile growth between air bubbling and air conditions, namely approximately 11 mm at day 5,could be due to buoyancy effect under water. Promoted growth under water was due to a decrease in cell wall ex...

  6. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhan-Chang; Jia Xiao-Peng; Huang Guo-Feng; Hu Mei-Hua; Li Yong; Yan Bing-Min; Ma Hong-An

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT).We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments.Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth.These results are in good agreement with our experimental data,which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell.The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM.Furthermore,this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal.

  7. FEM simulations and experimental studies of the temperature field in a large diamond crystal growth cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the temperature field variation in the growth region of a diamond crystal in a sealed cell during the whole process of crystal growth by using the temperature gradient method (TGM) at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT). We employ both the finite element method (FEM) and in situ experiments. Simulation results show that the temperature in the center area of the growth cell continues to decrease during the process of large diamond crystal growth. These results are in good agreement with our experimental data, which demonstrates that the finite element model can successfully predict the temperature field variations in the growth cell. The FEM simulation will be useful to grow larger high-quality diamond crystal by using the TGM. Furthermore, this method will be helpful in designing better cells and improving the growth process of gem-quality diamond crystal. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  9. Function of Membrane-Associated Proteoglycans in the Regulation of Satellite Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Muscle growth can be divided into embryonic and postnatal periods. During the embryonic period, mesenchymal stem cells proliferate and differentiate to form muscle fibers. Postnatal muscle growth (hypertrophy) is characterized by the enlargement of existing muscle fiber size. Satellite cells (also known as adult myoblasts) are responsible for hypertrophy. The activity of satellite cells can be regulated by their extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is composed of collagens, proteoglycans, non-collagenous glycoproteins, cytokines and growth factors. Proteoglycans contain a central core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs: chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate) and N- or O-linked glycosylation chains. Membrane-associated proteoglycans attach to the cell membrane either through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor or transmembrane domain. The GAGs can bind proteins including cytokines and growth factors. Both cytokines and growth factors play important roles in regulating satellite cell growth and development. Cytokines are generally associated with immune cells. However, cytokines can also affect muscle cell development. For instance, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leukemia inhibitory factor have been reported to affect the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts. Growth factors are potent stimulators or inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. The proper function of some cytokines and growth factors requires an interaction with the cell membrane-associated proteoglycans to enhance the affinity to bind to their primary receptors to initiate downstream signal transduction. This chapter is focused on the interaction of membrane-associated proteoglycans with cytokines and growth factors, and their role in satellite cell growth and development. PMID:27003397

  10. Inhibition of human gastric carcinoma cell growth by atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Liu; Wei Tang; Xian-Jun Qu; Wen-Fang Xu; Shu-Xiang Cui; Yong Zhou; Yun-Xia Yuan; Ming-Hui Chen; Ruo-Han Wang; Ruo-Yan Gai; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the growth inhibition efficacy of atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil (TFU)on human gastric carcinoma cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45.METHODS:Cell growth inhibition by TFU was measured by MTT and clonogenic assays without or with liver microsomal enzymes. Xenografts of cancer cells in nude mice were employed to study the anti-proliferative effects of TFU in vivo,RESULTS:TFU inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells. However, the inhibitory effects of TFU on cell growth were not significant. The inhibition rates were enhanced in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes, ranging 4.73%-48.57% in SGC-7901 cells and 9.0%-62.02% in MKN-45 cells. In vivo, TFU delayed the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells in nude mice. The inhibition rates were 40.49%, 63.24%, and 75.98% in SGC-7901 cells and 40.76%, 61.41%, and 82.07% in MKN-45 cells when the oral doses were 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. TFU treatment was generally well tolerated by mice with less than 20% reduction in body weight.CONCLUSION:TFU inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cells. The inhibition rates are increased in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes. The efficacy of TFU may be associated with the sustaining release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) mediated by the enzymes.

  11. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state

  12. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrillo Juan I

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for

  13. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Pyoung-Han [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang-Yun [Department of Alternative Therapy, School of Alternative Medicine and Health Science, Jeonju University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae-Yeol, E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  14. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  15. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tissue specific in vivo growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupski, T; Harding, M A; Herce, M E; Gulding, K M; Stoler, M H; Theodorescu, D

    2001-01-01

    Despite the fact that cancer cells can be found in many vascular beds, continued growth of the metastatic tumor focus exhibits a significant degree of 'organ tropism', with only certain organs exhibiting the ravages of metastatic disease. Since a limiting factor to the growth of metastases beyond 2 mm in diameter, may be a lack of angiogenesis, we sought to determine whether tumor overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic factor related to prostate cancer metastasis, is causally related to organ specific tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model. LnCaP-C4-2 is a subline of the human prostate cancer cell line LnCaP which unlike its parent, has a predilection for growth in bone, a common site for human prostate cancer metastasis. LnCaP-C4-2, is tumorigenic when injected intrafemorally in mice but requires co-injection of stromal components (Matrigel) to be tumorigenic in the subcutaneous site. Because of this site-specific tumorigenicity profile and relatively low VEGF mRNA and protein expression, this line was transfected with a full length cDNA encoding the 165 isoform of VEGF. Cells either overexpressing or not expressing the transfected gene were selected for study in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF did not seem to affect in vitro cell growth. Such overexpression did affect tumorigenicity and in vivo tumor growth rates when cells were inoculated in the subcutaneus site. Interestingly, the dependency of subcutaneous tumorigenicity on Matrigel co-inoculation was still observed in cells overexpressing VEGF. In contrast to the impact that VEGF overexpression has on subcutaneous tumorigenicity, no such effect was observed when cells were inoculated in orthotopic/prostate (primary) or intrafemoral (metastatic) sites. In view of the importance of tumor-stromal interactions in growth of xenografts, we sought to determine if the host strain is important to the observed tumorigenicity effects of VEGF overexpression

  16. Retinoic acid. Inhibition of the clonal growth of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Douer, D; Koeffler, H P

    1982-01-01

    Vitamin A and its analogues (retinoids) affect normal and malignant hematopoietic cells. We examined the effect of retinoids on the clonal growth in vitro of myeloid leukemia cells. Retinoic acid inhibited the clonal growth of the KG-1, acute myeloblastic leukemia, and the HL-60, acute promyelocytic leukemia, human cell lines. The KG-1 cells were extremely sensitive to retinoic acid, with 50% of the colonies inhibited by 2.4-nM concentrations of the drug. A 50% growth inhibition of HL-60 was ...

  17. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  18. Research on the Structure of Fish Collagen Nanofibers Influenced Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is highlighted in biomaterials field. The structures of nanofibers depend on various parameters, which are related closely to the bioactivity of biomaterials. The aim of this research is to analyze the structure of fish collagen nanofibers and to propose the new criterion for cell growth. This paper focused on the flow rate of solvent during the electrospinning. Through the cell culture, the relationship of the structure and cell growth is investigated. The results obtained in this study provide an understanding of the behaviors of cell growth under different structure of fish collagen nanofibers scaffold.

  19. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  20. Extracellular vesicle–depleted fetal bovine and human sera have reduced capacity to support cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erez Eitan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fetal bovine serum (FBS is the most widely used serum supplement for mammalian cell culture. It supports cell growth by providing nutrients, growth signals, and protection from stress. Attempts to develop serum-free media that support cell expansion to the same extent as serum-supplemented media have not yet succeeded, suggesting that FBS contains one or more as-yet-undefined growth factors. One potential vehicle for the delivery of growth factors from serum to cultured cells is extracellular vesicles (EVs. Methods: EV-depleted FBS and human serum were generated by 120,000g centrifugation, and its cell growth–supporting activity was measured. Isolated EVs from FBS were quantified and characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein assay. EV internalization into cells was quantified using fluorescent plate reader analysis and microscopy. Results: Most cell types cultured with EV-depleted FBS showed a reduced growth rate but not an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent etoposide and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–inducing chemical tunicamycin. Supplying cells with isolated FBS-derived EVs enhanced their growth. FBS-derived EVs were internalized by mouse and human cells wherein 65±26% of them interacted with the lysosomes. EV-depleted human serum also exhibited reduced cell growth–promoting activity. Conclusions: EVs play a role in the cell growth and survival-promoting effects of FBS and human serum. Thus, it is important to take the effect of EV depletion under consideration when planning EV extraction experiments and while attempting to develop serum-free media that support rapid cell expansion. In addition, these findings suggest roles for circulating EVs in supporting cell growth and survival in vivo.

  1. Upregulator of cell proliferation predicts poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma and contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis by downregulating FOXO3a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Xie

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to investigate the potential correlation between the expression level of upregulator of cell proliferation (URGCP/URG4 and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and to examine the biological function of URGCP/URG4 in the progression of HCC, to better understand its underlying molecular mechanism in hepatic tumorigenesis. DESIGN: URGCP/URG4 expression was analyzed in 15 HCC cell lines, in 278 archived paraffin-embedded HCC sections, and in 10 pairs of fresh HCC tumor and para-tumor non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC and Western blotting analysis (WB. The effect of URGCP/URG4 on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis was examined in vitro and in vivo. WB and luciferase reporter analyses were performed to identify the effects of URGCP/URG4-overexpression or -knockdown on expression of cell cycle regulators and transcriptional activity of FOXO3a. RESULTS: IHC results revealed an upregulation of URGCP/URG4 in all HCC cell lines and fresh HCC samples as compared with normal liver cells and para-tumor tissues, respectively. URGCP/URG4 was also expressed at a high level in 122 of the 278 (43.8% archived HCC specimens. The expression level of URGCP/URG4 was significantly correlated with clinical staging and poor patient survival of HCC in the study cohort, and in various clinical subgroups. Strikingly, ectopic expression of URGCP/URG4 induced proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of HCC cells, while silencing of URGCP/URG4 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, URGCP/URG4 overexpression in HCC cells increased cellular entry into the G1/S transitional phase, associated with downregulation of p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1 and upregulation of cyclin D1. These effects were accompanied by enhanced Akt activity and reduced FOXO3a transcriptional activity. CONCLUSIONS: URGCP/URG4 plays an important role in promoting proliferation and tumorigenesis of HCC and may represent a novel prognostic

  2. Cell growth stimulating effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores and their potential application for Chinese hamster ovary K1 cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ding; Zhong, Qi; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Jufang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, water-soluble extracts of Ganoderma lucidum spores (Gls), a Chinese medicinal herb that possesses cell growth stimulating function, were found to be an effective growth factor for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultivation. The Gls extract was prepared and supplemented to CHO K1 cell culture media with various serum levels. Our results obtained from both the static culture and the spinner-flask suspension culture showed that use of small-amount Gls extract effectively promoted cell growth and suppressed cell apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with normal cell cycle maintained in a low-serum medium. The low-serum medium containing 1 % (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0.01 % (w/v) Gls extract showed a comparable performance on both cell growth and fusion protein productivity with the conventional CHO culture medium containing 10 % (v/v) FBS and a commercial serum-free medium. This is the first study of the potential of Gls extracts for use as an alternative cell growth factor and nutrient for CHO cells. The findings have presented a new approach to economic cultivation of CHO cells for therapeutic protein production. PMID:26921102

  3. Optimization of Dairy Sludge for Growth of Rhizobium Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Kumar Singh; Gauri Singh; Digvijay Gautam; Manjinder Kaur Bedi

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with differ...

  4. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M.; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T.

    1986-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growth of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound /sup 125/I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients.

  5. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growth of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of 125I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound 125I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients

  6. Deletion of inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1 (IP6K1) reduces cell migration and invasion, conferring protection from aerodigestive tract carcinoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Rathan S; Kumar, Dharmika; Buwa, Natasha; Ganguli, Shubhra; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Bhandari, Rashna

    2016-08-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks), a family of enzymes found in all eukaryotes, are responsible for the synthesis of 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-IP7) from inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Three isoforms of IP6Ks are found in mammals, and gene deletions of each isoform lead to diverse, non-overlapping phenotypes in mice. Previous studies show a facilitatory role for IP6K2 in cell migration and invasion, properties that are essential for the early stages of tumorigenesis. However, IP6K2 also has an essential role in cancer cell apoptosis, and mice lacking this protein are more susceptible to the development of aerodigestive tract carcinoma upon treatment with the oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Not much is known about the functions of the equally abundant and ubiquitously expressed IP6K1 isoform in cell migration, invasion and cancer progression. We conducted a gene expression analysis on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking IP6K1, revealing a role for this protein in cell receptor-extracellular matrix interactions that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Consequently, cells lacking IP6K1 manifest defects in adhesion-dependent signaling, evident by lower FAK and Paxillin activation, leading to reduced cell spreading and migration. Expression of active, but not inactive IP6K1 reverses migration defects in IP6K1 knockout MEFs, suggesting that 5-IP7 synthesis by IP6K1 promotes cell locomotion. Actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration support the ability of cancer cells to achieve their complete oncogenic potential. Cancer cells with lower IP6K1 levels display reduced migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. When fed an oral carcinogen, mice lacking IP6K1 show reduced progression from epithelial dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Thus, our data reveal that like IP6K2, IP6K1 is also involved in early cytoskeleton remodeling events during cancer progression. However, unlike IP6K2, IP6K1 is essential for 4NQO

  7. Gremlin is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma and increases cell growth and proliferation in normal lung cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Mulvihill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gremlin, a member of the Dan family of BMP antagonists, is a glycosylated extracellular protein. Previously Gremlin has been shown to play a role in dorsal-ventral patterning, in tissue remodeling, and recently in angiogenesis. Evidence has previously been presented showing both over- and under-expression of Gremlin in different tumor tissues. Here, we sought to quantify expression of Gremlin in cancers of the lung and performed in vitro experiments to check whether Gremlin promotes cell growth and proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of Gremlin in 161 matched tumor and normal lung cancer specimens is quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and protein level is measured by immunohistochemistry. GREM1 was transfected into lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines to assess the impact of overexpression of Gremlin in vitro. RESULTS: Lung adenocarcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma shows a significant increase in Gremlin expression by mRNA and protein level. Lung fibroblast and epithelial cell lines transfected with GREM1 show significantly increased cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Gremlin acts in an oncogenic manner in lung adenocarcinoma and could hold promise as a new diagnostic marker or potential therapeutic target in lung AD or general thoracic malignancies.

  8. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M;

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CC...

  9. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P;

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected ...

  10. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiss, Dietmar M.W.; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.; Roovers, Rob C.; Coffer, Paul J.; Sijts, Alice J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, m...

  11. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells. PMID:18469090

  12. Fatty acid control of growth of human cervical and endometrial cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, R P; Ayub, M.; Wright, J T; Wood, C B; Habib, N.A.; Soutter, W P; Sullivan, M. H.; White, J. O.

    1990-01-01

    Stearic acid and iodo-stearic and inhibited cell growth in a cervical cancer cell line (HOG-1) in a dose-related manner, with a half maximal effect at 50 microM stearic acid. Addition of oleic acid abrogated the effect of stearic acid. EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and growth of HOG-1 cells was inhibited in the presence of stearic acid without any apparent effect on EGF receptor number or affinity.

  13. Influence of growth conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; Plotkin, B. J.; Klimas, D M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of cultural conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata was tested. C. albicans cells grown at room temperature were more hydrophobic than cells grown at 37 degrees C. No consistent pattern was observed with C. glabrata. Relative hydrophobicity was found to vary with the growth phase and growth medium for both species. The implications for pathogenesis studies are discussed.

  14. In vivo cell wall loosening by hydroxyl radicals during cress seed germination and elongation growth

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Vreeburg, Robert A. M.; Fry, Stephen C; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of plant life cycles, including seed germination, elongation growth and fruit ripening. Here we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical (•OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and seedling growth. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spectroscopy to show that •OH is generated in the cell wall during radicle elongation and weakening of the endosperm of cress (Lepidium sativ...

  15. Growth inhibition of thyroid follicular cell-derived cancers by the opioid growth factor (OGF - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donahue Renee N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is an uncommon cancer, but the most frequent malignancy of the endocrine system. Most thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cell. Follicular carcinoma (FTC is considered more malignant than papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human cancers. Opioid Growth Factor (OGF; chemical term - [Met5]-enkephalin and its receptor, OGFr, form an inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation. Both the peptide and receptor have been detected in a wide variety of cancers, and OGF is currently used clinically as a biotherapy for some non-thyroid neoplasias. This study addressed the question of whether the OGF-OGFr axis is present and functional in human thyroid follicular cell - derived cancer. Methods Utilizing human ATC (KAT-18, PTC (KTC-1, and FTC (WRO 82-1 cell lines, immunohistochemistry was employed to ascertain the presence and location of OGF and OGFr. The growth characteristics in the presence of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX, and the specificity of opioid peptides for proliferation of ATC, were established in KAT-18 cells. Dependence on peptide and receptor were investigated using neutralization studies with antibodies and siRNA experiments, respectively. The mechanism of peptide action on DNA synthesis and cell survival was ascertained. The ubiquity of the OGF-OGFr axis in thyroid follicular cell-derived cancer was assessed in KTC-1 (PTC and WRO 82-1 (FTC tumor cells. Results OGF and OGFr were present in KAT-18 cells. Concentrations of 10-6 M OGF inhibited cell replication up to 30%, whereas NTX increased cell growth up to 35% relative to cultures treated with sterile water. OGF treatment reduced cell number by as much as 38% in KAT-18 ATC in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. OGF antibodies neutralized the inhibitory effects of OGF, and siRNA knockdown of OGFr negated growth inhibition by OGF. Cell survival

  16. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li, Hai Wang, Bin Yang, Jichen Yang, Xiuyan Ruan, Yadong Yang, Edward K. Wakeland, Quanzhen Li, Xiangdong Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC and further evaluated the growth and apoptosis status of SMC and HuVEC. After SMC and HuVEC were exposed to CO for 7-day, the growth of SMC and HuVEC was significantly inhibited by CO in vitro on day 5 of CO exposure. And CO blocked cell cycle progress of SMC and HuVEC, more SMC and HuVEC stagnated at G0/G1 phase by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, CO treatment inhibited SMC and HuVEC apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide through decreasing caspase 3 and 9 activities. To confirm the molecular mechanism of CO effect on SMC and HuVEC growth, we compared the gene expression profile in SMC and CO-treated SMC, HuVEC and CO-treated HuVEC. By microarray analysis, we found the expression level of some genes which are related to cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and apoptosis were changed during CO exposure. We further identified that the down-regulated CDK2 contributed to arresting cell growth and the down-regulated Caspase 3 (CASP3 and Caspase 9 (CASP9 were associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, CO exerts a certain growth arrest on SMC and HuVEC by inhibiting cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase and has regulatory effect on cell apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated genes.

  17. Effects of EPO Gene on Growth and Apoptosis of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line A549

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing WU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Published data on the association between erythropoietin (EPO and cancer cell are inconclusive. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of erythropoietin (EPO on the growth and survival of lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Methods The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(--hEPO was constructed and transfected into A549 cells by liposome protoco1. The Levels of EPO in culture supernatant were detected by ELISA. Effects of EPO gene on growth and survival of the transfected cells were evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM . Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were also evaluated by ELISA. Results The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(--hEPO was successfully constructed. The growth of cells in hEPO transfected cells was significantly inhibited after transfection (P < 0.01. More cells were blocked in S phase in hEPO transfected group compared with control group (P < 0.05, and the apoptotic rate were also significantly higher than those of their controls (P < 0.01. Levels of VEGF in hEPO transfected cells were significantly lower than controls (P < 0.01. Conclusion Exogenous EPO gene expression in A549 cells can induce cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of A549 cells, and expression of VEGF can also be inhibited.

  18. Effect of tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 on growth inhibition of MG63 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qin; Yang Lin; Wenjian Chen; Wentao Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the osteosarcoma cell sublines which stably expressing tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) gene and evaluate its effect on growth inhibition of human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pCI-TSLC1 was stably transfected into MG63 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. The positive clones were developed by selection by G418. Biological characteristics of one of the 6 cell lines which highly expressing TSLC1, namely, the M8T were studied. Cell growth was analyzed with MTT assay. 2 × 107 cells suspended in 0.2 mL phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected into the two flanks of 5-6-week-old female BALB/C nu/nu athymic nude mice. The volumes of subcutaneous of tumor growth were evaluated and calculated by the formula V= Length × Width × Height × 0.5 once a week. Results: The M8T cell subline which stably expressing TSLC1 was characterized by Western blot. The genetic stability and purity of M8T cells were stable. TSLC1 significantly suppressed the growth of M8T cells in vitro. Moreover, the tumorigenicity of M8T cells was suppressed in vivo. Conclusion: The osteosarcoma cell sublines M8T which stably expressing TSLC1 had been successfully established. The ability of growth and metastasis of M8T was significantly suppressed both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Effects of transforming growth interacting factor on biological behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang Hu; Ji-Fang Wen; De-Sheng Xiao; Hui Zhen; Chun-Yan Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM:Transforming growth interacting factor (TGIF) is an inhibitor of both transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, the activation of MAPK pathway can prolong its half-life. However, its role in carcinogenesis is still unknown. Thus we attempted to investigate the effect of TGIF on biologic behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells.METHODS: Gastric carcinoma cell line, SGC-7901, was stably transfected with plasmid PcDNA3.1-TGIF. Western blotting and cell immunohistochemistry screening for the highly expressing clone of TGIF were employed. The growth of transfected cells was investigated by MTT and colonyformation assays, and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy.Tumorigenicity of the transfectant cells was also analyzed.RESULTS: TGIF had no effect on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, but cellular organelles of cells transfected with TGIF were richer than those of vector control or parental cells. Its clones were smaller than the control ones in plate efficiency, and its tumor tissues also had no obvious necrosis compared with the vector control or parental cells. Moreover, TGIF could resist TGF-β mediated growth inhibition.CONCLUSION: TGIF may induce differentiation of stomach neoplastic cells. In addition, TGIF can counteract the growth inhibition induced by TGF-β.

  20. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  1. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  2. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  3. The Kinetic of Growth Cell of Neurospora Sitophila at Phythohormone Production Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of growth cell kinetic of Neurospora Sitophila at Phythohormone production medium has been done. The growth of this mould at Mendel broth medium is affected by pH and glucose concentration. In the enriched medium by 2 % glucose content and pH 4.5 shows the optimal growth of cell with specific growth rate by 0.0785 per hour. The changing of pH connected with the growth cell curve, so this moment as an indicator of cell harvest time. At the stationary phase to dead phase is explained by pH changed between 2.80-2.85. This phase may be estimated as a time of Phythohormone synthesize by mold. (author)

  4. Perineural Growth in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Joseph; Muelleman, Thomas; Tawfik, Ossama; Thomas, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural growth is a unique route of tumor metastasis that is associated with poor prognosis in several solid malignancies. It is diagnosed by the presence of tumor cells inside the neural space seen on histological or imaging evaluations. Little is known about molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and spread of tumor cells in neural spaces. The poor prognosis associated with perineural growth and lack of targeted approaches necessitates the study of molecular factors involved in communication between tumor and neural cells. Perineural growth rates, shown to be as high as 63% in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), correlate with increased local recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Here we describe the literature on perineural growth in HNSCC. In addition, we discuss factors implicated in perineural growth of cancer. These factors include brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotropin-3 and -4, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), substance P (SP), and chemokines. We also explore the literature on membrane receptors, including the Trk family and the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor. This review highlights areas for further study of the mechanisms of perineural invasion which may facilitate the identification of therapeutic targets in HNSCC. PMID:25456006

  5. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G; Lee, Scott J; Hazen, Samuel P; Leschine, Susan B

    2016-02-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  6. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  7. Growth Inhibition Effect of DL-Lysine Acetylalicylate on sw480 Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu; TIAN Xiao-feng; WANG Li-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate on proliferation of colon carcinoma cells line sw480. Methods: After treatment of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate, the study was performed by observing sw480 colorectal cancer cells with phase contrast microscope, making growth curve, and examining the inhibition rate of sw480 cells with MTT assay. Results: The morphology of sw480 cells showed characteristics of apoptosis, the cell growth curve showed inhibited proliferation of sw480 cells when treated with DL-lysine acetylsalicylate (P<0.05). The rate of inhibition was upward when the drug concentration increased. Conclusion: DL-lysine acetylsalicylate for injection can inhibit the growth of sw480 colorectal cancer cells obviously in a dose dependent manner.

  8. Angiogenin mediates androgen-stimulated growth of prostate cancer cells and correlates with castration resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Miaofen G.; Sun, Yeqing; YOSHIOKA, NORIE; IBARAGI, SOICHIRO; Sheng, Jinghao; Sun, Guangjie; Kishimoto, Koji; Hu, Guo-fu

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a critical effector of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen-dependent PCa rely on the function of AR for growth and progression. Many castration-resistant PCa continue to depend on AR signaling for survival and growth. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is essential for both androgen-dependent and castration-resistant growth of PCa cells. During androgen-dependent growth of prostate cells, androgen-AR signaling leads to the accumulation of rRNA. However, the...

  9. Simultaneous Measurement of Growth and Movement of Cells Exploiting On-Chip Single-Cell Cultivation Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Senkei; Hattori, Akihiro; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yasuda, Kenji

    2004-03-01

    We have developed an on-chip single-cell microcultivation assay as a means of simultaneously observing the growth and movement of single bacterial cells during long-term cultivation. This assay enables the direct observation of single cells captured in microchambers fabricated on thin glass slides and having semipermeable membrane lids, in which the cells can swim within the space without escape for the long periods. Using this system, the relationship between the cell cycle and the tendency of movement was observed and it was found that the mean free path length did not change during the cell cycle, and that the growth and the swimming were not synchronized. The result indicates that the ability of movement of the cells was independent of the cell cycle.

  10. Specific immunotherapy generates CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells to suppress lung cancer growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Jing; Chen, Huiguo; Wu, Weibin; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Weng, Yimin; Liao, Hongying; Gu, Lijia

    2016-08-01

    That specific immunotherapy can inhibit cancer growth has been recognized; its efficiency is to be improved. This study aimed to inhibit lung cancer (LC) growth in a mouse model by using an LC-specific vaccination. In this study, a LC mouse model was created by adoptive transplantation with LC cells. The tumor-bearing mice were vaccinated with LC cell extracts plus adjuvant TNBS or adoptive transplantation with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. The results showed that the vaccination with LC extracts (LCE)/TNBS markedly inhibited the LC growth and induced CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC tissue and the spleen. These CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells proliferated and produce high levels of perforin upon exposure to LCE and specifically induced LC cell apoptosis. Exposure to TNBS induced RAW264.7 cells to produce macrophage inflammatory protein-3α; the latter activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and further induced perforin expression in the CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells suppressed LC growth in mice. In conclusion, immunization with LC extracts and TNBS can induce LC-specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC-bearing mice and inhibit LC growth. PMID:26910585

  11. Angiostatin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and growth in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding-Zhong Yang; Jing He; Ji-Cheng Zhang; Zhuo-Ren Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the biologic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the potential value of angiostatin gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.METHODS: The recombinant vector pcDNA3.1(+)-angiostatin was transfected into human pancreatic cancer cells PC-3 with Lipofectamine 2000, and paralleled with the vector and mock control. Angiostatin transcription and protein expression were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The stable cell line was selected by G418. The supernatant was collected to treat endothelial cells. Cell proliferation and growth in vitro were observed under microscope. Cell growth curves were plotted.The troms-fected or untroms-fected cells overexpressing angiostatin vector were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. The size of tumors was measured, and microvessel density count (MVD) in tumor tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry with primary anti-CD34antibody.RESULTS: After transfected into PC-3 with Lipofectamine 2000 and selected by G418, macroscopic resistant cell clones were formed in the experimental group transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)-angiostatin and vector control. But untreated cells died in the mock control. Angiostatin protein expression was detected in the experimental group by immunofluorescence and Western-blot. Cell proliferation and growth in vitro in the three groups were observed respectively under microscope. After treatment with supernatant, significant differences were observed in endothelial cell (ECV-304) growth in vitro. The cell proliferation and growth were inhibited. In nude mice model, markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and slowed tumor expansion were observed in the experimental group as compared to controls, which was parallel to the decreased microvessel density in and around tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: Angiostatin does not directly inhibit human pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and growth in vitro,but it inhibits endothelial cell growthin vitro. It exerts the anti

  12. The intrusive growth of initial cells in re-arangement of cells in cambium of Tilia cordata Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Włoch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the cambium of linden producing wood with short period of grain inclination change (2-4 years, the intensive reorientation of cells takes place. This is possible mainly through an intrusive growth of cell ends from one radial file entering space between tangential walls of neighboring file and through unequal periclinal divisions that occur in the "initial surface". The intrusive growth is located on the longitudinal edge of a fusiform cell close to the end, and causes deviation of cell ends in a neighbouring file from the initial surface. Unequal periclinal division divides a cell with a deviated end into two derivatives, unequal in size. The one of them, which inherits the deviated end, leaves the initial surface becoming a xylem or phloem mother cell. This means that the old end is eliminated. The intensity of intrusive growth and unequal periclinal divisions is decisive for the velocity of cambial cell reorientation. The oriented intrusive growth occurs only in the initial cells. For that reason, changes in cell-ends position do not occur within one packet of cells but are distinct between neighbouring packets.

  13. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bud Nelson; Nyhus, Julie K; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Emilio Barbera-Guillem

    2001-01-01

    High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, a...

  14. Tumor Cells Express FcγRI Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, M. Bud; Nyhus, Julie K; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Barbera-Guillem, Emilio

    2001-01-01

    High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRI expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, a...

  15. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Michael Reiter; Igor Tsaur; Georg Bartsch; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regu...

  16. Mechanism of divergent growth factor effects in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy; Haack-Sorensen, M.; Kassem, Moustapha; Mann, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Closely related signals often lead to very different cellular outcomes. We found that the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells into bone-forming cells is stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) but not platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics...... it as a possible control point. Indeed, chemical inhibition of PI3K in PDGF-stimulated cells removed the differential effect of the two growth factors, bestowing full differentiation effect onto PDGF. Thus, quantitative proteomics can directly compare entire signaling networks and discover critical...

  17. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors

  18. Measurements of prolactin and growth hormone synthesis and secretion by rat pituitary cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautvik, K M; Kriz, M

    1976-02-01

    A specific and sensitive immunoprecipitation method for measurements of biosynthesized radioactive prolactin and growth hormone is described. Antisera to rat prolactin and growth hormone were developed in the rabbit and monkey, respectively. The specificity of the immune sera was assessed by polyacylamide gel electrophoresis of the dissolved immunoprecipitates. The two antisera showed cross-reactions with the nonhomologous hormone of less than 1%. Separation of tritium-labelled prolactin and growth hormone by immunoprecipitation, followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate was shown to be 95-57% complete. When both hormones were measured in the same microsample by sequential immunoprecipitation, the reaction was 97% complete for determination of intra- and extracellular prolactin and extracellular growth hormone, but 85% complete for determination of intracellular growth hormone. This method has been used to characterize the basal synthesis and secretion of prolactin and growth hormone in three different but related, pituitary cell strains. Radioactive prolactin and growth hormone was obtained from monolayer cultures when the cells were grown in the presence of [3H]L-leucine. The rate of prolactin synthesis and extracellular accumulation was higher than that of growth hormone in a cell strain which produced both hormones. In these cells prolactin synthesis represents 1-5%, and growth hormone 0.1-0.6% of total protein synthesis. PMID:942913

  19. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences (BK21 program), Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  20. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  1. Interleukin 1 is an autocrine regulator of human endothelial cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferation of endothelial cells is regulated through the autocrine production of growth factors and the expression of cognate surface receptors. In this study, the authors demonstrate that interleukin 1 (IL-1) is an inhibitor of endothelial growth in vitro and in vivo. IL-1 arrested growing, cultured endothelial cells in G1 phase; inhibition of proliferation was dose dependent and occurred in parallel with occupancy of endothelial surface IL-1 receptors. In an angiogenesis model, IL-1 could inhibit fibroblast growth factor-induced vessel formation. The autocrine nature of the IL-1 effect on endothelial proliferation was demonstrated by the observation that occupancy of cell-surface receptors by endogenous IL-1 depressed cell growth. The potential significance of this finding was emphasized by the detection of IL-1 in the native endothelium of human umbilical veins. A mechanism by which IL-1 may exert its inhibitory effect on endothelial cell growth was suggested by studies showing that IL-1 decreased the expression of high-affinity fibroblast growth factor binding sites on endothelium. These results point to a potentially important role of IL-1 in regulating blood vessel growth the suggest that autocrine production of inhibitory factors may be a mechanism controlling proliferation of normal cells

  2. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  3. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-Zhu Li; Hong-Xia Deng; Wen-Zhu Lou; Xue-Yan Sun; Meng-Wan Song; Jing Tao; Bing-Xiu Xiao; Jun-Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. METHODS: Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G0/G1 phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G2/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G0/G1 phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. CONCLUSION: The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and S phases.

  4. Phosphorus deficiency inhibits cell division but not growth in the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen eLi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-hour diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus.

  5. Intratracheal Administration of Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor Promotes Alveolar Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Compensatory Lung Growth in Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is considered to be one of the most important mitogens for lung epithelial cells. The objectives of this study were to confirm the effectiveness of intratracheal injection of recombinant human KGF (rhKGF) during compensatory lung growth and to optimize the instillation protocol. Here, trilobectomy in adult rat was performed, followed by intratracheal rhKGF instillation with low (0.4 mg/kg) and high (4 mg/kg) doses at various time-points. The proliferation of alveolar cells was assessed by the immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the residual lung. We also investigated other immunohistochemical parameters such as KGF, KGF receptor and surfactant protein A as well as terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. Consequently, intratracheal single injection of rhKGF in high dose group significantly increased PCNA labeling index (LI) of alveolar cells in the remaining lung. Surprisingly, there was no difference in PCNA LI between low and high doses of rhKGF with daily injection, and PCNA LI reached a plateau level with 2 days-consecutive administration (about 60%). Our results indicate that even at low dose, daily intratracheal injection is effective to maintain high proliferative states during the early phase of compensatory lung growth

  6. Microcarrier culture of lepidopteran cell lines: implications for growth and recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomou, Laertis; Drugmand, Jean-Christophe; Bastin, Georges; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Agathos, Spiros N

    2002-01-01

    Several microcarrier systems were screened with Sf-9 and High-Five cell lines as to their ability to support cell growth and recombinant (beta-galactosidase) protein production. Growth of both cell lines on compact microcarriers, such as Cytodex-1 and glass beads, was minimal, as cells detached easily from the microcarrier surface and grew as single cells in the medium. Cell growth was also problematic on Cytopore-1 and -2 porous microcarriers. Cells remained attached for several days inside the microcarrier pores, but no cell division and proliferation were observed. On the contrary, insect cells grew well in the interior of Fibra-Cel disks mainly as aggregates at points of fiber intersection, reaching final (plateau) densities of about 4 x 10(6) (Sf-9) and 2.7 x 10(6) (High-Five) cells mL(-1) (8 x 10(6) and 5.5 x 10(6) cells per cm(2) of projected disk area, respectively). Their growth was described well by the logistic equation, which takes into account possible inhibition effects. Beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) production of Sf-9 cells on Fibra-Cel disks (infected at 3.3 x 10(6) cells mL(-1)) was prolonged (192 h), and specific protein production was similar to that of high-density free cell infection. Cultispher-S microcarriers were found to be a very efficient system for the growth of High-Five cells, whereas no growth of Sf-9 cells took place for the same system. Concentrations of about 9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) were reached within 120 h, with cell growth in both microcarriers and aggregates, appearance of cellular bridges between microcarriers and aggregates, and eventual formation of macroaggregates incorporating several microcarriers. Specific protein productions after beta-gal baculovirus infection at increasing cell concentrations were almost constant, thus leading to elevated volumetric protein production: final beta-gal titers of 946, 1728, and 1484 U mL(-1) were obtained for infection densities of 3.4, 7.2, and 8.9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1), respectively

  7. Intercellular redistribution of cAMP underlies selective suppression of cancer cell growth by connexin26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Chandrasekhar

    Full Text Available Connexins (Cx, which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations.

  8. Growth inhibiting effects of antisense eukaryotic expression vector of proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene on human bladder