WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell aging

  1. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  2. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future. PMID:26851627

  3. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lose some function as you age during adulthood. Aging changes occur in all of the body's cells, ... and peripheral nerves are made of nerve tissue. AGING CHANGES Cells are the basic building blocks of ...

  4. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004012.htm Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells To use the ... lose some function as you age during adulthood. Aging changes occur in all of the body's cells, ...

  5. The ageing haematopoietic stem cell compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, Hartmut; de Haan, Gerald; Florian, M. Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell ageing underlies the ageing of tissues, especially those with a high cellular turnover. There is growing evidence that the ageing of the immune system is initiated at the very top of the haematopoietic hierarchy and that the ageing of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) directly contributes t

  6. The Stem Cell Hypothesis of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is probably no single way to age. Indeed, so far there is no single accepted explanation or mechanisms of aging (although more than 300 theories have been proposed. There is an overall decline in tissue regenerative potential with age, and the question arises as to whether this is due to the intrinsic aging of stem cells or rather to the impairment of stem cell function in the aged tissue environment. CONTENT: Recent data suggest that we age, in part, because our self-renewing stem cells grow old as a result of heritable intrinsic events, such as DNA damage, as well as extrinsic forces, such as changes in their supporting niches. Mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer, such as senescence and apoptosis, which rely on telomere shortening and the activities of p53 and p16INK4a may also induce an unwanted consequence: a decline in the replicative function of certain stem cells types with advancing age. This decrease regenerative capacity appears to pointing to the stem cell hypothesis of aging. SUMMARY: Recent evidence suggested that we grow old partly because of our stem cells grow old as a result of mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer over a lifetime. We believe that a further, more precise mechanistic understanding of this process will be required before this knowledge can be translated into human anti-aging therapies. KEYWORDS: stem cells, senescence, telomere, DNA damage, epigenetic, aging.

  7. NK Cells in Healthy Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier Camous; Alejandra Pera; Rafael Solana; Anis Larbi

    2012-01-01

    NK cells exhibit the highest cytotoxic capacity within the immune system. Alteration of their number or functionality may have a deep impact on overall immunity. This is of particular relevance in aging where the elderly population becomes more susceptible to infection, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases amongst others. As the fraction of elderly increases worldwide, it becomes urgent to better understand the aging of the immune system to prevent and cure the elderly ...

  8. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa B. Boyette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan.

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stem Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regardless of the precise underlying molecular mechanisms, the fundamental defining manifestation of aging is an overall decline in the functional capacity of various organs to maintain baseline tissue homeostasis and to respond adequately to physiological needs under stress. There is an increasingly urgent need for a more complete understanding of the molecular pathways and biological processes underlying aging and age-related disorders. CONTENT: Mitochondria constitute the most prominent source of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and are implicated in multiple anabolic and catabolic circuitries. In addition, mitochondria coordinate cell-wide stress responses and control non-apoptotic cell death routines. The involvement of mitochondria in both vital and lethal processes is crucial for both embryonic and postembryonic development, as well as for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Age-associated telomere damage, diminution of telomere ‘capping’ function and associated p53 activation have emerged as prime instigators of a functional decline of tissue stem cells and of mitochondrial dysfunction that adversely affect renewal and bioenergetic support in diverse tissues. Constructing a model of how telomeres, stem cells and mitochondria interact with key molecules governing genome integrity, ‘stemness’ and metabolism provides a framework for how diverse factors contribute to aging and age-related disorders. SUMMARY: Cellular senescence defined as an irreversible proliferation arrest promotes age-related decline in mammalian tissue homeostasis. The aging of tissue-specific stem cell and progenitor cell compartments is believed to be central to the decline of tissue and organ integrity and function in the elderly. Taken into consideration that the overwhelming majority of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS are of mitochondrial origin, it is reasonable to posit that the elevated ROS production might be caused by

  10. Epigenetic perturbations in aging stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Sara Russo; de Haan, Gerald

    2016-08-01

    Stem cells maintain homeostasis in all regenerating tissues during the lifespan of an organism. Thus, age-related functional decline of such tissues is likely to be at least partially explained by molecular events occurring in the stem cell compartment. Some of these events involve epigenetic changes, which may dictate how an aging genome can lead to differential gene expression programs. Recent technological advances have made it now possible to assess the genome-wide distribution of an ever-increasing number of epigenetic marks. As a result, the hypothesis that there may be a causal role for an altered epigenome contributing to the functional decline of cells, tissues, and organs in aging organisms can now be explored. In this paper, we review recent developments in the field of epigenetic regulation of stem cells, and how this may contribute to aging. PMID:27229519

  11. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging

  13. T cells and aging, January 2002 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Graham; Barnett, Yvonne; Forsey, Ros; Frasca, Daniela; Globerson, Amiela; McLeod, Julie; Caruso, Calogero; Franceschi, Claudio; Fülöp, Támás; Gupta, Sudhir; Mariani, Erminia; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Solana, Rafael

    2002-05-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system may contribute to morbidity and mortality due to decreased resistance to infection and, possibly, certain cancers in the aged. Many studies mostly performed in mice, rats and man but also including monkeys and dogs have established that age-associated immune decline is characterized by decreases in both humoral and cellular responses. The former may be largely a result of the latter, because observed changes both in the B cell germline-encoded repertoire and the age-associated decrease in somatic hypermutation of the B cell antigen receptors are now known to be critically affected by helper T cell aging. As antigen presenting cell (APC) function appears to be well-maintained in the elderly, this review will focus on the T cell. Factors contributing to T cell immunosenescence may include a) altered production of T cell progenitors (stem cell defects, stromal cell defects), b) decreased levels of newly-generated mature T cells (thymic involution), c) aging of resting immune cells, d) disrupted activation pathways in immune cells (stimulation via the T cell receptor for antigen, costimulation, apoptosis control), e) replicative senescence of clonally expanding cells. This review aims to consider the current state of knowledge on the scientific basis for and potential clinical relevance of those factors in immunosenescence in humans. Experiments in other species will be touched upon with the proviso that there are clearly differences between them, especially between humans and rodents, but exactly what those differences are is not completely clear. Given its potential importance and the increasing proportion of elderly people the world over, coupled with the realisation that whereas mortality is decreasing, morbidity may not be decreasing in parallel (1), a better understanding of the causes and impact of immunosenescence may offer the possibility of identifying where prevention or delay of onset, as well as therapeutic

  14. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enter the Aging Arena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eWilliamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a significant risk factor for the development of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Although pharmacological treatments, including statins and anti-hypertensive drugs, have improved the prognosis for patients with cardiovascular disease, it remains a leading cause of mortality in those aged 65 years and over. Furthermore, given the increased life expectancy of the population in developed countries, there is a clear need for alternative treatment strategies. Consequently, the relationship between aging and progenitor cell-mediated repair is of great interest. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an integral role in the cellular repair mechanisms for endothelial regeneration and maintenance. However, EPCs are subject to age-associated changes that diminish their number in circulation and function, thereby enhancing vascular disease risk. A great deal of research is aimed at developing strategies to harness the regenerative capacity of these cells.In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the cells termed ‘EPCs’, examine the impact of age on EPC-mediated repair and identify therapeutic targets with potential for attenuating the age-related decline in vascular health via beneficial actions on EPCs.

  15. Myocardial aging--a stem cell problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello; Urbanek, Konrad; Hosoda, Toru; Sonnenblick, Edmund H; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Bolli, Roberto

    2005-11-01

    This review questions the old paradigm that describes the heart as a post-mitotic organ and introduces the notion of the heart as a self-renewing organ regulated by a compartment of multipotent cardiac stem cells (CSCs) capable of regenerating myocytes and coronary vessels throughout life. Because of this dramatic change in cardiac biology, the objective is to provide an alternative perspective of the aging process of the heart and stimulate research in an area that pertains to all of us without exception. The recent explosion of the field of stem cell biology, with the recognition that the possibility exists for extrinsic and intrinsic regeneration of myocytes and coronary vessels, necessitates reevaluation of cardiac homeostasis and myocardial aging. From birth to senescence, the mammalian heart is composed of non-dividing and dividing cells. Loss of telomeric DNA is minimal in fetal and neonatal myocardium but rather significant in the senescent heart. Aging affects the growth and differentiation potential of CSCs interfering not only with their ability to sustain physiological cell turnover but also with their capacity to adapt to increases in pressure and volume loads. The recognition of factors enhancing the activation of the CSC pool, their mobilization, and translocation, however, suggests that the detrimental effects of aging on the heart might be prevented or reversed by local stimulation of CSCs or the intramyocardial delivery of CSCs following their expansion and rejuvenation in vitro. CSC therapy may become, perhaps, a novel strategy for the devastating problem of heart failure in the old population. PMID:16237507

  16. Aging and the Dendritic Cell System: Implications for Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system shows a decline in responsiveness to antigens both with aging, as well as in the presence of tumors. The malfunction of the immune system with age can be attributed to developmental and functional alterations in several cell populations. Previous studies have shown defects in humoral responses and abnormalities in T cell function in aged individuals, but have not distinguished between abnormalities in antigen presentation and intrinsic T cell or B cell defects in aged indivi...

  17. Genome reorganization during aging of dividing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the effect of low dose rate ionizing radiation on the long-term proliferation of fibroblasts led to the observation that radiation accentuated the growth potential of the cells, favoring events which normally take place during division. These events could be related to the genome reorganization taking place during division. Hence, it has been hypothesized that the long-term proliferation of fibroblasts depends upon the potential for reorganization of the genome, the latter being a self-limiting process. At each division residual quantitative and qualitative changes would accumulate in chromatin, limiting the long-term potential for further rearrangements. The hypothesis was checked looking for quantitative and qualitative changes in DNA through the in vitro lifespan of human fibroblast populations. It was found that at each population doubling in 20% of the cells there is unequal distribution of DNA between sister cells. Results show that this could be due to errors in chromosome assembly and segregation, to loss of DNA, to errors during semiconservative DNA synthesis and to multiple rounds of DNA replication at a single origin. An increased alkali- and thermo-lability of chromatin was found during in vitro aging. At the ultrastructural level after mild decondensation, chromatin fibers were spaced and shorter. After Miller's spreading, most of the chromatin of old cells had lost the nucleosome organization and was fragmented. These chromatin changes became apparent only towards the end of the life span of human embryonic fibroblasts but were already present in a significant fraction of low population doubling level (PDL) fibroblasts from human adults. Almost all cells of low-PDL fibroblasts from the Werner syndrome presented these chromatin changes

  18. Cellular aging of mitochondrial DNA-depleted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported that mitochondrial DNA-depleted ρ0 cells are resistant to cell death. Because aged cells have frequent mitochondrial DNA mutations, the resistance of ρ0 cells against cell death might be related to the apoptosis resistance of aged cells and frequent development of cancers in aged individuals. We studied if ρ0 cells have features simulating aged cells. SK-Hep1 hepatoma ρ0 cells showed typical morphology associated with aging such as increased size and elongated appearance. They had increased senescence-associated β-Gal activity, lipofuscin pigment, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression. Consistent with their decreased proliferation, the expression of mitotic cyclins was decreased and that of cdk inhibitors was increased. Rb hypophosphorylation and decreased telomerase activity were also noted. Features simulating aged cells were also observed in MDA-MB-435 ρ0 cells. These results support the mitochondrial theory of aging, and suggest that ρ0 cells could serve as an in vitro model for aged cells

  19. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  20. Stem Cells as Vehicles for Youthful Regeneration of Aged Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Rando, Thomas A; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells hold great promise for regenerative therapies for a wide spectrum of diseases and disorders of aging by virtue of their ability to regenerate tissues and contribute to their homeostasis. Aging is associated with a marked decline in these functionalities of adult stem cells. As such, regeneration of aged tissues is both less efficient and less effective than that of young tissues. Recent studies have revealed the remarkably dynamic responses of stem cells to systemic signals, includ...

  1. Age-related Deterioration of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Seung Ah; Chang, Jae Suk

    2008-01-01

    Aging is the process of system deterioration over time in the whole body. Stem cells are self-renewing and therefore have been considered exempt from the aging process. Earlier studies by Hayflick showed that there is an intrinsic limit to the number of divisions that mammalian somatic cells can undergo, and cycling kinetics and ontogeny-related studies strongly suggest that even the most primitive stem cell functions exhibit a certain degree of aging. Despite these findings, studies on the e...

  2. Age-related changes in antral endocrine cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sandstrom, O.; Mahdavi, J.; El-Salhy, M.

    1999-01-01

    Antral endocrine cells in four age groups of mice, namely prepubertal (1 month old), young (3 months old), ageing (12 months old) and senescent (24 months old), were detected by immunocytochemistry and quantified by computerized image analysis. A statistical difference was detected between the different age groups regarding the numbers of gastrin-, somatostatin-, and serotonin-immunoreactive cells. The number of gastrin-immunoreactive cells significantly increa...

  3. Role of adenohypophyseal mixed cell-follicles in age estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa T

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used paraffin-embedded human pituitary obtained from 248 autopsy cases and identified mixed cell follicles by the immunohistochemical method. We examined the number and size of the mixed cell follicles, and the ratio of each component cell of these follicles, in the anterior pituitary at various age groups. The number of follicles increased with age, and the size of the follicles also tended to enlarge with age. Statistical analysis showed that a high correlation existed between age and the number or the size of the mixed cell-follicles formed by various adenohypophyseal cells. In addition, when the proportions of the different cell types that formed the follicles were examined, sex differences were observed with aging for the GH cells, the PRL cells, and the gonadotroph (GTH cells, while no changes were observed with aging in both men and women for the ACTH cells and TSH cells. These results indicate that the number, size, and ratio of each component cell of follicles in the anterior pituitary are adequately applicable for the purpose of age estimation in routine forensic medicine.

  4. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging...

  5. In Search for Anti-Aging Strategy: Can We Rejuvenate Our Aging Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggested that we grow old partly because of our stem cells grow old as a result of mechanisms that suppress the development of cancer over a lifetime. We believe that a further, more precise mechanistic understanding of this process will be required before this knowledge can be translated into human anti-aging therapies. CONTENT: A diminished capacity to maintain tissue homeostasis is a central physiological characteristic of aging. As stem cells regulate tissue homeostasis, depletion of stem cell reserves and/or diminished stem cell function have been postulated to contribute to aging. It has further been suggested that accumulated DNA damage could be a principal mechanism underlying age-dependent stem cell decline. It is interesting that many of the rejuvenating interventions act on the stem cell compartments, perhaps reflecting shared genetic and biochemical pathways controlling stem cell function and longevity. Strategy to slow down the aging processes is based on caloric restriction refers to a dietary regimen low in calories but without undernutrition. Sirtuin (SIRT1 and 3, increases longevity by mimicking the beneficial effects of caloric restriction. SIRT3 regulates stress-responsive mitochondrial homeostasis, and more importantly, SIRT3 upregulation rejuvenates aged stem cells in tissues. Resveratrol (3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene, a natural polyphenol found in grapes and wine, was the most powerful natural activator of SIRT1. In fact, resveratrol treatment has been demonstrated to rescue adult stem cell decline, slow down bodyweight loss, improve trabecular bone structure and mineral density, and significantly extend lifespan. SUMMARY: Tissue-specific stem cells persist throughout the entire lifespan to repair and maintain tissues, but their self-renewal and differentiation potential become dysregulated with aging. Given that adult stem cells are thought to be central to tissue maintenance and organismal

  6. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms. PMID:19421136

  7. Petal Senescence: New Concepts for Ageing Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2009-01-01

    Senescence in flower petals can be regarded as a form of programmed cell death (PCD), being a process where cells or tissues are broken down in an orderly and predictable manner, whereby nutrients are re-used by other cells, tissues or plant parts. The process of petal senescence shows many similari

  8. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J;

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans....... Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth...... factor beta (TGF-beta)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular...

  9. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  10. Stem cell transplantation improves aging-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ikehara, Susumu; LI Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of damage accumulation, and has been viewed as experimentally and medically intractable. The number of patients with age-associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer has increased recently. Aging-related diseases are related to a deficiency of the immune system, which results from an aged thymus and bone marrow cells. Intra bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation...

  11. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Laurentiu M. Popescu; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit http://www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups we...

  12. Modulation of cell death in age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezil, Tugsan; Basaga, Huveyda

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a stage of life of all living organisms. According to the free-radical theory, aging cells gradually become unable to maintain cellular homeostasis due to the adverse effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can cause irreversible DNA mutations, protein and lipid damage which are increasingly accumulated in the course of time if cells could not overcome these effects by the antioxidant defence system. Accrued damaged molecules in cells may either induce cellular death or contribute to develop various pathologies. Hence, programmed cell death mechanisms, apoptosis and autophagy, play a vital role in the aging process. Although they are strictly controlled by various interconnected signalling pathways, alterations in their regulations may contribute to severe pathologies including cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review, we summarized our current understanding and hypotheses regarding oxidative stress and age-related dysregulation of cell death signalling pathways. PMID:24079770

  13. Cell ageing: a flourishing field for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Brites

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is viewed as an irreversible cell-cycle arrest mechanism involving a complexity of biological progressive processes and the acquisition of diverse cellular phenotypes. Several cell-intrinsic and extrinsic causes (stresses may lead to diverse cellular signaling cascades that include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, excessive accumulation of misfolded proteins, impaired microRNA processing and inflammation. Here we review recent advances in the causes and consequences of brain cell ageing, including the senescence of endothelial cells at the central nervous system barriers, as well as of neurons and glial cells. We address what makes ageing an important risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we highlight the importance of defects in mitochondrial dynamics, in the cathepsin activity imbalance, in cell-cell communication, in the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins and in the microRNA profiling as having potential impact on cellular ageing processes. Another important aspect is that the absence of specific senescence biomarkers has hampered the characterization of senescent cells in ageing and age-associated diseases. In accordance, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP or secretome was shown to vary in distinct cell types and upon different stressors, and SASP heterogeneity is believed to create subsets of senenescent cells. In addition to secreted proteins, we then place extracellular vesicles (exosomes and ectosomes as important mediators of intercellular communication with pathophysiological roles in disease spreading, and as emerging targets for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the application of engineered extracellular vesicles as vehicles for drug delivery. Finally, we summarize current knowledge on methods to rejuvenate senescent cells

  14. Fuel cell rejuvenation of hygrothermally aged Nafion

    OpenAIRE

    Collette, Floraine,; THOMINETTE, Francette; ESCRIBANO, Sylvie; RAVACHOL, Angèle; MORIN, Arnaud; Gebel, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    International audience Nafion ® membranes stored for long periods at 80 °C under elevated relative humidity up to 95%RH exhibit large modifications of their properties attributed to the sulfonic acid end-group condensation into sulfonic anhydrides. The present study is devoted to the membrane property rejuvenation, namely the hydrolysis of the sulfonic anhydrides under different experimental conditions. Aged membranes were exposed to pure water and to acid solutions or vapors in order to c...

  15. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  16. Memory Engram Cells Have Come of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Susumu; Liu, Xu; Ramirez, Steve; Redondo, Roger

    2015-09-01

    The idea that memory is stored in the brain as physical alterations goes back at least as far as Plato, but further conceptualization of this idea had to wait until the 20(th) century when two guiding theories were presented: the "engram theory" of Richard Semon and Donald Hebb's "synaptic plasticity theory." While a large number of studies have been conducted since, each supporting some aspect of each of these theories, until recently integrative evidence for the existence of engram cells and circuits as defined by the theories was lacking. In the past few years, the combination of transgenics, optogenetics, and other technologies has allowed neuroscientists to begin identifying memory engram cells by detecting specific populations of cells activated during specific learning epochs and by engineering them not only to evoke recall of the original memory, but also to alter the content of the memory. PMID:26335640

  17. Erythrocyte aging in sickle cell disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological removal of old erythrocytes from the circulation by macrophages is initiated by binding of autologous IgG to senescent cell antigen (SCA). SCA is generated from the anion exchanger band 3. This process is accompanied by a number of alterations in the function and structure of band 3. W

  18. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss sever

  19. Lnk deficiency partially mitigates hematopoietic stem cell aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bersenev, Alexey; Rozenova, Krasimira; Balcerek, Joanna; JIANG, JING; Wu, Chao; Tong, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Upon aging, the number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow increases while their repopulation potential declines. Moreover, aged HSCs exhibit lineage bias in reconstitution experiments with an inclination towards myeloid at the expense of lymphoid potential. The adaptor protein Lnk is an important negative regulator of HSC homeostasis, as Lnk deficiency is associated with a 10-fold increase in HSC numbers in young mice. However, the age-related increase in functional HSC num...

  20. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state ...

  1. Yeast mother cell-specific ageing, genetic (in)stability, and the somatic mutation theory of ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Laun, Peter; Bruschi, Carlo V.; Dickinson, J. Richard; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Heeren, Gino; Schwimbersky, Richard; Rid, Raphaela; Breitenbach, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Yeast mother cell-specific ageing is characterized by a limited capacity to produce daughter cells. The replicative lifespan is determined by the number of cell cycles a mother cell has undergone, not by calendar time, and in a population of cells its distribution follows the Gompertz law. Daughter cells reset their clock to zero and enjoy the full lifespan characteristic for the strain. This kind of replicative ageing of a cell population based on asymmetric cell divisions is investigated as...

  2. Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  3. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  4. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  5. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. PMID:27221660

  6. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tangliang Li; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhenyu Ju; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employ-ing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically reg-ulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  7. The impact of aging on regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes eFessler; Anja eFelber; Christina eDuftner; Christian eDejaco

    2013-01-01

    Age related deviations of the immune system contribute to a higher likelihood of infections, cancer and autoimmunity in the elderly. Senescence of T-lymphocytes is characterized by phenotypical and functional changes including the loss of characteristic T-cell surface markers, while an increase of stimulatory receptors, cytotoxicity as well as resistance against apoptosis is observed. One of the key mediators of immune regulation are naturally occurring regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Tregs expre...

  8. Age-related degradation of naturally-aged class 1E battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thesholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the postseismic evaluations of the internals of the cells. Two distinct failure modes were observed (but not in all cells or types): complete physical separation at the terminal post-plate hanger interface and cell capacity of less than 80% of nominal following the 3-hour postseismic discharge capacity test. The significant age-related effects in terms of seismic survivability, in decreasing order of importance, were determined to be: (1) formation of brittle, corroded positive bus material; and (2) excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates

  9. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    -engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal...... stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial cells, and probably also neuron-like cells. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSCs are among the first...... stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Some recent studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSCs in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols, or to generate transplantable tissues...

  10. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit http://www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days–1 year), children (6–17 years) and adults (34–60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm2) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52–62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22–28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6–7%, fibroblasts 3–10%, macrophages 1–8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults). PMID:25545142

  11. T regulatory cells and the immune aging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Ann Titi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Goronzy, Jorg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Constant exposure to new and persisting antigens and the need to replace cellular attrition with newly build cells lead to profound remodeling of the immune system during the second half of life. The impact of the immunosenescence process varies amongst the different functional subsets represented within the immune system, and emerging data suggest that progressive aging significantly affects frequencies, subset distribution and functional competence of regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the central role of Treg cells in immune homeostasis, age-related loss of Treg function would be predicted to render the host susceptible to excessive immunity, encountered in elderly humans as a syndrome of chronic-smoldering inflammation. Conversely, age-dependent gain of Treg activity would expose the host to greater risk of immune failure, such as the rising risk of malignancies and infections in the aging population. Emerging data suggest that some Treg populations, specifically naturally occurring Tregs (nTreg), seem to accumulate with advancing age, whereas inducible Tregs (iTreg) appear to be less available in the older host. More studies are necessary to elucidate functional competence of old Tregs, with emphasis on comparing efficacy of young on old Tregs for defined functional domains. Mechanisms of declining Treg inducibility are not understood, but may provide an opportunity for targeted immunomodulation in the elderly. On the horizon is the potential to develop novel therapeutic interventions that target Tregs to make the elderly more efficient in fighting cancers and infections and dampen the risk for senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:24296590

  12. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell function in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Broendsted, Adam Elias; Kessel, Line; Hansen, Michael Stormly; Kawasaki, Aki

    2012-01-01

    The activity of melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion retinal cells (ipRGC) can be assessed by a means of pupil responses to bright blue (appr.480 nm) light. Due to age related factors in the eye, particularly, structural changes of the lens, less light reaches retina. The aim...

  13. Psychosocial resources, aging, and natural killer cell terminal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Lutz, Charles T

    2012-12-01

    Psychosocial factors may influence aspects of immunological aging. The present study tested the hypothesis that psychosocial resources correlate with the expression of the cell surface maker CD57 on natural killer (NK) immune cells. CD57 is a marker of terminal maturation and senescence in this cell subset. The study further tested the relative contribution of specific resources in the social, psychological, financial, and status-skill domains, given the potential differential value of different resources for younger and older adults, and the contribution of relative versus absolute resources. Younger (n = 38) and older (n = 34) women completed measures of relative and absolute resources and had blood drawn. Examined both between groups and within the older women, older age and fewer total relative resources were associated with more CD57 expression on NK cells. One SD in resources was the equivalent of 5 years of aging among the older women. Among the specific resource types, a preponderance of financial resources, both relative and absolute, was associated with less CD57 expression on NK cells, and these relationships did not significantly vary between younger and older women. There was no evidence that depressive symptoms mediated the effects of resources on CD57 expression on NK cells. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that the sense that one has substantial resources, particularly with regard to finances and possessions, may retard age-associated aspects of the microenvironment in which NK cells develop and mature, independent of effects on distress, and this process may begin in younger adulthood. PMID:22708535

  14. Programmed cell death of Ulmus pumila L. seeds during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulan ZHANG; Ming ZHANG; Fang LI; Xiaofeng WANG

    2008-01-01

    The programmed cell death (PCD) character-istics of Ulmus pumila L. seeds were investigated. The seeds were treated at a high temperature of 37℃ and 100% relative humidity for six days. DAPI (4'6-diami-dino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed that the aging treatment induced condensation and margination of chro-matin, as well as the formation of apoptotic bodies. DNA electrophoresis results of U. pumila seeds on an agarose gel showed a characteristic "ladder" pattern. Levels of electrolyte leakage of seed cells showed that membranes retained their integral form during almost the entire aging time. There was an immediate increase in the production rate of superoxide anion (O2-) and in the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which remained at a μmol level. All of these common characteristics indicate that seed aging can be classified as PCD.

  15. Changes in intracellular calcium in brain cells of aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Yunpeng Cao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that voltage-dependent calcium influx, and enhancement of certain calcium-dependent processes in neurons, is related to aging. OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in neurons of aged rats, and to compare with young rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized control experiment of neurophysiology was performed at the Central Laboratory of School of Pharmaceutical Science, China Medical University from June to August 2004. MATERIALS: Ten male, healthy, Wistar rats, 19 months old, were selected for the aged group. Ten male, 3-month-old, Wistar rats were selected for the young control group. Fura-2/AM was provided by the Institute of Pharmaceutical Research of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and the F-2000 fluorospectrophotometer was a product of Hitachi, Japan. METHODS: Fluorescence Fura-2 spectrophotometer was used to measure [Ca2+]i in acutely dissociated brain cells of aged and young rats. The concentration of extracellular potassium was controlled by adding different volumes of chloridated potassium solution of high concentration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats in the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular calcium concentration and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium. Absolute increase of [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats when extraceUular potassium was 5,10,20, 40 mmol/L. RESULTS: In the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular Ca2+ and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium, [Ca2+]i in the neurons of aged rats was significantly less than that in young rats (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: The overload of [Ca2+]i in neurons of aged rats is greater than that of young rats under the same circumstances.

  16. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (arrhenoblastoma) in adolescent age group

    OpenAIRE

    Swarnalata Samal; Amogh Chimote; Rohit Juneja; Madhuprita Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Arrhenoblastoma, also known as Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors or androblastomas, are very rare neoplasm of the ovaries, resulting in the overproduction of the male hormone testosterone. This is a rare tumour which accounts for less than 0.5% of all ovarian tumours. These tumours are found in women of all age groups, but are most common in young women. Presence of an ovarian tumour plus hormonal disturbances suggests a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour. Patients present with a recent history of progressi...

  17. Apple can act as anti-aging on yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Palermo; Fulvio Mattivi; Romano Silvestri; Giuseppe La Regina; Claudio Falcone; Cristina Mazzoni

    2012-01-01

    International audience In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism,...

  18. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect against retinal ganglion cell loss in aged rats with glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ying Hu,1,2 Hai Bo Tan,1 Xin Mei Wang,3 Hua Rong,1 Hong Ping Cui,1 Hao Cui2 Departments of Ophthalmology, 1Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, 2First Affiliated Hospital, 3Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is a common eye disease in the aged population and has severe consequences. The present study examined the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC transplantation in preventing loss of visual function in aged rats with glaucoma caused by laser-induced ocular hypertension. We found that BMSCs promoted survival of retinal ganglion cells in the transplanted eye as compared with the control eye. Further, in swimming tests guided by visual cues, the rats with a BMSC transplant performed significantly better. We believe that BMSC transplantation therapy is effective in treating aged rats with glaucoma. Keywords: glaucoma, stem cell, transplantation, cell therapy, aging

  19. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Palermo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components.

  20. Editorial: T cell memory, bone marrow, and aging: the good news

    OpenAIRE

    Effros, Rita B

    2012-01-01

    Discussion on the accumulating evidence that bone marrow in old age is not simply the place where immune cells are generated but the where certain memory cells selectively return to provide a set of distinct immune functions during old age.

  1. Inexhaustible hair-cell regeneration in young and aged zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Pinto-Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals have evolved two general strategies to counter injury and maintain physiological function. The most prevalent is protection by isolating vital organs into body cavities. However, protection is not optimal for sensory systems because their external components need to be exposed to the environment to fulfill their receptive function. Thus, a common strategy to maintain sensory abilities against persistent environmental insult involves repair and regeneration. However, whether age or frequent injuries affect the regenerative capacity of sensory organs remains unknown. We have found that neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line regenerate mechanosensory hair cells after recurrent severe injuries and in adulthood. Moreover, neuromasts can reverse transient imbalances of Notch signaling that result in defective organ proportions during repair. Our results reveal inextinguishable hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line, and suggest that the neuromast epithelium is formed by plastic territories that are maintained by continuous intercellular communication.

  2. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (arrhenoblastoma in adolescent age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalata Samal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Arrhenoblastoma, also known as Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors or androblastomas, are very rare neoplasm of the ovaries, resulting in the overproduction of the male hormone testosterone. This is a rare tumour which accounts for less than 0.5% of all ovarian tumours. These tumours are found in women of all age groups, but are most common in young women. Presence of an ovarian tumour plus hormonal disturbances suggests a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour. Patients present with a recent history of progressive masculinisation. Masculinisation is preceded by anovulation, oligomenorrhoea, amenorrhoea and defeminisation. Arrhenoblastomas are generally unilateral benign tumour; do not normally spread beyond the ovary, occurring in reproductive age. This work summarizes the morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of this tumour in a 15-year old girl with clinical signs of virilisation. A 14 year old female admitted with abdominal distension, change in voice, male pattern balding and clitoromegaly in the dept. of Ob/Gy A.V.B.R.H. (Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital Sawangi, Wardha. Investigations included Sonography C.T scan, ascetic tap, Serum testosterone was done. She was managed by exploratory Laparotomy and follow up was advised. On follow up her serum testosterone levels and sonography was done. Here we are representing the case. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(4.000: 722-725

  3. The aging of the red blood cell. A multifactor process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danon, D; Marikovsky, Y

    1988-01-01

    Red blood cell (rbc) senescence is associated with loss of surface sialic acid, which is the principal carrier of surface negative charge and determines the electrokinetic behavior of old rbcs. Loss of sialic acid in an old rbc is demonstrated in its decreased electric mobility and lower negative charge density, determined topographically with cationic particle labeling. Surface sialic acid determines also the mutual attraction--repulsion forces, as demonstrated in enhanced aggluinability with cationic molecules, lectins, and blood group antibodies. Loss of sialic acid accompanies ATP-depletion in vitro; thus, a T-antigen site is unmasked. Macrophages have specific receptors to the site as to newly exposed galactose and N-acetyl galactosamine sugars. Furthermore, the involvement of complement molecules in the recognition of old RBCs by macrophages has been shown. This is possibly due to loss of sialic acid or at least a regrouping--relocation of surface anionic sites due to cell shape changes from discocytes to crenated forms, which accompany both in vivo and in vitro rbc aging. In turn, shape changes are apparently controlled by the cytoskeletal network underlying the rbc membrane, which undergoes structural alteration with physiologic aging in changing the dimensions of oligomeric spectrin and the thickness of the spectrin-actin cytoskeletal assembly. PMID:3052636

  4. From cells to organisms: Can we learn about aging from cells in culture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can studying cultured cells inform us about the biology of aging? The idea that this may be was stimulated by the first formal description of replicative senescence. Replicative senescence limits the proliferation of normal human cells in culture, causing them to irreversibly arrest growth and adopt striking changes in cell function. We now know that telomere shortening, which occurs in most somatic cells as a consequence of DNA replication, drives replicative senescence in human cells. However, rodent cells also undergo replicative senescence, despite very long telomeres, and DNA damage,the action of certain oncogenes and changes in chromatin induce a phenotype similar to that of replicatively senescent cells. Thus,replicative senescence is an example of the more general process of cellular senescence, indicating that the telomere hypothesis of aging is a misnomer. Cellular senescence appears to be a response to potentially oncogenic insults, including oxidative stress. The growth arrest almost certainly suppresses tumorigenesis, at least in young organisms, whereas the functional changes may contribute to aging,although this has yet to be critically tested. Thus, cellular senescence may be an example of antagonistic pleiotropy.Cross-species comparisons suggest there is a relationship between the senescence of cells in culture and organismal life span, but the relationship is neither quantitative nor direct

  5. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bonomi

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH, and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF and 42 poor responders (PR to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001 in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  6. Effects of age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of human nucleus pulposus cells on selecting age range for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Lee, S M; Jeong, S W; Sung, Y G; Lee, J H; Kim, K W

    2016-07-01

    Autologous disc cell implantation, growth factors and gene therapy appear to be promising therapies for disc regeneration. Unfortunately, the replicative lifespan and growth kinetics of human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells related to host age are unclear. We investigated the potential relations among age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of NP cells, and determined the age range that is suitable for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases. We used NP tissues classified by decade into five age groups: 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. The mean cumulative population doubling level (PDL) and population doubling rate (PDR) of NP cells were assessed by decade. We also investigated correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR decreased significantly in patients in their 60s. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR in the younger groups (30s, 40s and 50s) were significantly higher than those in the older groups (60s and 70s). There also were significant negative correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. We found that the replicative lifespan and growth rate of human NP cells decreased with age. The replicative potential of NP cells decreased significantly in patients 60 years old and older. Young individuals less than 60 years old may be suitable candidates for NP cell-based biological therapies for treating degenerative disc diseases. PMID:27149303

  7. Lens Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Cell Density in Human Age-related Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xialin Liu; Yizhi Liu; Jianliang Zheng; Qiang Huang; Huling Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the potential effect of the lens epithelial cell proliferation in age-related cataract.Methods: In vitro cell proliferation was assayed by MTT method to evaluate the lens epithelial cell density, index, and proliferation capacity in normal lens and all kinds of age-related cataract. Capsulotomy specimens from all kinds of patients who underwent cataract phacoemulsification extraction surgery were compared with the lens epithelial specimens from non-cataract lenses of Eye Bank eyes.Results: Lens epithelial cell density of central anterior capsule (LECD) in female normal lens was higher than that in male, LECD in nuclear cataract( > NⅢ ) was higher than that in normal lens, but in the mature cortical cataract, LF CD was lower. Mitotic index of three kinds of age-related cataracts in vivo had no statistical difference, neither did cell proliferation capacity of cultivated cells in vitro.Conclusion: The individual difference of lens epithelial cell density and proliferation capacity in vivo may be an important underlying cause for senile cataract in the cellular level, especially for nuclear cataract.

  8. Age and vitamin E-induced changes in Gene Expression Profiles of T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cell is vulnerable to age associated changes and vitamin E has been shown to improve T cell functions in the old. We studied the gene expression profile of T cells to better understand the underlying mechanisms of age and vitamin E-induced changes in T cell function. Young and old C57BL mice were ...

  9. Activation-induced and damage-induced cell death in aging human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    In multicellular organisms the proper system functionality is ensured by the balance between cell division, differentiation, senescence and death. This balance is changed during aging. Immunosenescence plays a crucial role in aging and leads to the shrinkage of T cell repertoire and the propensity to apoptosis. The elimination of expanded T cells at the end of immune response is crucial to maintain homeostasis and avoid any uncontrolled inflammation. Resting mature T lymphocytes, when activated via their antigen-specific receptor (TCR) and CD28 co-receptor, start to proliferate and then undergo the so called activation induced cell death (AICD), which mechanistically is triggered by the death receptor and leads to apoptosis. T lymphocytes, like other cells, are also exposed to damage, which can trigger the so called damage-induced cell death (DICD). It was hypothesized that oxidative stress and chronic antigenic load increasing with age reduced lymphocyte susceptibility to DICD and enhanced a proinflamatory status leading to increased AICD. However, data collected so far are inconsistent and does not support this assumption. Systematic and comprehensive studies are still needed for conclusive elucidation of the role of AICD and DICD in human immunosenescence, including the role of autophagy and necroptosis in the processes. PMID:25843236

  10. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis. PMID:26460946

  11. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  12. Microglial cell dysregulation in brain aging and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Eugenín-von Bernhardi, Laura; Eugenín, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. In aging, microglia undergoes phenotypic changes compatible with their activation. Glial activation can lead to neuroinflammation, which is increasingly accepted as part of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesize that in aging, aberrant microglia activation leads to a deleterious environment and neurodegeneration. In aged mice, microglia exhibit an increased expression of c...

  13. Why do hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea die during aging?

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Philip; Bao, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Age-related decline of cochlear function is mainly due to the loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recent findings clearly indicate that survival of these two cell types during aging depends on genetic and environmental interactions, and this relationship is seen at the systemic, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. At cellular and molecular levels, age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs can occur independently, suggesting distinct mechanisms for the death of each during...

  14. Insights into age- and sickle-cell-disease- interaction using principal components analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thakre Tushar P; Amin Manik; Mamtani Manju R; Sharma Mamta; Sharma Smita; Amin Amit; Kulkarni Hemant

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In the context of sickle cell anemia, peripheral blood indexes provide key information that is also potentially influenced by age. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the extent and nature of interactions between sickle cell anemia and age, especially in situations where there is a high prevalence of sickle cell anemia. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 374 subjects with varying hemoglobin S (HbS) status, we characterized the interaction between age and sickle hem...

  15. Age-related changes in proliferation, the numbers of mast cells, eosinophils, and cd45-positive cells in human dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunin, Andrei G; Kornilova, Natalia K; Vasilieva, Olga V; Petrov, Vadim V

    2011-04-01

    Skin aging is an extremely important medical and social problem in the modern world. Therefore, a goal of the present work was to estimate changes in the numbers of fibroblast-like cells, proliferating cells nuclear antigen-positive cells, CD45-positive cells, mast cells, and eosinophils in human dermis at different ages. Skin specimens from human fetuses that died antenatally from 20 to 40 weeks of pregnancy and humans who died from different causes from 1 day to 85 years of life were used for the study. Results showed a decrease in a total number and the number of proliferating cells nuclear antigen-positive fibroblast-like cells in dermis with progression of age. The numbers of CD45-positive cells and mast cells are gradually increased with aging. Eosinophils are almost absent in dermis independently on age. Mast cells are probably a main factor that potentially can be involved in tissue damage and aging changes in skin. Mast cells should be regarded as an important target for anti-aging therapy. PMID:21106704

  16. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect against retinal ganglion cell loss in aged rats with glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu Y; Tan HB; Wang XM; Rong H; Cui HP; Cui H

    2013-01-01

    Ying Hu,1,2 Hai Bo Tan,1 Xin Mei Wang,3 Hua Rong,1 Hong Ping Cui,1 Hao Cui2 Departments of Ophthalmology, 1Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, 2First Affiliated Hospital, 3Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is a common eye disease in the aged population and has severe consequences. The present study examined the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation i...

  17. Ageing is associated with a decline in peripheral blood CD56bright NK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Laxman

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural killer (NK cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that lack CD3 and express variable levels of CD16, CD56 and CD57. In recent years NK cells have been categorised into two major groups based on the level of CD56 expression. This phenotypic classification correlates with functional activity as CD56bright NK cells are the major cytokine producing subset whereas CD56dim NK cells exhibit greater cytotoxic activity. Previous studies have revealed a reduction in total NK cell numbers in association with ageing and this study sought to determine the potential influence of ageing on the number of NK cell subsets within peripheral blood. Results The number of NK (CD56+CD3- cells within peripheral blood did not change with increasing age. The number of CD56dim NK cells also remained stable with ageing. In contrast the absolute number of CD56bright NK cells within peripheral blood declined by 48% with ageing from a mean of 15.6/μl in individuals aged 20–40 years to 8.1/μl in those aged 60+ years (p = 0.0004. Conclusion The number of CD56bright NK cells within peripheral blood declines with age. As this population plays a central role in cytokine secretion during the innate immune response this decline may contribute to impaired immune regulation in elderly individuals

  18. Chondrogenic potential of human adult mesenchymal stem cells is independent of age or osteoarthritis etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Schewe, B.; Benz, K.; Gaissmaier, C.; Bühring, H.J.; Stoop, R.

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease strongly correlated with history of joint trauma, joint dysplasia, and advanced age. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cells for biological cartilage regeneration. Conflicting data have been published concerning the availability of MSCs from

  19. Aging impairs recipient T cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors in response to transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As increasing numbers of older people are listed for solid organ transplantation, there is an urgent need to better understand how aging modifies alloimmune responses. Here, we investigated whether aging impairs the ability of donor dendritic cells or recipient immunity to prime alloimmune responses to organ transplantation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using murine experimental models, we found that aging impaired the host environment to expand and activate antigen specific CD8(+ T cells. Additionally, aging impaired the ability of polyclonal T cells to induce acute allograft rejection. However, the alloimmune priming capability of donor dendritic cells was preserved with aging. CONCLUSION: Aging impairs recipient responses, both T cell intrinsic and extrinsic, in response to organ transplantation.

  20. Nutraceutical intervention reverses the negative effects of blood from aged rats on stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Paula C; Kaneko, Yuji; Grimmig, Bethany; Pappas, Colleen; Small, Brent; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun; Douglas Shytle, R

    2015-10-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in function in many of the stem cell niches of the body. An emerging body of literature suggests that one of the reasons for this decline in function is due to cell non-autonomous influences on the niche from the body. For example, studies using the technique of parabiosis have demonstrated a negative influence of blood from aged mice on muscle satellite cells and neurogenesis in young mice. We examined if we could reverse this effect of aged serum on stem cell proliferation by treating aged rats with NT-020, a dietary supplement containing blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3, and carnosine that has been shown to increase neurogenesis in aged rats. Young and aged rats were administered either control NIH-31 diet or one supplemented with NT-020 for 28 days, and serum was collected upon euthanasia. The serum was used in cultures of both rat hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Serum from aged rats significantly reduced cell proliferation as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays in both NPCs and MSCs. Serum from aged rats treated with NT-020 was not different from serum from young rats. Therefore, NT-020 rescued the effect of serum from aged rats to reduce stem cell proliferation. PMID:26410618

  1. Anti-aging effects of vitamin C on human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Seung-Yup; Huh, Yul; Liu, Hung-Ching; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have arisen as a source of cells for biomedical research due to their developmental potential. Stem cells possess the promise of providing clinicians with novel treatments for disease as well as allowing researchers to generate human-specific cellular metabolism models. Aging is a natural process of living organisms, yet aging in human heart cells is difficult to study due to the ethical considerations regarding human experimentation as well as a current l...

  2. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Payal C.; Deal, Allison M.; Pfaff, Emily R.; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M.; Park, Yara A.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14–27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71–7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66–35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding. PMID:25963831

  3. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Arking, Robert, E-mail: aa2210@wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Yoo, Mi-Ae, E-mail: mayoo@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  4. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo

  5. Age-related molecular genetic changes of murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Keith A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are pluripotent cells, present in the bone marrow and other tissues that can differentiate into cells of all germ layers and may be involved in tissue maintenance and repair in adult organisms. Because of their plasticity and accessibility these cells are also prime candidates for regenerative medicine. The contribution of stem cell aging to organismal aging is under debate and one theory is that reparative processes deteriorate as a consequence of stem cell aging and/or decrease in number. Age has been linked with changes in osteogenic and adipogenic potential of MSCs. Results Here we report on changes in global gene expression of cultured MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of mice at ages 2, 8, and 26-months. Microarray analyses revealed significant changes in the expression of more than 8000 genes with stage-specific changes of multiple differentiation, cell cycle and growth factor genes. Key markers of adipogenesis including lipoprotein lipase, FABP4, and Itm2a displayed age-dependent declines. Expression of the master cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 and growth factors HGF and VEGF also declined significantly at 26 months. These changes were evident despite multiple cell divisions in vitro after bone marrow isolation. Conclusions The results suggest that MSCs are subject to molecular genetic changes during aging that are conserved during passage in culture. These changes may affect the physiological functions and the potential of autologous MSCs for stem cell therapy.

  6. Age-related changes in murine T cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Vissinga (Christine)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies presented here was to obtain a more detailed and integrated picture of the age-related changes in cellular immunity. The age-related changes of cellular immunity were studied by in vivo induction of DTH responses to a variety of antigens (Chapters 2 and 3). The res

  7. Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, Jeannette; Clausen, Christian;

    2003-01-01

    Age-related decrease in bone formation is well described. However, the cellular causes are not known. Thus, we have established cultures of bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) from young (aged 18-29 years, n = 6) and old (aged 68-81 years, n = 5) donors. MSC were serially passaged until reaching maxi...

  8. Fountain of Youth: aged blood-forming stem cells could be rejuvenated by young microenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Yin; Linheng Li

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper published in Nature by Amy J Wagers' group reports a re-markable function ofosteoblastic niche (defined as microenvironment) [1] in reversing the aged phenotype of he-matopoietic (blood-forming) stem cells, thus opening the possibility for clinical treatment of age-related diseases via modifying the stem cell niche.

  9. Impaired hematopoietic stem cell functioning after serial transplantation and during normal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Van Os, R; Ausema, A; Noach, EJK; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; Vellenga, E; De Haan, G

    2005-01-01

    Adult somatic stem cells possess extensive self-renewal capacity, as their primary role is to replenish aged and functionally impaired tissues. We have previously shown that the stem cell pool in short-lived DBA/2 (D2) mice is reduced during aging, in contrast to long-lived C57BL/6 (136) mice. This

  10. Transplanted adipose-derived stem cells delay D-galactose-induced aging in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Yang; Ou Sha; Jingxing Dai; Lin Yuan; Dongfei Li; Zhongqiu Wen; Huiying Yang; Meichun Yu; Hui Tao; Rongmei Qu; Yikuan Du; Yong Huang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of allogeneically transplanted, adipose-derived stem cells in aging rats, in the present study, we established a rat model of subacute aging using continuous subcutaneous injections of D-galactose. Two weeks after the adipose-derived stem cells transplantations, serum superoxide dismutase activity was significantly increased, malondialdehyde content was significantly reduced, hippocampal neuronal degeneration was ameliorated, the apoptotic index of hippocampal neurons was decreased, and learning and memory function was significantly improved in the aging rats. These results indicate that allogeneic transplantation of adipose-derived stem cells may effectively delay D-galactose-induced aging.

  11. Stem Cell-Specific Mechanisms Ensure Genomic Fidelity within HSCs and upon Aging of HSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Nattamai, Kalpana; Brown, Andreas; Florian, Maria C; Ryan, Marnie; Vogel, Mona; Bliederhaeuser, Corinna; Soller, Karin; Prows, Daniel R; Abdollahi, Amir; Schleimer, David; Walter, Dagmar; Milsom, Michael D; Stambrook, Peter; Porteus, Matthew; Geiger, Hartmut

    2015-12-22

    Whether aged hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have impaired DNA damage repair is controversial. Using a combination of DNA mutation indicator assays, we observe a 2- to 3-fold increase in the number of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system upon aging. Young and aged hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) do not show an increase in mutation upon irradiation-induced DNA damage repair, and young and aged HSPCs respond very similarly to DNA damage with respect to cell-cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. Both young and aged HSPCs show impaired activation of the DNA-damage-induced G1-S checkpoint. Induction of chronic DNA double-strand breaks by zinc-finger nucleases suggests that HSPCs undergo apoptosis rather than faulty repair. These data reveal a protective mechanism in both the young and aged hematopoietic system against accumulation of mutations in response to DNA damage. PMID:26686632

  12. Stem Cell-Specific Mechanisms Ensure Genomic Fidelity within HSCs and upon Aging of HSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M. Moehrle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether aged hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs have impaired DNA damage repair is controversial. Using a combination of DNA mutation indicator assays, we observe a 2- to 3-fold increase in the number of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system upon aging. Young and aged hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs do not show an increase in mutation upon irradiation-induced DNA damage repair, and young and aged HSPCs respond very similarly to DNA damage with respect to cell-cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. Both young and aged HSPCs show impaired activation of the DNA-damage-induced G1-S checkpoint. Induction of chronic DNA double-strand breaks by zinc-finger nucleases suggests that HSPCs undergo apoptosis rather than faulty repair. These data reveal a protective mechanism in both the young and aged hematopoietic system against accumulation of mutations in response to DNA damage.

  13. Aging and Immortality in a Cell Proliferation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Trugman, S A; Redner, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a model of cell division in which the length of telomeres within the cell regulate their proliferative potential. At each cell division the ends of linear chromosomes change and a cell becomes senescent when one or more of its telomeres become shorter than a critical length. In addition to this systematic shortening, exchange of telomere DNA between the two daughter cells can occur at each cell division. We map this telomere dynamics onto a biased branching diffusion process with an absorbing boundary condition whenever any telomere reaches the critical length. As the relative effects of telomere shortening and cell division are varied, there is a phase transition between finite lifetime and infinite proliferation of the cell population. Using simple first-passage ideas, we quantify the nature of this transition.

  14. Oogonial stem cells as a model to study age-associated infertility in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Fertility is the first biological process to break down during aging, thereby making it a useful tool to understand fundamental processes of aging. Reproductive aging in females is associated with a loss of ovarian function characterised by a reduction in the number and quality of oocytes. The central dogma, namely that females are born with a fixed pool of oocytes that progressively decline with increasing maternal age, has been challenged by evidence supporting postnatal oogenesis in mammals. Reports demonstrating formation of new oocytes from newly discovered germline stem cells, referred to as oogonial stem cells (OSCs), has opened new avenues for treatment of female infertility. In this review we discuss why the OSCs possibly lose their regenerative potential over time, and focus specifically on the aging process in germline stem cells as a possible mechanism for understanding female age-related infertility and how we can slow or delay ovarian aging. PMID:25897831

  15. Oogonial stem cells as a model to study age-associated infertility in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Sinclair, David A

    2015-07-01

    Fertility is the first biological process to break down during aging, thereby making it a useful tool to understand fundamental processes of aging. Reproductive aging in females is associated with a loss of ovarian function characterised by a reduction in the number and quality of oocytes. The central dogma, namely that females are born with a fixed pool of oocytes that progressively decline with increasing maternal age, has been challenged by evidence supporting postnatal oogenesis in mammals. Reports demonstrating formation of new oocytes from newly discovered germline stem cells, referred to as oogonial stem cells (OSCs), has opened new avenues for treatment of female infertility. In this review we discuss why the OSCs possibly lose their regenerative potential over time, and focus specifically on the aging process in germline stem cells as a possible mechanism for understanding female age-related infertility and how we can slow or delay ovarian aging. PMID:25897831

  16. Aging-induced stem cell mutations as drivers for disease and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Peter D.; Jasper, Heinrich; Rudolph, K Lenhard

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a decrease in genome integrity, impaired organ maintenance, and an increased risk of cancer, which coincide with clonal dominance of expanded mutant stem and progenitor cell populations in aging tissues, such as the intestinal epithelium, the hematopoietic system, and the male germline. Here we discuss possible explanations for age-associated increases in the initiation and/or progression of mutant stem/progenitor clones and highlight the roles of stem cell quiescenc...

  17. Sickle cell disease and age at menarche in Jamaican girls: observations from a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Serjeant, G; A Singhal; Hambleton, I.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To investigate the distribution of age at menarche in a representative sample of 99 patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease, 69 with sickle cell haemoglobin C (SC) disease, and 100 controls with a normal haemoglobin (AA) genotype followed in a cohort study from birth. (2) To explore the determinants of the age at menarche.
METHODS—Children ascertained in a newborn screening programme were followed prospectively from birth to age 18-26.5 years with regular ...

  18. Diminished Schwann cell repair responses underlie age-associated impaired axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Michio W; Brosius Lutz, Amanda; Cheng, Yung-Chih; Latremoliere, Alban; Duong, Kelly; Miller, Christine M; Posada, Sean; Cobos, Enrique J; Zhang, Alice X; Wagers, Amy J; Havton, Leif A; Barres, Ben; Omura, Takao; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-07-16

    The regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system declines with age. Why this occurs, however, is unknown. We demonstrate that 24-month-old mice exhibit an impairment of functional recovery after nerve injury compared to 2-month-old animals. We find no difference in the intrinsic growth capacity between aged and young sensory neurons in vitro or in their ability to activate growth-associated transcriptional programs after injury. Instead, using age-mismatched nerve transplants in vivo, we show that the extent of functional recovery depends on the age of the nerve graft, and not the age of the host. Molecular interrogation of the sciatic nerve reveals that aged Schwann cells (SCs) fail to rapidly activate a transcriptional repair program after injury. Functionally, aged SCs exhibit impaired dedifferentiation, myelin clearance, and macrophage recruitment. These results suggest that the age-associated decline in axonal regeneration results from diminished Schwann cell plasticity, leading to slower myelin clearance. PMID:25033179

  19. Single Cell Analysis of Yeast Replicative Aging Using a New Generation of Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Zhang; Chunxiong Luo; Ke Zou; Zhengwei Xie; Onn Brandman; Qi Ouyang; Hao Li

    2012-01-01

    A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cel...

  20. Cell-based therapies of liver diseases: age-related challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarygin KN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Konstantin N Yarygin, Alexei Y Lupatov, Irina V Kholodenko Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Moscow, Russia Abstract: The scope of this review is to revise recent advances of the cell-based therapies of liver diseases with an emphasis on cell donor’s and patient’s age. Regenerative medicine with cell-based technologies as its integral part is focused on the structural and functional restoration of tissues impaired by sickness or aging. Unlike drug-based medicine directed primarily at alleviation of symptoms, regenerative medicine offers a more holistic approach to disease and senescence management aimed to achieve restoration of homeostasis. Hepatocyte transplantation and organ engineering are very probable forthcoming options of liver disease treatment in people of different ages and vigorous research and technological innovations in this area are in progress. Accordingly, availability of sufficient amounts of functional human hepatocytes is crucial. Direct isolation of autologous hepatocytes from liver biopsy is problematic due to related discomfort and difficulties with further expansion of cells, particularly those derived from aging people. Allogeneic primary human hepatocytes meeting quality standards are also in short supply. Alternatively, autologous hepatocytes can be produced by reprogramming of differentiated cells through the stage of induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells can be directly induced to undergo advanced stage hepatogenic differentiation. Reprogramming of cells derived from elderly people is accompanied by the reversal of age-associated changes at the cellular level manifesting itself by telomere elongation and the U-turn of DNA methylation. Cell reprogramming can provide high quality rejuvenated hepatocytes for cell therapy and liver tissue engineering. Further technological advancements and establishment of national and global registries of

  1. Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Aging Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    It is not yet known whether hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are compromised in the aging population of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors after their exposure nearly 70 years ago. To address this, we evaluated age- and radiation-related changes in different subtypes of circulating HSPCs among the CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34(+)Lin(-)) cell population in 231 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. We enumerated functional HSPC subtypes, including: cobblestone area-forming cells; long-term culture-initiating cells; erythroid burst-forming units; granulocyte and macrophage colony-forming units; and T-cell and natural killer cell progenitors using cell culture. We obtained the count of each HSPC subtype per unit volume of blood and the proportion of each HSPC subtype in CD34(+)Lin(-) cells to represent the lineage commitment trend. Multivariate analyses, using sex, age and radiation dose as variables, showed significantly decreased counts with age in the total CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population and all HSPC subtypes. As for the proportion, only T-cell progenitors decreased significantly with age, suggesting that the commitment to the T-cell lineage in HSPCs continuously declines with age throughout the lifetime. However, neither the CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population, nor HSPC subtypes showed significant radiation-induced dose-dependent changes in counts or proportions. Moreover, the correlations of the proportions among HSPC subtypes in the survivors properly revealed the hierarchy of lineage commitments. Taken together, our findings suggest that many years after exposure to radiation and with advancing age, the number and function of HSPCs in living survivors as a whole may have recovered to normal levels. PMID:26720799

  2. Kinetin inhibits apoptosis of aging spleen cells induced by D-galactose in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mengyun; Ouyang, Wuqing; Wu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Yin; Wei, Yunpeng; An, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Kinetin (Kn) is a cytokinin growth factor that exerts several anti-aging and antioxidant effects on cells and organs. To investigate the mechanism underlying apoptotic events in aging cells induced by D-galactose (D-gal), we examined the effect of Kn delivered via nuchal subcutaneous injection on D-gal-induced aging and apoptosis in rats. Our results showed that interleukin (IL)-2 levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were decreased by Kn in aging rats while IL-6 production and ap...

  3. Effect of age on expression of spermatogonial markers in bovine testis and isolated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassetti, Mariana Ianello; Goissis, Marcelo Demarchi; Moreira, Pedro Vale; de Barros, Flavia Regina Oliveira; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Ávila; Visintin, José Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) are the most undifferentiated germ cell present in adult male testes and, it is responsible to maintain the spermatogenesis. Age has a negative effect over stem cell, but the aging effect on SSC is not elucidated for bovine. The present study aim to evaluate the effect of age on the expression of undifferentiated spermatogonial markers in testis and in enriched testicular cells from prepubertal calves and adult bulls. In this matter, testicular parenchyma from calves (3-5 months) (n=5) and bulls with 3 years of age (n=5) were minced and, isolated cells were obtained after two enzymatic digestions. Differential platting was performed for two hours onto BSA coated dish. Cell viability was assessed by Trypan Blue solution exclusion method and testicular cells enriched for SSC was evaluated by expression of specific molecular markers by qRT-PCR (POU5F1, GDNF, CXCR4, UCHL1, ST3GAL, SELP, ICAM1 and ITGA6) and flow cytometry (GFRA1, CXCR4 and ITGA6). CXCR4 and UCHL1 expression was evaluated in fixated testes by immunohistochemistry. We observed that age just affected the expression of selective genes [SELP (Fold Change=5.61; p=0.0023) and UCHL1 (Fold Change=4.98; p=0.0127)]. By flow cytometry, age affected only the proportion of ITGA6+ cells (P<0.001), which was higher in prepubertal calves when compared to adult bulls. In situ, we observed an effect of age on the number of UCHL1+ (p=0.0006) and CXCR4+ (p=0.0139) cells per seminiferous tubule. At conclusion, age affects gene expression and the population of cells expressing specific spermatogonial markers in the bovine testis. PMID:27180120

  4. Defining Hair Follicles in the Age of Stem Cell Bioengineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Cotsarelis, George; Stenn, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    One challenge faced by stem cell biologists is the bioengineering of an organ. Ehama et al. (2007, this issue) used cells derived from human and rodent epidermis and dermal papilla to reconstitute hair-follicle mini-organs. Some result in hair follicles; others are hair follicle–like. The challenge calls for the development of a set of criteria to define a hair follicle so that bioengineered products in the future can be evaluated.

  5. Derivation of Pluripotent Cells from Mouse SSCs Seems to Be Age Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Azizi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we aimed to answer important and fundamental questions in germ cell biology with special focus on the age of the male donor cells and the possibility to generate embryonic stem cell- (ESC- like cells. While it is believed that spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs and truly pluripotent ESC-like cells can be isolated from adult mice, it remained unknown if the spontaneous conversion of SSCs to ESC-like cells fails at some age. Similarly, there have been differences in the literature about the duration of cultures during which ESC-like cells may appear. We demonstrate the possibility to derive ESC-like cells from SSC cultures until they reach adolescence or up to 7 weeks of age, but we point out the impossibility to derive these cells from older, mature adult mice. The inability of real adult SSCs to shift to a pluripotent state coincides with a decline in expression of the core pluripotency genes Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2 in SSCs with age. At the same time genes of the spermatogonial differentiation pathway increase. The generated ESC-like cells were similar to ESCs and express pluripotency markers. In vitro they differentiate into all three germ lineages; they form complex teratomas after transplantation in SCID mice and produce chimeric mice.

  6. Cell size, number and density in the retina ganglion cell layer of Pekin duck retina at different embryonic age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZUO Shi-Feng

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cell size, number and density of the ganglion cell layer(GCL)of the Pekin duck retina were studied by using the methods of Nissl-staining and Scion Image picture processing at embryonic age day-11,14,17,20,23 and 26. The result indicated that the cells in GCL were small and round uniformly at E11 and E14. The large cells were first found at E17. From E11 to E26, cell size was increased 1.97-fold in the central area (CA and 3.1-fold in the temple periphery (TP, and there was significant difference among all embryonic ages. During the growth and development of embryo, the total number of cells in GCL was increased to 2.03×106 cells at E17, and then decreased significantly with age. Differentiation of the central-peripheral gradient in cell density has been performed at E11. Cell density in CA was up to the maximal value (2.54×104 cells/mm2 at E17 and then decreased. However, cell density was decreased constantly in the peripheral area, especially in TP. In conclusion, E17 is the most important point for the retina during the embryonic developmental of Pekin duck, accompanying changes in cell size, number and density in GCL [Acta Zoologica Sinica 54(6: 1082 – 1088, 2008].

  7. Increased mammogram-induced DNA damage in mammary epithelial cells aged in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Hernández

    Full Text Available Concerned about the risks of mammography screening in the adult population, we analyzed the ability of human mammary epithelial cells to cope with mammogram-induced DNA damage. Our study shows that an X-ray dose of 20 mGy, which is the standard dose received by the breast surface per two-view mammogram X-ray exploration, induces increased frequencies of DNA double-strand breaks to in vitro aged-but not to young-human mammary epithelial cells. We provide evidence that aged epithelial breast cells are more radiosensitive than younger ones. Our studies point to an inefficient damage response of aged cells to low-dose radiation, this being due to both delayed and incomplete mobilization of repair proteins to DNA strand breaks. This inefficient damage response is translated into an important delay in double-strand break disappearance and consequent accumulation of unrepaired DNA breaks. The result of this is a significant increase in micronuclei frequency in the in vitro aged mammary epithelial cells exposed to doses equivalent to a single mammogram X-ray exploration. Since our experiments were carried out in primary epithelial cell cultures in which cells age at the same time as they undergo replication-dependent telomere shortening, we needed to determine the contribution of these two factors to their phenotype. In this paper, we report that the exogenous expression of human telomerase retrotranscriptase in late population doubling epithelial cells does not rescue its delayed repair phenotype. Therefore, retarded DNA break repair is a direct consequence of cellular aging itself, rather than a consequence of the presence of dysfunctional telomeres. Our findings of long-lasting double strand breaks and incomplete DNA break repair in the in vitro aged epithelial cells are in line with the increased carcinogenic risks of radiation exposures at older ages revealed by epidemiologic studies.

  8. Age-related alteration in the composition of immunocompetent blood cells in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1328 survivors of Hiroshima were studied for alterations in the number of blood lymphocytes belonging to T-cell subpopulations, CD19 antigen-positive B cells and Leu 7 and CD16 antigen-positive lymphocytes. With increasing age, significant decreasing trends in the numbers of some lymphocytes in T-cell subpopulations and of B-cells were seen. The number of blood lymphocytes positive for CD5 antigen was significantly lower in those exposed to radiation (> 1Gy) in the older age group (more than 30 years at the time of bombing) and a similar tendency for decreases in the numbers of CD4, CD8, and CD19 antigen-positive cells was observed, but differences were not significant. The results suggest aging of the T-cell related immune system is accelerated in the irradiated people of advanced age, explained by the age-related decrease in thymic function in those subjects. The number of Leu 7 or CD19 antigen-positive cells was found to be increased significantly in the older age group compared to the younger, although there was little dose dependence. (U.K.)

  9. Sox10 expressing cells in the lateral wall of the aged mouse and human cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinping Hao

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis is a common human disorder, affecting one in three Americans aged 60 and over. Previous studies have shown that presbyacusis is associated with a loss of non-sensory cells in the cochlear lateral wall. Sox10 is a transcription factor crucial to the development and maintenance of neural crest-derived cells including some non-sensory cell types in the cochlea. Mutations of the Sox10 gene are known to cause various combinations of hearing loss and pigmentation defects in humans. This study investigated the potential relationship between Sox10 gene expression and pathological changes in the cochlear lateral wall of aged CBA/CaJ mice and human temporal bones from older donors. Cochlear tissues prepared from young adult (1-3 month-old and aged (2-2.5 year-old mice, and human temporal bone donors were examined using quantitative immunohistochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Cells expressing Sox10 were present in the stria vascularis, outer sulcus and spiral prominence in mouse and human cochleas. The Sox10(+ cell types included marginal and intermediate cells and outer sulcus cells, including those that border the scala media and those extending into root processes (root cells in the spiral ligament. Quantitative analysis of immunostaining revealed a significant decrease in the number of Sox10(+ marginal cells and outer sulcus cells in aged mice. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed degenerative alterations in the surviving Sox10(+ cells in aged mice. Strial marginal cells in human cochleas from donors aged 87 and older showed only weak immunostaining for Sox10. Decreases in Sox10 expression levels and a loss of Sox10(+ cells in both mouse and human aged ears suggests an important role of Sox10 in the maintenance of structural and functional integrity of the lateral wall. A loss of Sox10(+ cells may also be associated with a decline in the repair capabilities of non-sensory cells in the

  10. Stem cell specific mechanisms ensure genomic fidelity within HSCs and upon aging of HSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M.; Nattamai, Kalpana; Brown, Andreas; Florian, Maria C.; Ryan, Marnie; Vogel, Mona; Bliederhaeuser, Corinna; Soller, Karin; Prows, Daniel R.; Abdollahi, Amir; Schleimer, David; Walter, Dagmar; Milsom, Michael D.; Stambrook, Peter; Porteus, Matthew; Geiger, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Whether aged hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have impaired DNA damage repair is controversial. Using a combination of DNA mutation indicator assays, we observe a 2-3 fold increase in the number of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system upon aging. Young and aged HSCs and HPCs do not show an increase in mutation upon irradiation-induced DNA damage repair, and young and aged HSPCs respond very similarly to DNA damage with respect to cell cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. Both, young and aged HSPCs show impaired activation of the DNA-damage induced G1-S checkpoint. Induction of chronic DNA double strand breaks by zinc-finger nucleases suggest that HSPCs undergo apoptosis rather than faulty repair. These data reveal a protective mechanism in both the young and aged hematopoietic system against accumulation of mutations in response to DNA damage. PMID:26686632

  11. Cancer stem cells in Helicobacter pylori infection and aging: Implications for gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edi; Levi; Paula; Sochacki; Nabiha; Khoury; Bhaumik; B; Patel; Adhip; PN; Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrated the combined effects of aging and carcinogen treatment on cancer stem/stem-like cells(CSCs) of gastric mucosa in an animal model. METHODS: In this study we investigated the effects of aging and Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) inflammation as a model for inflammation induced carcinogenesis in human and rat gastric mucosa samples. In aging studies, we compared 4-mo old(young) with 22 mo(aged) old Fischer-344 rats. For human studies, gastric biop-sies and resection specimens representing normal mucosa or different stages of H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas were used for determining the expression of stem cell markers CD166, ALDH1 and LGR5. In addition we performed immunofluorescent double labeling for B-catenin and Lgr5 in both rat and human gastric tissues to examine the status of Wnt signaling in these cells. RESULTS: CSC markers ALDH1, LGR5, and CD166 were expressed in very low levels in normal human gastric mucosa or young rat gastric mucosa. In contrast, level of expression for all three markers significantly increased in H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas as well as in normal gastric mucosa in aged rats. We also observed cytoplasmic B-catenin staining in both aged rat and human H. pylori inflamed gastric mucosa, which were found to be colocalized with Lgr5 immunoreactive cells. The increased number of ALDH1, CD166 and LGR5 positive cells in H. pylori gastritis indicates that increased number of stem-like cells in gastric mucosa is an early event, and may constitute an important step in the progression to neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Our observation of the age-related increase in cancer stem/stem-like cells in the gastric mucosa may explain the increased incidence of gastric cancer during aging. Combination of aging and H. pylori infection may have additive effects in progression to neoplasia.

  12. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell’s replication activity and the donor’s age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21―40 years old, 41―60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula “ log2T D = t logN t ? logN 0” was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, P<0.05). These find- ings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger dona- tors, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  13. Lack of evidence for GDF11 as a rejuvenator of aged skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinken, Aaron C; Powers, Janine M; Luo, Guizhen; Holt, Jason A; Billin, Andrew N; Russell, Alan J

    2016-06-01

    Recent high-profile studies report GDF11 to be a key circulating 'anti-aging' factor. However, a screen of extracellular proteins attempting to identify factors with 'anti-aging' phenotypes in aged murine skeletal muscle satellite cells did not identify GDF11 activity. We have been unable to confirm the reported activity of GDF11, similar to other laboratories offering conflicting data and describe our attempts to do so in this short take. PMID:27139744

  14. Comparative characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from different age groups of cynomolgus monkeys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Y.Alex

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BM-MSCs) are a potential tool for cell therapy and tissue engineering.In this study,we carried on a comparative study of the characteristics of MSCs from different age cynomolgus monkeys.A variety of factors,including donor age,must be considered before further applications,and various tests should be used to properly assess MSCs before the clinical application,especially when a prolonged culture and ex vivo expansion is necessary.

  15. γ-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and aging of cultured endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study aging of cultured vascular cells. In order to induce an oxidative stress, which is known to participate in aging process, we apply γ-induced peroxidation and is revealed by indirect immunofluorescence. (author)

  16. Ageing does not result in a decline in cell synthetic activity in an injury prone tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, C T; McDermott, B T; Goodship, A E; Clegg, P D; Birch, H L

    2016-06-01

    Advancing age is a well-known risk factor for tendon disease. Energy-storing tendons [e.g., human Achilles, equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT)] are particularly vulnerable and it is thought that injury occurs following an accumulation of micro-damage in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Several authors suggest that age-related micro-damage accumulates due to a failure of the aging cell population to maintain the ECM or an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways. We hypothesized that ageing results in a decreased ability of tendon cells to synthesize matrix components and matrix-degrading enzymes, resulting in a reduced turnover of the ECM and a decreased ability to repair micro-damage. The SDFT was collected from horses aged 3-30 years with no signs of tendon injury. Cell synthetic and degradative ability was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels. Telomere length was measured as an additional marker of cell ageing. There was no decrease in cellularity or relative telomere length with increasing age, and no decline in mRNA or protein levels for matrix proteins or degradative enzymes. The results suggest that the mechanism for age-related tendon deterioration is not due to reduced cellularity or a loss of synthetic functionality and that alternative mechanisms should be considered. PMID:26058332

  17. Reduced hippocampal dentate cell proliferation and impaired spatial memory performance in aged epileptic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa F Cavarsan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased adult neurogenesis is observed after training in hippocampal-dependent tasks and also after acutely induced status epilepticus (SE although the specific roles of these cells are still a matter of debate. In this study, we investigated hippocampal cell proliferation and differentiation and the spatial learning performance in young or aged chronically epileptic rats. Status was induced by pilocarpine in 3 or 20-month old rats. Either two or twenty months later, rats were treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and subsequently underwent to 8-day schedule of water maze tests. As expected, learning curves were faster in young than in aged animals (P<0.001. Chronically epileptic animals exhibited impaired learning curves compared to age-matched controls. Interestingly, the duration of epilepsy (2 or 20 months did not correlate with the memory impairment of aged epileptic animals. The number of BrdU-positive cells was greater in young epileptic subjects than in age-matched controls. In contrast, cell proliferation was not increased in aged epileptic animals, irrespective of the time of SE induction. Finally, dentate cell proliferation was not related to performance in the water maze. Based on the present results we conclude that even though aging and epilepsy lead to impairments in spatial learning, their effects are not additive.

  18. Age related decline in the proliferative response of human T cells to OKT3 stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of the in vitro proliferative response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to the OKT3 monoclonal antibody is directly related to the level of monocyte representation in the cell population. The responses to OKT3 stimulation of PBMC obtained from different individual are difficult to interpret due to variable percentage representation of monocytes. To eliminate this problem purified T cells from humans of various ages were incubated with 2 ng/ml OKT3 antibody and 10% purified autologous monocytes. The 3H-TdR incorporation of 1 x 105 T cells at 72 hrs of culture was 69,939 +/- 6085 (SEM) cpm for young individuals (mean age 35 yrs) and 33,163 +/- 2962 cpm for healthy elderly individuals (mean age 78 yrs). In addition, IL2 receptors were measured using two color fluorescence and flow cytometry with phycoerythrin conjugated anti-IL2 receptor antibody and FITC conjugated OKT11 antibody. The percentage of cells expressing IL2 receptors was 46% for the cells from the young individuals and 23% for cells from old individuals. These results suggest that the age related decline in the proliferative ability of T cells is partially due to a decreased expression of IL2 receptors and that proliferation and IL2 receptor expression is under the control of monocyte accessory cells

  19. Uremia-Associated Premature Aging of T Cells Does Not Predict Infectious Complications After Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, B; Meijers, R W J; Klepper, M; Hesselink, D A; Baan, C C; Litjens, N H R; Betjes, M G H

    2016-08-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease have prematurely aged T cell systems. We tested whether T cell aging parameters were associated with the risk of infections after renal transplantation (RTx). We studied 188 patients over 1 year. Peripheral T cells were analyzed before and at 3 and 6 mo after RTx for frequency of recent thymic emigrants, relative telomere length and differentiation status. These parameters were related to the occurrence of opportunistic and serious infections. Overall, 84 patients developed an infection. In this group, 50 developed an opportunistic infection and 53 developed a serious infection. T cell aging parameters assessed before RTx were not associated with infection risk. The memory T cells showed a decrease within the first 3 mo in both groups (p < 0.001). The CD4(+) memory T cells increased between 3 and 6 mo within the infection group (p = 0.015). The number of CD8(+) memory T cells increased in both groups (p < 0.001) but reached baseline levels only in the infection group. In the infection group, the CD8(+) CD28(null) T cell percentage increased between 3 and 6 mo (p = 0.024), tending to be higher than at baseline (p = 0.061). These differences in post-RTx dynamics resulted from infections. Parameters of uremia-associated premature aging of peripheral T cells do not predict posttransplant infections. PMID:26914971

  20. Human Neural Stem Cell Aging Is Counteracted by α-Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Simona; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Iofrida, Caterina; Martini, Claudia

    2016-07-20

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) represent a subpopulation of cells, located in specific regions of the adult mammalian brain, with the ability of self-renewing and generating neurons and glia. In aged NSCs, modifications in the amount and composition of membrane proteins/lipids, which lead to a reduction in membrane fluidity and cholinergic activities, have been reported. In this respect, molecules that are effective at normalizing the membrane composition and cholinergic signaling could counteract stem cell aging. α-Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine (GPE), a nootropic drug, plays a role in phospholipid biosynthesis and acetylcholine release. Herein, GPE was assayed on human NSC cultures and on hydroxyurea-aged cells. Using cell counting, colorimetric, and fluorimetric analyses, immunoenzymatic assays, and real time PCR experiments, NSC culture proliferation, senescence, reactive oxygen species, and ADP/ATP levels were assessed. Aged NSCs exhibited cellular senescence, decreased proliferation, and an impairment in mitochondrial metabolism. These changes included a substantial induction in the nuclear factor NF-κB, a key inflammatory mediator. GPE cell treatment significantly protected the redox state and functional integrity of mitochondria, and counteracted senescence and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our data show the beneficial properties of GPE in this model of stem cell aging. PMID:27168476

  1. Age-Related Changes in Population of Stromal Precursor Cells in Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorskaya, Yulia F.; Latzinik, Natalia V.; Shuklina, Ekaterina U.; Nesterenko, Vladimir G.

    2000-07-01

    It is shown that the content of precursor cells of stromal tissue (CFC-F) in the hemopoietic and lymphoid organs of SAMP (rapidly-ageing mice) and SAMR mice (mice with a normal ageing rate) decreases as the animals grow older. However the decrease in the content of CFC-F in SAMP mice begins substantially earlier - in the age group of 9-11 months, while in the SAMR mice - only in the age group of 16-19 months. It was found that the age reduction of the number to an equal degree relates to the whole population of CFC-F, in particular both the fraction of weakly-linked CFC-F, which is isolated by means of mechanical disaggregation of the tissue, and the fraction which may only be isolated using trypsin. It is shown that the concentration of inducible osteogenic precursor cells (IOPC) in the spleen of guinea pigs does not change with age, but their content in that organ in old animals (2-3 years old) drops by two times. It was found that in elderly animals the mass of the ectopic osseous tissue, formed by the implantation of an osteoinductor (autologous epithelium of the urinary bladder) in a system open for entrance of cells, decreases by two times. After curettage of the medullary cavity of guinea pig tibia (i.e. under conditions of an increased demand for osteogenic cells) the mass of induced ectopic osseous tissue decreases by 4 times, which indicates to the possible functional relationship between the pool of determined and inducible osteogenic precursor cells. On the whole, the obtained data show that during ageing there is a reduction in the number of stromal precursor cells (CFC-F and IOPC), which form a specific microenvironment for hemopoietic and lymphoid organs, which is important to understand the role of these cells in the development of age pathologies, in particular senile osteoporosis. PMID:12687170

  2. A comparative review of aging and B cell function in mice and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Jean L.; Diaz, Alain; Riley, Richard L.; Cancro, Michael P.; Frasca, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Immune system function declines with age. Here we review and compare age-associated changes in murine and human B cell pools and humoral immune responses. We summarize changes in B cell generation and homeostasis, as well as notable changes at the sub-cellular level; then discuss how these changes help to explain alterations in immune responses across the adult lifespan of the animal. In each section we compare and contrast findings in the mouse, arguably the best animal model of the aging im...

  3. Cell size, number and density in the retina ganglion cell layer of Pekin duck retina at different embryonic age

    OpenAIRE

    ZUO Shi-Feng; CHEN Yao-Xing; WANG Zi-Xu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yu-lan

    2008-01-01

    Changes in cell size, number and density of the ganglion cell layer(GCL)of the Pekin duck retina were studied by using the methods of Nissl-staining and Scion Image picture processing at embryonic age day-11,14,17,20,23 and 26. The result indicated that the cells in GCL were small and round uniformly at E11 and E14. The large cells were first found at E17. From E11 to E26, cell size was increased 1.97-fold in the central area (CA) and 3.1-fold in the temple periphery (TP), and there was si...

  4. Centriole Age Underlies Asynchronous Primary Cilium Growth in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Charles T; Stearns, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that are present in most mammalian tissues and play important roles in development and disease [1]. They are required for the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) [2-4] and PDGF [5] signalling pathways. Primary cilia grow from the older of the two centrioles of the centrosome, referred to as the mother centriole. In cycling cells the cilium typically grows in G1 and is lost before mitosis, but the regulation of its growth is poorly understood. Centriole ...

  5. Reduced reactivation from dormancy but maintained lineage choice of human mesenchymal stem cells with donor age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Dexheimer

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are promising for cell-based regeneration therapies but up to date it is still controversial whether their function is maintained throughout ageing. Aim of this study was to address whether frequency, activation in vitro, replicative function, and in vitro lineage choice of MSC is maintained throughout ageing to answer the question whether MSC-based regeneration strategies should be restricted to younger individuals. MSC from bone marrow aspirates of 28 donors (5-80 years were characterized regarding colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F numbers, single cell cloning efficiency (SSCE, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization, Oil Red O content, proteoglycan- and collagen type II deposition were quantified. While CFU-F frequency was maintained, SSCE and early proliferation rate decreased significantly with advanced donor age. MSC with higher proliferation rate before start of induction showed stronger osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. MSC with high osteogenic capacity underwent better chondrogenesis and showed a trend to better adipogenesis. Lineage choice was, however, unaltered with age. CONCLUSION: Ageing influenced activation from dormancy and replicative function of MSC in a way that it may be more demanding to mobilize MSC to fast cell growth at advanced age. Since fast proliferation came along with high multilineage capacity, the proliferation status of expanded MSC rather than donor age may provide an argument to restrict MSC-based therapies to certain individuals.

  6. Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components

  7. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-Lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies. PMID:25666161

  8. Fibroblast growth factors as regulators of stem cell self-renewal and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeoh, Joyce S. G.; de Haan, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Organ and tissue dysfunction which is readily observable during aging results from a loss of cellular homeostasis and reduced stem cell self-renewal. Over the past 10 years, studies have been aimed at delineating growth factors that will sustain and promote the self-renewal potential of stem cells a

  9. Age-Dependent Pancreatic Gene Regulation Reveals Mechanisms Governing Human β Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, H Efsun; Li, Lingyu; Tsai, Jennifer; Torre, Eduardo A; Rosli, Yenny; Peiris, Heshan; Spitale, Robert C; Dai, Chunhua; Gu, Xueying; Qu, Kun; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jing; Grompe, Markus; Scharfmann, Raphael; Snyder, Michael S; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2016-05-10

    Intensive efforts are focused on identifying regulators of human pancreatic islet cell growth and maturation to accelerate development of therapies for diabetes. After birth, islet cell growth and function are dynamically regulated; however, establishing these age-dependent changes in humans has been challenging. Here, we describe a multimodal strategy for isolating pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells from children and adults to identify age-dependent gene expression and chromatin changes on a genomic scale. These profiles revealed distinct proliferative and functional states of islet α cells or β cells and histone modifications underlying age-dependent gene expression changes. Expression of SIX2 and SIX3, transcription factors without prior known functions in the pancreas and linked to fasting hyperglycemia risk, increased with age specifically in human islet β cells. SIX2 and SIX3 were sufficient to enhance insulin content or secretion in immature β cells. Our work provides a unique resource to study human-specific regulators of islet cell maturation and function. PMID:27133132

  10. When aging reaches CD4+ T-cells: phenotypic and functional changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Moro-García

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beyond midlife, the immune system shows aging features and its defensive capability becomes impaired, by a process known as immunosenescence that involves many changes in the innate and adaptive responses. Innate immunity seems to be better preserved globally, while the adaptive immune response exhibits profound age-dependent modifications. Elderly people display a decline in numbers of naïve T-cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, while, in contrast, their proportion of highly differentiated effector and memory T-cells, such as the CD28null T-cells, increases markedly. Naïve and memory CD4+ T-cells constitute a highly dynamic system with constant homeostatic and antigen-driven proliferation, influx, and loss of T-cells. Thymic activity dwindles with age and essentially ceases in the later decades of life, severely constraining the generation of new T-cells. Homeostatic control mechanisms are very effective at maintaining a large and diverse subset of naïve CD4+ T-cells throughout life, but although later than in CD8+T-cell compartment, these mechanisms ultimately fail with age.

  11. Chronic stress induces ageing-associated degeneration in rat Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Fei Wang; Qian Wang; Yong Chen; Qiang Lin; Hui-Bao Gao; Ping Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that stress and ageing exert inhibitory effects on rat Leydig cells.In a pattern similar to the normal process of Leydig cell ageing,stress-mediated increases in glucocorticoid levels inhibit steroidogenic enzyme expression that then results in decreased testosterone secretion.We hypothesized that chronic stress accelerates the degenerative changes associated with ageing in Leydig cells.To test this hypothesis,we established a model of chronic stress to evaluate stress-induced morphological and functional alterations in Brown Norway rat Leydig cells; additionally,intracellular lipofuscin levels,reactive oxygen species (ROS)levels and DNA damage were assessed.The results showed that chronic stress accelerated ageing-related changes:ultrastructural alterations associated with ageing,cellular lipofuscin accumulation,increased ROS levels and more extensive DNA damage were observed.Additionally,testosterone levels were decreased.This study sheds new light on the idea that chronic stress contributes to the degenerative changes associated with ageing in rat Leydig cells in vivo.

  12. Age-related changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1993-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is expressed by muscle and involved in muscle-neuron and muscle-muscle cell interactions. The expression in muscle is regulated during myogenesis and by the state of innervation. In aged muscle, both neurogenic and myogenic degenerative processes occur. We here...... virtually unchanged at all ages examined. However, changes in the extent of sialylation of NCAM were demonstrated. Even though the relative amounts of the various NCAM polypeptides were unchanged during aging, distinct changes in NCAM mRNA classes were observed. Three NCAM mRNA classes of 6.7, 5.2 and 2.......9 kb were present in perinatal and young adult skeletal muscle, whereas only the 5.2 and 2.9 kb mRNA classes could be demonstrated in aged muscle. This indicates that metabolism of the various NCAM polypeptides is individually regulated during aging. Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA in skeletal muscle...

  13. Age and gender-related differences in mitral cells of olfactory bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the age and gender-related differences in mitral cells of the human cadaveric olfactory bulbs. Sixty olfactory bulbs, 30 each from male and female (age 20-76 years) human cadavers divided into six groups of age and gender-wise were collected from the mortuary of the King Edward Medical University, Lahore. Mitral cells were counted and their diameter was calculated from 10 micro m thick cresyl violet stained histological sections. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA for age-related differences and independent t-test for gender-related differences. There was significant reduction in the number of mitral cells and diameter of their nuclei with age. There was significant decrease in the number of mitral cells in males, between groups I and II (p < 0.001); II and III (p < 0.001); and I and III (p < 0.001); statistically significant decrease also occurred in females, between groups IV and V (p < 0.001); V and VI (p < 0.001); and IV and VI (p < 0.001). In most cases, the distance between individual mitral cells was seen to be much greater than in younger group. In group VI, few mitral cells were observed in the cell layer. There was also significant decrease in the diameter of mitral cell nuclei in males, between groups I and III (p < 0.001); and II and III (p < 0.010); in females, between groups IV and VI (p < 0.001); and V and VI (p < 0.001). No gender-related differences were observed. The number of mitral cells and diameter of their nuclei decreased with advancing age. (author)

  14. Anti-Aging Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Skin Aging Induced by D-Galactose

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shengchang; Dong, Ziqing; Peng, Zhangsong; Lu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Glycation products accumulate during aging of slowly renewing tissue, including skin, and are suggested as an important mechanism underlying the skin aging process. Adipose-derived cells are widely used in the clinic to treat ischemic diseases and enhance wound healing. Interestingly, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are also effective in anti-aging therapy, although the mechanism underlying their effects remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the anti-...

  15. Activation of cell death pathways in the inner ear of the aging CBA/J mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Sha, Su-Hua; CHEN, FU-QUAN; Schacht, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that oxidative stress increases in the inner ear of aging CBA/J mice and might contribute to the loss of function of the sensory system. We now investigate the activation of cell death pathways in the cochlea of these animals. Middle-aged (12 months) and old (18-26 months) mice with hearing deficits displayed outer hair cell nuclei with apoptotic and, to a lesser extent, necrotic features. Both intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways were activated by trans...

  16. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  17. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  18. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, C J; Casas-Selves, M.; Kim, J; Zaberezhnyy, V.; Aghili, L.; Daniel, A.E.; Jimenez, L; Azam, T.; McNamee, E.N.; Clambey, E.T.; Klawitter, J; Serkova, N.J.; Tan, A.C.; Dinarello, C A; DeGregori, J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV1...

  19. Loss of CD34 expression in aging human choriocapillaris endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott H Sohn

    Full Text Available Structural and gene expression changes in the microvasculature of the human choroid occur during normal aging and age-related macular degeneration (AMD. In this study, we sought to determine the impact of aging and AMD on expression of the endothelial cell glycoprotein CD34. Sections from 58 human donor eyes were categorized as either young (under age 40, age-matched controls (> age 60 without AMD, or AMD affected (>age 60 with early AMD, geographic atrophy, or choroidal neovascularization. Dual labeling of sections with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin (UEA-I and CD34 antibodies was performed, and the percentage of capillaries labeled with UEA-I but negative for anti-CD34 was determined. In addition, published databases of mouse and human retinal pigment epithelium-choroid were evaluated and CD34 expression compared between young and old eyes. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that while CD34 and UEA-I were colocalized in young eyes, there was variable loss of CD34 immunoreactivity in older donor eyes. While differences between normal aging and AMD were not significant, the percentage of CD34 negative capillaries in old eyes, compared to young eyes, was highly significant (p = 3.8×10(-6. Endothelial cells in neovascular membranes were invariably CD34 positive. Published databases show either a significant decrease in Cd34 (mouse or a trend toward decreased CD34 (human in aging. These findings suggest that UEA-I and endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity are more consistent markers of aging endothelial cells in the choroid, and suggest a possible mechanism for the increased inflammatory milieu in the aging choroid.

  20. Aging differentially affects male and female neural stem cell neurogenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Waldron

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Jay Waldron1, Althea McCourty1, Laurent Lecanu1,21The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Neural stem cell transplantation as a brain repair strategy is a very promising technology. However, despite many attempts, the clinical success remains very deceiving. Despite clear evidence that sexual dimorphism rules many aspects of human biology, the occurrence of a sex difference in neural stem cell biology is largely understudied. Herein, we propose to determine whether gender is a dimension that drives the fate of neural stem cells through aging. Should it occur, we believe that neural stem cell sexual dimorphism and its variation during aging should be taken into account to refine clinical approaches of brain repair strategies.Methods: Neural stem cells were isolated from the subventricular zone of three- and 20-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats. Expression of the estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and glucocorticoid receptor was analyzed and quantified by Western blotting on undifferentiated neural stem cells. A second set of neural stem cells was treated with retinoic acid to trigger differentiation, and the expression of neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial markers was determined using Western blotting.Conclusion: We provided in vitro evidence that the fate of neural stem cells is affected by sex and aging. Indeed, young male neural stem cells mainly expressed markers of neuronal and oligodendroglial fate, whereas young female neural stem cells underwent differentiation towards an astroglial phenotype. Aging resulted in a lessened capacity to express neuron and astrocyte markers. Undifferentiated neural stem cells displayed sexual dimorphism in the expression of steroid receptors, in particular ERα and ERβ, and the expression level of several steroid receptors increased

  1. Effect of ageing on CMV-specific CD8 T cells from CMV seropositive healthy donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Corona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing is associated with changes in the immune system with substantial alterations in T-lymphocyte subsets. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is one of the factors that affect functionality of T cells and the differentiation and large expansions of CMV pp65-specific T cells have been associated with impaired responses to other immune challenges. Moreover, the presence of clonal expansions of CMV-specific T cells may shrink the available repertoire for other antigens and contribute to the increased incidence of infectious diseases in the elderly. In this study, we analyse the effect of ageing on the phenotype and frequency of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cell subsets according to the expression of CCR7, CD45RA, CD27, CD28, CD244 and CD85j. Results Peripheral blood from HLA-A2 healthy young, middle-aged and elderly donors was analysed by multiparametric flow cytometry using the HLA-A*0201/CMV pp65495–504 (NLVPMVATV pentamer and mAbs specific for the molecules analysed. The frequency of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells was increased in the elderly compared with young and middle-aged donors. The proportion of naïve cells was reduced in the elderly, whereas an age-associated increase of the CCR7null effector-memory subset, in particular those with a CD45RAdim phenotype, was observed, both in the pentamer-positive and pentamer-negative CD8 T cells. The results also showed that most CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells in elderly individuals were CD27/CD28 negative and expressed CD85j and CD244. Conclusion The finding that the phenotype of CMV pp65-specific CD8 T cells in elderly individuals is similar to the predominant phenotype of CD8 T cells as a whole, suggests that CMV persistent infections contributes to the age-related changes observed in the CD8 T cell compartment, and that chronic stimulation by other persistent antigens also play a role in T cell immunosenescence. Differences in subset distribution in elderly individuals showing a decrease in

  2. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K., E-mail: mcloo001@tc.umn.edu

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  3. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer’s patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  4. Selected Activities of Citrus Maxima Merr. Fruits on Human Endothelial Cells: Enhancing Cell Migration and Delaying Cellular Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Paiwan Buachan; Linda Chularojmontri; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM) fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration and aging. T...

  5. The effects of proliferation and DNA damage on hematopoietic stem cell function determine aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Satish

    2016-07-01

    In most of the mammalian tissues, homeostasis as well as injury repair depend upon a small number of resident adult stem cells. The decline in tissue/organ function in aged organisms has been directly linked with poorly functioning stem cells. Altered function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is at the center of an aging hematopoietic system, a tissue with high cellular turnover. Poorly engrafting, myeloid-biased HSCs with higher levels of DNA damage accumulation are the hallmark features of an aged hematopoietic system. These cells show a higher proliferation rate than their younger counterparts. It was proposed that quiescence of these cells over long period of time leads to accumulation of DNA damage, eventually resulting in poor function/pathological conditions in hematopoietic system. However, various mouse models with premature aging phenotype also show highly proliferative HSCs. This review examines the evidence that links proliferation of HSCs with aging, which leads to functional changes in the hematopoietic system. Developmental Dynamics 245:739-750, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26813236

  6. Dual role of the caspase enzymes in satellite cells from aged and young subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, S; Sancilio, S; Mancinelli, R; Gatta, V; Di Pietro, R

    2013-01-01

    Satellite cell (SC) proliferation and differentiation have critical roles in skeletal muscle recovery after injury and adaptation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. Normal ageing hinders SC proliferation and differentiation, and is associated with increased expression of a number of pro-apoptotic factors in skeletal muscle. In light of previous studies that have demonstrated age-related altered expression of genes involved in SC antioxidant and repair activity, this investigation was aimed at evaluating the incidence of apoptotic features in human SCs. Primary cells were obtained from vastus lateralis of nine young (27.3±2.0 years old) and nine old (71.1±1.8 years old) subjects, and cultured in complete medium for analyses at 4, 24, 48, and 72 h. Apoptosis was assessed using AnnexinV/propidium iodide staining, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling technique, RT-PCR, DNA microarrays, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence analysis. There was an increased rate of apoptotic cells in aged subjects at all of the experimental time points, with no direct correlation between AnnexinV-positive cells and caspase-8 activity. On the other hand, CASP2, CASP6, CASP7, and CASP9 and a number of cell death genes were upregulated in the aged SCs. Altogether, our data show age-related enhanced susceptibility of human SCs to apoptosis, which might be responsible for their reduced response to muscle damage. PMID:24336075

  7. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991819

  8. Human T cell aging and the impact of persistent viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas eFulop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a dysregulation of the immune response, loosely termed immunosenescence. Each part of the immune system is influenced to some extent by the aging process. However, adaptive immunity seems more extensively affected and among all participating cells it is the T cells that are most altered. There is a large body of experimental work devoted to the investigation of age-associated differences in T cell phenotypes and functions in young and old individuals, but few longitudinal studies in humans actually delineating changes at the level of the individual. In most studies, the number and proportion of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, is reported to be higher in the elderly than in the young. Limited longitudinal studies suggest that accumulation of these cells is a dynamic process and does indeed represent an age-associated change. Accumulations of such late-stage cells may contribute to the enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory milieu commonly seen in older people. We do not know exactly what causes these observed changes, but an understanding of the possible causes is now beginning to emerge. A favored hypothesis is that these events are at least partly due to the effects of the maintenance of essential immune surveillance against persistent viral infections, notably Cytomegalovirus (CMV, which may exhaust the immune system over time. It is still a matter of debate as to whether these changes are compensatory and beneficial or pathological and detrimental to the proper functioning of the immune system and whether they impact longevity. Here, we will review present knowledge of T cell changes with aging and their relation to chronic viral and possibly other persistent infections.

  9. Age-associated reduction of cell spreading induces mitochondrial DNA common deletion by oxidative stress in human skin dermal fibroblasts: implication for human skin connective tissue aging

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Chunji; Cho, Moon Kyun; Perry, Daniel; Quan, Taihao

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced cell spreading is a prominent feature of aged dermal fibroblasts in human skin in vivo. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) common deletion has been reported to play a role in the human aging process, however the relationship between age-related reduced cell spreading and mtDNA common deletion has not yet been reported. Results To examine mtDNA common deletion in the dermis of aged human skin, the epidermis was removed from full-thickness human skin samples using cryostat. mtDNA comm...

  10. Efferent synapses return to inner hair cells in the aging cochlea

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, Amanda M.; Fuchs, Paul; Ryugo, David K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Efferent innervation of the cochlea undergoes extensive modification early in development, but it is unclear if efferent synapses are modified by age, hearing loss, or both. Structural alterations in the cochlea affecting information transfer from the auditory periphery to the brain may contribute to age-related hearing deficits. We investigated changes to efferent innervation in the vicinity of inner hair cells (IHC) in young and old C57BL/6 mice using transmission electron microscopy to rev...

  11. Mechanisms of apoptotic cell death of lymphocytes in aging and in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schindowski, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are becoming more and more important for our society and our health care system. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a disorder that destroys some parts of the brain and is characterized by global cognitive decline including a progressive irreversible loss of memory, orientation, and reasoning. “Healthy aging”, therefore, is one of the major aims for modern medicine. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, plays an important role for example in fetal development, as well a...

  12. Phenotypes of Aging Postovulatory Oocytes After Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah Reum; Shimoike, Takashi; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kishigami, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Oocytes rapidly lose their developmental potential after ovulation, termed postovulatory oocyte aging, and often exhibit characteristic phenotypes, such as cytofragmentation, abnormal spindle shapes, and chromosome misalignments. Here, we reconstructed mouse oocytes using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to reveal the effect of somatic cell-derived nuclei on oocyte physiology during aging. Normal oocytes started undergoing cytofragmentation 24 hours after oocyte collection; however, this occurred earlier in SCNT oocytes and was more severe at 48 hours, suggesting that the transferred somatic cell nuclei affected oocyte physiology. We found no difference in the status of acetylated α-tubulin (Ac-Tub) and α-tubulin (Tub) between normal and SCNT aging oocytes, but unlike normal oocytes, aging SCNT oocytes did not have astral microtubules. Interestingly, aging SCNT oocytes displayed more severely scattered chromosomes or irregularly shaped spindles. Observations of the microfilaments showed that, in normal oocytes, there was a clear actin ring beneath the plasma membrane and condensed microfilaments around the spindle (the actin cap) at 0 hours, and the actin filaments started degenerating at 1 hour, becoming completely disrupted and distributed to the cytoplasm at 24 hours. By contrast, in SCNT oocytes, an actin cap formed around the transplanted nuclei within 1 hour of SCNT, which was still present at 24 hours. Thus, SCNT oocytes age in a similar but distinct way, suggesting that they not only contain nuclei with abnormal epigenetics but are also physiologically different. PMID:27253626

  13. [Is it possible to "cancel" aging process of cell cultures under optimal conditions for cultivation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhkov, A I; Kovaleva, M K; Menzianova, N G

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the cells epigenotypes Dunaliella viridis Teod. in the process of chronological and replicative aging were investigated. By 40th day of accumulative cultivation (which coincided with the stationary growth phase) DNA content in the cells of Dunaliella viridis increased 2 times, triacylglycerides 3 times, beta-carotene and carbonyl proteins 2 times, RNA content decreased in comparison with cells in exponential growth phase, i. e., the 40th day of growth of culture forms the age-related epigenotype. 4 received subcultures were being transplanted during 2 years in mid-logarithmic growth phase (subculture-10), early stationary phase of growth (subculture-20), in the mid-stationary growth phase (subculture-30), and late stationary growth phase (subculture-40). It is shown that epigenotype of subculture-10 remained unchanged over 2 years of cultivation, i. e., it does not manifest replicative aging. At the same time, the subculture-20, although long enough (at least 40 passages), maintained epigenotype characteristic of young cultures, and showed age-related changes. Pronounced age-dependent changes of epigenotype in the course of cultivation were identified for subculture-30, and subculture-40 was characterized by unstable epigenotype. Thus, cultivation conditions determine the intensity of replicative aging in Dunaliella viridis. PMID:21809617

  14. Renal cell carcinoma in India demonstrates early age of onset & a late stage of presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Agnihotri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Clinical spectrum of most of the diseases in developing countries is different from the west. Similarly whether renal cell carcinomas (RCC in a developing country like India is seen in the same spectrum in relation to the age at presentation as in the west is not described in the literature. This study was carried out to investigate the spectrum of RCC in India with regards to age of onset, stage at presentation and survival. Methods: Patients with renal tumour, treated between January 2000 to December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in north India, were analyzed for age at presentation, clinical features and histopathological characteristics. Clinical diagnosis was made by contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Renal masses diagnosed as angiomyolipoma, infective masses and hydatid cysts were excluded from the analysis. Impact of various age groups on gender, tumour size, TNM stage, Fuhrman grade, histopathological subtypes, lymph node, inferior vena cava (IVC involvement and survival was analyzed. Patients were grouped in five age groups i.e. ≤39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and more than 70 yr of age. Results: Of the total 617 patients with 617 renal tumours (2 patients had bilateral tumours but only the larger tumour was considered clinically suspected as RCC, 586 had epithelial cell tumour and the remaining 31 had non epithelial cell tumour. The mean tumour size was 8.08±3.5 cm (median 7, range 1-25 cm. Tumour of less than 4 cm size was present in only 10.4 per cent patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 55.15±13.34 (median 56, range 14-91 yr years. A total of 30.03 per cent of renal tumours presented in patients younger than 50 yr of age. Though there was no difference in stage, Fuhrman′s grade, IVC involvement and lymph nodal spread among various age groups, younger patients had higher proportion of non clear cell RCC and only 48.59 per cent of them presented

  15. The generation of oligodendroglial cells is preserved in the rostral migratory stream during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian eCapilla-Gonzalez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ is the largest source of newly generated cells in the adult mammalian brain. SVZ-derived neuroblasts migrate via the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulb (OB, where they differentiate into mature neurons. Additionally, a small proportion of SVZ-derived cells contribute to the generation of myelinating oligodendrocytes. The production of new cells in the SVZ decreases during aging, affecting the incorporation of new neurons into the OB. However, the age-related changes that occur across the RMS are not fully understood. In this study we evaluate how aging affects the cellular organization of migrating neuroblast chains, the proliferation, and the fate of the newly generated cells in the SVZ-OB system. By using electron microscopy and immunostaining, we found that the RMS path becomes discontinuous and its cytoarchitecture is disorganized in aged mice (24-month-old mice. Subsequently, OB neurogenesis was impaired in the aged brain while the production of oligodendrocytes was not compromised. These findings provide new insight into oligodendrocyte preservation throughout life. Further exploration of this matter could help the development of new strategies to prevent neurological disorders associated with senescence.

  16. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...

  17. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer.The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach.I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging,stem cells,and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling.The high expression of aging-or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging,stem cells,and cancer.These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation,metabolic process,DNA damage response,apoptosis,p53 signaling pathway,immune/inflammatory response,and other processes,suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging.Moreover,these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation,proliferation,and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells.These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer.Certainly,the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation.This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  18. Effects of spermatozoa-oviductal cell coincubation time and oviductal cell age on spermatozoa-oviduct interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldarmahi, Ahmed; Elliott, Sarah; Russell, Jean; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    The oviduct plays a crucial role in sperm storage, maintenance of sperm viability and sperm transport to the site of fertilisation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of oviductal cell culture passage number, oviductal cell age and spermatozoa-oviduct coincubation times on gene expression in oviductal cells. Immortalised oviductal epithelial cells (OPEC) obtained from two different cell passages (36 and 57) were subcultured three times with and without spermatozoa for 24 h (control group). In a second study, OPEC were cocultured with spermatozoa for different time intervals (0, 4, 12 and 24 h). Expression of adrenomedullin (ADM), heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (HSPA8) and prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) in OPEC was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of ADM and HSPA8 was decreased significantly in OPEC cells from Passage 57, particularly in the later subculture group. These effects on HSPA8, but not ADM, expression in OPEC were further altered after coculture with spermatozoa for 24 h. We also demonstrated that spermatozoa-oviduct coculture for 12 and 24 h resulted in significantly higher expression of ADM, HSPA8 and PGES in OPEC. Overall, the data suggest that the OPEC lose some of their properties as a result of oviductal cell aging and that there are spermatozoa-oviduct interactions leading to increased oviductal cell gene expression. PMID:23551866

  19. From Ancient Pathways to Aging Cells-Connecting Metabolism and Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Campisi, Judith

    2016-06-14

    Cellular senescence is a complex stress response that permanently arrests the proliferation of cells at risk for oncogenic transformation. However, senescent cells can also drive phenotypes associated with aging. Although the senescence-associated growth arrest prevents the development of cancer, and the metabolism of cancer cells has been studied in depth, the metabolic causes and consequences of cellular senescence were largely unexplored until recently. New findings reveal key roles for several aspects of cellular metabolism in the establishment and control of senescent phenotypes. These discoveries have important implications for both cancer and aging. In this review, we highlight some of the recent links between metabolism and phenotypes that are commonly associated with senescent cells. PMID:27304503

  20. Genetic inactivation of Cdk7 leads to cell cycle arrest and induces premature aging due to adult stem cell exhaustion

    OpenAIRE

    Ganuza, Miguel; Sáiz-Ladera, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Gómez, Gonzalo; Schneider, Ralph; Blasco, María A.; Pisano, David; Paramio, Jesús M.; Santamaría, David; Barbacid, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Employing a conditionally inactive gene trap allele, Cdk7's function in regulating cellular proliferation by Cdk1/2-phosphorylation is convincingly dissected from alternative notions on CTD-phosphorylation of RNA Pol II. Premature aging phenotypes caused by stem cell depletion lend the necessary functional support.

  1. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  2. Morphological changes of cell proliferation and apoptosis in rat jejunal mucosa at different ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Jian Li; Qing Li; Jian Zhang; Xiang-Lin Duan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes of cell proliferation and apoptosis in rat jejunal epithelium at different ages.METHODS: Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the jejunal mucosal and glandulous epithelia from birth to postnatal 12th month were observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC), and TUNEL method. The height of villus, the thickness of muscle layer and the number of goblet cells in jejunal mucosal and glandulous epithelia were measured by BeiHang analytic software and analyzed by STAT.RESULTS: (1) Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells of jejunal glandulous recess were found and increased in number from birth to the postnatal 3rd month. The number of PCNA positive cells peaked in the postnatal 3rd month, and decreased from then on. (2) The number of apoptotic cells also peaked in the postnatal 3rd month, showing a similar trend to that of the PCNA positive cells. (3) The height of jejunal villus increased after birth, peaked in the postnatal 3rd month and decreased from then on. The jejunal muscle layer became thicker in the postnatal 3rd week and the postnatal 12th month.The number of goblet cells of the jejunal mucosal and glandulous epithelia had a linear correlation with age.CONCLUSION: (1) PCNA positive cells are distributed in the jejunal glandulous recess. (2) Apoptotic cell number peaks in the postnatal 3rd month, indicating that cell proliferation and apoptosis are developed with the formation of digestive metabolism as rat grows to maturity. (3) The thickness of jejunal muscle layer increases to a maximum in the postnatal 3rd week, which may be related to the change in diet from milk to solid food. (4) The number of goblet cells increases rapidly in the postnatal 3rd week, probably due to ingestion of solid food.

  3. Cell Death Atlas of the Postnatal Mouse Ventral Forebrain and Hypothalamus: Effects of Age and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Todd H.; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V.; Murray, Elaine K.; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain. PMID:23296992

  4. Reduced Hippocampal Dentate Cell Proliferation and Impaired Spatial Memory Performance in Aged-Epileptic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    LucieneCovolan; ClaudioM TQueiroz; JairGuilhermeSantos; GilbertoFXavier

    2013-01-01

    Increased adult neurogenesis is observed after training in hippocampal-dependent tasks and also after acutely induced status epilepticus (SE) although the specific roles of these cells are still a matter of debate. In this study, we investigated hippocampal cell proliferation and differentiation and the spatial learning performance in young or aged chronically epileptic rats. Status was induced by pilocarpine in 3 or 20-month old rats. Either two or twenty months later, rats were treated with...

  5. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadafumi Yokoyama

    Full Text Available The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS.

  6. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina: an immunohistochemical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Aggarwal; T C Nag; S Wadhwa

    2007-03-01

    During normal ageing, the rods (and other neurones) undergo a significant decrease in density in the human retina from the fourth decade of life onward. Since the rods synapse with the rod bipolar cells in the outer plexiform layer, a decline in rod density (mainly due to death) may ultimately cause an associated decline of the neurones which, like the rod bipolar cells, are connected to them. The rod bipolar cells are selectively stained with antibodies to protein kinase C-. This study examined if rod bipolar cell density changes with ageing of the retina, utilizing donor human eyes (age: 6–91 years). The retinas were fixed and their temporal parts from the macula to the mid-periphery sectioned and processed for protein kinase C- immunohistochemistry. The density of the immunopositive rod bipolar cells was estimated in the mid-peripheral retina (eccentricity: 3–5 mm) along the horizontal temporal axis. The results show that while there is little change in the density of the rod bipolar cells from 6 to 35 years (2.2%), the decline during the period from 35 to 62 years is about 21% and between seventh and tenth decades, it is approximately 27%.

  7. Female Aging Alters Expression of Human Cumulus Cells Genes that Are Essential for Oocyte Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamadir Al-Edani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of female aging is an important issue in human reproduction. There was a need for an extensive analysis of age impact on transcriptome profile of cumulus cells (CCs to link oocyte quality and developmental potential with patient’s age. CCs from patients of three age groups were analyzed individually using microarrays. RT-qPCR validation was performed on independent CC cohorts. We focused here on pathways affected by aging in CCs that may explain the decline of oocyte quality with age. In CCs collected from patients >37 years, angiogenic genes including ANGPTL4, LEPR, TGFBR3, and FGF2 were significantly overexpressed compared to patients of the two younger groups. In contrast genes implicated in TGF-β signaling pathway such as AMH, TGFB1, inhibin, and activin receptor were underexpressed. CCs from patients whose ages are between 31 and 36 years showed an overexpression of genes related to insulin signaling pathway such as IGFBP3, PIK3R1, and IGFBP5. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to identify the microRNAs that are potential regulators of the differentially expressed genes of the study. It revealed that the pathways impacted by age were potential targets of specific miRNAs previously identified in our CCs small RNAs sequencing.

  8. Cell autonomous expression of inflammatory genes in biologically aged fibroblasts associated with elevated NF-kappaB activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bender Patrick; Beggs William; Yalamanchili Nirupama; Mayo Kelli L; Kriete Andres; Kari Csaba; Rodeck Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic inflammation is a well-known corollary of the aging process and is believed to significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality of many age-associated chronic diseases. However, the mechanisms that cause age-associated inflammatory changes are not well understood. Particularly, the contribution of cell stress responses to age-associated inflammation in 'non-inflammatory' cells remains poorly defined. The present cross-sectional study focused on differences in mo...

  9. Characteristics of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in aged mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence for dysfunction of endothelial repair in aged mice was sought by studying the pattern of induced differentiation, quantity, and function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in aged mice. The CD117-positive stem cell population was separated from bone marrow by magnetic activated cell-sorting system (MACS), and EPCs were defined by demonstrating the expression of CD117+CD34+Flk-1+ by flow cytometry. After 7 days of culture, the number of clones formed was counted, and proliferation and migration of EPCs were analyzed by MTT[3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay and modified Boyden chamber assay. The results demonstrated that compared to the control group, the quantity of bone marrow-derived CD117+ stem cells and EPCs, as well as the proliferation, migration, the number of clones formed, and phagocytotic function of EPCs were significantly reduced in aged mice. There were no significant differences in the morphology and induced differentiation pattern of EPCs between the aged mouse group and the control group. Authors suggest that the dysfunction of EPCs may serve as a surrogate parameter of vascular function in old mice

  10. Remodeling of chromatin structure in senescent cells and its potential impact on tumor suppression and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an important tumor suppression process, and a possible contributor to tissue aging. Senescence is accompanied extensive changes in chromatin structure. In particular, many senescent cells accumulate specialized domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF), which are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. This article reviews ou...

  11. How stem cells manage to escape senescence and ageing - while they can: A recent study reveals that autophagy is responsible for senescence-dependent loss of regenerative potential of muscle stem cells during ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchetti, Miria

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells or satellite cells are responsible for muscle regeneration in the adult. Although satellite cells are highly resistant to stress, and display greater capacity to repair molecular damage than the committed progeny, their regenerative potential declines with age. During ageing, satellite cells switch to a state of permanent cell cycle arrest or senescence which prevents their activation. A recent study reveals that the senescence of satellite cell relies on defective autophagy, the quality control mechanism that degrades damaged proteins and organelles. Molecular damage is generated by oxidative stress that also promotes epigenetic changes that activate the expression of master genes, in a double-hit mechanism that ensures senescence. Importantly, genetic, and pharmacological correction of defective autophagy reverses satellite cell senescence and restores muscle regeneration in geriatric mice, with perspectives of modulating age-related functional decline of muscle. This study provides new clues to understand stem cell and organismal ageing. PMID:27389857

  12. Loss of stem cell repopulating ability upon transplantation. Effects of donor age, cell number, and transplantation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term functional capacities of marrow cell lines were defined by competitive repopulation, a technique capable of detecting a small decline in repopulating abilities. There was little or no difference between cells from old and young donors, but a single serial transplantation caused a large decline in repopulating ability. Varying the numbers of marrow cells transplanted into the initial carrier from 10(5) to 10(7) did not alter the ability of the carrier's marrow cells to repopulate in competition with previously untransplanted cells. This ability was improved only in carriers that had received 10(8) marrow cells, although deleterious effects of transplantation were still present. These effects were not solely caused by cell damage from the transplantation procedure, because transplantation by parabiosis, or recovery from sublethal irradiation without transplantation, reduced repopulating abilities as much as transplanting 10(5) to 10(7) marrow cells. The transplantation effect also was not caused solely by irradiation, because the same effect appeared in unirradiated W/Wv carriers. The transplantation effect was more pronounced when donors were identified by hemoglobin type than by chromosome markers, implying that nonerythroid cell lines may be less affected by transplantation than erythroid precursor cells. When the effects of a lifetime of normal function and a single transplantation were compared, the latter caused 3-7 times more decline in repopulating abilities of phytohemagglutinin-responsive cell precursors, and at least 10-20 times more decline in erythroid cell precursors. Stem cell lines can be serially transplanted at least five times before losing their ability to repopulate and save lethally irradiated recipients or to cure genetically anemic mice. Therefore, if transplantation causes an acceleration of the normal aging process, these figures suggest that stem cells should be able to function normally through at least 15-50 life spans

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. PMID:26875723

  14. Death mode-dependent reduction in succinate dehydrogenase activity in hair cells of aging rat cochleae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei-ping; HU Bo-hua; SUN Jian-he; ZHAI Suo-qiang; Donald Henderson

    2010-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have shown that both apoptosis and necrosis are involved in hair cell (HC) pathogenesis in aging cochleae. To better understand the biological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of HC death, we examined the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial bioenergetic enzyme, in the HCs of aging cochleae.Methods The auditory brainstem response thresholds elicited by tone bursts at 4, 10 and 20 kHz were measured in both young (2-3 months) and aging (22-23 months) Wistar rats. SDH activity was evaluated with a colorimetric assay using nitroblue tetrazolium monosodium salt. The SDH-labeled organs of Corti were double stained with propidium iodide, a DNA intercalating fluorescent probe for illustration of HC nuclei. All the specimens were examined with fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy.Results Aging rats exhibited a significant elevation of ABR thresholds with threshold shifts being 34 dB at 20 kHz, 28 dB at 10 kHz, and 25 dB at 4 kHz. Consistent with the reduction in the cochlear function, aging cochleae exhibited the reduction of SDH staining intensity in the apical and the basal ends of the cochleae, where a large number of apoptotic, necrotic, and missing HCs were evident. The reduction in SDH staining appeared in a cell-death-mode dependent fashion. Specifically, SDH labeling remained in apoptotic HCs. In contrast, SDH staining was markedly reduced or absent in necrotic HCs.Conclusions In the aging cochlea, SDH activity is preserved in HCs undergoing apoptosis, but is substantially reduced in necrosis. These results suggest that mitochondrial energetic function is involved in the regulation of cell death pathways in the pathogenesis of aging cochleae.

  15. Selected Activities of Citrus Maxima Merr. Fruits on Human Endothelial Cells: Enhancing Cell Migration and Delaying Cellular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiwan Buachan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC. Short-term (48 h co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL. CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  16. Cycle aging of commercial NMC/graphite pouch cells at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cycle aging of commercial 40 A h pouch cells was studied at different temperatures. • Cycle testing, impedance spectroscopy, and post-mortem analyses were carried out. • Post-mortem study enabled attributing the observed aging to different mechanisms. • Capacity fade was related to SEI-layer and at high temperature also to Li plating. • Significant increase in the electrolyte and separator resistances was observed. - Abstract: Cycle aging of commercial 40 A h pouch-type lithium-ion cells with NMC/graphite chemistry was studied at different cycling temperatures (room temperature, +45 °C, and +45 °C charge/+65 °C discharge). Aging was observed as capacity fade and resistance increase, and the aging mechanisms were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and post-mortem analysis, where visual inspection and thickness measurements were employed together with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analyses. It was observed that elevated temperatures resulted in accelerated capacity fade, especially for the +45 °C/+65 °C condition. SEI-layer growth and lithium plating, discovered in cell disassembly, were attributed to be the main mechanisms responsible for capacity loss. In addition to the capacity fade, resistance increase was observed both in ohmic and polarization resistances. The ohmic resistance growth was attributed to lack of electrolyte and increased separator resistance. Polarization resistance evolution during cycling was similar at room temperature and at +45 °C, but different at the +45 °C/+65 °C condition. It was concluded that post-mortem analysis is essential for attributing the cycle testing and impedance spectroscopy results to different components and processes inside the cell. For example, the lithium plating phenomenon could not have been predicted or discovered

  17. A micro-Raman spectroscopic investigation of leukemic U-937 cells in aged cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Enza; Trusso, Sebastiano; Franco, Domenico; Nicolò, Marco Sebastiano; Allegra, Alessandro; Neri, Fortunato; Musolino, Caterina; Guglielmino, Salvatore P. P.

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been shown that micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is able to discriminate among different types of tissues and tumoral cells by the detection of significant alterations and/or reorganizations of complex biological molecules, such as nucleic acids, lipids and proteins. Moreover, its use, being in principle a non-invasive technique, appears an interesting clinical tool for the evaluation of the therapeutical effects and of the disease progression. In this work we analyzed molecular changes in aged cultures of leukemia model U937 cells with respect to fresh cultures of the same cell line. In fact, structural variations of individual neoplastic cells on aging may lead to a heterogeneous data set, therefore falsifying confidence intervals, increasing error levels of analysis and consequently limiting the use of Raman spectroscopy analysis. We found that the observed morphological changes of U937 cells corresponded to well defined modifications of the Raman contributions in selected spectral regions, where markers of specific functional groups, useful to characterize the cell state, are present. A detailed subcellular analysis showed a change in cellular organization as a function of time, and correlated to a significant increase of apoptosis levels. Besides the aforementioned study, Raman spectra were used as input for principal component analysis (PCA) in order to detect and classify spectral changes among U937 cells.

  18. Increased Stiffness in Aged Skeletal Muscle Impairs Muscle Progenitor Cell Proliferative Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Lacraz

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a decreased regenerative potential due to the loss of function of endogenous stem cells or myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs. Aged skeletal muscle is characterized by the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM, which in turn influences the biomechanical properties of myofibers by increasing their stiffness. Since the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment directly impacts MPC function, we hypothesized that the increase in muscle stiffness that occurs with aging impairs the behavior of MPCs, ultimately leading to a decrease in regenerative potential.We showed that freshly isolated individual myofibers from aged mouse muscles contain fewer MPCs overall than myofibers from adult muscles, with fewer quiescent MPCs and more proliferative and differentiating MPCs. We observed alterations in cultured MPC behavior in aged animals, where the proliferation and differentiation of MPCs were lower and higher, respectively. These alterations were not linked to the intrinsic properties of aged myofibers, as shown by the similar values for the cumulative population-doubling values and fusion indexes. However, atomic force microscopy (AFM indentation experiments revealed a nearly 4-fold increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment. We further showed that the increase in stiffness is associated with alterations to muscle ECM, including the accumulation of collagen, which was correlated with higher hydroxyproline and advanced glycation end-product content. Lastly, we recapitulated the impaired MPC behavior observed in aging using a hydrogel substrate that mimics the stiffness of myofibers.These findings provide novel evidence that the low regenerative potential of aged skeletal muscle is independent of intrinsic MPC properties but is related to the increase in the stiffness of the MPC microenvironment.

  19. Intervention of oxygen-control ability to radiation sensitivity, cell aging and cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen is essential for life, and cells have therefore developed numerous adaptive responses to oxygen change. Here, we examined the difference in oxygen-control functions of human (HE), mouse (ME), and Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells cultured under different oxygen conditions (0.5%, 2% and 20%), and also examined whether oxygen tensions contributed to cellular lifespan and transformation. HE cells had their replicative lifespan slightly extended under hypoxic (0.5% and 2% oxygen) conditions, but were not immortalized under any of the oxygen concentrations. On the other hand, although ME cells cultured under 20% oxygen tension decreased their proliferation potency temporarily at early stage, all rodent cells were immortalized and acquired anchorage-independency, regardless of oxygen tension. These results suggest that cellular oxygen control function is related to sensitivities cellular immortalization and transformation. To understand intervention of oxygen control ability on cellular immortalization and transformation, we examined the intracellular oxidative level, mitochondria functions and radiation sensitivity. Intracellular oxidative levels of hypoxically cultured rodent cells were significantly enhanced. Mitochondrial membrane potential was altered depend on oxygen tensions, but the change was not parallel to mitochondria number in rodent cells. ME cells were particularly sensitive to oxygen change, and showed a clear oxygen effect on the X-ray survival. However, there was no difference in frequency of radiation-induced micronuclei between HE and ME cells. These results suggest that the response to oxygen change differs markedly in HE and rodent cells. (author)

  20. Strengthening of the DNA-protein complex during stationary phase aging of cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of accumulation of cross-linkages in the DNA-protein complex was studied during stationary phase aging of cells in culture. Chinese hamster cells were used in the experiments, along with human fibroblasts. 3H-thymidine, 14C-valine, and 14C-leucine were added to the medium. The quantity of protein firmly bound with DNA was judged from the value of the coefficient 14C/3H determined with allowance for penetration of counting from the 14C-channel into the 3H-channel. The authors maintain that the results presented in this paper provide further evidence of the value of stationary phase cell cultures for the study of the mechanisms of aging and also of some of the general principles underlying hereditary pathology

  1. Age of Diagnosis of Squamous Cell Cervical Carcinoma and Early Sexual Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Hughes, James P.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Galloway, Denise A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Given the established links between young age at first intercourse (AFI), number of sex partners, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC), we hypothesized that women diagnosed with SCC at younger ages would be more likely to report young AFI than women diagnosed later in life. Methods We performed a population-based investigation among invasive SCC cases who were diagnosed between 1986 and 2004, were 22 to 53 years old, and lived in the metropolitan Seattle-Puget Sound region (n=333). Using multivariate linear regression, we estimated coefficients and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between age at SCC diagnosis and AFI (AFI and SCC diagnosis ranged from 4 to 35 years. In a multivariate model, compared to SCC cases reporting AFI≥19, the mean age of diagnosis was 3.1 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFIAFI 15–18 years (CI: −4.6, −0.6). Although number of sex partners before age 20 was associated with age at SCC diagnosis in a crude analysis, the association was not independent of AFI. However, in the AFI≥19 and AFIAFIAFI, though the effect appeared to be modified by number of sex partners before age 20. PMID:19318437

  2. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  3. Seismic fragility testing of naturally-aged, safety-related, class 1E battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concern over seismic susceptibility of naturally-aged lead-acid batteries used for safety-related emergency power in nuclear power stations was brought about by battery problems that periodically had been reported in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The Turkey Point Station had reported cracked and buckled plates in several cells in October 1974 (LER 75-5). The Fitzpatrick Station had reported cracked battery cell cases in October 1977 (LER 77-55) and again in September 1979 (LER 79-59). The Browns Ferry Station had reported a cracked cell leaking a small quantity of electrolyte in July 1981 (LER 81-42). The Indian Point Station had reported cracked and leaking cells in both February (LER 82-7) and April 1982 (LER 82-16); both of these LERs indicated the cracked cells were due to expansion (i.e., growth) of the positive plates

  4. Estrogen and progesterone stimulate Schwann cell proliferation in a sex- and age-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Kanje, M

    1999-01-01

    The effects of estrogen and progesterone on Schwann cell proliferation were studied in cultured segments of the rat sciatic nerve from adult male, female, and newborn rats, by measurement of [3H thymidine incorporation or bromo-deoxy-uridine- (BrdU)-labelling and immunocytochemistry. Estrogen (100...... Schwann cells from male rats at high concentrations. The proliferative effects of estrogen and progesterone were blocked when the segments were cultured in the presence of inhibitors of their respective receptors, ICI 128 780 and zk 112994. The data suggest that Schwann cells possess distinct receptors...... for estrogen and progesterone and that these receptors may be involved in the control of Schwann cell proliferation. It also shows that the response of Schwann cells to sex hormones varies with sex and perhaps also with age....

  5. Age-related changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule in skeletal muscle: a comparative study of newborn, adult and aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Olsen, M; Zhernosekov, D;

    1993-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is expressed by muscle and involved in muscle-neuron and muscle-muscle cell interactions. The expression in muscle is regulated during myogenesis and by the state of innervation. In aged muscle, both neurogenic and myogenic degenerative processes occur. We here...... virtually unchanged at all ages examined. However, changes in the extent of sialylation of NCAM were demonstrated. Even though the relative amounts of the various NCAM polypeptides were unchanged during aging, distinct changes in NCAM mRNA classes were observed. Three NCAM mRNA classes of 6.7, 5.2 and 2.......9 kb were present in perinatal and young adult skeletal muscle, whereas only the 5.2 and 2.9 kb mRNA classes could be demonstrated in aged muscle. This indicates that metabolism of the various NCAM polypeptides is individually regulated during aging. Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA in skeletal muscle...

  6. Protective effects of sodium orthovanadate in diabetic reticulocytes and ageing red blood cells of Wistar rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bihari L Gupta; Anju Preet; Najma Z Baquer

    2004-03-01

    The reticulocytes and the ageing red blood cells (RBCs) namely young (Y), middle-aged (M) and old RBCs (O) of female Wistar rats from different groups such as control animals (C), controls treated with vanadate (C + V), alloxan-induced diabetic (D), diabetic-treated with insulin (D + I) and vanadate (D + V), were fractionated on a percoll/BSA gradient. The following enzymes were measured – hexokinase (HK), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSSG-R), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AsAT) and arginase in the hemolysates of all the RBCs fractions. Decreases in the activity of HK and AsAT by about 70%, arginase and GSH-Px by 30% in old RBCs were observed in comparison to reticulocytes of control animals. Increases in the activity of GSSG-R by 86%, AlaAT by more than 400% and GST by 70% were observed in old RBCs in comparison to reticulocytes of control animals. Alloxan diabetic animals showed a further decrease in the activities of HK in Y RBCs by 37%, M RBCs by 39% and O RBCs by 32%, GSH-Px activity in Y RBCs by 13%, M RBCs by 20% and O RBCs by 33% and GST activity in Y RBCs by 14%, M RBCs by 42% and O RBCs by 60% in comparison to their corresponding cells of control animals. An increase in the activity of all the enzymes studied was also observed in reticulocytes of diabetic animals in comparison to reticulocytes of controls. The GSSG-R activity was found to be increased in Y RBCs by 49%, M RBCs by 67% and O RBCs by 64% as compared to the corresponding age-matched cells of control animals. The activity of arginase also decreased in Y RBCs by about10%, M RBCs by 20% and O RBCs by 30% in comparison to the age-matched cells of control animals. A decrease in the activity of AsAT in Y and M RBCs by 30%, and O RBCs by 25% was observed in diabetic animals in comparison to the age-matched cells of control animals. The activity of AlaAT was found to be decreased by more than 10% in Y and M

  7. Radiation biology of Caenorhabditis elegans. Germ cell response, aging and behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of radiation effect in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans has been carried out over three decades and now allow for understanding at the molecular, cellular and individual levels. This review describes the current knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing irradiation with a scope of the germ line, aging and behavior. In germ cells, ionizing radiation induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Lots of molecules involved in these responses and functions have been identified in C. elegans, which are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes. Radiosensitivity and the effect of heavy-ion microbeam irradiation on germ cells with relationship between initiation of meiotic recombination and DNA lesions are discussed. In addition to DNA damage, ionizing radiation produces free radicals, and the free radical theory is the most popular aging theory. A first signal transduction pathway of aging has been discovered in C. elegans, and radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress is recently noted for an inducible factor of hormetic response and genetic instability. The hormetic response in C. elegans exposed to oxidative stress is discussed with genetic pathways of aging. Moreover, C. elegans is well known as a model organism for behavior. The recent work reported the radiation effects via specific neurons on learning behavior, and radiation and hydrogen peroxide affect the locomotory rate similarly. These findings are discussed in relation to the evidence obtained with other organisms. Altogether, C. elegans may be a good 'in vivo' model system in the field of radiation biology. (author)

  8. Basal neutrophil function in human aging: Implications in endothelial cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Neto, Joes; Cardoso, André S C; Monteiro, Hugo P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Junqueira, Virginia B C; Simon, Karin A

    2016-07-01

    Much attention has been drawn to the pro-inflammatory condition that accompanies aging. This study compared parameters from non-stimulated neutrophils, obtained from young (18-30 years old [y.o.]) and elderly (65-80 y.o.) human volunteers. Measured as an inflammatory marker, plasmatic concentration of hs-CRP was found higher in elderly individuals. Non-stimulated neutrophil production of ROS and NO was, respectively, 38 and 29% higher for the aged group. From the adhesion molecules evaluated, only CD11b expression was elevated in neutrophils from the aged group, whereas no differences were found for CD11a, CD18, or CD62. A 69% higher non-stimulated in vitro neutrophil/endothelial cell adhesion was observed for neutrophils isolated from elderly donors. Our results suggest that with aging, neutrophils may be constitutively producing more reactive species in closer proximity to endothelial cells of vessel walls, which may both contribute to vascular damage and reflect a neutrophil intracellular disrupted redox balance, altering neutrophil function in aging. PMID:27109745

  9. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Ribeiro-Varandas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC. Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis.

  10. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  11. Aging affects B-cell antigen receptor repertoire diversity in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibian-Keissar, Hilla; Hazanov, Lena; Schiby, Ginette; Rosenthal, Noemie; Rakovsky, Aviya; Michaeli, Miri; Shahaf, Gitit Lavy; Pickman, Yishai; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Melamed, Doron; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Mehr, Ramit; Barshack, Iris

    2016-02-01

    The elderly immune system is characterized by reduced responses to infections and vaccines, and an increase in the incidence of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Age-related deficits in the immune system may be caused by peripheral homeostatic pressures that limit bone marrow B-cell production or migration to the peripheral lymphoid tissues. Studies of peripheral blood B-cell receptor spectratypes have shown that those of the elderly are characterized by reduced diversity, which is correlated with poor health status. In the present study, we performed for the first time high-throughput sequencing of immunoglobulin genes from archived biopsy samples of primary and secondary lymphoid tissues in old (74 ± 7 years old, range 61-89) versus young (24 ± 5 years old, range 18-45) individuals, analyzed repertoire diversities and compared these to results in peripheral blood. We found reduced repertoire diversity in peripheral blood and lymph node repertoires from old people, while in the old spleen samples the diversity was larger than in the young. There were no differences in somatic hypermutation characteristics between age groups. These results support the hypothesis that age-related immune frailty stems from altered B-cell homeostasis leading to narrower memory B-cell repertoires, rather than changes in somatic hypermutation mechanisms. PMID:26614343

  12. Inflammation and Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Immunopathological and Ultrastructural Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeljan, Christopher P; Ardeljan, Daniel; Abu-Asab, Mones; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) remains elusive despite the characterization of many factors contributing to the disease in its late-stage phenotypes. AMD features an immune system in flux, as shown by changes in macrophage polarization with age, expression of cytokines and complement, microglial accumulation with age, etc. These point to an allostatic overload, possibly due to a breakdown in self vs. non-self when endogenous compounds and structures acquire the appearance of non-self over time. The result is inflammation and inflammation-mediated cell death. While it is clear that these processes ultimately result in degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor, the prevalent type of cell death contributing to the various phenotypes is unknown. Both molecular studies as well as ultrastructural pathology suggest pyroptosis, and perhaps necroptosis, are the predominant mechanisms of cell death at play, with only minimal evidence for apoptosis. Herein, we attempt to reconcile those factors identified by experimental AMD models and integrate these data with pathology observed under the electron microscope-particularly observations of mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA leakage, autophagy, and cell death. PMID:25580276

  13. Effect of IL-7 Therapy on Naive and Memory T Cell Homeostasis in Aged Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Afam A; Rohankhedkar, Mukta; Konfe, Audrie L; Abana, Chike O; Reyes, Matthew D; Clock, Joseph A; Duell, Derick M; Sylwester, Andrew W; Sammader, Partha; Legasse, Alfred W; Park, Byung S; Axthelm, Michael K; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko; Picker, Louis J

    2015-11-01

    Aging is associated with gradual deterioration of adaptive immune function, a hallmark of which is the profound loss of naive T cells (TN) associated with decline in thymic output and export of new cells into the peripheral T cell pool. Because the lymphotropic cytokine IL-7 plays crucial roles in both development of TN in the thymus and TN homeostasis in the periphery, we sought to determine the extent to which therapeutic administration of IL-7 could reverse TN deficiency in aging rhesus macaques (RM), either by enhancement of the demonstrably reduced thymopoiesis or by peripheral TN expansion. Our results indicate that treatment of both adult (8-15 y) and old (>20 y) RM with recombinant simian IL-7 (rsIL-7) results in only transient increases in peripheral CD4(+) and CD8(+) TN numbers with no long-term benefit, even with repeated therapy. This transient effect was due to peripheral TN expansion and not enhanced thymic function, and appeared to be limited by induction of IL-7 nonresponsiveness. However, rsIL-7 therapy had a more promising effect on the central memory T cell (TCM) population (both CD4(+) and CD8(+)) in adult and old RM, doubling the numbers of these cells in circulation and maintaining this larger population long term. IL-7 therapy did not reduce TCR diversity of the memory T cell compartment, suggesting that rsIL-7-induced expansion was symmetrical. Thus, although rsIL-7 failed to counter age-associated TN loss, the ability of this therapy to expand clonotypically diverse CD4(+) and CD8(+) TCM populations might potentially improve adaptive immune responsiveness in the elderly. PMID:26416281

  14. Survival and Toxicity in Patients With Disseminated Germ CellCancer Aged 40 Years and Older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Bandak, Mikkel; Thomsen, Maria F;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germ-cell cancer (GCC) patients aged ≥40 years have a two-fold higher GCC-specific mortality. It has been hypothesized that reduced treatment intensity combined with increased treatment related toxicity could be the explanation. The objective was to analyze chemotherapy intensity......, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP). A control-group of 135 patients aged 18-35 years was randomly selected matched on year of BEP treatment. Cumulated doses of BEP as well as bone marrow toxicity, renal- and lung functions were recorded before, during and after termination of treatment. All patients were...... the two groups were found regarding bone marrow toxicity or mean percentage changes in lung- or renal function. Patients aged ≥40 year had increased cancer specific mortality, HR = 4.8 (P = 0.005). In particular patients with disease progression after first line chemotherapy had increased mortality (P...

  15. Age-Dependent Differences in Systemic and Cell-Autonomous Immunity to L. monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Sherrid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defense against infection can broadly be categorized into systemic immunity and cell-autonomous immunity. Systemic immunity is crucial for all multicellular organisms, increasing in importance with increasing cellular complexity of the host. The systemic immune response to Listeria monocytogenes has been studied extensively in murine models; however, the clinical applicability of these findings to the human newborn remains incompletely understood. Furthermore, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell, known as “cell-autonomous immunity,” appears most relevant following infection with L. monocytogenes; as the main target, the monocyte is centrally important to innate as well as adaptive systemic immunity to listeriosis. We thus suggest that the overall increased risk to suffer and die from L. monocytogenes infection in the newborn period is a direct consequence of age-dependent differences in cell-autonomous immunity of the monocyte to L. monocytogenes. We here review what is known about age-dependent differences in systemic innate and adaptive as well as cell-autonomous immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

  16. Accelerated fat cell aging links oxidative stress and insulin resistance in adipocytes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finny Monickaraj; Sankaramoorthy Aravind; Pichamoorthy Nandhini; Paramasivam Prabu; Chandrakumar Sathishkumar; Viswanathan Mohan; Muthuswamy Balasubramanyam

    2013-03-01

    Telomere shortening is emerging as a biological indicator of accelerated aging and aging-related diseases including type 2 diabetes. While telomere length measurements were largely done in white blood cells, there is lack of studies on telomere length in relation to oxidative stress in target tissues affected in diabetes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to induct oxidative stress in adipocytes and to test whether these adipocytes exhibit shortened telomeres, senescence and functional impairment. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were subjected to oxidative stress and senescence induction by a variety of means for 2 weeks (exogenous application of H2O2, glucose oxidase, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and glucose oscillations). Cells were probed for reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), DNA damage, mRNA and protein expression of senescent and pro-inflammatory markers, telomere length and glucose uptake. Compared to untreated cells, both ROS generation and DNA damage were significantly higher in cells subjected to oxidative stress and senescence. Adipocytes subjected to oxidative stress also showed shortened telomeres and increased mRNA and protein expression of p53, p21, TNF and IL-6. Senescent cells were also characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin and impaired glucose uptake. Briefly, adipocytes under oxidative stress exhibited increased ROS generation, DNA damage, shortened telomeres and switched to senescent/pro-inflammatory phenotype with impaired glucose uptake.

  17. Calendar aging of a graphite/LiFePO4 cell

    OpenAIRE

    KASSEM, Mohammad; Bernard, Julien; REVEL, Renaud; Pelissier, Serge; DUCLAUD, François; Delacourt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Graphite/LFP commercial cells are stored under 3 different conditions of temperature (30 °C, 45 °C, and 60 °C) and SOC (30%, 65%, and 100%) during up to 8 months. Several non-destructive electrochemical tests are performed at different storage times in order to understand calendar aging phenomena. After storage, all the cells except those stored at 30 °C exhibited capacity fade. The extent of capacity fade strongly increases with storage temperature and to a lesser extent with the state of ch...

  18. Effects of Age and Gender on WNT Gene Expression in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Longxiang; Zhou, Shuanhu; Glowacki, Julie

    2009-01-01

    WNT signaling pathways play important roles in the behavior of human bone marrow stromal cells. Although WNT expression has been examined in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) with limited numbers of subjects or from commercial sources, there are conflicting results on WNT gene expression in hMSCs. Furthermore, the effects of age and gender on WNT expression in hMSCs are largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated RNA expression of all the WNT genes in hMSCs from 19 subjects, 12 women a...

  19. Age and gender effects on DNA strand break repair in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander; Petersen, Inge; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Christensen, Kaare; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2013-01-01

    single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Of these lesions, DSBs are the least frequent but the most dangerous for cells. We have measured the level of endogenous SSBs, SSB repair capacity, γ-H2AX response, and DSB repair capacity in......Exogenous and endogenous damage to DNA is constantly challenging the stability of our genome. This DNA damage increase the frequency of errors in DNA replication, thus causing point mutations or chromosomal rearrangements and has been implicated in aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases...

  20. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells: a new approach to anti-aging medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Amit N

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endothelial dysfunction is associated with major causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as numerous age-related conditions. The possibility of preserving or even rejuvenating endothelial function offers a potent means of preventing/treating some of the most fearful aspects of aging such as loss of mental, cardiovascular, and sexual function. Endothelial precursor cells (EPC provide a continual source of replenishment for damaged or senescent blood vessels. In this review we discuss the biological relevance of circulating EPC in a variety of pathologies in order to build the case that these cells act as an endogenous mechanism of regeneration. Factors controlling EPC mobilization, migration, and function, as well as therapeutic interventions based on mobilization of EPC will be reviewed. We conclude by discussing several clinically-relevant approaches to EPC mobilization and provide preliminary data on a food supplement, Stem-Kine, which enhanced EPC mobilization in human subjects.

  1. Curcumin in Cell Death Processes: A Challenge for CAM of Age-Related Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salvioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the yellow pigment from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, is a widely studied phytochemical which has a variety of biological activities: anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. In this review we discuss the biological mechanisms and possible clinical effects of curcumin treatment on cancer therapy, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, with particular attention to the cell death processes induced by curcumin. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are major determinants of the aging process, we also argue that curcumin can have a more general effect that slows down the rate of aging. Finally, the effects of curcumin can be described as xenohormetic, since it activates a sort of stress response in mammalian cells.

  2. Age-old wisdom concerning cell-based therapies with added knowledge in the stem cell era: our perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethy S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Senthilkumar Preethy,1,2 Sudhakar John,1 Jegatheesan Saravana Ganesh,1 Thangavelu Srinivasan,1 Hiroshi Terunuma,3 Masaru Iwasaki,4 Samuel J Abraham1,4 1Nichi-In Centre for Regenerative Medicine, 2Hope Foundation Trust, Chennai, India; 3Biotherapy Institute of Japan, Tokyo, 4Yamanashi University School of Medicine, Chuo, Japan Abstract: Among the various strategies providing a cure for illness, cell-based therapies have caught the attention of the world with the advent of the "stem cell" era. Our inherent understanding indicates that stem cells have been in existence since the birth of multicellular organisms. However, the formal discovery of stem cells in the last century, followed by their intricate and extensive analysis, has led to clinical and translational efforts with the aim of using them in the treatment of conditions which don't have a definitive therapeutic strategy, has fueled our interest and expectations. Technological advances in our ability to study their cellular components in depth, along with surface markers and other finer constituents, that were unknown until last century, have improved our understanding, leading to several novel applications. This has created a need to establish guidelines, and in that process, there are expressed understandings and views which describe cell therapy along lines similar to that of biologic products, drugs, and devices. However, the age-old wisdom of using cells as tools for curing illness should not be misled by recent knowledge, to make cell therapy using highly complex stem cells equal to factory-synthesized and reproducible chemical compounds, drugs, or devices. This article analyses the differences between these two entities from various perspectives. Keywords: cell transplantation, drugs, regenerative medicine, stem cells

  3. The distribution, immune complex trapping ability and morphology of follicular dendritic cells in popliteal lymph nodes of aged rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, H.; Dobashi, Michio

    1998-01-01

    Immune system function declines with age, and lymph nodes involute. The aims of the study were to describe the distribution of follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in the lymphoid follicles of aged rats, and to determine whether these cells have reduced ability to trap immune complexes (ICs). Popliteal lymph nodes of rats aged 24-28 months were immunostained for S-100 protein as a marker of FDCs. Some rats were pretreated with peroxidase-anti-peroxidase complex (P...

  4. Disruption of Nrf2 Signaling Impairs Angiogenic Capacity of Endothelial Cells: Implications for Microvascular Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Valcarcel-Ares, M. Noa; Gautam, Tripti; Warrington, Junie P.; Bailey-Downs, Lora; Sosnowska, Danuta; de Cabo, Rafael; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a key role in preserving a healthy endothelial phenotype and maintaining the functional integrity of the vasculature. Previous studies demonstrated that aging is associated with Nrf2 dysfunction in endothelial cells, which alters redox signaling and likely promotes the development of large vessel disease. Much less is known about the consequences of Nrf2 dysfunction at the level of the microcirculation...

  5. Contributions of DNA interstrand cross-links to aging of cells and organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Grillari, Johannes; Katinger, Hermann; Voglauer, Regina

    2007-01-01

    Impaired DNA damage repair, especially deficient transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, leads to segmental progeroid syndromes in human patients as well as in rodent models. Furthermore, DNA double-strand break signalling has been pinpointed as a key inducer of cellular senescence. Several recent findings suggest that another DNA repair pathway, interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair, might also contribute to cell and organism aging. Therefore, we summarize and discuss here that (i) s...

  6. Aging and Regional Differences in Fat Cell Progenitors – A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sepe, Anna; Tchkonia, Tamara; Thomou, Thomas; Zamboni, Mauro; Kirkland, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Fat mass and fat tissue distribution change dramatically throughout life. In old age, fat becomes dysfunctional and is redistributed from subcutaneous to intra-abdominal visceral depots as well as other ectopic sites, including bone marrow, muscle and the liver. These changes are associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Fat tissue is a nutrient storage, endocrine and immune organ that undergoes renewal throughout the lifespan. Preadipocytes, which account for 15–50% of cells in f...

  7. MITRAL VALVULAR INTERSTITIAL CELL RESPONSES TO SUBSTRATE STIFFNESS DEPEND ON AGE AND ANATOMIC REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Durst, Christopher A.; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2010-01-01

    The material properties of heart valves depend on subject age, disease state, and the complex valvular microarchitecture. Furthermore, valvular interstitial cells (VICs) are mechanosensitive, and their synthesis of extracellular matrix not only determines the valve's material properties but also provides an adhesive substrate for VICs. However, the interrelationship between substrate stiffness and VIC phenotype and synthetic properties is poorly understood. Given that the local mechanical env...

  8. Effect of Mitochondrial Transplantation from Cumulus Granular Cells to the Early Embryos of Aged Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of mitochondria in the early embryonic development of ageing mice.Methods Mitochondria isolated from cumulus granular cells of aged mice were microinjected into oocytes or zygotes of aged mice. In the setting of oocyte injection, mitochondria were transferred via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI+MIT), and ICSI without mitochondrial transfer. In the setting of zygote injection, mitochondria were directly microinjected into fertilized oocytes (MIT), and those injected with buffer alone (mock injection) or not injected (uninjected) served as controls.Results Although the rates of oocyte cleavage between ICSI and ICSI+MIT groups were not statistically different (P>0.05), the rate of blastocyst in the ICSI+MIT group was significantly higher than that in ICSI group (P<0.05). Although both the cleavage and blastocyst rates of mock injection group were significantly lower than those of uninjected group (P<0.05), likely due to mechanical damages of the cells by microinjection, the decrease of these rates was prevented by mitochondrial transfer. After mitochondrial transfer, the rates of both cleavage and blastocyst were significantly improved over the mock-injection group (P<0.05).Conclusion Mitochondrial transplantation can improve the developmental potential of early embryos of aged mice.

  9. Aging impairs osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells grown on titanium by favoring adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABUNA, Rodrigo Paolo Flores; STRINGHETTA-GARCIA, Camila Tami; FIORI, Leonardo Pimentel; DORNELLES, Rita Cassia Menegati; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aging negatively affects bone/titanium implant interactions. Our hypothesis is that the unbalance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis induced by aging may be involved in this phenomenon. Objective We investigated the osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from young and aged rats cultured on Ti. Material and Methods Bone marrow MSCs derived from 1-month and 21-month rats were cultured on Ti discs under osteogenic conditions for periods of up to 21 days and osteoblast and adipocyte markers were evaluated. Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization and gene expression of RUNX2, osterix, ALP, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin were reduced in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on Ti. Gene expression of PPAR-γ , adipocyte protein 2, and resistin and lipid accumulation were increased in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on the same conditions. Conclusions These results indicate that the lower osteogenic potential of MSCs derived from aged rats compared with young rats goes along with the higher adipogenic potential in cultures grown on Ti surface. This unbalance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation should be considered in dental implant therapy to the elderly population. PMID:27556209

  10. p66Shc Aging Protein in Control of Fibroblasts Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz R. Wieckowski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are wieldy accepted as one of the main factors of the aging process. These highly reactive compounds modify nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and affect the functionality of mitochondria in the first case and ultimately of the cell. Any agent or genetic modification that affects ROS production and detoxification can be expected to influence longevity. On the other hand, genetic manipulations leading to increased longevity can be expected to involve cellular changes that affect ROS metabolism. The 66-kDa isoform of the growth factor adaptor Shc (p66Shc has been recognized as a relevant factor to the oxygen radical theory of aging. The most recent data indicate that p66Shc protein regulates life span in mammals and its phosphorylation on serine 36 is important for the initiation of cell death upon oxidative stress. Moreover, there is strong evidence that apart from aging, p66Shc may be implicated in many oxidative stress-associated pathologies, such as diabetes, mitochondrial and neurodegenerative disorders and tumorigenesis. This article summarizes recent knowledge about the role of p66Shc in aging and senescence and how this protein can influence ROS production and detoxification, focusing on studies performed on skin and skin fibroblasts.

  11. Biological properties of differently-aged human keratinocytes:population doubling time growth curve and cell cycle analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological properties of keratinocytes from differently-aged healthy human beings. Methods Keratinocytes from fetus,teenager and middle-aged groups were separated and cultured. The population doubling time (PDT) and cell growth curve in different cells were compared,and the cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results ① In primary culture of keratinocytes,the adherence time in middle-aged group was longer than that in fetus and teenager groups. However,all cell morphology sh...

  12. Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs Accumulation by Pyridoxamine Modulates Glomerular and Mesangial Cell Estrogen Receptor α Expression in Aged Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pereira-Simon

    Full Text Available Age-related increases in oxidant stress (OS play a role in regulation of estrogen receptor (ER expression in the kidneys. In this study, we establish that in vivo 17β-estradiol (E2 replacement can no longer upregulate glomerular ER expression by 21 months of age in female mice (anestrous. We hypothesized that advanced glycation end product (AGE accumulation, an important source of oxidant stress, contributes to these glomerular ER expression alterations. We treated 19-month old ovariectomized female mice with pyridoxamine (Pyr, a potent AGE inhibitor, in the presence or absence of E2 replacement. Glomerular ERα mRNA expression was upregulated in mice treated with both Pyr and E2 replacement and TGFβ mRNA expression decreased compared to controls. Histological sections of kidneys demonstrated decreased type IV collagen deposition in mice receiving Pyr and E2 compared to placebo control mice. In addition, anti-AGE defenses Sirtuin1 (SIRT1 and advanced glycation receptor 1 (AGER1 were also upregulated in glomeruli following treatment with Pyr and E2. Mesangial cells isolated from all groups of mice demonstrated similar ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression changes to those of whole glomeruli. To demonstrate that AGE accumulation contributes to the observed age-related changes in the glomeruli of aged female mice, we treated mesangial cells from young female mice with AGE-BSA and found similar downregulation of ERα, SIRT1, and AGER1 expression. These results suggest that inhibition of intracellular AGE accumulation with pyridoxamine may protect glomeruli against age-related oxidant stress by preventing an increase of TGFβ production and by regulation of the estrogen receptor.

  13. Reversal of Apoptotic Resistance by Lycium barbarum Glycopeptide 3 in Aged T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG-GUO YUAN; HONG-BIN DENG; LI-HUI CHEN; DIAN-DONG LI; QI-YANG HE

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study whether Lycium barbarian glycopeptide 3 (LBGP3) affects T cell apeptosis in aged mice. Methods LBGP3 was purified with DEAE cellulose and Sephadex columns. Apoptotic "sub-Gl peak" was detected by flow cytometry and DNA ladder was resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Levels of IFN-γ, and IL-10 were measured with specific kits and mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. Apoptosis-related proteins of FLIP, FasL, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blotting. Resdts LBGP3 was purified from Fructus Lycii water extracts and identified as a 41 kD glycopeptide.Treatment with 200 μg/mL LBGP3 increased the apoptotic rate of T cells from aged mice and showed a similar DNA ladder pattern to that in young T ceils. The reversal of apoptotic resistance was involved in down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and FLIP, and up-regulating the expression of FasL. Conclusion Lycium barbarum glycopeptide 3 reverses apoptotic resistance of aged T cells by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related molecules.

  14. AGE-RAGE interaction in the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Cibin T; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-08-01

    Basement membrane (BM) proteins accumulate chemical modifications with age. One such modification is glycation, which results in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In a previous study, we reported that AGEs in the human lens capsule (BM) promote the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells, which we proposed as a mechanism for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract formation. In this study, we investigated the role of a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT in a human lens epithelial cell line (FHL124). RAGE was present in FHL124 cells, and its levels were unaltered in cells cultured on either native or AGE-modified BM or upon treatment with TGFβ2. RAGE overexpression significantly enhanced the TGFβ2-mediated EMT responses in cells cultured on AGE-modified BM compared with the unmodified matrix. In contrast, treatment of cells with a RAGE antibody or EN-RAGE (an endogenous ligand for RAGE) resulted in a significant reduction in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT response. This was accompanied by a reduction in TGFβ2-mediated Smad signaling and ROS generation. These results imply that the interaction of matrix AGEs with RAGE plays a role in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT of lens epithelial cells and suggest that the blockade of RAGE could be a strategy to prevent PCO and other age-associated fibrosis. PMID:27263094

  15. Vitamin E reverses impaired linker for activation of T cells activation in T cells from aged C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental vitamin E restores age-related defects in IL-2 production, T cell proliferation, and immune synapse formation. Here, we evaluated the effect of vitamin E on TCR-proximal signaling events. In aged murine CD4+ T cells stimulated via CD3 and CD28, tyrosine 191 of the adaptor protein LAT wa...

  16. Heat Stress and Hormetin-Induced Hormesis in Human Cells: Effects on Aging, Wound Healing, Angiogenesis, and Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Rattan, Suresh I.S.; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Demirovic, Dino; Dymek, Barbara; Lima, Cristovao F.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of molecular damage and increased molecular heterogeneity are hallmarks of cellular aging. Mild stress-induced hormesis can be an effective way for reducing the accumulation of molecular damage, and thus slowing down aging from within. We have shown that repeated mild heat stress (RMHS) has anti-aging effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of normal human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes undergoing aging in vitro. RMHS given to human cells ...

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ageing: Targeting the "Purinome" to Promote Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha-Matos, J B; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can differentiate into bone forming cells. Such ability is compromised in elderly individuals resulting in bone disorders such as osteoporosis, also limiting their clinical usage for cell transplantation and bone tissue engineering strategies. In bone marrow niches, adenine and uracil nucleotides are important local regulators of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Nucleotides can be released to the extracellular milieu under both physiological and pathological conditions via (1) membrane cell damage, (2) vesicle exocytosis, (3) ATP-binding cassette transporters, and/or (4) facilitated diffusion through maxi-anion channels, hemichannels or ligand-gated receptor pores. Nucleotides and their derivatives act via adenosine P1 (A1 , A2A , A2B , and A3 ) and nucleotide-sensitive P2 purinoceptors comprising ionotropic P2X and G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Purinoceptors activation is terminated by membrane-bound ecto-nucleotidases and other ecto-phosphatases, which rapidly hydrolyse extracellular nucleotides to their respective nucleoside 5'-di- and mono-phosphates, nucleosides and free phosphates, or pyrophosphates. Current knowledge suggests that different players of the "purinome" cascade, namely nucleotide release sites, ecto-nucleotidases and purinoceptors, orchestrate to fine-tuning regulate the activity of MSCs in the bone microenvironment. Increasing studies, using osteoprogenitor cell lines, animal models and, more recently, non-modified MSCs from postmenopausal women, raised the possibility to target chief components of the purinergic signaling pathway to regenerate the ability of aged MSCs to differentiate into functional osteoblasts. This review summarizes the main findings of those studies, prompting for novel therapeutic strategies to control ageing disorders where bone destruction exceeds bone formation, like osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fracture mal-union. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1852

  18. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age. PMID:26616110

  19. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10−11/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10−22 m2 s−1 Pa−1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  20. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel CH-2000 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  1. In serum veritas—in serum sanitas? Cell non-autonomous aging compromises differentiation and survival of mesenchymal stromal cells via the oxidative stress pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Geißler, S; Textor, M; K Schmidt-Bleek; Klein, O; Thiele, M; Ellinghaus, A; Jacobi, D.; Ode, A; Perka, C; Dienelt, A; Klose, J.; Kasper, G; Duda, G. N.; Strube, P.

    2013-01-01

    Even tissues capable of complete regeneration, such as bone, show an age-related reduction in their healing capacity. Here, we hypothesized that this decline is primarily due to cell non-autonomous (extrinsic) aging mediated by the systemic environment. We demonstrate that culture of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in serum from aged Sprague–Dawley rats negatively affects their survival and differentiation ability. Proteome analysis and further cellular investigations strongly suggest that s...

  2. Myomir dysregulation and reactive oxygen species in aged human satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Ester Sara; Mancinelli, Rosa; Pietrangelo, Tiziana; La Rovere, Rita Maria Laura; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Fulle, Stefania

    2016-04-29

    Satellite cells that reside on the myofibre surface are crucial for the muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Aging goes along with a less effective regeneration of skeletal muscle tissue mainly due to the decreased myogenic capability of satellite cells. This phenomenon impedes proper maintenance and contributes to the age-associated decline in muscle mass, known as sarcopenia. The myogenic potential impairment does not depend on a reduced myogenic cell number, but mainly on their difficulty to complete a differentiation program. The unbalanced production of reactive oxygen species in elderly people could be responsible for skeletal muscle impairments. microRNAs are conserved post-transcriptional regulators implicated in numerous biological processes including adult myogenesis. Here, we measure the ROS level and analyze myomiR (miR-1, miR-133b and miR-206) expression in human myogenic precursors obtained from Vastus lateralis of elderly and young subjects to provide the molecular signature responsible for the differentiation impairment of elderly activated satellite cells. PMID:26975470

  3. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pettila, Ville

    2011-04-15

    Abstract Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121\\/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25\\/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death.

  4. Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Vanderlan, Michael [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

  5. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Godin

    Full Text Available The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs and lung fibroblasts (hLFs. Native aged (1 year lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases.

  6. Biological properties of differently-aged human keratinocytes:population doubling time growth curve and cell cycle analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qun Ma; Jie Feng; Lech Chyczewski; Jacek Niklinski

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological properties of keratinocytes from differently-aged healthy human beings. Methods Keratinocytes from fetus, teenager and middle-aged groups were separated and cultured. The population doubling time (PDT) and cell growth curve in different cells were compared, and the cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results ① In primary culture of keratinocytes, the adherence time in middle-aged group was longer than that in fetus and teenager groups. However, all cell morphology showed no obvioas differences. In subculture of kecatinocytes, with donator's age increasing, time of cell adherence prolonged, passage number decreused and differences in cell morphology were obrioas. ② The average PDT of keratinocytes was shorter in fetus group than in teenager and middle-aged groups. Bat difference in cell growth curve between different passages was not observed. ③ Keratinocytes showed G2/M period in fetus group but G0/G1 period in teenager and middle-aged groups mainly. Conclusion As age increases, the biological properties of keratinocytes change obviously.

  7. Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration and altered expression of cell-surface functional receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kelley Strohacker; Whitney L Breslin; Katie C Carpenter; Brian K McFarlin

    2012-03-01

    The expression of monocyte cell-surface receptors represents one index of immune dysfunction, which is common with aging. Although mouse models of aging are prevalent, monocyte subset assessment is rare. Our purpose was to compare cell receptor expression on classic (CD115+/Gr-1high) and non-classic (CD115+/Gr-1low) monocytes from 80- or 20-week-old CD-1 mice. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to determine the concentration of monocyte subsets and their respective cell-surface expression of TLR2, TLR4, CD80, CD86, MHC II and CD54. These receptors were selected because they have been previously associated with altered monocyte function. Data were analysed with independent -tests; significance was set at < 0.05. Old mice had a greater concentration of both classic (258%, =0.003) and non-classic (70%, =0.026) monocytes. The classic : non-classic monocyte ratio doubled in old as compared with that in young mice (=0.006), indicating a pro-inflammatory shift. TLR4 ($\\downarrow$27%, =0.001) and CD80 ($\\downarrow$37%, =0.004) were decreased on classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. TLR2 ($\\uparrow$24%, =0.002) and MHCII ($\\downarrow$21%, =0.026) were altered on non-classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. The increased classic : non-classic monocyte ratio combined with changes in the cell-surface receptor expression on both monocyte subsets is indicative of immune dysfunction, which may increase age-associated disease risk.

  8. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma in 260 patients aged 80 years or more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report the experience of two French cancer centers in the treatment of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients aged ≥80 years. Materials and methods: Two hundred and sixty patients aged ≥80 years with a primary oral cavity SCC were included in this retrospective analysis. Results: Sex ratio was near to 1. Tobacco or alcohol intoxication was the main risk factor for 66% of men and 16% of women and leukoplakia, lichen planus, or oral traumatism for 55% of women and 11% of men (p < 0.0001). Two hundred patients received a loco-regional (LR) treatment with a curative intent (surgery and/or radiotherapy), 29 with a palliative intent and 31 did not receive a LR treatment. Curative treatments were initially planned to be adapted to age in 118 patients (59%). The median disease-specific survival (DSS) was 29 months. In multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors for DSS were stage (HR = 0.42 [0.24-0.72]), age (HR = 0.43 [0.24-0.75]) and performance status (HR = 0.50 [0.27-0.95]). The median overall survival (OS) was 14 months. In multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors for OS were age (HR = 0.52 [0.35-0.79]), stage (HR = 0.56 [0.38-0.84]), tumor differentiation (HR = 0.60 [0.33-0.93]) and performance status (HR = 0.6 [0.37-0.97]). In patients treated with a curative intent, treatment adapted to age was not associated with a decreased overall survival or disease-specific survival as compared with the standard treatment. However, prophylactic lymph node treatment in stages I-II tumors decreased the rate of nodal recurrence from 38% to 6% (p = 0.01). Conclusion: This study emphasizes the need for prospective evaluation of standard and adapted schedules in elderly patients with oral cavity cancer.

  9. Common cell biologic and biochemical changes in aging and age-related diseases of the eye: Toward new therapeutic approaches to age-related ocular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviews of information about age related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, and glaucoma make it apparent that while each eye tissue has its own characteristic metabolism, structure and function, there are common perturbations to homeostasis that are associated with age-related dysfunction. The c...

  10. Age-related impairment of humoral response to influenza is associated with changes in antigen specific T follicular helper cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Julie S; Masters, April R; Hopkins, Jacob W; Haynes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses are essential for generation of protective humoral immunity during influenza infection. Aging has a profound impact on CD4(+) T cell function and humoral immunity, yet the impact of aging on antigen specific TFH responses remains unclear. Influenza specific TFH cells are generated in similar numbers in young and aged animals during infection, but TFH cells from aged mice exhibit significant differences, including reduced expression of ICOS and elevated production of IL-10 and IFNγ, which potentially impairs interaction with cognate B cells. Also, more influenza specific T cells in aged mice have a regulatory phenotype, which could contribute to the impaired TFH function. Adoptive transfer studies with young T cells demonstrated that TGF-β1 in the aged environment can drive increased regulatory T cell accumulation. Aging and the aged environment thus impact antigen specific TFH cell function and formation, which contribute to reduced protective humoral responses. PMID:27109638

  11. Immunophenotyping and T-cell proliferative capacity in a healthy aged population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Alessandra; Bauer, Moisés; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Chies, José Artur Bogo

    2003-01-01

    The age-related decline of immunological functions is well established but it remains largely unknown which specific changes are related to disease. We analyzed peripheral blood lymphocytes of 42 healthy elderly as well as 24 healthy young subjects from southern Brazil. No differences in phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation and CD4:CD8 ratio were found between the subjects. However, CD4 expression (considering mean fluorescence intensity) was found upregulated in elderly subjects. No changes in activation molecules CD25, CD28, CD69 and CD95 were observed. A reduced proportion of naive (CD45RA+) T cells was found in the elderly compared to young subjects. No changes in adhesion molecule expression (CD11c and CD31) were observed. However, the frequencies of CD49d-positive cells, as well as expression of CD62L, were increased in the eldery subjects. We further described two subgroups of eldery subjects with an immunological risk profile defined by lower CD4:CD8 ratio and reduced proliferative response to mitogens. These data suggest that healthy aging is associated with intact T-cell proliferation and some compensatory immunophenotypical changes. PMID:14618026

  12. Patient-Specific Age: The Other Side of the Coin in Advanced Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimke, Magdalena M; Marozin, Sabrina; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are present as a rare subpopulation within any type of stroma in the body of higher animals. Prominently, MSC have been recognized to reside in perivascular locations, supposedly maintaining blood vessel integrity. During tissue damage and injury, MSC/pericytes become activated, evade from their perivascular niche and are thus assumed to support wound healing and tissue regeneration. In vitro MSC exhibit demonstrated capabilities to differentiate into a wide variety of tissue cell types. Hence, many MSC-based therapeutic approaches have been performed to address bone, cartilage, or heart regeneration. Furthermore, prominent studies showed efficacy of ex vivo expanded MSC to countervail graft-vs.-host-disease. Therefore, additional fields of application are presently conceived, in which MSC-based therapies potentially unfold beneficial effects, such as amelioration of non-healing conditions after tendon or spinal cord injury, as well as neuropathies. Working along these lines, MSC-based scientific research has been forged ahead to prominently occupy the clinical stage. Aging is to a great deal stochastic by nature bringing forth changes in an individual fashion. Yet, is aging of stem cells or/and their corresponding niche considered a determining factor for outcome and success of clinical therapies? PMID:26696897

  13. Patient-specific age: the other side of the coin in advanced mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Maria Schimke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are present as a rare subpopulation within any type of stroma in the body of higher animals. Prominently, MSC have been recognized to reside in perivascular locations, supposedly maintaining blood vessel integrity. During tissue damage and injury, MSC/pericytes become activated, evade from their perivascular niche and are thus assumed to support wound healing and tissue regeneration.In vitro MSC exhibit demonstrated capabilities to differentiate into a wide variety of tissue cell types. Hence, many MSC-based therapeutic approaches have been performed to address bone, cartilage or heart regeneration. Furthermore, prominent studies showed efficacy of ex vivo expanded MSC to countervail graft-versus-host-disease. Therefore, additional fields of application are presently conceived, in which MSC-based therapies potentially unfold beneficial effects, such as amelioration of non-healing conditions after tendon or spinal cord injury, as well as neuropathies. Working along these lines, MSC-based scientific research has been forged ahead to prominently occupy the clinical stage.Aging is to a great deal stochastic by nature bringing forth changes in an individual fashion. Yet, is aging of stem cells or/and their corresponding niche considered a determining factor for outcome and success of clinical therapies?

  14. Age-related lung cell response to urban Buenos Aires air particle soluble fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostachuk, Agustín; Evelson, Pablo; Martin, Susana; Dawidowski, Laura; Sebastián Yakisich, J; Tasat, Deborah R

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) may alter lung homeostasis inducing changes in fluid balance and host defense. Bioavailability of soluble PM compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and transition metals has been shown to play a key role in lung injury. We have previously characterized the size, shape, and chemical components of urban air particles from Buenos Aires (UAP-BA) and their biological impact on lungs. Herein, we evaluate the possible toxic effect of UAP-BA-soluble fraction (UAP-BAsf) on pulmonary cells obtained from young (1-2 months old) and aged (9-12 months old) Wistar rats using phagocytosis, oxidant-antioxidant generation, and apoptosis as endpoints. UAP-BA were collected in downtown BA and residual oil fly ash (ROFA), employed as a positive control, was collected from Boston Edison Co., Mystic Power Plant, Mystic, CT, USA. Both particle-soluble fractions (sf) were employed at concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 microg/mL. UAP-BAsf and ROFAsf even at the lowest dose assayed (10 microg/mL) showed in both lung cell populations the ability to stimulate phagocytosis and increase superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) generation. Both types of air particles caused a marked intracellular oxidant stress in aged pulmonary cells that may contribute to subsequent cell activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, leading to cell dysfunction. These data suggest that the impact of UAP-BAsf on phagocytosis, oxidant radical generation, and apoptosis is clearly dependent on the maturational state of the animal and might have different mechanisms of action. PMID:18313661

  15. AB044. AGE/RAGE/Akt pathway contributes to prostate cancer cell proliferation by promoting Rb phosphorylation and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiming; Bao, Yawei; Zhao, Shanchao; He, Minyi; Luo, Haihua; Ren, Zhonglu; Lv, Yongjie; Hong, Yingqia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolomic research has revealed that metabolites play an important role in prostate cancer development and progression. Previous studies have suggested that prostate cancer cell proliferation is induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) exposure, but the mechanism of this induction remains unknown. This study aim to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferative response of prostate cancer cell to the interaction of AGEs and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Methods To investigate this mechanism, we used Western blotting to evaluate the responses of the retinoblastoma (Rb), p-Rb and PI3K/Akt pathway to AGEs stimulation. We also examined the effect of knocking down Rb and blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway on AGEs induced PC-3 cell proliferation. Results Our results indicated that AGE-RAGE interaction enhanced Rb phosphorylation and subsequently decreased total Rb levels. Bioinformatics analysis further indicated a negative correlation between RAGE and RB1 expression in prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, we observed that AGEs stimulation activated the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling abrogated AGEs-induced cell proliferation. Conclusions We report, for the first time, that AGE-RAGE interaction enhances prostate cancer cell proliferation by phosphorylation of Rb via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  16. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were...... recruited from our outpatient retinal clinic. Control individuals were typically spouses. The diagnosis of neovascular AMD was confirmed using fluorescein and indocyaningreen angiography. Fresh venous blood was analyzed by flow cytometry using fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies to the Treg surface antigens...... CD4, CD25, CD127, CD45RA, and CD31. Main outcome measures were the percentage of CD25(high)CD127(low) Tregs, the percentage of CD45RA(+) naïve Tregs, and the percentage of CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant Tregs. RESULTS: Comparing patients with neovascular AMD to controls, no significant differences...

  17. The effect of aging and caloric restriction on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo RuRan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism explaining the increased disease susceptibility in aging is not well understood. CD8+ T cells are crucial in anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. Although the chemokine system plays a critical role in CD8+ T cell function, very little is known about the relationship between aging and the T cell chemokine system. Results In this study we have examined the effect of aging on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression. Freshly isolated splenic CD8+ T cells from old C57BL/6 mice were found to have higher CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR5, and lower CCR7 gene expression compared to their younger cohort. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation elicited a similar robust chemokine receptor response from young and old CD8+ T cells. Western blot analyses confirmed elevated protein level of CCR4 and CCR5 in aged CD8+ T cells. Increases in T cell CCR1 and CCR5 expression also correlate to increased in vitro chemotaxis response to macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 α(MIP-1α. Finally, caloric restriction selectively prevents the loss of CD8+ T cell CCR7 gene expression in aging to the level that is seen in young CD8+ T cells. Conclusion These findings are consistent with the notion that aging exists in a state of low grade pro-inflammatory environment. In addition, our results provide a potential mechanism for the reported aging-associated impaired T cell lymphoid homing and allograft response, and reduced survival in sepsis.

  18. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Control Multilayered Territorialized Atherosclerosis B-Cell Responses in Aged ApoE−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikakulapu, Prasad; Hu, Desheng; Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Bontha, Sai Vineela; Peng, Li; Beer, Michael; Weber, Christian; McNamara, Coleen A.; Grassia, Gianluca; Maffia, Pasquale; Manz, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Explore aorta B-cell immunity in aged apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Approach and Results— Transcript maps, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunofluorescence analyses, cell transfers, and Ig-ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunospot) assays showed multilayered atherosclerosis B-cell responses in artery tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs). Aging-associated aorta B-cell–related transcriptomes were identified, and transcript atlases revealed highly territorialized B-cell responses in ATLOs versus atherosclerotic lesions: ATLOs showed upregulation of bona fide B-cell genes, including Cd19, Ms4a1 (Cd20), Cd79a/b, and Ighm although intima plaques preferentially expressed molecules involved in non–B effector responses toward B-cell–derived mediators, that is, Fcgr3 (Cd16), Fcer1g (Cd23), and the C1q family. ATLOs promoted B-cell recruitment. ATLO B-2 B cells included naive, transitional, follicular, germinal center, switched IgG1+, IgA+, and IgE+ memory cells, plasmablasts, and long-lived plasma cells. ATLOs recruited large numbers of B-1 cells whose subtypes were skewed toward interleukin-10+ B-1b cells versus interleukin-10− B-1a cells. ATLO B-1 cells and plasma cells constitutively produced IgM and IgG and a fraction of plasma cells expressed interleukin-10. Moreover, ApoE−/− mice showed increased germinal center B cells in renal lymph nodes, IgM-producing plasma cells in the bone marrow, and higher IgM and anti–MDA-LDL (malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein) IgG serum titers. Conclusions— ATLOs orchestrate dichotomic, territorialized, and multilayered B-cell responses in the diseased aorta; germinal center reactions indicate generation of autoimmune B cells within the diseased arterial wall during aging. PMID:27102965

  19. Notch signaling mediates the age-associated decrease in adhesion of germline stem cells to the niche.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yuan Tseng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs, and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion.

  20. Notch signaling mediates the age-associated decrease in adhesion of germline stem cells to the niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion. PMID:25521289

  1. Age, scrapie status, PrP genotype and follicular dendritic cells in ovine ileal Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruchella, Giuseppe; Ligios, Ciriaco; Di Guardo, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) residing within ileal Peyer's patches (PPs) are of crucial relevance for sheep scrapie early pathogenesis and subsequent scrapie prion neuroinvasion. In this study, ileal PP follicles were significantly more numerous in lambs than in adult Sarda breed sheep, with significant differences being also found in lymphoid follicle area, perimeter and FDC density. Furthermore, PrPd deposition within ileal PPs and host's PrP genotype did not significantly influence these parameters. We conclude that age significantly affects FDC density in ileal PPs from Sarda breed ovines, independently from host's scrapie status and PrP genotype. PMID:21962485

  2. [The immunomodulatory role of retinal microglial cells in age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P F; Sun, X D

    2016-05-11

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of visual impairment in the elder population. Recent studies have revealed that retinal microgliacytes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AMD, and the activation of retinal microglia could regulate the progress of AMD. The immunomodulatory role of retinal microglial cells is reviewed in this article, so as to investigate the mechanism and provide new insight for prevention and treatment of AMD.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 386-390). PMID:27220713

  3. Maintenance of osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation potential with age and osteoporosis in human marrow stromal cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Eriksen, E F;

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP) is the...... result of enhanced adipogenesis and decreased osteoblastogenesis from the MSCs. Thus, cultures of MSCs were established from young donors (age 18-42, n = 34), elderly healthy donors (age 66-78, n = 20), and patients with OP (age 58-76, n = 15). Cells were cultured for 2 weeks in an adipogenic medium...... phosphatase (AP+), and adipocytic colonies containing adipocytes (Ad+) were quantitated. In addition, steady state mRNA levels of gene markers of adipocytic and osteoblastic phenotypes were determined using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The adipogenic and osteogenic media induced...

  4. Aging effects of plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin films on cell-adhesive implant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testrich, H., E-mail: holger.testrich@uni-greifswald.de [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Rebl, H. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Finke, B.; Hempel, F. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Nebe, B. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Meichsner, J. [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Thin plasma polymer films from ethylenediamine were deposited on planar substrates placed on the powered electrode of a low pressure capacitively coupled 13.56 MHz discharge. The chemical composition of the plasma polymer films was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) as well as by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after derivatization of the primary amino groups. The PPEDA films undergo an alteration during the storage in ambient air, particularly, due to reactions with oxygen. The molecular changes in PPEDA films were studied over a long-time period of 360 days. Simultaneously, the adhesion of human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 (ATCC) was investigated on PPEDA coated corundum blasted titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), which is applied as implant material in orthopedic surgery. The cell adhesion was determined by flow cytometry and the cell shape was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to uncoated reference samples a significantly enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation were measured for PPEDA coated samples, which have been maintained after long-time storage in ambient air and additional sterilization by γ−irradiation. - Highlights: • Development of cell-adhesive nitrogen-rich coatings for biomedical applications. • Plasma polymer films from low pressure 13.56 MHz discharge in argon-ethylenediamine. • Enhanced osteoblast adhesion/proliferation on coated implant material (Ti-6Al-4V). • Despite film aging over 360 days the enhanced cell adhesion of the coating remains. • No influence of additional y-sterilization on the enhanced cell adhesion.

  5. Studying the Anti-aging Effect of Human Growth Hormone on Human Fibroblast Cells via Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Chaparzadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In recent years, studies have focused on the telomerase for cancer treatmentby repressing telomerase in cancerous cells or prevent cell aging by activating it in theaged cells. Thus, in these studies natural and synthetic agents have been used to repressor activate telomerase. In this research, we investigated the effects of human growth hormone(hGH on aging via evaluation of telomerase activity.Materials and Methods: Primary human foreskin fibroblast cells were isolated, culturedand treated with different concentrations of hGH. BrdU and MTT cell proliferation assaysand cells number counting. Cell aging was assayed by the senescence sensitivegalactosidase staining method. Telomerase activity was measured with a telomerasePCR ELISA kit.Data were analyzed with SPSS software (one-way ANOVA and univariateANOVA.Results: Our results indicated that cells treated with a lower concentration (0.1, 1 ng/mlof hGH had more green color cells (aged cells. Furthermore, cell proliferation increasedwith increasing hGH concentrations (10 to 100 ng/ml which was significant in comparisonwith untreated control cells. TRAP assay results indicated that telomerase activityincreased with increasing hGH concentration, but there was no significant difference. Additionally,more rapid cell growth and telomerase activity was noted in the absence of H2O2when compared with the presence of H2O2, which was significantly different.Conclusion: Although increasing cell proliferation along with increasing hGH concentrationwas confirmed by all cell proliferation assays, only the cell counting test was statisticallysignificant. Thus, it is inconclusive that hGH (up to 100 ng/ml has an anti-agingeffect. Also, because there was no significant difference in the telomerase activity results(in spite of increasing progress along with increasing hGH concentration we can not certainlyconclude that hGH (up to 100 ng/ml impacts telomerase activity.

  6. Number and proliferative capacity of osteogenic stem cells are maintained during aging and in patients with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, J; Eriksen, E F;

    2001-01-01

    [age, 66-74 years]) and 13 patients with osteoporosis (age, 58-83 years). Bone marrow was aspirated from iliac crest; mononuclear cells were enriched in MSCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) using STRO-1 antibody. Total CFU-F number, size distribution, cell density per CFU-F, number of...... alkaline phosphatase positive (ALP+) CFU-Fs, and the total ALP+ cells were determined. In addition, matrix mineralization as estimated by alizarin red S (AR-S) staining was quantified. No significant difference in colony-forming efficiency between young individuals (mean +/- SEM; 87 +/- 12 CFU...

  7. Inverse Associations between Obesity Indicators and Thymic T-Cell Production Levels in Aging Atomic-Bomb Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, ...

  8. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia;

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways...... in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major...... [myosin-light chain-2 (MLC2) phosphorylation], loss of cell polarity, loss of cell-cell junctions, luminal infiltration and basal invasion induced by AGE-modified basal lamina matrix in PEC acini. Our in vitro results were concordant with luminal occlusion of acini in the prostate glands of adult Endo180...

  9. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Yoshida

    Full Text Available Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly.

  10. Inverse associations between obesity indicators and thymic T-cell production levels in aging atomic-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kubo, Yoshiko; Yamaoka, Mika; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of the naive T-cell population represents a deteriorating state in the immune system that occurs with advancing age. In animal model studies, obesity compromises the T-cell immune system as a result of enhanced adipogenesis in primary lymphoid organs and systemic inflammation. In this study, to test the hypothesis that obesity may contribute to the aging of human T-cell immunity, a thousand atomic-bomb survivors were examined for obesity status and ability to produce naive T cells, i.e., T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) numbers in CD4 and CD8 T cells. The number of TRECs showed a strong positive correlation with naive T cell numbers, and lower TREC numbers were associated with higher age. We found that the TREC number was inversely associated with levels of obesity indicators (BMI, hemoglobin A1c) and serum CRP levels. Development of type-2 diabetes and fatty liver was also associated with lower TREC numbers. This population study suggests that obesity with enhanced inflammation is involved in aging of the human T-cell immune system. Given the fact that obesity increases the risk of numerous age-related diseases, attenuated immune competence is a possible mechanistic link between obesity and disease development among the elderly. PMID:24651652

  11. IL-15 Fosters Age-Driven Regulatory T Cell Accrual in the Face of Declining IL-2 Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Raynor, Jana; Sholl, Allyson; Plas, David R.; Bouillet, Philippe; Chougnet, Claire A.; Hildeman, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We and others have shown that regulatory T cells (Treg) accumulate dramatically with age in both humans and mice. Such Treg accrual contributes to age-related immunosenescence as they reduce the response to tumors and parasite infection. While we reported earlier that aged Treg have decreased expression of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bim and germline deletion of Bim promoted earlier accumulation of Treg, it remains unclear whether the effects of Bim are: (i) Treg intrinsic and (ii) dominant to...

  12. IL-15 fosters age-driven regulatory T cell accrual in the face of declining IL-2 levels

    OpenAIRE

    Jana eRaynor; Allyson eSholl; Plas, David R.; Philippe eBouillet; Chougnet, Claire A.; Hildeman, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We and others have shown that regulatory T cells (Treg) accumulate dramatically with age in both humans and mice. Such Treg accrual contributes to age-related immunosenescence as they reduce the response to tumors and parasite infection. While we reported earlier that aged Treg have decreased expression of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bim and germline deletion of Bim promoted earlier accumulation of Treg, it remains unclear whether the effects of Bim are (i) Treg intrinsic and (ii) dominant t...

  13. Age-related impairment of humoral response to influenza is associated with changes in antigen specific T follicular helper cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Lefebvre, Julie S; Masters, April R; Hopkins, Jacob W; Laura Haynes

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses are essential for generation of protective humoral immunity during influenza infection. Aging has a profound impact on CD4+ T cell function and humoral immunity, yet the impact of aging on antigen specific TFH responses remains unclear. Influenza specific TFH cells are generated in similar numbers in young and aged animals during infection, but TFH cells from aged mice exhibit significant differences, including reduced expression of ICOS and elevated p...

  14. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  15. Sox4 Links Tumor Suppression to Accelerated Aging in Mice by Modulating Stem Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Foronda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sox4 expression is restricted in mammals to embryonic structures and some adult tissues, such as lymphoid organs, pancreas, intestine, and skin. During embryogenesis, Sox4 regulates mesenchymal and neural progenitor survival, as well as lymphocyte and myeloid differentiation, and contributes to pancreas, bone, and heart development. Aberrant Sox4 expression is linked to malignant transformation and metastasis in several types of cancer. To understand the role of Sox4 in the adult organism, we first generated mice with reduced whole-body Sox4 expression. These mice display accelerated aging and reduced cancer incidence. To specifically address a role for Sox4 in adult stem cells, we conditionally deleted Sox4 (Sox4cKO in stratified epithelia. Sox4cKO mice show increased skin stem cell quiescence and resistance to chemical carcinogenesis concomitantly with downregulation of cell cycle, DNA repair, and activated hair follicle stem cell pathways. Altogether, these findings highlight the importance of Sox4 in regulating adult tissue homeostasis and cancer.

  16. Age-dependent separation of class-specific suppressor cells in thymus of SJL/J mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thymus of SJL/J mice of age 3-6 weeks has been previously shown to contain suppressor cells that inhibit the antibody response of lymph node cells to SRBC. The effect of these suppressor cells disappears as the animals age (24 weeks or more). The authors find that these aged animals acquire thymic suppressor cells which suppress the generation of cytotoxic T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. Although such suppressors are not present in the thymuses of young SJL/J mice, suppression can be induced by treatment with estrogen and progesterone. The differentiation of functionally different suppressor cell populations in thymus may be affected by both age and horomonal status. Lymph node cells were mixed with γ-irradiated spleen cells in a culture medium. Varying numbers of thymocytes were added and after 4-5 days incubation the number of cytotoxic T-cells was assayed using a 51Cr-release assay. Antibody formation in vivo was tested in γ-irradiated mice. The graft versus host reaction was tested in X-irradiated mice. (Auth.)

  17. Mechanical strain modulates age-related changes in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells

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    Chiang Wen-Sheng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on the effects of aging in human and mouse mesenchymal stem cells suggest that a decline in the number and differentiation potential of stem cells may contribute to aging and aging-related diseases. In this report, we used stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue (ADSCs of young (8-10 weeks, adult (5 months, and old (21 months mice to test the hypothesis that mechanical loading modifies aging-related changes in the self-renewal and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of these cells. Results We show that aging significantly reduced the proliferation and increased the adipogenesis of ADSCs, while the osteogenic potential is not significantly reduced by aging. Mechanical loading (10% cyclic stretching, 0.5 Hz, 48 h increased the subsequent proliferation of ADSCs from mice of all ages. Although the number of osteogenic colonies with calcium deposition was increased in ADSCs subjected to pre-strain, it resulted from an increase in colony number rather than from an increase in osteogenic potential after strain. Pre-strain significantly reduced the number of oil droplets and the expression of adipogenic marker genes in adult and old ADSCs. Simultaneously subjecting ADSCs to mechanical loading and adipogenic induction resulted in a stronger inhibition of adipogenesis than that caused by pre-strain. The reduction of adipogenesis by mechanical strain was loading-magnitude dependent: loading with 2% strain only resulted in a partial inhibition, and loading with 0.5% strain could not inhibit adipogenesis in ADSCs. Conclusions We demonstrate that mechanical stretching counteracts the loss of self-renewal in aging ADSCs by enhancing their proliferation and, at the same time, reduces the heightened adipogenesis of old cells. These findings are important for the further study of stem cell control and treatment for a variety of aging related diseases.

  18. Prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions induce impaired Oct-1 activity and autophagy in prematurely aged human mesenchymal stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Arantza; Gago, Andrea; de Eguino, Garbiñe Ruiz; Calvo-Fernández, Teresa; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Schlangen, Karin; Fullaondo, Ane; Aransay, Ana M; Martín, Abraham; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2014-04-01

    Aging, a time-dependent functional decline of biological processes, is the primary risk factor in developing diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular or degenerative diseases. There is a real need to understand the human aging process in order to increase the length of disease-free life, also known as "health span". Accumulation of progerin and prelamin A are the hallmark of a group of premature aging diseases but have also been found during normal cellular aging strongly suggesting similar mechanisms between healthy aging and LMNA-linked progeroid syndromes. How this toxic accumulation contributes to aging (physiological or pathological) remains unclear. Since affected tissues in age-associated disorders and in pathological aging are mainly of mesenchymal origin we propose a model of human aging based on mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) which accumulate prelamin A. We demonstrate that prelamin A-accumulating hMSCs have a premature aging phenotype which affects their functional competence in vivo. The combination of prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions enhance the aging phenotype by dysregulating the activity of the octamer binding protein Oct-1This experimental model has been fundamental to identify a new role for Oct-1 in hMSCs aging. PMID:24753226

  19. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells improve cognitive dysfunction due to aging hypoperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jing; YIN Shao-jun; CHEN Yu-juan; BIAN Wei-hong; YU Jing; ZHAO Yu-wu; LIU Xue-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Aging is an important risk factor for vascular dementia, and D-galactose (D-gal) injection can simulate the pathology of aging. Two-vessel occlusion of common carotid arteries (2VO) is the most popular model for vascular dementia. This study was aimed to investigate the possibility of D-gal injection plus 2VO simulating cognitive impairment of aging vascular dementia; and whether transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can improve the cognitive function induced by D-gal injection plus 2VO.Methods Totally 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups equivalently: control group, D-gal group,D-gal+2VO group, D-gal+2VO+saline water group, and D-gal+2VO+BMSCs group. Aging hypoperfusion rats were created by subcutaneous injection of D-gal and occlusion of two common carotid arteries. BMSCs or saline water was stereotactically transplanted into the subventricular zone as treatment vehicles at 24 hours post operation. Two-way repeat analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for significance analysis of 5 groups at 6 weeks post transplantation;moreover, Tamhane's test (equal variance not assumed) and least significant difference (LSD) test (equal variance assumed) were used for pairwise comparison in Morris water maze (MWM).Results Transplanted BMSCs distributed around the lateral ventricles and acquired the phenotypes of neurons and astrocytes. In terms of swimming path distance and escape latency in MWM, D-gal+2VO+BMSC group showed significant improvement than the D-gal+2VO group but was still obviously worse than the control group (both P <0.05).There was no significant difference in swimming speed for all 5 groups.Conclusions D-gal plus 2VO induces cognitive dysfunction. The engrafted BMSCs exhibit the beneficial effect on cognitive function via promotion interactively with host brain.

  20. Age dependence of radiation-induced renal cell carcinomas in an Eker rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to carcinogens early in life may contribute to cancer development later in life. The amount of radiation exposure children experience during medical procedures has been increasing, so it is important to evaluate the radiation risk of cancer in developing organs. Toward this goal, we assessed the risk of developing renal cell carcinoma using Eker rats as a kidney tumor model. F1 hybrids of male Eker (Tsc2 mutant) and female F344 rats were irradiated with 0.5 or 2 Gy gamma radiation on gestation days 15 and 19, and on postnatal days 5, 20, and 49. At 27 weeks of age, kidneys were examined for proliferative lesions. Preneoplastic lesions such as phenotypically altered tubules increased after postnatal irradiation as a function of age-at-irradiation, and hyperplasia were greatly increased after perinatal and postnatal irradiation. In contrast, development of adenoma and adenocarcinoma were evident in animals irradiated at perinatal ages, being maximal at gestational day 19. The frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the Tsc2 locus was unexpectedly low -0% (0 of 4) for the unirradiated control, and 17% (6 of 35) for the irradiated group. Irrespective of LOH, the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway, which is negatively regulated by the Tsc1/2 complex, was activated in both benign and malignant lesions, as evidenced by phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein and 4E-BP1. This suggests that the wild-type Tsc2 allele may be functionally inactivated. In conclusion, actively growing kidneys in perinatal-aged (F344 x Eker) F1 rats (Tsc2+/- are at risk for radiation-induced malignant transformation of the renal epithelium associated with mTOR activation. (author)

  1. Age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased proportion of CD56(+) T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Singh, Amardeep; Krüger Falk, Mads; Juel, Helene Bæk; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the association between age-related changes in the T-cell compartment and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Case-control study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 117 AMD cases and 106 controls were included prospectively. METHODS: Fresh-drawn peripheral blood...... levels of circulating aged CD56(+) CD28(-) T cells in patients with AMD. Although this supports the notion of AMD as a systemic disease, it also suggests that the adaptive immune system is implicated in its pathogenesis....

  2. Age-specific changes of mesenchymal stem cells are paralleled by upregulation of CD106 expression as a response to an inflammatory environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jamnig, A.; Fehrer, C.; Kloss, F.; Laschober, G.; Lepperdinger, G.; Brunauer, R.; Gassner, R.; Singh, S; Hafen, U.

    2011-01-01

    AbstractRegeneration, tissue remodeling and organ repair after injury which rely on theregulated activity of tissue-borne stem cells become increasingly compromised withadvancing age.Mesenchymal stroma cells were isolated from bone of differently aged healthydonors. The rare population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) contained in theprimary cell isolates, barely declined in number, yet relative to the donor age thestem cells displayed diminished long-term proliferation potential. The expressi...

  3. Aged garlic extract prevents a decline of NK cell number and activity in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hideki; Saeki, Tomoko; Otani, Toru; Suzuki, Takaichiro; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Nishino, Hoyoku; Fukuda, Sanae; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2006-03-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) has manifold biological activities including immunomodulative and antioxidative effects. It is used as a major component of nonprescription tonics and cold-prevention medicines or dietary supplements. Advanced-cancer patients decline in immune functions and quality of life (QOL). The study's subjects were patients with inoperable colorectal, liver, or pancreatic cancer. In a randomized double-blind trial, AGE was administered to one group and a placebo was administered to another for 6 mo. The primary endpoint was a QOL questionnaire based on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT). The subendpoints were changes in the natural-killer (NK) cell activity the salivary cortisol level from before and after administering AGE. Out of 55 patients invited to participate in the trial, 50 (91%) consented to enroll. They consisted of 42 patients with liver cancer (84%), 7 patients with pancreatic cancer (14%), and 1 patient with colon cancer (2%). Drug compliance was relatively good in both the AGE and placebo groups. Although no difference was observed in QOL, both the number of NK cells and the NK cell activity increased significantly in the AGE group. No adverse effect was observed in either group. The study showed that administering AGE to patients with advanced cancer of the digestive system improved NK cell activity, but caused no improvement in QOL. PMID:16484572

  4. SirT1—A Sensor for Monitoring Self-Renewal and Aging Process in Retinal Stem Cells

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    Chi-Hsien Peng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinal stem cells bear potency of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into many retinal cells. Utilizing appropriate sensors one can effectively detect the self-renewal and aging process abilities. Silencing information regulator (SirT1, a member of the sirtuin family, is a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase and an essential mediator for longevity in normal cells by calorie restriction. We firstly investigate the SirT1 mRNA expression in retinal stem cells from rats and 19 human eyes of different ages. Results revealed that SirT1 expression was significantly decreased in in vivo aged eyes, associated with poor self-renewal abilities. Additionally, SirT1 mRNA levels were dose-dependently increased in resveratrol- treated retinal stem cells. The expression of SirT1 on oxidative stress-induced damage was significantly decreased, negatively correlated with the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with resveratrol could effectively further reduce oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment in retinal stem cells. Importantly, the anti-oxidant effects of resveratrol in H2O2-treated retinal stem cells were significantly abolished by knockdown of SirT1 expression (sh-SirT1. SirT1 expression provides a feasible sensor in assessing self-renewal and aging process in retinal stem cells. Resveratrol can prevent reactive oxygen species-induced damages via increased retinal SirT1 expression.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  6. Interleukin-21 administration to aged mice rejuvenates their peripheral T-cell pool by triggering de novo thymopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Chami, E; Tormo, A; Pasquin, S; Kanjarawi, R; Ziouani, S; Rafei, M

    2016-04-01

    The vaccination efficacy in the elderly is significantly reduced compared to younger populations due to thymic involution and age-related intrinsic changes affecting their naïve T-cell compartment. Interleukin (IL)-21 was recently shown to display thymostimulatory properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that its administration to ageing hosts may improve T-cell output and thus restore a competent peripheral T-cell compartment. Indeed, an increase in the production of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) attributable to intrathymic expansion of early thymic progenitors (ETPs), double-negative (DN), and double-positive (DP) thymocytes as well as thymic epithelial cell (TEC) was observed in recombinant (r)IL-21-treated aged mice. In sharp contrast, no alterations in the frequency of bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitors were detected following rIL-21 administration. Enhanced production of naïve T cells improved the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity and re-established a pool of T cells exhibiting higher levels of miR-181a and diminished amounts of the TCR-inhibiting phosphatases SHP-2 and DUSP5/6. As a result, stimulation of T cells derived from rIL-21-treated aged mice displayed enhanced activation of Lck, ZAP-70, and ERK, which ultimately boosted their IL-2 production, CD25 expression, and proliferation capabilities in comparison with T cells derived from control aged mice. Consequently, aged rIL-21-treated mice vaccinated using a tyrosinase-related protein 2 (Trp2)-derived peptide exhibited a substantial delay in B16 tumor growth and improved survival. The results of this study highlight the immunorestorative function of rIL-21 paving its use as a strategy for the re-establishment of effective immunity in the elderly. PMID:26762709

  7. In vivo and in vitro analysis of age-associated changes and somatic cellular senescence in renal epithelial cells.

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    Birgit Berkenkamp

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a major clinical problem and advanced age is associated with ineffective renal regeneration and poor functional outcome. Data from kidney injury models suggest that a loss of tubular epithelial proliferation contributes to a decrease in renal repair capacity with aging, but aging can also lead to a higher severity of inflammation and damage which may influence repair. In this study we tested intrinsic age-dependent changes in tubular epithelial proliferation in young and old mice, by injecting low-dose lead acetate as a non-injurious mitogen. In parallel, we explored in vitro techniques of studying cellular senescence in primary tubular epithelial cells (PTEC. Lead acetate induced tubular epithelial proliferation at a significantly higher rate in young as compared to old mice. Old kidneys showed significantly more senescence as demonstrated by increased p16 (INK4a, senescence associated β-galactosidase, and γH2AX(+/Ki-67(- cells. This was paralleled in old kidneys by a higher number of Cyclin D1 positive tubular cells. This finding was corroborated by a positive correlation between Cyclin D1 positivity and age in human renal biopsies. When tubular cells were isolated from mouse kidneys they rapidly lost their age-associated differences under culture conditions. However, senescence was readily induced in PTEC by γ-irradiation representing a future model for study of cellular senescence in the renal epithelium. Together, our data indicate that the tubular epithelium of aged kidney has an intrinsically reduced proliferative capacity probably due to a higher load of senescent cells. Moreover, stress induced models of cellular senescence are preferable for study of the renal epithelium in vitro. Finally, the positive correlation of Cyclin D1 with age and cellular senescence in PTEC needs further evaluation as to a functional role of renal epithelial aging.

  8. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell function in relation to age: A pupillometric study in humans with special reference to the age-related optic properties of the lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbst Kristina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion retinal cells (ipRGC can be assessed by a means of pupil responses to bright blue (appr.480 nm light. Due to age related factors in the eye, particularly, structural changes of the lens, less light reaches retina. The aim of this study was to examine how age and in vivo measured lens transmission of blue light might affect pupil light responses, in particular, mediated by the ipRGC. Methods Consensual pupil responses were explored in 44 healthy subjects aged between 26 and 68 years. A pupil response was recorded to a continuous 20 s light stimulus of 660 nm (red or 470 nm (blue both at 300 cd/m2 intensity (14.9 and 14.8 log photons/cm2/s, respectively. Additional recordings were performed using four 470 nm stimulus intensities of 3, 30, 100 and 300 cd/m2. The baseline pupil size was measured in darkness and results were adjusted for the baseline pupil and gender. The main outcome parameters were maximal and sustained pupil contraction amplitudes and the postillumination response assessed as area under the curve (AUC over two time-windows: early (0–10 s after light termination and late (10–30 s after light termination. Lens transmission was measured with an ocular fluorometer. Results The sustained pupil contraction and the early poststimulus AUC correlated positively with age (p = 0.02, p = 0.0014, respectively for the blue light stimulus condition only. The maximal pupil contraction amplitude did not correlate to age either for bright blue or red light stimulus conditions. Lens transmission decreased linearly with age (p 2 light (p = 0.02. Conclusions Age did not reduce, but rather enhance pupil responses mediated by ipRGC. The age related decrease of blue light transmission led to similar results, however, the effect of age was greater on these pupil responses than that of the lens transmission. Thus there must

  9. The effect of aging on IgD receptor expression by T cells and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C D; Thorbecke, G J

    1997-12-01

    Exposure to oligomeric or aggregated (a), but not to monomeric (m), IgD causes a rapid (within 1 h) upregulation of IgD-R expression on CD4+ T cells from young, but not from aged, mice and on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from all young and from approximately 65% of aged humans. In normal young (but not in IgD-/-) mice, this increase in IgD-R expression is associated with a marked increase in primary and secondary antibody responses, transferable to both aged and young mice with T cells from aIgD pretreated donors. In both species, immunization causes a rise in the IgD-R+ expression in vivo in the young. In mice, mIgD abolishes both the induction of IgD-R expression and augmentation of immune responses, suggesting that interaction between IgD-R+ T and IgD+ B cells is needed. In aged humans, the ability of peripheral blood lymphocytes to exhibit IgD-R expression in response to aIgD in vitro or to influenza vaccine in vivo is strongly correlated to the individual's ability to produce antibody. In T cells from aged mice, but not from aged IgD-non-responder humans, IgD-R are able to come to the cell surface if an additional signal has been supplied, such as by (ionomycin/thapsigargin + aIgD). Agents which induce IgD-R and augmentation of antibody production in aged and young mice include phosphatidylcholine and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. The immunoaugmenting effect of pretreatment with these agents appears indeed due to IgD-R+ T cells, because it is abolished by mIgD. PMID:9476673

  10. Extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields increase cell proliferation in lymphocytes from young and aged subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the in vitro exposure to extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on the proliferation of human lymphocytes from 24 young and 24 old subjects was studied. The exposure to PEMFs during a 3-days culture period or during the first 24 hours was able to increase phytohaemagglutinin-induced lymphocyte proliferation in both groups. Such effect was greater in lymphocytes from old people which showed a markedly reduced proliferative capability and, after PEMF exposure, reached values of 3H-TdR incorporation similar to those of young subjects. The relevance of these data for the understanding and the reversibility of the proliferative defects in cells from aged subjects and for the assessment of risk related to the environmental exposure to PEMFs has to be considered

  11. [Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: Systemic treatment of patients aged 70 and over].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Ducoloné, Alain; Mennecier, Bertrand; Fraisse, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Patients aged 70 and over represent the third of the population of patients with lung cancer. There has been for a long time a certain nihilism regarding the treatment of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer as well from medical doctors but also from families and patients themselves with the false belief of an indolent course of the disease in elderly patients. As a result, clinical trials devoted to elderly patients were quite scarce until the end of the last decade. Nevertheless, an important trial was published in 1999 with the comparison of vinorelbine as a single agent versus best supportive care only in patients aged 70 and over with an advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The survival benefit with vinorelbine was important. Then two trials were published comparing monotherapy with either vinorelbine or gemcitabine to the doublet vinorelbine and gemcitabine without convincing results. As a consequence, the ASCO 2004 recommendations were to treat elderly patients with a monotherapy (gemcitabine or vinorelbine). Recently an IFCT trial was presented at the plenary session of the ASCO 2010. A carboplatin (every 4weeks)+weekly paclitaxel doublet was compared to a vinorelbine or gemcitabine (choice of the center). The survival benefit was of such magnitude that the paradigm of treatment of elderly patients PS 0-2 with advanced NSCLC should be modified in favor of the tested doublet. There should be a reappraisal of the geriatric indexes recommended by the oncogeriatricians regarding their exact prognostic or predictive role. PMID:21388776

  12. HSF1-controlled and age-associated chaperone capacity in neurons and muscle cells of C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kern

    Full Text Available Protein stability under changing conditions is of vital importance for the cell and under the control of a fine-tuned network of molecular chaperones. Aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases are directly associated with enhanced protein instability. Employing C. elegans expressing GFP-tagged luciferase as a reporter for evaluation of protein stability we show that the chaperoning strategy of body wall muscle cells and neurons is significantly different and that both are differently affected by aging. Muscle cells of young worms are largely resistant to heat stress, which is directly mediated by the stress response controlled through Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1. During recovery following heat stress the ability to refold misfolded proteins is missing. Young neurons are highly susceptible to chronic heat stress, but show a high potency to refold or disaggregate proteins during subsequent recovery. The particular proteome instability in neurons results from a delayed induction of the heat shock response. In aged neurons protein stability is increased during heat stress, whereas muscle cells show enhanced protein instability due to a deteriorated heat shock response. An efficient refolding activity is absent in both aged tissues. These results provide molecular insights into the differential protein stabilization capacity in different tissues and during aging.

  13. Transplanted Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Testicular Dysfunction In A D-Galactose-Induced Aging Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Du, Yi-Kuan; Wang, Jun; Luan, Ping; Yang, Qin-Lao; Huang, Wen-Hua; Yuan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Glycation product accumulation during aging of slowly renewing tissues may be an important mechanism underlying aging of the testis. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have shown promise in a novel tissue regenerative technique and may have utility in treating sexual dysfunction. ADSCs have also been found to be effective in antiaging therapy, although the mechanism underlying their effects remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the anti-aging effect of ADSCs in a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging animal model and to clarify the underlying mechanism. Randomly selected 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were subcutaneously injected with D-gal daily for 8 weeks. Two weeks after completion of treatment, D-gal-induced aging rats were randomized to receive caudal vein injections of 3 × 10(6) 5-bromo 2'deoxy-uridine-labeled ADSCs or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline. Serum testosterone level, steroidogenic enzymes (3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased significantly in aging rats compared with the control group; serum lipid peroxidation, spermatogenic cell apoptosis, and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) expression increased significantly. ADSCs increased the SOD level and reduced the MDA level in the aging animal model and restored levels of serum testosterone, steroidogenic enzymes, and spermatogenic cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that ADSCs can contribute to testicular regeneration during aging. ADSCs also provide functional benefits through glycation suppression and antioxidant effects in a rat model of aging. Although some ADSCs differentiated into Leydig cells, the paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, resulting in the reduction of apoptosis. PMID:25728126

  14. Immunochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen in aging cultured astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Vanzani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell differentiation degree and mitotic activity were sequentially assessed by immunoperoxidase labeling of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, respectively, in rat brain cultured astrocytes maintained up to 60 days in vitro (DIV of first subculture, or weekly passaged until their 12th subculture. Cell count was performed through a 0.01 mm2 section reticule and morphometric analysis with a stereological grid. The number of double immunoreactive cells peaked by 2 DIV to achieve its lowest value at 60 DIV. At 24 hs of cell seeding of successive passages, such values peaked by the 6th subculture to gradually decrease thereafter. Increasing cell hypertrophy was found during the long-term first subculture but not after passaging. At the end of the observation period, doubly immunolabeled astrocytes were still recorded, thus evidencing retention of proliferative potential despite aging.El grado de diferenciación celular y la actividad mitótica fueron secuencialmente determinados mediante marcación por inmunoperoxidasa de la proteína gliofibrilar ácida (GFAP y del antígeno nuclear de proliferación celular (PCNA, respectivamente, en cultivos astrocitarios obtenidos de encéfalo de rata y mantenidos hasta 60 días in vitro (DIV de su primer subcultivo, o mediante pasajes semanales hasta el 12do subcultivo. El conteo celular se realizó mediante una retícula de 0.01-mm2 de sección y el análisis morfométrico con una grilla estereológica. El número de células doblemente inmunorreactivas alcanzó valores máximos a los 2 DIV para descender a los menores a los 60 DIV. A las 24 hs de sembrado celular de los sucesivos pasajes, esos valores ascendieron hacia el 6to subcultivo para luego declinar. En cuanto a la hipertrofia celular, se observó en todo el curso del primer subcultivo, pero no durante los posteriores pasajes. Al final del período de observación, todavía se continuaban detectando

  15. Age-Dependent Cell Trafficking Defects in Draining Lymph Nodes Impair Adaptive Immunity and Control of West Nile Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M Richner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impaired immune responses in the elderly lead to reduced vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to viral infections. Although several groups have documented age-dependent defects in adaptive immune priming, the deficits that occur prior to antigen encounter remain largely unexplored. Herein, we identify novel mechanisms for compromised adaptive immunity that occurs with aging in the context of infection with West Nile virus (WNV, an encephalitic flavivirus that preferentially causes disease in the elderly. An impaired IgM and IgG response and enhanced vulnerability to WNV infection during aging was linked to delayed germinal center formation in the draining lymph node (DLN. Adoptive transfer studies and two-photon intravital microscopy revealed a decreased trafficking capacity of donor naïve CD4+ T cells from old mice, which manifested as impaired T cell diapedesis at high endothelial venules and reduced cell motility within DLN prior to antigen encounter. Furthermore, leukocyte accumulation in the DLN within the first few days of WNV infection or antigen-adjuvant administration was diminished more generally in old mice and associated with a second aging-related defect in local cytokine and chemokine production. Thus, age-dependent cell-intrinsic and environmental defects in the DLN result in delayed immune cell recruitment and antigen recognition. These deficits compromise priming of early adaptive immune responses and likely contribute to the susceptibility of old animals to acute WNV infection.

  16. BTLA expression declines on B cells of the aged and is associated with low responsiveness to the trivalent influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Senthil; Kurupati, Raj K; Doyle, Susan A; Freeman, Gordon J; Schmader, Kenneth E; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2015-08-14

    Virus-neutralizing antibody and B cell responses to influenza A viruses were measured in 35 aged and 28 middle-aged individuals following vaccination with the 2012 and 2013 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines. Antibody responses to the vaccine strains were lower in the aged. An analysis of B cell subsets by flow cytometry with stains for immunoregulators showed that B cells of multiple subsets from the aged as compared to younger human subjects showed differences in the expression of the co-inhibitor B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). Expression of BTLA inversely correlated with age and appears to be linked to shifting the nature of the response from IgM to IgG. High BTLA expression on mature B cells was linked to higher IgG responses to the H1N1 virus. Finally, high BTLA expression on isotype switched memory B cells was linked to better preservation of virus neutralizing antibody titers and improved recall responses to vaccination given the following year. PMID:26277622

  17. Elevated levels of interferon-γ production by memory T cells do not promote transplant tolerance resistance in aged recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Kim

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence predisposes the elderly to infectious and autoimmune diseases and impairs the response to vaccination. We recently demonstrated that ageing also impedes development of transplantation tolerance. Unlike their young counterparts (8-12 weeks of age aged male recipients (greater than 12 months of age transplanted with a full MHC-mismatched heart are resistant to tolerance mediated by anti-CD45RB antibody. Surprisingly, either chemical or surgical castration restored tolerance induction to levels observed using young recipients. Based on the strong impact of endocrine modulation on transplant tolerance, we explored the impact of ageing and castration on the immune system. Here we report a significant increase in the percentage of T cells that produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ in aged male versus young male animals and that the overall increase in IFN-γ production was due to an expansion of IFN-γ-producing memory T cells in aged animals. In contrast to IFN-γ production, we did not observe differences in IL-10 expression in young versus old male mice. We hypothesized that endocrine modulation would diminish the elevated levels of IFN-γ production in aged recipients, however, we observed no significant reduction in the percentage of IFN-γ+ T cells upon castration. Furthermore, we neutralized interferon-γ by antibody and did not observe an effect on graft survival. We conclude that while elevated levels of interferon-γ serves as a marker of tolerance resistance in aged mice, other as yet to be identified factors are responsible for its cause. Defining these factors may be relevant to design of tolerogenic strategies for aged recipients.

  18. Telomeres, mitochondria and stem cell aging%端粒、线粒体和干细胞衰老

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄黎亚; 陈书艳

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the special cells which play a key role in the whole life cycle. It is very important to maintain the activity of stem cells, slow down slem cell aging and prolong the life of stem cells. In this paper, the molecular mechanism of stem cell aging is reviewed from the aspects including genome maintenance, telomeres, cell cycle inhibitors and mitochondria. The relationship between telomere-p53 pathway and mitochondria-reactive oxygen species pathway is focused, and the impacts of the two pathways on stem cell aging are introduced.%干细胞是一类在所有生命周期中具有关键性作用的特殊细胞,保持干细胞活力、延缓干细胞衰老及延长干细胞寿命具有重要意义.该文从基因组维护和端粒、细胞周期抑制因子、线粒体等几个方面对干细胞衰老的分子机制作一整体性综述,侧重于端粒-p53通路和线粒体-活性氧自由基途径间的关系及其对干细胞衰老的影响.

  19. Experiences in the measurement of RBC-bound IgG as markers of cell age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleari, Renata; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Azzario, Franco; Maccioni, Liliana; Galanello, Renzo; Mosca, Andrea

    2004-05-01

    An immunologically mediated pathway has been largely accepted to be one of the mechanisms involved in the clearance of senescent or prematurely damaged RBC. According to this pathway, RBC removal is mediated by binding of naturally occurring IgG to clustered integral membrane proteins, followed by complement deposition. The validation of an immunoenzymatic method for the detection of RBC-bound autologous IgG is presented. The use of RBC-bound IgG as an index related to red cell age was evaluated by measuring IgG binding in RBC treated with the clustering agent ZnCl2, in density fractionated RBC and in a selected group of patients expected to have an altered RBC life span. The immunoenzymatic method for IgG detection resulted to be reproducible (CV = 3.4%). IgG binding to in vitro clustered RBC was found to be enhanced to a very great extent, about 20 times higher with respect to untreated RBC. A slight but significant increase (about 1.8-fold) in membrane-bound IgG was observed in the highest density fraction of normal RBC, which constituted 1% of the total cells. A significantly greater number of RBC-bound IgG was measured in splenectomized beta-thalassemia intermedia patients and in subjects with secondary decreases in the C3 complement fraction concentration. PMID:15039023

  20. Index of CD34+ Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Bone Marrow of Spinal Cord Injury Patients of Different Age Groups: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyasagar Devaprasad Dedeepiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent evidence of safety and efficacy of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNC in spinal cord injury makes the Bone Marrow (BM CD34+ percentage and the BMMNC count gain significance. The indices of BM that change with body mass index and aging in general population have been reported but seldom in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI victims, whose parameters of relevance differ from general population. Herein, we report the indices of BMMNC in SCI victims. Materials and Methods. BMMNCs of 332 SCI patients were isolated under GMP protocols. Cell count by Trypan blue method and CD34+ cells by flow cytometry were documented and analysed across ages and gender. Results. The average BMMNC per ml in the age groups 0–20, 21–40, 41–60, and 61–80 years were 4.71, 4.03, 3.67, and 3.02 million and the CD34+ were 1.05%, 1.04%, 0.94%, and 0.93% respectively. The decline in CD34+ was sharp between 20–40 and 40–60 age groups. Females of reproductive age group had lesser CD34+. Conclusion. The BMMNC and CD34+ percentages decline with aging in SCI victims. Their lower values in females during reproductive age should be analysed for relevance to hormonal influence. This study offers reference values of BMMNC and CD34+ of SCI victims for successful clinical application.

  1. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations

  2. Reduced heat shock response in human mononuclear cells during aging and its association with polymorphisms in HSP70 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in heat shock response (HSR) were studied in mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphocytes) collected from young (mean age = 22.6 +/- 1.7 years) and middle-aged (mean age = 56.3 +/- 4.7 years) subjects after 1 hour of heat shock at 42 degrees C. Genotype-specific HSR was...... measured by genotyping the subjects for 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms, HSPA1A(A-110C), HSPA1B(A1267G), and HSPA1L(T2437C), 1 each in the 3 HSP70 genes. A significant age-related decrease in the induction of Hsp70 occurred after heat shock in both monocytes and lymphocytes. The noninducible and...

  3. Age and sex differences in the incorporation of EPA and DHA into plasma fractions, cells and adipose tissue in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Celia G.; Browning, Lucy M; Mander, Adrian P; Madden, Jackie; West, Annette L.; Calder, Philip C.; Jebb, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether age and sex influence both the status and the incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood plasma, cells and tissues. The study was a double-blind, randomised, controlled intervention, providing EPA+DHA equivalent to 0, 1, 2 or 4 portions of oily fish per week, for 12 months. Participants were stratified by age and sex. A linear regression model was used to analyse baseline outcomes, with covariates for age or sex groups, and adjusting for BMI. The ...

  4. Aging mechanism of Sulfonated poly(aryl ether ketone) (sPAEK) in an hydroperoxide solution and in fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Carine; Gonon, Laurent; Marestin, Catherine; Morin, Arnaud; Gebel, Gérard

    Ex situ and in situ fuel cell degradation of a sPAEK membrane were investigated. Post-mortem analyses of the aged membrane and of the degradation products eluted in water were carried out by NMR, IR, SEC and EDX. Ex situ agings were performed in a low concentration H 2O 2 solution (0.07%) without any metallic catalyst. We exemplify that ex situ accelerated aging tests in such hydrogen peroxide solution are relevant to the chemical degradation in fuel cell. We have shown that a 500 h fuel cell test at moderate temperature (60 °C) induces significant modifications on the macromolecules such as a 40% molecular weight reduction. Degradation appears heterogeneous and limited to the cathode side. The model compound approach developed in the previous article (Perrot et al. [42]) has allowed the identification of the aging path in fuel cell. Phenolic and carboxylic acid chain ends have been identified as the main products resulting from polymer chain scissions. The ex situ lifetime (100 h) of the membrane appears very limited with respect to the in situ operating time suggesting that the low H 2O 2 concentration (0.07%) is still much higher than in fuel cell.

  5. Culture of skeletal myoblasts from human donors aged over 40 years: dynamics of cell growth and expression of differentiation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherubino Paolo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local myogenesis, neoangiogenesis and homing of progenitor cells from the bone marrow appear to contribute to repair of the infarcted myocardium. Implantation into heart tissues of autologous skeletal myoblasts has been associated with improved contractile function in animal models and in humans with acute myocardial ischemia. Since heart infarction is most prevalent in individuals of over 40 years of age, we tested whether culture methods available in our laboratory were adequate to obtain sufficient numbers of differentiated skeletal myoblasts from muscle biopsy specimens obtained from patients aged 41 to 91. Methods and results No matter of donor age, differentiated skeletal muscle cells could be produced in vitro in amounts adequate for cellular therapy (≥300 millions. Using desmin as a cytoplasmic marker, about 50% cultured cells were differentiated along myogenic lineages and expressed proteins proper of skeletal muscle (myosin type I and II, actin, actinin, spectrin and dystrophin. Cytogenetic alterations were not detected in cultured muscle cells that had undergone at least 10 population doublings. Molecular methods employed for the screening of persistent viral infections evidenced that HCV failed to replicate in muscle cells cultured from one patient with chronic HCV infection. Conclusion The proposed culture methods appear to hold promise for aged patients not only in the field of cardiovascular medicine, but also in the urologic and orthopedic fields.

  6. AGE AND SEX CHARACTERISTICS OF MELATONIN-POSITIVE-LABELED CELLS OF THE GASTRIC MUCOSA IN DESYNCHRONOSIS IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuk, V; Kononenko, N; Kozub, T; Chikitkina, V; Galiy, L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the research was to study the state of melatonin-positive-labeled cells (MPLC) of GM in desynchronosis in rats of different age and gender. 780 sections of the pyloric part of the gastric mucosa were studied in rats of both genders at the age of 9, 15 and 20 months. Animals were divided into intact control groups and the groups of the animals kept under the conditions of continuous light for 14 days - desynchronosis. The study was performed by the method of immunohistochemical staining with the primary antibodies to melatonin (Biorbyt, UK) and the secondary Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated antibody (Abcam, UK). In the course of the research it was found that MPLC in all experimental groups were mainly located in the basal and middle segments of the tubular glands of gastric mucosa and were represented by three types of cells. In desynchronosis the number of melatonin-positive-labeled cells significantly reduced in almost every age group, with the exception of females at the age of 20 months. Thus in elderly males and females the number of melatonin-positive-labeled cells of type III increases, whereas in young and mature males it decreases, and cells of type I predominate. PMID:27441544

  7. Reversibility of cellular aging by reprogramming through an embryonic-like state : a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Lemaitre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a unique opportunity to derive patient-specific stem cells with potential application in autologous tissue replacement therapies and without the ethical concerns of Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC. However, this strategy still suffers from several hurdles that need to be overcome before clinical applications. Among them, cellular senescence, which contributes to aging and restricted longevity, has been described as a barrier to the derivation of iPSCs. This suggests that aging might be an important limitation for therapeutic purposes for elderly individuals. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest in response to various forms of stress, including activation of oncogenes, shortened telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. To overcome this barrier, we developed an optimized 6-factor-based reprogramming protocol that is able to cause efficient reversing of cellular senescence and reprogramming into iPSCs. We demonstrated that iPSCs derived from senescent and centenarian fibroblasts have reset telomere size, gene expression profiles, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial metabolism, and are indistinguishable from hESC. Finally, we demonstrate that re-differentiation led to rejuvenated cells with a reset cellular physiology, defining a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation. We discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming of senescent cells

  8. Epithelial cell renewal in the digestive gland and stomach of mussels, season, age and tidal regime related variations

    OpenAIRE

    Zaldibar, B.; Cancio, I.; Marigómez, I.

    2008-01-01

    The natural variability in cell proliferation activity in the epithelium of the digestive gland and stomach was investigated in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lmk), of different age and tidal level at different seasons. After treating mussels with the thymidine analogue bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 6 hours, BrdU immunohistochemistry was performed every 2 hours for the next 36. The relative proportion of BrdU positive cells was quantified as BrdU labelling (‰). ...

  9. Age-adjusted recipient pretransplantation telomere length and treatment-related mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Peffault de Latour, Régis; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Busson, Marc; Abrams, Jeffrey; Adoui, Nadir; Robin, Marie; Larghero, Jérôme; Dhedin, Nathalie; Xhaard, Alienor; Clave, Emmanuel; Charron, Dominique; Toubert, Antoine; Loiseau, Pascale; Socié, Gérard; Young, Neal S

    2012-01-01

    Telomere attrition induces cell senescence and apoptosis. We hypothesized that age-adjusted pretransplantation telomere length might predict treatment-related mortality (TRM) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Between 2000 and 2005, 178 consecutive patients underwent HSCT from HLA-identical sibling donors after myeloablative conditioning regimens, mainly for hematologic malignancies (n = 153). Blood lymphocytes' telomere length was measured by real-time quantitative PCR bef...

  10. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth

  11. Passive electrophysiological properties of aged and axotomized cat spinal cord motoneurons: the effect of cell size and electrode shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J K; Chase, M H

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were obtained from intact and axotomized lumbar motoneurons of aged cats. The sub-threshold electrical properties of these cells were measured, including input resistance, resting membrane potential, and the first two equalizing time constants as well as their associated amplitude constants. These data were used in a semi-infinite cable model of the motoneuron to estimate the size of the shunt resistance (Rshunt) which is created when the electrode penetrates the cell membrane. The average Rshunt for intact aged cells was 5.35 +/- 1.01 M omega, while that for the axotomized aged cells was 8.93 +/- 1.20 M omega. The statistically significant difference in mean shunt magnitude did not affect the measurements of membrane time constant because this constant is independent of the shunt in this model of the motoneuron. However, the determination of cell input resistance, which is not independent of the shunt, was shown to underestimate the real cell input resistance by 23-29%. We therefore conclude that the shunt resistance is an important factor which should be taken into account when measuring input resistance. PMID:1508398

  12. Altered connexin 43 expression underlies age-dependent decrease of regulatory T cell suppressor function in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczma, Michal; Wang, Cong-Yi; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Gourdie, Robert; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most extensively studied autoimmune diseases, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells are still not well understood. In this study, we show that regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in NOD mice undergo age-dependent loss of suppressor functions exacerbated by the decreased ability of activated effector T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate T(regs) in the peripheral organs. This age-dependent loss is associated with reduced intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions, which is caused by impaired upregulation and decreased expression of connexin 43. Regulatory functions can be corrected, even in T cells isolated from aged, diabetic mice, by a synergistic activity of retinoic acid, TGF-β, and IL-2, which enhance connexin 43 and Foxp3 expression in T(regs) and restore the ability of conventional CD4(+) T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate peripherally derived T(regs). Moreover, we demonstrate that suppression mediated by T(regs) from diabetic mice is enhanced by a novel reagent, which facilitates gap junction aggregation. In summary, our report identifies gap junction-mediated intercellular communication as an important component of the T(reg) suppression mechanism compromised in NOD mice and suggests how T(reg) mediated immune regulation can be improved. PMID:25911751

  13. Aging mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yoshiko; Kuro-o, Makoto; Ishikawa, Fuyuki

    2000-01-01

    Aging (senescence) has long been a difficult issue to be experimentally analyzed because of stochastic processes, which contrast with the programmed events during early development. However, we have recently started to learn the molecular mechanisms that control aging. Studies of the mutant mouse, klotho, showing premature aging, raise a possibility that mammals have an “anti-aging hormone.” A decrease of cell proliferation ability caused by the telomeres is also t...

  14. Aging increases microglial proliferation, delays cell migration, and decreases cortical neurogenesis after focal cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Moraga, Ana; Pradillo, Jesús M; García-Culebras, Alicia; Palma-Tortosa, Sara; Ballesteros, Ivan; Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Moro, María A.; Lizasoain, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Aging is not just a risk factor of stroke, but it has also been associated with poor recovery. It is known that stroke-induced neurogenesis is reduced but maintained in the aged brain. However, there is no consensus on how neurogenesis is affected after stroke in aged animals. Our objective is to determine the role of aging on the process of neurogenesis after stroke. Methods We have studied neurogenesis by analyzing proliferation, migration, and formation of new neurons, as well a...

  15. Discrimination of degradation processes in lithium-ion cells based on the sensitivity of aging indicators towards capacity loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Marius; Guenther, Clemens; Kasper, Michael; Petzl, Mathias; Danzer, Michael A.

    2015-06-01

    In typical applications of lithium-ion batteries, the cells are monitored in order to guarantee a safe and stable performance during operation. Therefore, methods to characterize aging processes in a non-destructive way are desired. In this work, internal resistance and power capability calculated from time domain measurements are investigated. Test cells (NMC/graphite) are cycled at the lowest temperature in the operational range (T = 0 °C) as well as under high temperature conditions (T = 50 °C) in order to characterize the aging behavior for extreme temperatures. For both internal resistance and power capability, an analysis of their sensitivities towards capacity loss induced by high or low temperature cycling is carried out. It is demonstrated how discrepancies in sensitivity can be used for the diagnostic purpose of discriminating between low and high temperature aging effects during cycling. A baseline diagnostic approach for constant operating conditions and an extended algorithm for varying conditions are presented. The extended approach is based on the evaluation of cell trajectories in a state space with capacity loss and polarization parameters. It provides measures which characterize the aging behavior and allow to identify the dominant aging mechanism.

  16. Stochastic modeling indicates that aging and somatic evolution in the hematopoetic system are driven by non-cell-autonomous processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhok, Andrii I; Salstrom, Jennifer L; DeGregori, James

    2014-12-01

    Age-dependent tissue decline and increased cancer incidence are widely accepted to be rate-limited by the accumulation of somatic mutations over time. Current models of carcinogenesis are dominated by the assumption that oncogenic mutations have defined advantageous fitness effects on recipient stem and progenitor cells, promoting and rate-limiting somatic evolution. However, this assumption is markedly discrepant with evolutionary theory, whereby fitness is a dynamic property of a phenotype imposed upon and widely modulated by environment. We computationally modeled dynamic microenvironment-dependent fitness alterations in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the Sprengel-Liebig system known to govern evolution at the population level. Our model for the first time integrates real data on age-dependent dynamics of HSC division rates, pool size, and accumulation of genetic changes and demonstrates that somatic evolution is not rate-limited by the occurrence of mutations, but instead results from aged microenvironment-driven alterations in the selective/fitness value of previously accumulated genetic changes. Our results are also consistent with evolutionary models of aging and thus oppose both somatic mutation-centric paradigms of carcinogenesis and tissue functional decline. In total, we demonstrate that aging directly promotes HSC fitness decline and somatic evolution via non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. PMID:25564763

  17. Age-Dependent Decrease in Chaperone Activity Impairs MANF Expression, Leading to Purkinje Cell Degeneration in Inducible SCA17 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su; Huang, Shanshan; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Although protein-misfolding-mediated neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to aging, how aging contributes to selective neurodegeneration remains unclear. We established spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17) knockin mice that inducibly express one copy of mutant TATA box binding protein (TBP) at different ages by tamoxifen-mediated Cre recombination. We find that more mutant TBP accumulates in older mouse and that this accumulation correlates with age-related decreases in Hsc70 and chaperone activity. Consistently, older SCA17 mice experienced earlier neurological symptom onset and more severe Purkinje cell degeneration. Mutant TBP shows decreased association with XBP1s, resulting in the reduced transcription of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), which is enriched in Purkinje cells. Expression of Hsc70 improves the TBP-XBP1s interaction and MANF transcription, and overexpression of MANF ameliorates mutant TBP-mediated Purkinje cell degeneration via protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent signaling. These findings suggest that the age-related decline in chaperone activity affects polyglutamine protein function that is important for the viability of specific types of neurons. PMID:24462098

  18. Relationship between sensitivity to ultraviolet light and budding in yeast cells of different culture ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subpopulations of yeast cells, consisting of cells of different sizes and different percentages of budding cells, were prepared by centrifugation through sucrose solutions with linear density gradients of cultures at different phases of the growth cycle. Ultraviolet survival of these cells was determined by colony counting, and the survival rate was compared with the cells' respiratory rates. Individual budding cells and interdivisional cells, and also mother cells and daughter cells derived from irradiated budding cells, were isolated by the micromanipulation technique. The number of divisions in each cell was measured during a 21-hr incubation period immediately after irradiation. In the population in the logarithmic phase consisting of homogeneous cells of middle size, no difference in uv sensitivity was observed between mother cells and daughter cells, irrespective of mutual adhesion. Budding cell resistance was observed in the population in the transitional phase; this was due to the lesser uv sensitivity of daughter cells in the fresh medium. In the stationary phase, daughter cells were rather more sensitive than mother cells or interdivisional cells, so there was little difference in uv sensitivity between budding cells and interdivisional cells

  19. Competence Classification of Cumulus and Granulosa Cell Transcriptome in Embryos Matched by Morphology and Female Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Lea Langhoff; Andersen, Claus Yding; Nyboe-Andersen, Anders; Ziebe, Søren; Winther, Ole; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective By focussing on differences in the mural granulosa cell (MGC) and cumulus cell (CC) transcriptomes from follicles resulting in competent (live birth) and non-competent (no pregnancy) oocytes the study aims on defining a competence classifier expression profile in the two cellular compartments. Design: A case-control study. Setting: University based facilities for clinical services and research. Patients: MGC and CC samples from 60 women undergoing IVF treatment following the long GnRH-agonist protocol were collected. Samples from 16 oocytes where live birth was achieved and 16 age- and embryo morphology matched incompetent oocytes were included in the study. Methods MGC and CC were isolated immediately after oocyte retrieval. From the 16 competent and non-competent follicles, mRNA was extracted and expression profile generated on the Human Gene 1.0 ST Affymetrix array. Live birth prediction analysis using machine learning algorithms (support vector machines) with performance estimation by leave-one-out cross validation and independent validation on an external data set. Results We defined a signature of 30 genes expressed in CC predictive of live birth. This live birth prediction model had an accuracy of 81%, a sensitivity of 0.83, a specificity of 0.80, a positive predictive value of 0.77, and a negative predictive value of 0.86. Receiver operating characteristic analysis found an area under the curve of 0.86, significantly greater than random chance. When applied on 3 external data sets with the end-point outcome measure of blastocyst formation, the signature resulted in 62%, 75% and 88% accuracy, respectively. The genes in the classifier are primarily connected to apoptosis and involvement in formation of extracellular matrix. We were not able to define a robust MGC classifier signature that could classify live birth with accuracy above random chance level. Conclusion We have developed a cumulus cell classifier, which showed a promising performance on

  20. Aging alters bone-fat reciprocity by shifting in vivo mesenchymal precursor cell fate towards an adipogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lakshman; Brennan, Tracy A; Russell, Elizabeth; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chen, Qijun; Brad Johnson, F; Pignolo, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) play an important role in bone homeostasis. Age-related changes occur in bone resulting in a decrease in bone density and a relative increase in adipocity. Although in vitro studies suggest the existence of an age-related lineage switch between osteogenic and adipogenic fates, stem cell and microenvironmental contributions to this process have not been elucidated in vivo. In order to study the effects of MPC and microenvironmental aging on functional engraftment and lineage switching, transplantation studies were performed under non-myeloablative conditions in old recipients, with donor MPCs derived from young and old green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Robust engraftment by young MPCs or their progeny was observed in the marrow, bone-lining region and in the matrix of young recipients; however, significantly lower engraftment was seen at the same sites in old recipients transplanted with old MPCs. Differentiation of transplanted MPCs strongly favored adipogenesis over osteogenesis in old recipients irrespective of MPC donor age, suggesting that microenvironmental alterations that occur with in vivo aging are predominately responsible for MPC lineage switching. These data indicate that aging alters bone-fat reciprocity and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors towards an adipogenic fate. PMID:26805026

  1. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  2. Combined negative effect of donor age and time in culture on the reprogramming efficiency into induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ras Trokovic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC by the forced expression of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Pluripotent reprogramming appears as a slow and inefficient process because of genetic and epigenetic barriers of somatic cells. In this report, we have extended previous observations concerning donor age and passage number of human fibroblasts as critical determinants of the efficiency of iPSC induction. Human fibroblasts from 11 different donors of variable age were reprogrammed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Although all fibroblasts gave rise to iPSC colonies, the reprogramming efficiency correlated negatively and declined rapidly with increasing donor age. In addition, the late passage fibroblasts gave less reprogrammed colonies than the early passage cell counterparts, a finding associated with the cellular senescence-induced upregulation of p21. Knockdown of p21 restored iPSC generation even in long-term passaged fibroblasts of an old donor, highlighting the central role of the p53/p21 pathway in cellular senescence induced by both donor age and culture time.

  3. Therapeutics with SPION-labeled stem cells for the main diseases related to brain aging: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarim LT

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Larissa T Alvarim,1,3,* Leopoldo P Nucci,2,* Javier B Mamani,1 Luciana C Marti,1 Marina F Aguiar,1,2 Helio R Silva,1,3 Gisele S Silva,1 Mariana P Nucci-da-Silva,4 Elaine A DelBel,5,6 Lionel F Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal de São Paulo, UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Departamento de Radiologia, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; 5Universidade de São Paulo-Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 6NAPNA- Núcleo de Apoio a Pesquisa em Neurociências Aplicadas, São Paulo, Brazil*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The increase in clinical trials assessing the efficacy of cell therapy for structural and functional regeneration of the nervous system in diseases related to the aging brain is well known. However, the results are inconclusive as to the best cell type to be used or the best methodology for the homing of these stem cells. This systematic review analyzed published data on SPION (superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled stem cells as a therapy for brain diseases, such as ischemic stroke, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dementia. This review highlights the therapeutic role of stem cells in reversing the aging process and the pathophysiology of brain aging, as well as emphasizing nanotechnology as an important tool to monitor stem cell migration in affected regions of the brain.Keywords: iron oxide, dementia, stem cell, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, sclerosis disease, brain aging

  4. Content of stromal precursor cells in heterotopic transplants of bone marrow in CBA mice of various ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Kuralesova, A I; Shuklina, E Yu; Nesterenko, V G

    2002-02-01

    Efficiency of colony formation of stromal precursor cells in cultured bone marrow transplants from old (24 month) CBA mice implanted to young (2-month-old) mice almost 3-fold surpassed that in cultured transplants implanted to old recipients. The content of nucleated cells in bone marrow transplants from senescence accelerated mice SAMP increased more than 2-fold, if SAMR mice with normal aging rate were used as the recipients instead of SAMP mice. Bone marrow taken from old and young CBA mice endured the same number of transplantations if the recipient mice were of the same age (5 month). It was concluded that stromal tissue considerably changes with age and is under strict control of the body. PMID:12432868

  5. Impact of HIV on CD8+ T cell CD57 expression is distinct from that of CMV and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available Chronic antigenic stimulation by cytomegalovirus (CMV is thought to increase "immunosenesence" of aging, characterized by accumulation of terminally differentiated CD28- CD8+ T cells and increased CD57, a marker of proliferative history. Whether chronic HIV infection causes similar effects is currently unclear.We compared markers of CD8+ T cell differentiation (e.g., CD28, CD27, CCR7, CD45RA and CD57 expression on CD28- CD8+ T cells in healthy HIV-uninfected adults with and without CMV infection and in both untreated and antiretroviral therapy (ART-suppressed HIV-infected adults with asymptomatic CMV infection.Compared to HIV-uninfected adults without CMV (n=12, those with asymptomatic CMV infection (n=31 had a higher proportion of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 (P=0.005. Older age was also associated with greater proportions of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 (rho: 0.47, P=0.007. In contrast, untreated HIV-infected CMV+ participants (n=55 had much lower proportions of CD28- CD8+ cells expressing CD57 than HIV-uninfected CMV+ participants (P<0.0001 and were enriched for less well-differentiated CD28- transitional memory (TTR CD8+ T cells (P<0.0001. Chronically HIV-infected adults maintaining ART-mediated viral suppression (n=96 had higher proportions of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 than untreated patients (P<0.0001, but continued to have significantly lower levels than HIV-uninfected controls (P=0.001. Among 45 HIV-infected individuals initiating their first ART regimen, the proportion of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 declined (P<0.0001, which correlated with a decline in percent of transitional memory CD8+ T cells, and appeared to be largely explained by a decline in CD28-CD57- CD8+ T cell counts rather than an expansion of CD28-CD57+ CD8+ T cell counts.Unlike CMV and aging, which are associated with terminal differentiation and proliferation of effector memory CD8+ T cells, HIV inhibits this process, expanding less well

  6. Cholecystokinin expression in the β-cell leads to increased β-cell area in aged mice and protects from streptozotocin-induced diabetes and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Jeremy A; Kibbe, Carly R; Baan, Mieke; Sirinvaravong, Sirinart; Umhoefer, Heidi M; Engler, Kimberly A; Meske, Louise M; Sacotte, Kaitlyn A; Erhardt, Daniel P; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-11-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide hormone produced in the gut and brain with beneficial effects on digestion, satiety, and insulin secretion. CCK is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells, but only in models of obesity and insulin resistance. Whole body deletion of CCK in obese mice leads to reduced β-cell mass expansion and increased apoptosis. We hypothesized that islet-derived CCK is important in protection from β-cell apoptosis. To determine the specific role of β-cell-derived CCK in β-cell mass dynamics, we generated a transgenic mouse that expresses CCK in the β-cell in the lean state (MIP-CCK). Although this transgene contains the human growth hormone minigene, we saw no expression of human growth hormone protein in transgenic islets. We examined the ability of MIP-CCK mice to maintain β-cell mass when subjected to apoptotic stress, with advanced age, and after streptozotocin treatment. Aged MIP-CCK mice have increased β-cell area. MIP-CCK mice are resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes and exhibit reduced β-cell apoptosis. Directed CCK overexpression in cultured β-cells also protects from cytokine-induced apoptosis. We have identified an important new paracrine/autocrine effect of CCK in protection of β-cells from apoptotic stress. Understanding the role of β-cell CCK adds to the emerging knowledge of classic gut peptides in intraislet signaling. CCK receptor agonists are being investigated as therapeutics for obesity and diabetes. While these agonists clearly have beneficial effects on body weight and insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, they may also directly protect β-cells from apoptosis. PMID:26394663

  7. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mezghani Sana; Hammami Amira; Amri Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiatio...

  8. Calendar ageing analysis of a LiFePO4/graphite cell with dynamic model validations: Towards realistic lifetime predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasketa-Zabala, E.; Gandiaga, I.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Villarreal, I.

    2014-12-01

    The present study aims at establishing a methodology for a comprehensive calendar ageing predictive model development, focusing specially on validation procedures. A LFP-based Li-ion cell performance degradation was analysed under different temperature and SOC storage conditions. Five static calendar ageing conditions were used for understanding the ageing trends and modelling the dominant ageing phenomena (SEI growth and the resulting loss of active lithium). The validation process included an additional test under other constant operating conditions (static validation) and other four tests under non-constant impact factors operating schemes within the same experiment (dynamic validation), in response to battery stress conditions in real applications. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental results as the residuals are always below 1% for experiments run for 300-650 days. The model is able to predict dynamic behaviour close to real operating conditions and the level of accuracy corresponds to a root-mean-square error of 0.93%.

  9. Effects of thermal aging on thermo-mechanical behavior of a glass sealant for solid oxide cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdoli, Hamid; Alizadeh, Parvin; Boccaccini, Dino;

    2014-01-01

    , modulus of elasticity, and high-temperature deformation of the glass. The balance between the viscosity and viscous flowing behavior was explored for the non-aged and aged glasses as it is essential to have a successful sealing for a SOC stack. The results reveal a temperature dependence of Young......Thermo-mechanical properties of a silicate based glass and its potential use for sealing application in intermediate temperature solid oxide cell (SOC) are presented in this paper. Effects of thermal aging are discussed on structural and microstructural evolution, thermal expansion, viscosity......'s modulus in which a transition between a slow softening (elastic) regime and a rapid softening one was observed. Crystallization induced by thermal aging led to higher creep resistance, but lower capability of crack healing when inspected by electron microscopy. However, potential of stress relaxation in...

  10. Yeast Replicator: A High-Throughput Multiplexed Microfluidics Platform for Automated Measurements of Single-Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism for replicative aging studies; however, conventional lifespan measurement platforms have several limitations. Here, we present a microfluidics platform that facilitates simultaneous lifespan and gene expression measurements of aging yeast cells. Our multiplexed high-throughput platform offers the capability to perform independent lifespan experiments using different yeast strains or growth media. Using this platform in minimal media environments containing glucose, we measured the full lifespan of individual yeast cells in wild-type and canonical gene deletion backgrounds. Compared to glucose, in galactose we observed a 16.8% decrease in replicative lifespan accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in single-cell oxidative stress levels reported by PSOD1-mCherry. Using PGAL1-YFP to measure the activity of the bistable galactose network, we saw that OFF and ON cells are similar in their lifespan. Our work shows that aging cells are committed to a single phenotypic state throughout their lifespan.

  11. Cell culture condition-dependent impact of AGE-rich food extracts on kinase activation and cell survival on human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Norbert; Weissenberg, Kristian; Somoza, Veronika; Ruhs, Stefanie; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Simm, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction. Effects of food extracts are often initially analysed in cellular test systems and it is not clear how different cell culture conditions might influence the results. Therefore, we compared the effects of two models for AGE-rich food, bread crust and coffee extract (CE) on WI-38 human lung fibroblasts under different cell culture conditions (sub-confluent versus confluent cells, with and without serum). WI-38 cells responded to coffee and bread crust extract (BCE) with a rapid phosphorylation of PKB (AKT), p42/44 MAPK (ERK 1/2) and p38 MAPK, strongly depending on culture conditions. BCE resulted in increased cell numbers, whereas CE appeared to be cytotoxic. When cell numbers under all culture conditions and treatments were correlated with kinase phosphorylation, the relation between phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-AKT represented a good, cell culture condition-independent predictor of cell survival. PMID:24111510

  12. Age-related transcription levels of KU70, MGST1 and BIK in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, Wolf C; Czibere, Akos; Jäger, Marcus; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Libermann, Towia A; Gattermann, Norbert; Haas, Rainer; Aivado, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    Despite the known longevity of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSC), numerous functional impairments of these cells can be observed in an age-dependent manner. However, the molecular alterations associated with aging of HSC are largely unknown. Therefore, we scrutinized gene expression patterns of HSC from newborn, young and old healthy donors. CD34+ HSC were isolated via immuno-magnetic separation and evaluated by FACS analysis. We performed cDNA macroarray analyses on a first set of CD34+ samples (n=13). We found the genes encoding KU-antigen 70 kD (KU70), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1) and BCL2-interacting killer (BIK) to possess age-related mRNA expression levels. KU70 is a DNA repair gene and part of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex. Its expression was negatively correlated with donor age showing highest expression levels in newborn, 2.6-fold lower levels in young and 6.3-fold lower levels in old donors. The transcription levels of MGST1, a gene protecting against oxidative stress, progressively increased with age. Expression was lowest in newborn, 2.6-fold higher in young and 4.3-fold higher in old donors. BIK is a proapoptotic gene and its expression was positively correlated with donor age: lowest in newborn, 1.8-fold higher in young and 4.1-fold higher in old donors. These findings were confirmed with an independent, second set of CD34+ samples (n=16) by means of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Elucidation of age-dependent molecular alterations in healthy HSC facilitate a better understanding of functional impairments in hematopoiesis and may become valuable for anti-aging drug development and the emerging field of regenerative medicine. PMID:17714764

  13. Establishment of Age- and Gender-Specific Reference Ranges for 36 Routine and 57 Cell Population Data Items in a New Automated Blood Cell Analyzer, Sysmex XN-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Han, Min-Young; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo

    2016-01-01

    We established age- and gender-specific reference ranges for the 36 routine complete blood cell (CBC) and 57 cell population data (CPD) items in the Sysmex XN-2000 (Sysmex, Japan). In total, 280 peripheral blood samples were obtained from an equal number of healthy adults. Values for 36 routine items and 57 CPD items were obtained for each sample, and the results were categorized into six subgroups (N>39 in each subgroup) according to patient age (20-40, 41-60, and >60 yr) and gender (male and female), and compared with respect to age and gender differences. The majority of data items (22 of 36 routine CBC items and 44 of 57 CPD items) exhibited significant differences (P≤0.05) in their results with respect to age or gender, and several red cell-, lymphocyte-, and platelet-related data tended to decrease in women or older adults. These results provide a basis for establishing age- and gender-specific reference ranges for routine and CPD items in Sysmex XN-2000. Furthermore, these reference ranges could be used to determine clinical significance for new items of Sysmex XN-2000 in further studies. PMID:26915613

  14. Age and the means of bypassing stasis are determinants of the intrinsic subtypes of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on molecular features, breast cancers are grouped into intrinsic subtypes that have different prognoses and therapeutic response profiles. With increasing age, breast cancer incidence increases, with hormone receptor-positive and other luminal-like subtype tumors comprising a majority of cases. It is not known at what stage of tumor progression subtype specification occurs, nor how the process of aging affects the intrinsic subtype. We examined subtype markers in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines established following exposure of primary cultured cell strains to a two-step immortalization protocol that targets the two main barriers to immortality: stasis (stress-associated senescence and replicative senescence. Cell lines derived from epithelial cells obtained from non-tumorous pre- and post-menopausal breast surgery tissues were compared. Additionally, comparisons were made between lines generated using two different genetic interventions to bypass stasis: transduction of either an shRNA that down-regulated p16INK4A, or overexpressed constitutive active cyclin D1/CDK2. In all cases, the replicative senescence barrier was bypassed by transduction of c-Myc. Cells from all resulting immortal lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and gene expression analyses of lineage-specific markers were used to categorize the intrinsic subtypes of the immortalized lines. Bypassing stasis with p16 shRNA in young strains generated cell lines that were invariably basal-like, but the lines examined from older strains exhibited some luminal features such as keratin 19 and estrogen receptor expression. Overexpression of cyclin D1/CDK2 resulted in keratin 19 positive, luminal-like cell lines from both young and old strains, and the lines examined from older strains exhibited estrogen receptor expression. Thus age and the method of bypassing stasis are independent determinants of subtype in immortalized human

  15. Age and the means of bypassing stasis influence the intrinsic subtype of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan K; Garbe, James C; Vrba, Lukas; Miyano, Masaru; Futscher, Bernard W; Stampfer, Martha R; LaBarge, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Based on molecular features, breast cancers are grouped into intrinsic subtypes that have different prognoses and therapeutic response profiles. With increasing age, breast cancer incidence increases, with hormone receptor-positive and other luminal-like subtype tumors comprising a majority of cases. It is not known at what stage of tumor progression subtype specification occurs, nor how the process of aging affects the intrinsic subtype. We examined subtype markers in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines established following exposure of primary cultured cell strains to a two-step immortalization protocol that targets the two main barriers to immortality: stasis (stress-associated senescence) and replicative senescence. Cell lines derived from epithelial cells obtained from non-tumorous pre- and post-menopausal breast surgery tissues were compared. Additionally, comparisons were made between lines generated using two different genetic interventions to bypass stasis: transduction of either an shRNA that down-regulated p16(INK4A), or overexpressed constitutive active cyclin D1/CDK2. In all cases, the replicative senescence barrier was bypassed by transduction of c-Myc. Cells from all resulting immortal lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and gene expression analyses of lineage-specific markers were used to categorize the intrinsic subtypes of the immortalized lines. Bypassing stasis with p16 shRNA in young strains generated cell lines that were invariably basal-like, but the lines examined from older strains exhibited some luminal features such as keratin 19 and estrogen receptor expression. Overexpression of cyclin D1/CDK2 resulted in keratin 19 positive, luminal-like cell lines from both young and old strains, and the lines examined from older strains exhibited estrogen receptor expression. Thus age and the method of bypassing stasis independently influence the subtype of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

  16. Choice of Cell Source in Cell-Based Therapies for Retinal Damage due to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar John

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex disorder that affects primarily the macula involving the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE but also to a certain extent the photoreceptor layer and the retinal neurons. Cell transplantation is a promising option for AMD and clinical trials are underway using different cell types. Methods. We hypothesize that instead of focusing on a particular cell source for concurrent regeneration of all the retinal layers and also to prevent exhaustive research on an array of cell sources for regeneration of each layer, the choice should depend on, precisely, which layer is damaged. Results. Thus, for a damage limited to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE layer, the choice we suggest would be RPE cells. When the damage extends to rods and cones, the choice would be bone marrow stem cells and when retinal neurons are involved, relatively immature stem cell populations with an inherent capacity to yield neuronal lineage such as hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells can be tried. Conclusion. This short review will prove to be a valuable guideline for those working on cell therapy for AMD to plan their future directions of research and therapy for this condition.

  17. Stimulation of cell proliferation by glutathione monoethyl ester in aged bone marrow stromal cells is associated with the assistance of TERT gene expression and telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminizadeh, Najmeh; Tiraihi, Taki; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Taheri, Taher

    2016-08-01

    The proliferation and differentiation potential of aged bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are significantly reduced. In order to improve the performance of the aged BMSCs, these cells were treated with 2 mM glutathione monoethyl ester (GSH-MEE) for 24 h. Proliferation rate, telomerase activity, telomere length, and differentiation to cholinergic neuron-like cells (CNLCs) were observed to increase. Though, the expression level of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene increased, but CTC1 and TEN1 genes from Ctc1-Stn1-Ten1 complex encoding proteins with regulatory function significantly decreased. Trypan blue exclusion assay was used to analyze the proliferation and, while telomere length, its several related gene expressions, and telomerase activity were measured using the real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, respectively. CNLCs differentiation potential was evaluated by estimating the percentage of choline acetyltransferase immunereactive cells.The results suggested that GSH-MEE could improve aged rat BMSC properties and would be of potential benefit for enhancing the performance of aged people's BMSCs. PMID:27251157

  18. Differences in phenotype and gene expression of prostate stromal cells from patients of varying ages and their influence on tumour formation by prostate epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chuan Wang; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Hai Wang; Bang-Min Han; Fu-Jun Zhao; Guang-Hui Zhu; Yan Hong; Shu-Jie Xia

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer (PCa) is an age-related disease,and the stromal microenvironment plays an important role in prostatic malignant progression.However,the differences in prostate stromal cells present in young and old tissue are still obscure.We established primary cultured stromal cells from normal prostatic peripheral zone (PZ) of donors of varying ages and found that cultured stromal cells from old donors (PZ-old) were more enlarged and polygonal than those from young donors (PZ-young).Furthermore,based on immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analysis,the components of stromal cells changed from a majority of fibroblasts to a mixture of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts with increasing donor age.Using a three-dimensional in vitro culture system,we found that PZ-old stromal cells could enhance the proliferation,migration and invasion of cocultured benign BPH-1 and PC-3 cells.Using an in vivo tissue recombination system,we also found that PZ-old stromal cells are more effective than PZ-young cells in promoting tumour formation by BPH-1 cells of high passage(>100) and PC-3 cells.To probe the possible mechanism of these effects,we performed cDNA microarray analysis and profiled 509 upregulated genes and 188 downregulated genes in PZ-old cells.Among the changed genes,we found genes coding for a subset of paracrine factors that are capable of influencing adjacent epithelial cells; these include hepatocyte growth factor (HGF),fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5),insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2),insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4),IGFBP5 and matrix metal lopeptidase 1 (MMP1).Changes in the expression of these genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR),Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.Overall,our findings indicate that stromal cells from prostate PZ of old donors are more active than similar cells from young donors in promoting the malignant process of adjacent epithelial cells

  19. Effect of age on neocortical brain cells in 90+ year old human females--a cell counting study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Jacobsen, Jette Stub; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people are living past the age of 100 years, but little is known about what differentiates centenarians from the rest of the population. In this study, brains from female subjects in 3 different age groups, 65-75 years (n = 8), 76-85 years (n = 8), and 94-105 years (n = 7)...

  20. B Cell Production of Both OPG and RANKL is Significantly Increased in Aged Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan; Terauchi, Masakazu; Vikulina, Tatyana; Roser-Page, Susanne; Weitzmann, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor for osteoclastic bone loss and bone fracture. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is the key effector cytokine for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption, and is moderated by its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG). The development of an inflammatory environment during aging leads to increased bone resorption and loss of bone mineral density (BMD). Interestingly, animal and clinical studies show that OPG is actually increased in aging but fails to fully compensa...

  1. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  2. Suppression of IGF-I signals in neural stem cells enhances neurogenesis and olfactory function during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Zayna; Aïd, Saba; Berry, Hugues; Holzenberger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Downregulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathways prolongs lifespan in various species, including mammals. Still, the cellular mechanisms by which IGF signaling controls the aging trajectory of individual organs are largely unknown. Here, we asked whether suppression of IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) in adult stem cells preserves long-term cell replacement, and whether this may prevent age-related functional decline in a regenerating tissue. Using neurogenesis as a paradigm, we showed that conditional knockout of IGF-1R specifically in adult neural stem cells (NSC) maintained youthful characteristics of olfactory bulb neurogenesis within an aging brain. We found that blocking IGF-I signaling in neural precursors increased cumulative neuroblast production and enhanced neuronal integration into the olfactory bulb. This in turn resulted in neuro-anatomical changes that improved olfactory function. Interestingly, mutants also displayed long-term alterations in energy metabolism, possibly related to IGF-1R deletion in NSCs throughout lifespan. We explored Akt and ERK signaling cascades and revealed differential regulation downstream of IGF-1R, with Akt phosphorylation preferentially decreased in IGF-1R(-/-) NSCs within the niche, and ERK pathway downregulated in differentiated neurons of the OB. These challenging experimental results were sustained by data from mathematical modeling, predicting that diminished stimulation of growth is indeed optimal for tissue aging. Thus, inhibiting growth and longevity gene IGF-1R in adult NSCs induced a gain-of-function phenotype during aging, marked by optimized management of cell renewal, and enhanced olfactory sensory function. PMID:26219530

  3. Aging Impairs the Ability of Conventional Dendritic Cells to Cross-Prime CD8+ T Cells upon Stimulation with a TLR7 Ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía R Zacca

    Full Text Available The aging process is accompanied by altered immune system functioning and an increased risk of infection. Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen-presenting cells that play a key role in both adaptive and innate immunity, but how aging affects DCs and their influence on immunity has not been thoroughly established. Here we examined the function of conventional DCs (cDCs in old mice after TLR7 stimulation, focusing on their ability to cross-prime CD8+ T cells. Using polyU, a synthetic ssRNA analog, as TLR7 ligand and OVA as an antigen (Ag model, we found that cDCs from old mice have a poor ability to stimulate a CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxic response. cDCs from old mice exhibit alterations in Ag-processing machinery and TLR7 activation. Remarkably, CD8α+ cDCs from old mice have an impaired ability to activate naïve CD8+ T cells and, moreover, a lower capacity to mature and to process exogenous Ag. Taken together, our results suggest that immunosenescence impacts cDC function, affecting the activation of naïve CD8+ T cells and the generation of effector cytotoxic T cells.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, M John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L; Thomas, Mark V; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N; Gonzalez, Octavio A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, M. John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L.; Thomas, Mark V.; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N.; Gonzalez, Octavio A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  6. Time Course of Age-dependent Changes in Intraocular Pressure and Retinal Ganglion Cell Death in DBA/2J Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiulan Zhang; Mei Zhang; Marcel Y. Avila; Jian Ge; Alan M. Laties

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To characterizes the progression of glaucoma in DBA/2J mice by measuring intraocular pressure (IOP) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) numbers in mice of various ages.Methods: A quantitative assessment of the pathophysiology of the DBA/2J mice was performed and the C57/BL6 mice was used as control. The IOP was measured by the servo-null micropipette system; the regional patterns of the loss of RGCs were determined by cell count of retrogradely-labeled RGCs.Results: The baseline IOP for DBA/2J mice at 7 weeks was (16.6 ± 1.2)mm Hg.Then IOP increased extend to 12 months, with the peak of (25.2 ± 1.2)mm Hg at 6 months of age. Retinal ganglion cell numbers did not decrease relative to control until 12 months of age (P=0.006), when the loss was proportionally higher in peripheral regions (P<0.05).Conclusion: The elevation in IOP precedes the loss of RGCs by several months.RGCs cell loss occurs particularly in peripheral regions of the retina. These findings expand our understanding of the changes in DBA/2J mice and provide information for experiments design when they are used as a glaucoma model for future studies of RGCs degeneration in glaucoma.

  7. Decreased SIRT3 in aged human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Shao, Yong; Ma, Chong-Yi; Chen, Wei; Sun, Lu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yang; Fu, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Kai-Yu; Jia, Zhi-Bo; Xie, Bao-Dong; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Li, Ren-Ke; Tian, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized to mitochondria and linked to lifespan extension in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. As aged cells have less regenerative capacity and are more susceptible to oxidative stress, we investigated the effect of ageing on SIRT3 levels and its correlation with antioxidant enzyme activities. Here, we show that severe oxidative stress reduces SIRT3 levels in young human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Overexpression of SIRT3 improved hMSCs resistance to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. By activating manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT), SIRT3 protects hMSCs from apoptosis under stress. SIRT3 expression, levels of MnSOD and CAT, as well as cell survival showed little difference in old versus young hMSCs under normal growth conditions, whereas older cells had a significantly reduced capacity to withstand oxidative stress compared to their younger counterparts. Expression of the short 28 kD SIRT3 isoform was higher, while the long 44 kD isoform expression was lower in young myocardial tissues compared with older ones. These results suggest that the active short isoform of SIRT3 protects hMSCs from oxidative injury by increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of this short isoform decreases in cardiac tissue during ageing, leading to a reduced capacity for the heart to withstand oxidative stress. PMID:25210848

  8. Test Series 4: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Exide EMP-13 battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the fourth in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of a 27-year old lead-antimony Exide EMP-13 cells from the recently decommissioned Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; and multicell (five-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of nine electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations. None of the nine cells failed during the actual seismic tests when a range of ZPAs up to 1.5 g was imposed. Subsequent discharge capacity tests of five of the cells showed, however, that none of the cells could deliver the accepted standard of 80% of their rated electrical capacity for 3 hours. In fact, none of the 5 cells could deliver more than a 33% capacity. Two of the seismically tested cells and one untested, low capacity cell were disassembled for examination and metallurgical analyses. The inspection showed the cells to be in poor condition. The negative plates in the vicinity of the bus connections were extremely weak, the positive buses were corroded and brittle, negative and positive active material utilization was extremely uneven, and corrosion products littered the cells

  9. Environmental stress, ageing and glial cell senescence : a novel mechanistic link to Parkinson's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinta, S J; Lieu, C A; Demaria, M; Laberge, R-M; Campisi, J; Andersen, J K

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. For example, in Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic environmental exposure to certain toxins has been linked to the age-related development of neuropathology. Neuronal damage i

  10. Effect of PKC-β Signaling Pathway on Expression of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in Different Cell Models in Response to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisienny C. T. Rempel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are compounds classified as uremic toxins in patients with chronic kidney disease that have several pro-inflammatory effects and are implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases. To explore the mechanisms of AGEs–endothelium interactions through the receptor for AGEs (RAGE in the PKC-β pathway, we evaluated the production of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in human endothelial cells (HUVECs, monocytes, and a coculture of both. AGEs were prepared by albumin glycation and characterized by absorbance and electrophoresis. The effect of AGEs on cell viability was assessed with an MTT assay. The cells were also treated with AGEs with and without a PKC-β inhibitor. MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in the cell supernatants were estimated by ELISA, and RAGE was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. AGEs exposure did not affect cell viability, but AGEs induced RAGE, MCP-1, and VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs. When HUVECs or monocytes were incubated with AGEs and a PKC-β inhibitor, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 expression significantly decreased. However, in the coculture, exposure to AGEs and a PKC-β inhibitor produced no significant effect. This study demonstrates, in vitro, the regulatory mechanisms involved in MCP-1 production in three cellular models and VCAM-1 production in HUVECs, and thus mimics the endothelial dysfunction caused by AGEs in early atherosclerosis. Such mechanisms could serve as therapeutic targets to reduce the harmful effects of AGEs in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  11. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-γ, it increased the PPAR-γ transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-γ activation.

  12. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume 830-0011 (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume 830-0011 (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2009-07-24

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-{gamma}, it increased the PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-{gamma} activation.

  13. C/EBPα is dispensable for the ontogeny of PD-1+ CD4+ memory T cells but restricts their expansion in an age-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrie, Ida Christine; Ohlsson, Ewa; Nielsen, Olaf;

    2014-01-01

    Ageing and cancer is often associated with altered T cell distributions and this phenomenon has been suggested to be the main driver in the development of immunosenescence. Memory phenotype PD-1+ CD4+ T cells accumulate with age and during leukemic development, and they might account for the atte...

  14. Abrogation of Age-Induced MicroRNA-195 Rejuvenates the Senescent Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Reactivating Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Motoi; Kim, Ha Won; Matsu-ura, Kaoru; Wang, Yi-Gang; Xu, Meifeng; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported that a novel subpopulation of young mesenchymal stem cells (YMSCs) existed in old bone marrow, which possessed high antiaging properties as well as excellent efficacy for cardiac repair. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators in post-transcriptional gene expression programs, and however, it is unknown whether miRNAs directly control stem cell senescence. Here we present the first evidence that miR-195 overexpressed in old MSCs (OMSCs) induces stem cell senescence deteriorating their regenerative ability by directly deactivating telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert), and abrogation of miR-195 can reverse stem cell aging. MiRNAs profiling analysis in YMSCs and OMSCs by microarray showed that miR-140, miR-146a/b, and miR-195 were significantly upregulated in OMSCs, which led us to hypothesize that these are age-induced miRNAs involved in stem cell senescence. Of these miRNAs, we found miR-195 directly targeted 3'-untranslated region of Tert gene by computational target prediction analysis and luciferase assay, and knockdown of miR-195 significantly increased Tert expression in OMSCs. Strikingly, miR-195 inhibition significantly induced telomere relengthening in OMSCs along with reduced expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, silencing miR-195 in OMSCs by transfection of miR-195 inhibitor significantly restored antiaging factors expression including Tert and Sirt1 as well as phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO1. Notably, abrogation of miR-195 markedly restored proliferative abilities in OMSCs. Transplantation of OMSCs with knocked out miR-195 reduced infarction size and improved LV function. In conclusion, rejuvenation of aged stem cells by miR-195 inhibition would be a promising autologous therapeutic strategy for cardiac repair in the elderly patients. PMID:26390028

  15. Thermal aging stability of infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell electrode microstructures: A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Ni, Meng; Yan, Mufu; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured electrodes are widely used for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells, due to their remarkably high activity. However, the industrial applications of the infiltrated electrodes are hindered by the durability issues, such as the microstructure stability against thermal aging. Few strategies are available to overcome this challenge due to the limited knowledge about the coarsening kinetics of the infiltrated electrodes and how the potentially important factors affect the stability. In this work, the generic thermal aging kinetics of the three-dimensional microstructures of the infiltrate electrodes is investigated by a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation model considering surface diffusion mechanism. Effects of temperature, infiltration loading, wettability, and electrode configuration are studied and the key geometric parameters are calculated such as the infiltrate particle size, the total and percolated quantities of three-phase boundary length and infiltrate surface area, and the tortuosity factor of infiltrate network. Through parametric study, several strategies to improve the thermal aging stability are proposed.

  16. Granular cell tumor of the clitoris in the pediatric age. A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Lucchetti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumors (GCTs or Abrikossoff's tumors are rare, soft tissue tumors of neural origin with a generally benign behavior. They can occur anywhere in the body (with up to 7%–16% situated in the vulva and can occur in patients of any age, being considered rare in children. A 6 year-old girl presented with a clitoral mass, surgically removed. Pathology revealed GCT of clitoris. To our knowledge this is the first case of GCT of the clitoris in the pediatric (prepubertal age group reported in English literature. Although rare in pediatric age, GCT has to be suspected as a cause of vulvar mass. Surgical treatment and clinical follow-up must consider the possibility of recurrence, multiple location and malignancy with time.

  17. Growth and Potential Damage of Human Bone-Derived Cells on Fresh and Aged Fullerene C60 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Vacik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenes are nanoparticles composed of carbon atoms arranged in a spherical hollow cage-like structure. Numerous studies have evaluated the therapeutic potential of fullerene derivates against oxidative stress-associated conditions, including the prevention or treatment of arthritis. On the other hand, fullerenes are not only able to quench, but also to generate harmful reactive oxygen species. The reactivity of fullerenes may change in time due to the oxidation and polymerization of fullerenes in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of fullerene films (from one week to one year and the proliferation, viability and metabolic activity of human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS. We also monitored potential membrane and DNA damage and morphological changes of the cells. After seven days of cultivation, we did not observe any cytotoxic morphological changes, such as enlarged cells or cytosolic vacuole formation. Furthermore, there was no increased level of DNA damage. The increasing age of the fullerene films did not cause enhancement of cytotoxicity. On the contrary, it resulted in an improvement in the properties of these materials, which are more suitable for cell cultivation. Therefore, fullerene films could be considered as a promising material with potential use as a bioactive coating of cell carriers for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Peripubertal ovariectomy provides long-term postponement of age-associated decline in thymic cellularity and T-cell output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to reassess the recently challenged role of ovarian hormones in age-associated thymic involution. For this purpose, in eleven-month-old peripubertally ovariectomized (Ox rats we analyzed: i thymic weight and cellularity, ii size of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP thymocyte population, which is believed to correlate to the thymic capacity to export mature T cells, iii number of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs, and iv number of peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. It was found that both thymic weight and cellularity were greater in Ox than in control rats. In addition, in Ox rats the numbers of DP thymocytes and both CD4+ and CD8+ RTEs, were significantly greater than in controls, indicating a more efficient generation of T cells in these rats. Furthermore, these findings, coupled with data indicating that the number of neither CD4+ nor CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes was affected by ovariectomy, most likely, suggest a reduced homeostatic proliferation of memory cells in Ox rats, i.e. broadening of TCR peripheral repertoire without changes in the overall number of T cells leading to a more efficient response to newly encountered antigens. The results indicate that the ovarian steroid deprivation from early peripubertal period leads to a long lasting postponement/alleviation of age-associated decline in T-cell mediated immune response.

  19. Aging effect on the efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-In; Jeon, Chan-Wook

    2015-11-01

    The electrical performance of two different types of Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS solar cells were measured repeatedly over a period of several months. One of the solar cells initially showed cross-over in its current-voltage curve, whereas the other showed normal p- n diode operation. The efficiencies of both devices were found to improve with aging due to the significantly increased doping density in the space charge region. The long-term aging effect was found to be irreversible and disappeared after thermal annealing of the device at relatively low temperature. The increase in doping density was attributed to Cu electromigration under the influence of a built-in electric field existing in the space charge region of the absorbers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Skin aging:

    OpenAIRE

    Puizina-Ivić, Neira

    2008-01-01

    There are two main processes that induce skin aging: intrinsic and extrinsic. A stochastic process that implies random cell damage as a result of mutations during metabolic processes due to the production of free radicals is also implicated. Extrinsic aging is caused by environmental factors such as sun exposure, air pollution, smoking, alcohol abuse, and poor nutrition. Intrinsicaging reflects the genetic background and depends on time. Various expressions of intrinsic aging include smooth, ...

  1. 5-azacytidine improves the osteogenic differentiation potential of aged human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells by DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xueying; Ehnert, Sabrina; Culmes, Mihaela; Bachmann, Anastasia; Seeliger, Claudine; Schyschka, Lilianna; Wang, Zhiyong; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Stöckle, Ulrich; De Sousa, Paul A; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Nussler, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic value of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs) for bone regeneration is critically discussed. A possible reason for reduced osteogenic potential may be an age-related deterioration of the Ad-MSCs. In long term in vitro culture, epigenomic changes in DNA methylation are known to cause gene silencing, affecting stem cell growth as well as the differentiation potential. In this study, we observed an age-related decline in proliferation of primary human Ad-MSCs. Decreased Nanog, Oct4 and Lin28A and increased Sox2 gene-expression was accompanied by an impaired osteogenic differentiation potential of Ad-MSCs isolated from old donors (>60 a) as compared to Ad-MSCs isolated from younger donors (<45 a). 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC) and 5-methylcytonsine (5 mC) distribution as well as TET gene expression were evaluated to assess the evidence of active DNA demethylation. We observed a decrease of 5 hmC in Ad-MSCs from older donors. Incubation of these cells with 5-Azacytidine induced proliferation and improved the osteogenic differentiation potential in these cells. The increase in AP activity and matrix mineralization was associated with an increased presence of 5 hmC as well as with an increased TET2 and TET3 gene expression. Our data show, for the first time, a decrease of DNA hydroxymethylation in Ad-MSCs which correlates with donor-age and that treatment with 5-Azacytidine provides an approach which could be used to rejuvenate Ad-MSCs from aged donors. PMID:24603866

  2. 5-azacytidine improves the osteogenic differentiation potential of aged human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells by DNA demethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Yan

    Full Text Available The therapeutic value of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs for bone regeneration is critically discussed. A possible reason for reduced osteogenic potential may be an age-related deterioration of the Ad-MSCs. In long term in vitro culture, epigenomic changes in DNA methylation are known to cause gene silencing, affecting stem cell growth as well as the differentiation potential. In this study, we observed an age-related decline in proliferation of primary human Ad-MSCs. Decreased Nanog, Oct4 and Lin28A and increased Sox2 gene-expression was accompanied by an impaired osteogenic differentiation potential of Ad-MSCs isolated from old donors (>60 a as compared to Ad-MSCs isolated from younger donors (<45 a. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC and 5-methylcytonsine (5 mC distribution as well as TET gene expression were evaluated to assess the evidence of active DNA demethylation. We observed a decrease of 5 hmC in Ad-MSCs from older donors. Incubation of these cells with 5-Azacytidine induced proliferation and improved the osteogenic differentiation potential in these cells. The increase in AP activity and matrix mineralization was associated with an increased presence of 5 hmC as well as with an increased TET2 and TET3 gene expression. Our data show, for the first time, a decrease of DNA hydroxymethylation in Ad-MSCs which correlates with donor-age and that treatment with 5-Azacytidine provides an approach which could be used to rejuvenate Ad-MSCs from aged donors.

  3. 5-Azacytidine Improves the Osteogenic Differentiation Potential of Aged Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by DNA Demethylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmes, Mihaela; Bachmann, Anastasia; Seeliger, Claudine; Schyschka, Lilianna; Wang, Zhiyong; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Stöckle, Ulrich; De Sousa, Paul A.; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic value of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs) for bone regeneration is critically discussed. A possible reason for reduced osteogenic potential may be an age-related deterioration of the Ad-MSCs. In long term in vitro culture, epigenomic changes in DNA methylation are known to cause gene silencing, affecting stem cell growth as well as the differentiation potential. In this study, we observed an age-related decline in proliferation of primary human Ad-MSCs. Decreased Nanog, Oct4 and Lin28A and increased Sox2 gene-expression was accompanied by an impaired osteogenic differentiation potential of Ad-MSCs isolated from old donors (>60 a) as compared to Ad-MSCs isolated from younger donors (<45 a). 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC) and 5-methylcytonsine (5 mC) distribution as well as TET gene expression were evaluated to assess the evidence of active DNA demethylation. We observed a decrease of 5 hmC in Ad-MSCs from older donors. Incubation of these cells with 5-Azacytidine induced proliferation and improved the osteogenic differentiation potential in these cells. The increase in AP activity and matrix mineralization was associated with an increased presence of 5 hmC as well as with an increased TET2 and TET3 gene expression. Our data show, for the first time, a decrease of DNA hydroxymethylation in Ad-MSCs which correlates with donor-age and that treatment with 5-Azacytidine provides an approach which could be used to rejuvenate Ad-MSCs from aged donors. PMID:24603866

  4. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives...

  5. Ageing is associated with a decline in peripheral blood CD56bright NK cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak Laxman; Chan Y L Tracey; Khan Naeem; Chidrawar Shivani M; Moss Paul AH

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that lack CD3 and express variable levels of CD16, CD56 and CD57. In recent years NK cells have been categorised into two major groups based on the level of CD56 expression. This phenotypic classification correlates with functional activity as CD56bright NK cells are the major cytokine producing subset whereas CD56dim NK cells exhibit greater cytotoxic activity. Previous studies have revealed a reduction in total NK cell ...

  6. Morphological, molecular and functional differences of adult bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells isolated from rats of different ages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovani, Cristina [Blond McIndoe Laboratories, School of Biomedicine, The University of Manchester, Room 3,106 Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, Academic Health Science Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences (United Kingdom); Department of Integrative Medical Biology and Surgical and Perioperative Science, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Raimondo, Stefania [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche, University of Turin (Italy); Haneef, Maryam S. [Blond McIndoe Laboratories, School of Biomedicine, The University of Manchester, Room 3,106 Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, Academic Health Science Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences (United Kingdom); Geuna, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche, University of Turin (Italy); Terenghi, Giorgio [Blond McIndoe Laboratories, School of Biomedicine, The University of Manchester, Room 3,106 Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, Academic Health Science Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences (United Kingdom); Shawcross, Susan G., E-mail: sue.shawcross@manchester.ac.uk [Blond McIndoe Laboratories, School of Biomedicine, The University of Manchester, Room 3,106 Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, Academic Health Science Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences (United Kingdom); Wiberg, Mikael [Department of Integrative Medical Biology and Surgical and Perioperative Science, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Umea University, Umea (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells have self-renewal and multiple differentiation potentials, and play important roles in regenerative medicine. However, their use may be limited by senescence or age of the donor, leading to changes in stem cell functionality. We investigated morphological, molecular and functional differences between bone marrow-derived (MSC) and adipose-derived (ASC) stem cells isolated from neonatal, young and old rats compared to Schwann cells from the same animals. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, proliferation assays, western blotting and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate expression of senescence markers. Undifferentiated and differentiated ASC and MSC from animals of different ages expressed Notch-2 at similar levels; protein-38 and protein-53 were present in all groups of cells with a trend towards increased levels in cells from older animals compared to those from neonatal and young rats. Following co-culture with adult neuronal cells, dMSC and dASC from animals of all ages elicited robust neurite outgrowth. Mitotracker{sup Registered-Sign} staining was consistent with ultrastructural changes seen in the mitochondria of cells from old rats, indicative of senescence. In conclusion, this study showed that although the cells from aged animals expressed markers of senescence, aged MSC and ASC differentiated into SC-like cells still retain potential to support axon regeneration. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aged MSC and ASC differentiated into Schwann-like cells support axon regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 expression does not appreciably influence the biology of Schwann or stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch 2 expression was similar in cells derived from animals of different ages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation rates of dMSC varied little over time or with animal age.

  7. Morphological, molecular and functional differences of adult bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells isolated from rats of different ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells have self-renewal and multiple differentiation potentials, and play important roles in regenerative medicine. However, their use may be limited by senescence or age of the donor, leading to changes in stem cell functionality. We investigated morphological, molecular and functional differences between bone marrow-derived (MSC) and adipose-derived (ASC) stem cells isolated from neonatal, young and old rats compared to Schwann cells from the same animals. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, proliferation assays, western blotting and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate expression of senescence markers. Undifferentiated and differentiated ASC and MSC from animals of different ages expressed Notch-2 at similar levels; protein-38 and protein-53 were present in all groups of cells with a trend towards increased levels in cells from older animals compared to those from neonatal and young rats. Following co-culture with adult neuronal cells, dMSC and dASC from animals of all ages elicited robust neurite outgrowth. Mitotracker® staining was consistent with ultrastructural changes seen in the mitochondria of cells from old rats, indicative of senescence. In conclusion, this study showed that although the cells from aged animals expressed markers of senescence, aged MSC and ASC differentiated into SC-like cells still retain potential to support axon regeneration. -- Highlights: ► Aged MSC and ASC differentiated into Schwann-like cells support axon regeneration. ► p53 expression does not appreciably influence the biology of Schwann or stem cells. ► Notch 2 expression was similar in cells derived from animals of different ages. ► Proliferation rates of dMSC varied little over time or with animal age.

  8. Mitochondria in Ageing and Diseases: The Super Trouper of the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Coppotelli; Ross, Jaime M.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of knowledge regarding how mitochondrial dysfunction may translate into ageing and disease phenotypes, as well as how it is modulated by genetic and lifestyle factors.[...

  9. Differential responses of Trans-Resveratrol on proliferation of neural progenitor cells and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Pandey, Ankita; Jahan, Sadaf; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Dipak; Srivastava, Akriti; Singh, Shripriya; Rajpurohit, Chetan Singh; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Pant, Aditya Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of literature has supported the potential benefits of Resveratrol (RV) as a life-extending as well as an anticancer compound. However, these two functional discrepancies resulted at different concentration ranges. Likewise, the role of Resveratrol on adult neurogenesis still remains controversial and less understood despite its well documented health benefits. To gather insight into the biological effects of RV on neurogenesis, we evaluated the possible effects of the compound on the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture, and in the hippocampus of aged rats. Resveratrol exerted biphasic effects on NPCs; low concentrations (10 μM) stimulated cell proliferation mediated by increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 kinases, whereas high concentrations (>20 μM) exhibited inhibitory effects. Administration of Resveratrol (20 mg/kg body weight) to adult rats significantly increased the number of newly generated cells in the hippocampus, with upregulation of p-CREB and SIRT1 proteins implicated in neuronal survival and lifespan extension respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that Resveratrol exhibits dose dependent discrepancies and at a lower concentration can have a positive impact on the proliferation, survival of NPCs and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis implicating its potential as a candidate for restorative therapies against age related disorders. PMID:27334554

  10. Oestradiol and IGF1 reduce cell loss after global ischemia in middle-aged female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Traub, Michael L.; De Butte-Smith, Maxine; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Etgen, Anne M.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the ability of oestradiol and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) to afford neuroprotection against ischemia-induced neuronal death in young female and male rodents is well established, the impact of IGF1 in middle-aged animals is largely unknown. This study assessed the efficacy of oestradiol and IGF1 in reducing neuronal death after transient global ischemia in middle-aged female rats following an 8-week hormone withdrawal. Rats were ovariohysterectomized (OVX) and implanted 8 weeks...

  11. The changing understanding of ageing. Part 2: Body composition, metabolism and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis F. Lawler

    2011-01-01

    This second of three discussions about ageing biology and diseases continues at the level of the organism, examining the relationship among body composition, late life and diseases. One view of significant age-related mass loss in humans suggests that anabolic failure is associated with various precipitating factors that may share anorexia in common. Lean mass decline with even partial anorexia should alert clinicians to monitor patients for emergence of otherwise subclinical disease. Weight ...

  12. Homeostatic imbalance between apoptosis and cell renewal in the liver of premature aging Xpd mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Yoon Park

    Full Text Available Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Xpd(TTD mice, harboring defects in nucleotide excision repair and transcription due to a mutation in the Xpd gene (R722W, display severe symptoms of premature aging but have a reduced incidence of cancer. To gain further insight into the molecular basis of the mutant-specific manifestation of age-related phenotypes, we used comparative microarray analysis of young and old female livers to discover gene expression signatures distinguishing Xpd(TTD mice from their age-matched wild type controls. We found a transcription signature of increased apoptosis in the Xpd(TTD mice, which was confirmed by in situ immunohistochemical analysis and found to be accompanied by increased proliferation. However, apoptosis rate exceeded the rate of proliferation, resulting in homeostatic imbalance. Interestingly, a metabolic response signature was observed involving decreased energy metabolism and reduced IGF-1 signaling, a major modulator of life span. We conclude that while the increased apoptotic response to endogenous DNA damage contributes to the accelerated aging phenotypes and the reduced cancer incidence observed in the Xpd(TTD mice, the signature of reduced energy metabolism is likely to reflect a compensatory adjustment to limit the increased genotoxic stress in these mutants. These results support a general model for premature aging in DNA repair deficient mice based on cellular responses to DNA damage that impair normal tissue homeostasis.

  13. Age determines the prognostic role of the cancer stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieog J Sven D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare the expression and the prognostic effect of the breast cancer stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1 in young and elderly breast cancer patients. Methods The study population (N = 574 consisted of all early breast cancer patients primarily treated with surgery in our center between 1985 and 1994. Median follow-up was 17.9 years (range: 0.1 to 23.5. Tissue microarray slides were immunohistochemically stained for ALDH1 expression and quantified by two independent observers who were blinded to clinical outcome. Assessment of the prognostic effect of ALDH1 expression was stratified according to age and systemic treatment. Results Complete lack of expression of ALDH1 was found in 40% of tumors. With increasing age more tumors showed complete absence of ALDH1 expression (P 65 years, ALDH1 status was not associated with any clinical outcome. Conversely, in patients aged P = .021 and relative survival (relative excess risks of death = 2.36 (95% CI, 1.22 to 3.68; P = .016. Ten-year relative survival risk was 57% in ALDH1-positive patients compared to 83% in ALDH1-negative patients. Conclusion ALDH1 expression and its prognostic effect are age-dependent. Our results support the hypothesis that breast cancer biology is different in elderly patients compared to their younger counterparts and emphasizes the importance of taking into consideration age-specific interactions in breast cancer research.

  14. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors. PMID:3840716

  15. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  16. Premature aging phenotype in mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors: region specific changes in layer V pyramidal cell morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Konsolaki

    2014-02-01

    accelerated cognitive aging, based on structural alterations and spatial learning deficits only evident in old animals (Zoli et al., 1999; Picciotto and Zoli, 2002. However a systematic comparison of neuronal microanatomy in adult and aged animals has not been done to date. In the present study adult (4-6months and old (22-24months WT and β2-/- animals were used to examine the respective contributions of age and genotype on neuronal structure. We focus on layer V pyramidal cells because: (i they constitute the main cortical output (DeFelipe and Farinas, 1992; Romand et al., 2011 (ii they are often reported to exhibit increased sensitivity to aging (Nakamura et al., 1985; Baskys et al., 1990; De Brabander et al., 1998; Turner et al., 2005; (iii they possess a high density of cholinergic terminals (Houser et al., 1985 and, in contrast to layer III cells, they exhibit strong presynaptic modulation by β2 containing nAChRs and are activated by nAChR stimulation (Poorthuis et al., 2013; hence they would be a sensitive readout for the lack of high affinity nicotinic receptors. Furthermore, to examine the degree of age-related vulnerability across distinct cortical areas we used YFP-H mice that express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in specific populations of thick-tufted layer V pyramidal neurons across the cortical mantle (Feng et al., 2000; Sugino et al., 2006. We used mutants crossed with YFP+ mice in order to have the same labeled populations in both genotypes, and we examined cells in primary visual cortex (V1 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, two cortical regions that receive similar cholinergic inputs (McKinney et al., 1983; Jacobowitz and Creed, 1983; Everitt and Robbins, 1997; Laplante et al., 2005 but have distinct cytoarchitecture and functional role (Elston et al., 2005. We ask whether neurons in old β2-/- mice exhibit greater structural deficits than aged-matched controls and whether deficits appear in old age or are already present earlier. Brains from 21 adult

  17. Evidence for a mitotic clock in human hematopoietic stem cells: loss of telomeric DNA with age.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaziri, H; Dragowska, W; Allsopp, R C; Thomas, T E; Harley, C B; Lansdorp, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    The proliferative life-span of the stem cells that sustain hematopoiesis throughout life is not known. It has been proposed that the sequential loss of telomeric DNA from the ends of human chromosomes with each somatic cell division eventually reaches a critical point that triggers cellular senescence. We now show that candidate human stem cells with a CD34+CD38lo phenotype that were purified from adult bone marrow have shorter telomeres than cells from fetal liver or umbilical cord blood. We...

  18. Index of CD34+ Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Bone Marrow of Spinal Cord Injury Patients of Different Age Groups: A Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vidyasagar Devaprasad Dedeepiya; Yegneswara Yellury Rao; Gosalakkal A. Jayakrishnan; Parthiban, Jutty K. B. C.; Subramani Baskar; Sadananda Rao Manjunath; Rajappa Senthilkumar; Abraham, Samuel J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Recent evidence of safety and efficacy of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNC) in spinal cord injury makes the Bone Marrow (BM) CD34+ percentage and the BMMNC count gain significance. The indices of BM that change with body mass index and aging in general population have been reported but seldom in Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) victims, whose parameters of relevance differ from general population. Herein, we report the indices of BMMNC in SCI victims. Materials and Methods. BMMNCs o...

  19. EFFECT OF THE COW AGE GROUP AND LACTATION STAGE ON THE COUNT OF SOMATIC CELLS IN COW MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata SITKOWSKA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to evaluate the effect of the cow age group and lactation stage on the count of somatic cells in cow milk. The analysis was made based on the breeding documentation of 11359 test yields from cows representing twelve herds in the Kujawy and Pomorze Province. All the animals researched calved for the first time in 2001. The numerical data were verified statistically with the analysis of variance following GLM procedure, considering the effect of the herd, father, sampling month, cow groups (primiparas, multiparas, lactation stage at which the sample was taken. The effect of these factors on basic milking yield and the content of somatic cells were mostly highly significant. It was observed that depending on the milk use length in cows during lactation, the content of somatic cells in milk increased, and the yield of milk, fat and protein decreased.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Internal Resistance of Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery Cells during Calendar Ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina;

    2013-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are increasingly considered for a wide area of applications because of their superior characteristics in comparisons to other energy storage technologies. However, at present, Lithium-ion batteries are expensive storage devices and consequently their ageing behavior must be...... known in order to estimate their economic viability in different application. The ageing behavior of Lithium-ion batteries is described by the fade of their discharge capacity and by the decrease of their power capability. The capability of a Lithium-ion battery to deliver or to absorb a certain power...... is directly related to its internal resistance. This work aims to investigate the dependency of the internal resistance of lithium-ion batteries on the storage temperature and on the storage time. For this purpose, accelerated ageing calendar lifetime tests were carried out over a period of one year...

  1. Frequency of M-cadherin-stained satellite cells declines in human muscles during aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajko, Š.; Kubínová, Lucie; Cvetko, E.; Kreft, M.; Wernig, A.; Eržen, I.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2004), s. 179-185. ISSN 0022-1554 Grant ostatní: European programme(XE) QLKG-1999-02034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : satellite cells * skeletal muscle * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.513, year: 2004

  2. Identification of growth phases and influencing factors in cultivations with AGE1.HN cells using set-based methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Borchers

    Full Text Available Production of bio-pharmaceuticals in cell culture, such as mammalian cells, is challenging. Mathematical models can provide support to the analysis, optimization, and the operation of production processes. In particular, unstructured models are suited for these purposes, since they can be tailored to particular process conditions. To this end, growth phases and the most relevant factors influencing cell growth and product formation have to be identified. Due to noisy and erroneous experimental data, unknown kinetic parameters, and the large number of combinations of influencing factors, currently there are only limited structured approaches to tackle these issues. We outline a structured set-based approach to identify different growth phases and the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. To this end, measurement uncertainties are taken explicitly into account to bound the time-dependent specific growth rate based on the observed increase of the cell concentration. Based on the bounds on the specific growth rate, we can identify qualitatively different growth phases and (in-validate hypotheses on the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. We apply the approach to a mammalian suspension cell line (AGE1.HN. We show that growth in batch culture can be divided into two main growth phases. The initial phase is characterized by exponential growth dynamics, which can be described consistently by a relatively simple unstructured and segregated model. The subsequent phase is characterized by a decrease in the specific growth rate, which, as shown, results from substrate limitation and the pH of the medium. An extended model is provided which describes the observed dynamics of cell growth and main metabolites, and the corresponding kinetic parameters as well as their confidence intervals are estimated. The study is complemented by an uncertainty and outlier analysis. Overall, we demonstrate utility of set-based methods for analyzing cell

  3. Identification of growth phases and influencing factors in cultivations with AGE1.HN cells using set-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Steffen; Freund, Susann; Rath, Alexander; Streif, Stefan; Reichl, Udo; Findeisen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Production of bio-pharmaceuticals in cell culture, such as mammalian cells, is challenging. Mathematical models can provide support to the analysis, optimization, and the operation of production processes. In particular, unstructured models are suited for these purposes, since they can be tailored to particular process conditions. To this end, growth phases and the most relevant factors influencing cell growth and product formation have to be identified. Due to noisy and erroneous experimental data, unknown kinetic parameters, and the large number of combinations of influencing factors, currently there are only limited structured approaches to tackle these issues. We outline a structured set-based approach to identify different growth phases and the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. To this end, measurement uncertainties are taken explicitly into account to bound the time-dependent specific growth rate based on the observed increase of the cell concentration. Based on the bounds on the specific growth rate, we can identify qualitatively different growth phases and (in-)validate hypotheses on the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. We apply the approach to a mammalian suspension cell line (AGE1.HN). We show that growth in batch culture can be divided into two main growth phases. The initial phase is characterized by exponential growth dynamics, which can be described consistently by a relatively simple unstructured and segregated model. The subsequent phase is characterized by a decrease in the specific growth rate, which, as shown, results from substrate limitation and the pH of the medium. An extended model is provided which describes the observed dynamics of cell growth and main metabolites, and the corresponding kinetic parameters as well as their confidence intervals are estimated. The study is complemented by an uncertainty and outlier analysis. Overall, we demonstrate utility of set-based methods for analyzing cell growth and

  4. Collagenase-resistant collagen promotes mouse aging and vascular cell senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Vafaie, Faran; Yin, Hao; O’Neil, Caroline; Nong, Zengxuan; Watson, Alanna; Arpino, John-Michael; Chu, Michael W.A.; Wayne Holdsworth, David; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils become resistant to cleavage over time. We hypothesized that resistance to type I collagen proteolysis not only marks biological aging but also drives it. To test this, we followed mice with a targeted mutation (Col1a1r/r ) that yields collagenase-resistant type I collagen. Compared with wild-type littermates, Col1a1r/r mice had a shortened lifespan and developed features of premature aging including kyphosis, weight loss, decreased bone mineral density, and hypertension. We ...

  5. Oral squamous cell carcinomas in age distinct population: A comparison of p53 immunoexpression

    OpenAIRE

    Akhilesh Chandra; Anil Singh; Bastian Thattil Sebastian; Archana Agnihotri; Ruchita Bali; Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The study aimed to assess the diffused expression of p53 protein in patients with OSCC and its association with age at diagnosis (using 50 years as a cut point). Study Design: Ten normal oral mucosa and sixty OSCC lesions from age-distinct patient populations were immunohistochemically analyzed for the expression of p53 protein. Results: In OSCC cases, 31 out of total 60 cases (51.67%) showed positive expression for p53 protein and it was more common in older study group (56.67%) ...

  6. Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Combination with Substrate for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Britney O; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the western world, which severely decreases the quality of life in the patients and places an economic burden on their families and society. The disease is caused by the dysfunction of a specialized cell layer in the back of the eye called the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Pluripotent stem cells can provide an unlimited source of RPE, and laboratories around the world are investigating their potential as therapies for AMD. To ensure the precise delivery of functional RPE to the diseased site, some groups are developing a therapy composed of mature RPE monolayers on a supportive scaffold for transplantation as an alternative to injecting a single-cell suspension. This review summarizes methods of generating RPE from pluripotent stem cells, compares biodegradable and biostable materials as scaffolds, and describes the specific combination of human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE on Parylene-C membranes, which is scheduled to begin clinical trials in the United Sates in 2016. Stem cell-derived RPE monolayers on scaffolds hold great promise for the treatment of AMD and other retinal diseases. PMID:26889704

  7. The total number of Leydig and Sertoli cells in the testes of men across various age groups - a stereological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter M; Seierøe, Karina; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in testes from male subjects across the human lifespan, using an optimized stereological method for cell-counting. In comparison with many other organs, estimation of the total cell numbers in the testes is...... particularly sensitive to methodological problems. Therefore, using the optical fractionator technique and a sampling design specifically optimized for human testes, we estimated the total number of Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes from 26 post mortem male subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years. The...... mean unilateral total number of Sertoli cells was 407 × 10(6) [range: 86 × 10(6) to 665 × 10(6) , coefficient of variation (CV) = 0.33], and the mean unilateral total number of Leydig cells was 99 × 10(6) (range: 47 × 10(6) to 245 × 10(6) , CV = 0.48). There was a significant decline in the number of...

  8. VITAMIN E (E) SUPPLEMENTATION REVERSES THE AGE ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE ADAPTOR PROTEIN LAT IN CD4+ T CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cell proliferation and interleukin (IL-2) production declines with age. Engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by antigen, known as the immune synapse (IS), in coordination with phosphorylation of key signaling proteins, leads to increased IL-2 synthesis and T cell proliferation. Defects in effec...

  9. Vitamin E (E) supplementation reverses the age associated decline in phosphorylation of the adaptor protein LAT in CD4+ T cells of old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cell proliferation and interleukin (IL-2) production declines with age. Engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) by antigen (Ag), known as the immune synapse (IS), in coordination with phosphorylation of key signaling proteins, leads to increased IL-2 synthesis and T cell proliferation. Defects in ...

  10. H2O2-mediated DNA damage and repair in the brain cells in the aging rats detected by comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suming ZhangM.D., Ph.D; Zongchao Han, M.D.; Siyu Fang, M.D.; Ruan Yang, M.D; Wei Wang, M.D., Ph. D

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To identify the relation between DNA damage susceptibility/ DNA repair capability and aging process after insults, an observation of H2O2_induced DNA damage and the kinetics of DNA repair in senescent murine brain cells with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE/Comet assay) was made. Methods: The dissociated brain cells harvested in the area of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal gang]ion from 3-month (n=10), 8-month (n=8) and 26-month (n=5) old rats were respectively treated with H2O2 in gradient doses for 10 min, or without H2O2 as controls. The cells embedded in agarose were lysed, helix-untied, electrophoresed, stained with a fluorescence DNA binding stain, viewed under a fluorescence microscope. Individual image was optically recorded. The frequency of the tailed cells and the grade of tails wereused to analyze single strand breaks of DNA and injury intensity. Results: By the cell and DNA image like comets, a linear increase was noticed in vulnerability of DNA both to H2O2 doses and to the age. Regarding the damaged region of the brain, the cortex cells were more vulnerable to the insult than the hippocampus/basal ganglionic cells. Whatever aging or not the cells were, the maximum of ratio of DNA repair was only within 1 hour during the incubation for 0.5-4 hours after the insults. Furthermore, the more aging, the less ratio of DNA repair of sick cells. Conclusion: The DNA damagesusceptibility and the DNA repair capability of individual cells, whatever its age is, can be detected by this brain cell injury model. Comet assay is a sensitive way to find out DNA damage and repair of the cells. It should be more difficult for the cells to cope with an acute and excessive than with a persistent, chronic and mild DNA damage which is more related to an accumulating injury, the aging.

  11. Combining Magnetic Sorting of Mother Cells and Fluctuation Tests to Analyze Genome Instability During Mitotic Cell Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Melissa N.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For i...

  12. Effects of Bak Foong Pills and Menoease Pills on white blood cell distribution in old age female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Alice Lok Sze; Gou, Yu Lin; Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the effects of Bak Foong Pills (BFP) and the new BFP-derived post-menopause formula, Menoease Pills (MBFP), on the distribution of peripheral white blood cells (WBC) between BFP/MBFP-treated and non-treated rats. Eighteen months old female SD rats were used to mimic post-menopausal and old age animal models. The percentage distribution of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes were measured using flow cytometry with and without treatments of BFP or MBFP. Results showed that WBC distribution in old age rats were significantly different from that of adult rats, suggesting that as the animal aged, their WBC distributions were altered. Old age rats were observed to have much lower percentages of lymphocytes, but higher percentages of granulocytes when compared to the adult rats, indicating possible attenuated immunity. Following treatment with BFP or MBFP, WBC populations were found to be redistributed back into the ranges observed in adult animals. Furthermore, MBFP, was found to alter WBC distribution in a dose-dependent manner. When compared to estrogen (E(2)), a well documented regulator of immune function, results showed that MBFP was able to show significantly greater effects on WBC redistribution compared to E(2). However, in ovariectomised (ovx) old age rats, neither MBFP nor E(2) treated groups showed any changes in WBC redistribution. These results indicate that MBFP may share similarities to E(2). Indeed, the effect of MBFP and E(2) seems to require intact ovaries, which are believed to be necessary for the modulation of WBC distributions and immune functions. Overall, our findings suggest that BFP and MBFP may be able to regulate WBC population in old age female rats, and thus, indicate their potential role on improving the attenuated immunity evident in post-menopausal and elderly women. PMID:14646184

  13. Abundance of phosphorylated Apis mellifera CREB in the honeybee's mushroom body inner compact cells varies with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Katrin B; Heufelder, Karin; Kersting, Isabella; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-04-15

    Hymenopteran eusociality has been proposed to be associated with the activity of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein). The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a eusocial insect displaying a pronounced age-dependent division of labor. In honeybee brains, CREB-dependent genes are regulated in an age-dependent manner, indicating that there might be a role for neuronal honeybee CREB (Apis mellifera CREB, or AmCREB) in the bee's division of labor. In this study, we further explore this hypothesis by asking where in the honeybee brain AmCREB-dependent processes might take place and whether they vary with age in these brain regions. CREB is activated following phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue. An increase of phosphorylated CREB is therefore regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, we here examine the localization of phosphorylated AmCREB (pAmCREB) in the brain and its age-dependent variability. We report prominent pAmCREB staining in a subpopulation of intrinsic neurons of the mushroom bodies. In these neurons, the inner compact cells (IC), pAmCREB is located in the nuclei, axons, and dendrites. In the central bee brain, the IC somata and their dendritic region, we observed an age-dependent increase of pAmCREB. Our results demonstrate the IC to be candidate neurons involved in age-dependent division of labor. We hypothesize that the IC display a high level of CREB-dependent transcription that might be related to neuronal and behavioral plasticity underlying a bee's foraging behavior. PMID:26355639

  14. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise;

    2015-01-01

    18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency was...

  15. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all...

  16. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kuehn, Sven; Kuster, Niels [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland); Christopoulou, Maria [National Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Str., 15780 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: christ@itis.ethz.ch

    2010-04-07

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  17. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  18. Age-related changes in expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1993-01-01

    ). Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA was analyzed by Northern blotting using DNA oligonucleotide probes designed for demonstration of certain exons or exon combinations. Total NCAM mRNA was downregulated during postnatal development followed by upregulation in the aging heart. Three major NCAM mRNA classes of 6.......7, 5.2 and 2.9 kb were expressed in newborn heart in approximately equal proportions. At all other ages, the mRNAs of 5.2 and 2.9 kb were more predominant than the 6.7 kb mRNA. During postnatal development and aging, expression of exon VASE was selectively downregulated in the 6.7 kb NCAM mRNA class......, whereas it was clearly detectable in NCAM mRNA classes of 5.2 and 2.9 kb. Insertion of exons a and AAG between exons 12 and 13 was more pronounced in the 5.2 and 2.9 kb NCAM mRNAs than in the 6.7 kb mRNA at all ages. Insertions at the 12/13 junctions decreased in the 6.7 kb mRNA as compared to the 5.2 and...

  19. Aged Muscle Demonstrates Fiber-Type Adaptations in Response to Mechanical Overload, in the Absence of Myofiber Hypertrophy, Independent of Satellite Cell Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonah D; Fry, Christopher S; Mula, Jyothi; Kirby, Tyler J; Jackson, Janna R; Liu, Fujun; Yang, Lin; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-04-01

    Although sarcopenia, age-associated loss of muscle mass and strength, is neither accelerated nor exacerbated by depletion of muscle stem cells, satellite cells, we hypothesized that adaptation in sarcopenic muscle would be compromised. To test this hypothesis, we depleted satellite cells with tamoxifen treatment of Pax7(CreER)-DTA mice at 4 months of age, and 20 months later subjected the plantaris muscle to 2 weeks of mechanical overload. We found myofiber hypertrophy was impaired in aged mice regardless of satellite cell content. Even in the absence of growth, vehicle-treated mice mounted a regenerative response, not apparent in tamoxifen-treated mice. Further, myonuclear accretion occurred in the absence of growth, which was prevented by satellite cell depletion, demonstrating that myonuclear addition is insufficient to drive myofiber hypertrophy. Satellite cell depletion increased extracellular matrix content of aged muscle that was exacerbated by overload, potentially limiting myofiber growth. These results support the idea that satellite cells regulate the muscle environment, and that their loss during aging may contribute to fibrosis, particularly during periods of remodeling. Overload induced a fiber-type composition improvement, independent of satellite cells, suggesting that aged muscle is very responsive to exercise-induced enhancement in oxidative capacity, even with an impaired hypertrophic response. PMID:25878030

  20. Aging Effects Modelling For The New Generation Of GAAS/GE Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanteperdix, G.; Baur, C.; Taylor, S.; Meusel, M.; Guillaume, L.; Theroude, C.

    2011-10-01

    From 2006 to 2009, an ESA funded study has been carried out to characterize and model the European AZUR 3G28 III-V multi-junction solar cells with respect to its radiation response. This paper aims at presenting the study and its organization as well as summarizing its main achievements. The behavior of the component cells is presented and compared with the corresponding multiple junctions cell. A second part explains how relative damage coefficients have been extracted and how they are applied to spacecraft analysis, including quantitative estimates of uncertainties, comments on howe they could relate to design margins and comparison with approach based on 'non ionizing energy loss'.

  1. Seismic testing of naturally aged exide EMP-13 station battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sample of 27 year old lead acid storage batteries from the Shippingport Nuclear Power Station (Shippingport, PA) were tested on a shaker table. The intensity of the shaker tests reached the full capacity of the table. There were no sudden changes in output voltage for any of the seven cells during the stimulated earthquakes. Following the tests, however, the capacity of the cells was found to be sharply reduced. A number of cells were disassembled and examined. Internal components were found to be in poor condition, with loss of negative plate material and generalized corrosion

  2. Age-related neurogenesis decline in the subventricular zone is associated with specific cell cycle regulation changes in activated neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynac, Mathieu; Morizur, Lise; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Mouthon, Marc-André; Boussin, François D

    2016-01-01

    Although neural stem cells (NSCs) sustain continuous neurogenesis throughout the adult lifespan of mammals, they progressively exhibit proliferation defects that contribute to a sharp reduction in subventricular neurogenesis during aging. However, little is known regarding the early age-related events in neurogenic niches. Using a fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique that allows for the prospective purification of the main neurogenic populations from the subventricular zone (SVZ), we demonstrated an early decline in adult neurogenesis with a dramatic loss of progenitor cells in 4 month-old young adult mice. Whereas the activated and quiescent NSC pools remained stable up to 12 months, the proliferative status of activated NSCs was already altered by 6 months, with an overall extension of the cell cycle resulting from a specific lengthening of G1. Whole genome analysis of activated NSCs from 2- and 6-month-old mice further revealed distinct transcriptomic and molecular signatures, as well as a modulation of the TGFβ signalling pathway. Our microarray study constitutes a cogent identification of new molecular players and signalling pathways regulating adult neurogenesis and its early modifications. PMID:26893147

  3. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. → GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. → Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression via PPARγ activation.

  4. Nifedipine inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction-mediated proximal tubular cell injury via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Takanori [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Yamagishi, Sho-ichi, E-mail: shoichi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Diabetic Vascular Complications, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Takeuchi, Masayoshi [Department of Pathophysiological Science, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya [Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}. {yields} GW9662 treatment alone increased RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. {yields} Nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-{beta} gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. -- Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction evokes oxidative stress generation and subsequently elicits inflammatory and fibrogenic reactions, thereby contributing to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. We have previously found that nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the AGE-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. However, effects of nifedipine on proximal tubular cell injury remain unknown. We examined here whether and how nifedipine blocked the AGE-induced tubular cell damage. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, inhibited the AGE-induced up-regulation of RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells, which was prevented by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}). GW9662 treatment alone was found to increase RAGE mRNA levels in tubular cells. Further, nifedipine inhibited the AGE-induced reactive oxygen species generation, NF-{kappa}B activation and increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and transforming growth factor-beta gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were blocked by GW9662. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory agent against AGEs in tubular cells by suppressing RAGE expression

  5. Effect of ageing of gas diffusion layers on the water distribution in flow field channels of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätzel, Juliane; Markötter, Henning; Arlt, Tobias; Klages, Merle; Haußmann, Jan; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Scholta, Joachim; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the influence of artificial ageing of gas diffusion layers (GDL) on the water distribution and transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) during cell operation. Water droplet size distributions are measured by means of in-operando neutron radiography. We find a strong correlation between droplet size distribution and GDL ageing time: With increasing GDL ageing, water droplet sizes in the flow field channels strongly decrease, indicating an ineffective water transport that leads to a reduced cell performance. This effect can be assigned to water accumulations on the GDL surface that block the gas supply towards the catalyst layer.

  6. Age-associated decline in T cell repertoire diversity leads to holes in the repertoire and impaired immunity to influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Yager, Eric J.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Lanzer, Kathleen; Randall, Troy D; Woodland, David L.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    2008-01-01

    A diverse T cell repertoire is essential for a vigorous immune response to new infections, and decreasing repertoire diversity has been implicated in the age-associated decline in CD8 T cell immunity. In this study, using the well-characterized mouse influenza virus model, we show that although comparable numbers of CD8 T cells are elicited in the lung and lung airways of young and aged mice after de novo infection, a majority of aged mice exhibit profound shifts in epitope immunodominance an...

  7. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bellayr, Ian H.; Catalano, Jennifer G; Lababidi, Samir; Yang, Amy X.; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R.; Puri, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Howeve...

  8. Synchronisation and control of proliferation in cycling cell population models with age structure

    OpenAIRE

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Gaubert, Stéphane; Lepoutre, Thomas; Ouillon, Thomas; Saito, Shoko

    2014-01-01

    International audience We present and analyse in this article a mathematical question with a biological origin, the theoretical treatment of which may have far-reaching implications in the practical treatment of cancers. Starting from biological and clinical observations on cancer cells, tumourbearing laboratory rodents, and patients with cancer, we ask from a theoretical biology viewpoint questions that may be transcribed, using physiologically based modelling of cell proliferation dynami...

  9. Elevation of Brain Magnesium Potentiates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation in the Hippocampus of Young and Aged Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shanshan; Liu, Yunpeng; Shi, Yang; Ma, Yihe; Hu, Yixin; Wang, Meiyan; Li, Xue

    2016-09-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and generate all neural lineage types, and they persist in the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex. Here, we show that dietary-supplemented - magnesium-L-threonate (MgT), a novel magnesium compound designed to elevate brain magnesium regulates the NSC pool in the adult hippocampus. We found that administration of both short- and long-term regimens of MgT, increased the number of hippocampal NSCs. We demonstrated that in young mice, dietary supplementation with MgT significantly enhanced NSC proliferation in the SGZ. Importantly, in aged mice that underwent long-term (12-month) supplementation with MgT, MgT did not deplete the hippocampal NSC reservoir but rather curtailed the age-associated decline in NSC proliferation. We further established an association between extracellular magnesium concentrations and NSC self-renewal in vitro by demonstrating that elevated Mg(2+) concentrations can maintain or increase the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our study also suggests that key signaling pathways for cell growth and proliferation may be candidate targets for Mg(2+) 's effects on NSC self-renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1903-1912, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754806

  10. p19INK4d Controls Hematopoietic Stem Cells in a Cell-Autonomous Manner during Genotoxic Stress and through the Microenvironment during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Hilpert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are characterized by the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic compartment. Thrombopoietin maintains adult HSCs in a quiescent state through the induction of cell cycle inhibitors p57Kip2 and p19INK4d. Using the p19INK4d−/− mouse model, we investigated the role of p19INK4d in basal and stress-induced hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that p19INK4d is involved in the regulation of HSC quiescence by inhibition of the G0/G1 cell cycle transition. Under genotoxic stress conditions, the absence of p19INK4d in HSCs leads to accelerated cell cycle exit, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptosis when cells progress to the S/G2-M stages of the cell cycle. Moreover, p19INK4d controls the HSC microenvironment through negative regulation of megakaryopoiesis. Deletion of p19INK4d results in megakaryocyte hyperproliferation and increased transforming growth factor β1 secretion. This leads to fibrosis in the bone marrow and spleen, followed by loss of HSCs during aging.

  11. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Petruzzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45, previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments were conducted using Nero di Troia red wine contaminated with 2 μg/L OTA and supplemented with yeast biomass (20 g/L. The samples were analyzed periodically to assess mycotoxin concentration, chromatic characteristics, and total anthocyanins over 84 days of aging. Yeast cell walls revealed the highest OTA-adsorption in comparison to thermally-inactivated cells (50% vs. 43% toxin reduction, whilst no significant differences were found for the amount of adsorbed anthocyanins in OTA-contaminated and control wines. OTA and anthocyanins adsorption were not competitive phenomena. Unfortunately, the addition of yeast cells to wine could cause color loss; therefore, yeast selection should also focus on this trait to select the best strain.

  12. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Baiano, Antonietta; De Gianni, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments were conducted using Nero di Troia red wine contaminated with 2 μg/L OTA and supplemented with yeast biomass (20 g/L). The samples were analyzed periodically to assess mycotoxin concentration, chromatic characteristics, and total anthocyanins over 84 days of aging. Yeast cell walls revealed the highest OTA-adsorption in comparison to thermally-inactivated cells (50% vs. 43% toxin reduction), whilst no significant differences were found for the amount of adsorbed anthocyanins in OTA-contaminated and control wines. OTA and anthocyanins adsorption were not competitive phenomena. Unfortunately, the addition of yeast cells to wine could cause color loss; therefore, yeast selection should also focus on this trait to select the best strain. PMID:26516913

  13. Mitochondrial energy metabolism changes during aging-mouse cranial nerve cells treated with various doses and forms of Fructus schizandrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Guo; Jinhe Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the cellular aging process, the number of mitochondria, generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activity of respiratory chain enzyme complex 1 and 4, and oxidation decrease. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of aqueous and spirituous extract, as well as polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae (Magnolia Vine) on energy metabolism and mitochondrial anti-oxidation in cranial nerve cells of a D-gal-induccd aging mouse model.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study. The experiment was conducted at the Department of Biochemistry, Qiqihar Medical College between March and July 2006.MATERIALS: Fifty healthy, Kunming mice of both sexes, aged 2 3 months old and weighing 18-22 g, were used for the present study. Fructus schizandrae was purchased from the Medical College of Jiamusi University. Aqueous extracts, spirituous extracts, and polysaccharides from Fructus schizandrae were prepared. D-galactose (D-gal) is a product of the Second Reagent Factory, Shanghai City, China. Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) kit, malonaldehyde (MDA) kit, protein quantification kit, and inorganic phosphorus testing kit were purchased from Jian Cheng Bioeng. Co., China.METHODS: Fifty mice were randomly divided into five groups, with 10 mice in each group: young control, aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides. Over a course of 30 days, mice in aging model, aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract, spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract, and Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides groups were injected subcutaneously with D-gal (100 mg/kg) into the nape of the neck daily, and administered intragastrically with an equal volume of sterile, warm water (aging model), aqueous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), spirituous Fructus schizandrae extract (2 g/kg), or Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides (0.2 g/kg), respectively. Mice in the young control group were injected into

  14. Molecular mechanisms of anti-aging hormetic effects of mild heat stress on human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh I S; Eskildsen-Helmond, Yvonne E G; Beedholm, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies we have shown that repetitive mild heat stress has anti-aging hormetic effects on growth and various other cellular and biochemical characteristics of human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro. We have reported the hormetic effects of repeated challenge...... at the levels of maintenance of stress protein profile; reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins; stimulation of the proteasomal activities for the degradation of abnormal proteins; improved cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogenperoxide, and ultraviolet-B rays......; and enhanced levels of various antioxidant enzymes. We are now undertaking a detailed analysis of the signal transduction pathways to determine alterations in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation states of extracellular signal-related kinase, c-Jun terminal kinase and p38 MAP-kinases as a measure...

  15. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    OpenAIRE

    Saima Jadoon; Sabiha Karim; Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin Asad; Muhammad Rouf Akram; Abida Kalsoom Khan; Arif Malik; Chunye Chen; Ghulam Murtaza

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review a...

  16. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  17. The changing understanding of ageing. Part 2: Body composition, metabolism and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis F. Lawler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This second of three discussions about ageing biology and diseases continues at the level of the organism, examining the relationship among body composition, late life and diseases. One view of significant age-related mass loss in humans suggests that anabolic failure is associated with various precipitating factors that may share anorexia in common. Lean mass decline with even partial anorexia should alert clinicians to monitor patients for emergence of otherwise subclinical disease. Weight or mass loss and clinical disease also may be independent, thus creating an interwoven and complex view. Recent data from the Portuguese water dog genetics model suggest that heritable factors play a role in end of life body metrics and some histological changes, and that some metric and histological changes are themselves inter-related. While widespread inflammation and hyperplasia were less frequent than expected, there exists nonetheless a disease relationship to the growth hormone (GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1-insulin axis that requires further exploration. Oxidative metabolism and apoptosis are reviewed briefly as examples at the cellular level that may be reflected in gross ageing phenotypes, further underscoring the complex nature of many late-life diseases.

  18. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  19. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Jadoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  20. In utero bisphenol A exposure disrupts germ cell nest breakdown and reduces fertility with age in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a known reproductive toxicant in rodents. However, the effects of in utero BPA exposure on early ovarian development and the consequences of such exposure on female reproduction in later reproductive life are unclear. Thus, we determined the effects of in utero BPA exposure during a critical developmental window on germ cell nest breakdown, a process required for establishment of the finite primordial follicle pool, and on female reproduction. Pregnant FVB mice (F0) were orally dosed daily with tocopherol-striped corn oil (vehicle), diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 μg/kg, positive control), or BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 μg/kg) from gestational day 11 until birth. Ovarian morphology and gene expression profiles then were examined in F1 female offspring on postnatal day (PND) 4 and estrous cyclicity was examined daily after weaning for 30 days. F1 females were also subjected to breeding studies with untreated males at three to nine months. The results indicate that BPA inhibits germ cell nest breakdown via altering expression of selected apoptotic factors. BPA also significantly advances the age of first estrus, shortens the time that the females remain in estrus, and increases the time that the females remain in metestrus and diestrus compared to controls. Further, F1 females exposed to low doses of BPA exhibit various fertility problems and have a significantly higher percentage of dead pups compared to controls. These results indicate that in utero exposure to low doses of BPA during a critical ovarian developmental window interferes with early ovarian development and reduces fertility with age. - Highlights: • In utero BPA exposure inhibits germ cell nest breakdown in female mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure alters expression of apoptosis regulators in the ovaries of mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure advances first estrus age and alters cyclicity in mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure causes various fertility problems in

  1. In utero bisphenol A exposure disrupts germ cell nest breakdown and reduces fertility with age in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang2@illinois.edu; Hafner, Katlyn S., E-mail: katlynhafner@gmail.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2014-04-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a known reproductive toxicant in rodents. However, the effects of in utero BPA exposure on early ovarian development and the consequences of such exposure on female reproduction in later reproductive life are unclear. Thus, we determined the effects of in utero BPA exposure during a critical developmental window on germ cell nest breakdown, a process required for establishment of the finite primordial follicle pool, and on female reproduction. Pregnant FVB mice (F0) were orally dosed daily with tocopherol-striped corn oil (vehicle), diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 μg/kg, positive control), or BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 μg/kg) from gestational day 11 until birth. Ovarian morphology and gene expression profiles then were examined in F1 female offspring on postnatal day (PND) 4 and estrous cyclicity was examined daily after weaning for 30 days. F1 females were also subjected to breeding studies with untreated males at three to nine months. The results indicate that BPA inhibits germ cell nest breakdown via altering expression of selected apoptotic factors. BPA also significantly advances the age of first estrus, shortens the time that the females remain in estrus, and increases the time that the females remain in metestrus and diestrus compared to controls. Further, F1 females exposed to low doses of BPA exhibit various fertility problems and have a significantly higher percentage of dead pups compared to controls. These results indicate that in utero exposure to low doses of BPA during a critical ovarian developmental window interferes with early ovarian development and reduces fertility with age. - Highlights: • In utero BPA exposure inhibits germ cell nest breakdown in female mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure alters expression of apoptosis regulators in the ovaries of mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure advances first estrus age and alters cyclicity in mouse offspring. • In utero BPA exposure causes various fertility problems in

  2. Repair of DNA strand breaks in progeric fibroblasts and aging human diploid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by 10 krad of γ-irradiation has been studied in normal human diploid skin fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts from six patients with symptoms of progeria. Although slightly more rapid in very early passage, the repair rate in normal cells was similar throughout most of their life span in vitro. The appearance of cells with reduced repair capacity was evident as the cultures became senescent. The progeric fibroblasts varied greatly in their response to irradiation. The rate of repair was greatly reduced in two strains, whereas in two others extensive DNA degradation was consistently observed in unirradiated cells. Degradation was apparently related to the radiation received from the incorporated radiolabel. Normal repair was seen in progeric fibroblasts transformed by SV40 virus

  3. Post-renal Transplantation de novo Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Middle-aged Man

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, V. K.; Sutariya, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is usually seen in the native kidney but may be seen in the renal allograft. We report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma in a 56-year-old renal allograft recipient who was transplanted for end-stage renal disease induced by analgesic nephropathy. This complication developed after 13 years of renal transplantation. Patient was investigated for hematuria and abdominal pain with a normal renal function. Computed tomography depicted a mass sized 9.0×7.3×6.8 cm that involved...

  4. Pericytes: Multitasking Cells in the Regeneration of Injured, Diseased, and Aged Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Birbrair

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes’ influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  5. Expression and traffic of cellular prolyl oligopeptidase are regulated during cerebellar granule cell differentiation, maturation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Baylach, M J; Felipo, V; Männistö, P T; García-Horsman, J A

    2008-10-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is an endopeptidase which cleaves short proline-containing neuropeptides, and it is involved in memory and learning. POP also has an intercellular function mediated through the inositol pathway, and has been involved in cell death. POP has been early considered as a housekeeping enzyme, but the recent research indicates that POP expression is regulated across tissues and intracellularly. In the brain, POP is exclusively expressed in neurons and most abundantly in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex, in the CA1 field neurons of hippocampus and in cerebellar Purkinje's cells. Intracellularly, POP is mainly present in the cytoplasm and some in intracellular membranes, like rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this paper, we systematically studied the levels of expression of POP along the life of cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture and the distribution of POP within different intracellular compartments. We used the tight-binding inhibitor JTP-4819 covalently coupled with fluorescein (FJTP) as a tool to study the changes on expression and localization of POP protein. Our results indicate that POP activity levels are regulated during the life of the neurons. POP was found mainly in cytoplasm and neuronal projections, but at an early developmental phase significant amounts were found also in nuclei. Along the life of the neurons, POP activity fluctuated in 7-day cycles. In young neurons, the cytosolic POP activity was low but increased by maturation so that the activity peak coincided with full differentiation. Over aging, cytoplasmic POP was concentrated around nucleus, but the activity decreased with time. POP was also present in vesicles across the neuron. No major changes were seen in the nuclear or membrane bound POP over aging until activity disappeared upon neuronal death. This is the first time when POP was found in the nuclei of human neuronal cells. PMID:18718510

  6. Predictors of Academic Achievement for School-Age Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelsey E.; Patterson, Chavis A.; Szabo, Margo M.; Tarazi, Reem A.; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2013-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for neurocognitive impairment and poor academic achievement, although there is limited research on factors predicting academic achievement in this population. This study explores the relative contribution to academic achievement of a comprehensive set of factors, such as environmental…

  7. Effect of hygrothermal ageing on the tensile and fracture response of a fuel cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafion is a polymer electrolyte membrane used as proton-conducting medium for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Since the membrane is a very critical component of the fuel cell, its operational durability becomes highly significant to the fuel cell performance. In general, a low temperature fuel cell operates under 80 °C and 90% RH (relative humidity) and since the Nafion is very sensitive to these operating conditions its mechanical properties vary drastically, leading to premature mechanical failure of the membrane over a period of time. In a first of its kind, this paper focuses on the fracture response of the membrane that is externally pretreated with respect to different hygrothermal conditions. The membrane is also tested for its tensile strength. The results obtained from this study suggest a very interesting phenomenon. The data show that though there is no meaningful trend in the results obtained through tensile tests, fracture tests show a remarkable difference in the fracture energy of the specimens that are subjected to different hygrothermal conditions. (papers)

  8. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer: A tool whose time has come of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristofanilli Massimo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are isolated tumor cells disseminated from the site of disease in metastatic and/or primary cancers, including breast cancer, that can be identified and measured in the peripheral blood of patients. As recent technical advances have rendered it easier to reproducibly and repeatedly sample this population of cells with a high degree of accuracy, these cells represent an attractive surrogate marker of the site of disease. Currently, CTCs are being integrated into clinical trial design as a surrogate for phenotypic and genotypic markers in correlation with development of molecularly targeted therapies. As CTCs play a crucial role in tumor dissemination, translational research is implicating CTCs in several biological processes, including epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this mini-review, we review CTCs in metastatic breast cancer, and discuss their clinical utility for assessing prognosis and monitoring response to therapy. We will also introduce their utility in pharmacodynamic monitoring for rational selection of molecularly targeted therapies and briefly address how they can help elucidate the biology of cancer metastasis.

  9. Reduced satellite cell numbers with spinal cord injury and aging in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdijk, L.B.; Dirks, M.L.; Snijders, T.; Prompers, J.J.; Beelen, M.; Jonkers, R.A.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Loon, L.J. van

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Both sarcopenia and spinal cord injury (SCI) are characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Despite obvious similarities in atrophy between both models, differences in muscle fiber size and satellite cell content may exist on a muscle fiber type-specific level. MET

  10. Age-Associated Resident Memory CD8 T Cells in the Central Nervous System Are Primed To Potentiate Inflammation after Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzel, Rodney M; Crapser, Joshua; Patel, Anita R; Verma, Rajkumer; Grenier, Jeremy M; Chauhan, Anjali; Jellison, Evan R; McCullough, Louise D

    2016-04-15

    Aging is associated with an increase in basal inflammation in the CNS and an overall decline in cognitive function and poorer recovery following injury. Growing evidence suggests that leukocyte recruitment to the CNS is also increased with normal aging, but, to date, no systematic evaluation of these age-associated leukocytes has been performed. In this work, the effect of aging on CNS leukocyte recruitment was examined. Aging was associated with more CD45(high) leukocytes, primarily composed of conventional CD8(+) T cells. These results were strain independent and seen in both sexes. Intravascular labeling and immunohistology revealed the presence of parenchymal CD8(+) T cells in several regions of the brain, including the choroid plexus and meninges. These cells had effector memory (CD44(+)CD62L(-)) and tissue-resident phenotypes and expressed markers associated with TCR activation. Analysis of TCRvβ repertoire usage suggested that entry into the CNS is most likely stochastic rather than Ag driven. Correlational analyses revealed a positive association between CD8 T cell numbers and decreased proinflammatory function of microglia. However, the effects of cerebral ischemia and ex vivo stimulation of these cells dramatically increased production of TNF, IFN-γ, and MCP-1/CCL2. Taken together, we identified a novel population of resident memory, immunosurveillant CD8 T cells that represent a hallmark of CNS aging and appear to modify microglia homeostasis under normal conditions, but are primed to potentiate inflammation and leukocyte recruitment following ischemic injury. PMID:26962232

  11. Milk Yield Traits, Somatic Cell Score, Milking Time and Age at Calving of Pure Holstein Versus Crossbred Cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malchiodi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pure Holstein (HO, n=430, crosses between Swedish Red and HO (SRxHO, n=41, Montbeliarde and HO (MOxHO, n=18, and MO and SRxHO (MOxSH, n=53 were compared for milk, fat and protein yield, fat and protein percentage, somatic cell count (SCC, milking time (MT, and age at first and second calving. A total of 180,933 test-day information for milk yield and MT, and 5,249 for fat and protein percentage and SCC were recorded on first and second parity cows milked in one herd of Cremona province (northern Italy. Somatic cell count and MT were log-transformed to somatic cells score (SCS and LnMT, respectively, before statistical investigation. Production traits, LnMT and SCS were analyzed through a mixed model that included fixed effects of test-day, parity, days in milk (DIM, genotype and interaction between parity and genotype, and the random effects of cow nested within genotype and residual, whereas the model for age at calving included year and month of calving and genotype as fixed effects, and residual as random. MOxHO and pure HO cows differed only for age at second calving (70 d higher for purebreds; P<0.05. Holsteins produced more milk (+2.86 kg/d; P<0.01 and protein yield (+0.05 kg/d; P<0.05 than SRxHO crossbreds, but lower protein percentage (-0.09%; P<0.01, and age at second calving was 44 d (P<0.01 higher than SRxHO. Also, HO produced more milk and fat than MOxSH cows (+1.61 and +0.08 kg/d, respectively; P<0.05, but lower protein percentage (-0.11%; P<0.001, and calved later, both at first and second calving (+24 and +43 d, respectively; P<0.05. Results indicated that crossbred cows can compete with the cosmopolitan breed for several traits.

  12. Superoxide dismutase activity as a function of culture aging of B-16 mouse melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOVANA B. SIMIC-KRSTIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The C3 clone of B-16 mouse melanoma was cultured for 1, 6 and 9 days and analysed. The changes which are not directly linked to melanogenesis in the B-16 / C3 cultures during their maturation were characterized. Early (1 day, confluent (6 days and old (9 days cell cultures are distinguished by their leucine aminopeptidase (LAP and a-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE isoenzyme patterns. Both quantitative and qualitative changes in LAP and ANAE isoenzyme can be observed during culture maturation. There is an increase in the activity of the enzyme copper, zinc-containing superoxide-dismutase (CuZn SOD. The increaase in the CuZn SOD enzyme activity might be related to B-16/C3 cell melanogenesis and / or to differentiation.

  13. Aging differentially affects male and female neural stem cell neurogenic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Waldron; Althea McCourty; Laurent Lecanu

    2010-01-01

    Jay Waldron1, Althea McCourty1, Laurent Lecanu1,21The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Neural stem cell transplantation as a brain repair strategy is a very promising technology. However, despite many attempts, the clinical success remains very deceiving. Despite clear evidence that sexual dimorphism rules many aspects of human biology, the occurrence of a sex difference in...

  14. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O' Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H

    2004-10-04

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  15. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage

  16. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neuro-genesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuro-genesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the sub-ventricular zone of high dose irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neuro-genesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neuro-genesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging. (authors)

  17. Connectivity in Later Life: The Declining Age Divide in Mobile Cell Phone Ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Gilleard; Ian Jones; Paul Higgs

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades changes in social connectivity have become key features in the changing contexts of later life. Communities of propinquity no longer seem to be as determining of social relationships as they once were. Mobile cell phone technology and the Internet have redefined what it means to ‘keep in touch’. Some authors have argued that these new forms of connectivity have created a ‘digital divide’ between those who have become active adopters of these technologies and those wh...

  18. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Uraiwan Panich; Gunya Sittithumcharee; Natwarath Rathviboon; Siwanon Jirawatnotai

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been...

  19. The development of autoimmune features in aging mice is closely associated with alterations of the peripheral CD4⁺ T-cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusser, Anja; Nuber, Natko; Wirz, Oliver F; Rolink, Hannie; Andersson, Jan; Rolink, Antonius

    2014-10-01

    Some signs of potential autoimmunity, such as the appearance of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) become prevalent with age. In most cases, elderly people with ANAs remain healthy. Here, we investigated whether the same holds true for inbred strains of mice. Indeed, we show that most mice of the C57BL/6 (B6) strain spontaneously produced IgG ANA at 8-12 months of age, showed IgM deposition in kidneys and lymphocyte infiltrates in submandibular salivary glands. Despite all of this, the mice remained healthy. ANA production is likely CD4(+) T-cell dependent, since old (40-50 weeks of age) B6 mice deficient for MHC class II do not produce IgG ANAs. BM chimeras showed that ANA production was not determined by age-related changes in radiosensitive, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and that the CD4(+) T cells that promote ANA production were radioresistant. Thymectomy of B6 mice at 5 weeks of age led to premature alterations in T-cell homeostasis and ANA production, by 15 weeks of age, similar to that in old mice. Our findings suggest that a disturbed T-cell homeostasis may drive the onset of some autoimmune features. PMID:25044476

  20. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-beta-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-gamma release from natural killer cells in the brain

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ) on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10)), expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK) cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2) by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  1. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-β-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-γ release from natural killer cells in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Rachael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ. IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10, expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2 by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  2. Case of clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma that developed in the normal liver of a middle-aged woman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Takahashi; Hiromasa Ohira; Hironobu Saito; Yukiko Kanno; Kazumichi Abe; Junko Yokokawa; Atsushi Irisawa; Akira Kenjo; Takuro Saito; Mitsukazu Gotoh

    2008-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was admitted to our department for close examination of a liver tumor that was found during a medical checkup. Abdominal US, CT and MRI showed a tumor in segment 7 (S7) of the liver. Although imaging suggested hepatocellular carcinoma, laboratory tests showed no abnormality in liver function, hepatitis virus markers were negative, and tumor markers including protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist Ⅱ (PIVKA-Ⅱ), a-fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)were all within normal ranges. Upon aspiration biopsy of the liver, the histopathological diagnosis was moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, right hepatectomy was performed. Although a part of the tumor was necrotic, about 60% of the viable part showed a clear-cell variant. Consequently, it was diagnosed as clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma. It was noted that the background liver tissue was normal. This case is worthy of reporting because development of clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma in the normal liver of a middle-aged woman is rarely seen.

  3. COMPARATIVE EFFECT OF AGEING AND GAMMA IRRADIATION ON THE SOMATIC CELLS OF LATHYRUS SATIVUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritambhara Shukla nee Tripathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma irradiation is one of the most important physical mutagen used for inducing beneficial as well as harmful cytogenetic effects in many crop plants. The cytogenetic changes occurring due to the storage of Lathyrus sativus L. seeds after gamma irradiation were examined during the present study. Mitotic index showed a dose dependant decrease while the dose and duration of treatments increased. The effect of ageing accompanied with gamma irradiation was found to be more deleterious as compared to that of individual treatments of the two. Various chromosomal abnormalities viz. fragmentation, scattering, bridges, laggards, stickiness, etc. were found at all the three treatment sets. A significant reduction in moisture content, germination percentage and increase in the percentage of chromosomal anomalies was recorded maximum in the stored gamma irradiated seeds which ultimately ensures the fact that immediate sowing of the irradiated seeds is of prime importance and it may adversely affect the survivability of the seeds as well as plant when sowing is delayed.

  4. Proteomic analysis of the effects of aged garlic extract and its FruArg component on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory response in microglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    Full Text Available Aged garlic extract (AGE is widely used as a dietary supplement, and is claimed to promote human health through anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory activities with hypolipidemic, antiplatelet and neuroprotective effects. Prior studies of AGE have mainly focused on its organosulfur compounds, with little attention paid to its carbohydrate derivatives, such as N-α-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl-L-arginine (FruArg. The goal of this study is to investigate actions of AGE and FruArg on antioxidative and neuroinflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated murine BV-2 microglial cells using a proteomic approach. Our data show that both AGE and FruArg can significantly inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO production in BV-2 cells. Quantitative proteomic analysis by combining two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE with mass spectrometry revealed that expressions of 26 proteins were significantly altered upon LPS exposure, while levels of 20 and 21 proteins exhibited significant changes in response to AGE and FruArg treatments, respectively, in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Notably, approximate 78% of the proteins responding to AGE and FruArg treatments are in common, suggesting that FruArg is a major active component of AGE. MULTICOM-PDCN and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses indicate that the proteins differentially affected by treatment with AGE and FruArg are involved in inflammatory responses and the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response. Collectively, these results suggest that AGE and FruArg attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and promote resilience in LPS-activated BV-2 cells by suppressing NO production and by regulating expression of multiple protein targets associated with oxidative stress.

  5. Non-malignant clonal expansions of memory CD8+ T cells that arise with age vary in their capacity to mount recall responses to infection1

    OpenAIRE

    Kohlmeier, Jacob E.; Connor, Lisa M.; Roberts, Alan D.; Cookenham, Tres; Martin, Kyle; Woodland, David L

    2010-01-01

    Immune responsiveness declines with age in part due to the development of CD8+ T cell expansions (TCE) that can dominate the peripheral T cell pool. Although some TCE arise due to persistent antigen stimulation from chronic infections, others arise in the apparent absence of chronic infection. We have recently shown that this latter class of TCE can arise over time from the memory CD8+ T cell pool established by an acute viral infection. Unlike TCE driven by chronic infections, these age-rela...

  6. The more, the less: age and chemotherapy load are predictive of poor stem cell mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shen-miao; CHEN Huan; CHEN Yu-hong; ZHU Hong-hu; ZHAO Ting; LIU Kai-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensive treatment such as autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation is an important therapeutic strategy in many hematologic malignancies.A number of factors have been reported to impact PBSC mobilization,but the predictive factors varied from one study to another.This retrospective study assessed our current mobilization and collection protocols,and explored the factors predictive of PBSC mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies.Methods Data of 64 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies (multiple myeloma,n=22; acute leukemia,n=27; lymphoma,n=15) who underwent PBSC mobilization for over 1 year were analyzed.Four patients with response to treatment of near complete remission or better were administered granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize PBSCs.Sixty patients received G-CSF followed by chemotherapy mobilizing regimens.Poor mobilization (PM) was defined as when ≤2.0×106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight were collected within three leukapheresis procedures.Results The incidence of PM at the first mobilization attempt was 19% (12/64).The PM group was older than the non-PM group (median age,51 vs.40 years; P=0.013).In univariate analysis,there were no significant differences in gender,diagnosis,and body weight between the PM and non-PM groups.A combination of chemotherapy and G-CSF was more effective than G-CSF alone as a mobilizing regimen (P=0.019).Grade Ⅲ or Ⅳ hematopoietic toxicity of chemotherapy had no significant effect on the mobilization efficacy.Supportive care and the incidence of febrile neutropenia were not significantly different between the two groups.In multivariate analysis,age (odds ratio (OR),9.536;P=-0.002) and number of previous chemotherapy courses (OR 3.132; P=0.024) were two independent negative predictive factors for CD34+ cell yield.PM patients could be managed well by remobilization.Conclusion Older age and a heavy load of previous chemotherapy are the negative

  7. A middle-aged man with a history of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garciaorr R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A 56 year old man was seen with a lung nodule. He had an extensive past medical history including renal cell carcinoma, congestive heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea and a 135 pack-year history of smoking. His physical examination was consistent with congestive heart failure. Sputum cultures for bacteria, fungi and tuberculosis were all negative. A CT scan revealed a spiculated, noncalcified 2.1 mass in the right lower lobe. PET scan showed the lesion to have a standard uptake value of 1.5. The lesion was followed and after 3 months had enlarged to 6.4 cm. Biopsy was done and consistent with a lung abscess. Conservative therapy resulted in resolution only to have the lesion recur 22 months later with the patient expiring from massive hemoptysis and respiratory failure. This case illustrates the usefulness of doubling time in separating benign from malignant lung lesions.

  8. Immunofluorescence Analysis of Testicular Biopsies With Germ Cell and Sertoli Cell Markers Shows Significant MVH Negative Germ Cell Depletion With Older Age of Orchidopexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruili; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Sun, Cong; Cortes, Dina; Southwell, Bridget; Hutson, John

    2014-01-01

    Undescended testis is the most common defect in newborn boys. It is associated with increased risks of infertility and testicular malignancy due to abnormal germ cell development in these testes. Early surgery may limit such risks. The aim of our study was to analyse germ cell development verses ...

  9. Melatonin alleviates hyperthyroidism induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell death in hippocampus of aged female golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Geeta; Verma, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a well known phenomenon under hyperthyroid condition that induces various physiological and neural problems with a higher prevalence in females. We, therefore investigated the antioxidant potential of melatonin (Mel) on hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell death in the hippocampus region of brain (cognition and memory centre) of aged female golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Aged female hamsters were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n=7); group-I: control, group-II: Melatonin (5mgkg(-1)day(-1), i.p., for one week), group-III: Hyperthyroid (100μg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., for two weeks) and group-IV- Hyper+Mel. Hormonal profiles (thyroid and melatonin), activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and GPX), lipid peroxidation level (TBARS) and the specific apoptotic markers (Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3) expression were evaluated. A significant increase in the profile of total thyroid hormone (tT3 and tT4) in hyperthyroidic group as compared to control while tT3 significantly decreased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. However, Mel level significantly decreased in hyperthyroidic group but increased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. Further, the number of immune-positive cells for thyroid hormone receptor-alpha (TR-α) decreased in the hippocampus of hyperthyroidic group and increased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. Profiles of antioxidant enzymes showed a significant decrease in hyperthyroidic group with a simultaneous increase in lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Melatonin treatment to hyperthyroidic group lead to decreased TBARS level with a concomitant increase in antioxidant enzyme activity. Moreover, increased expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3, in hyperthyroidic group had elevated neuronal cell death in hippocampal area and melatonin treatment reduced its expression in hyperthyroidic group. Our findings thus indicate that melatonin reduced the hyperthyroidism

  10. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra, E-mail: A.Kwiatkows@gmail.com [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Zebrowski, Jacek [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Oklejewicz, Bernadetta [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Czarnik, Justyna [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Halibart-Puzio, Joanna [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wnuk, Maciej [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  11. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage

  12. The influence of gender- and age-related differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in steady-state human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the importance of gender and aging on the individual radiosensitivity of lineage-committed myeloid hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) detected in mononuclear cells (MNCs) of steady-state human peripheral blood (PB), the clonogenic survival of HPCs, including colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage; burst-forming unit-erythroid; colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte cells derived from MNCs exposed to 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy X-irradiation were estimated. MNCs were prepared from the buffy-coats of 59 healthy individual blood donors. The results showed that large individual differences exist in the number of HSPCs, as well as in the surviving fraction of cells. Furthermore, the number of progenitor cells strongly correlated with their surviving fraction, suggesting that the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells decreases with the number of cells in the 105 cells population. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the surviving fraction observed at a dose of 0.5 Gy and the age of an individual, however, none of these correlations were observed after 2 Gy irradiation. No statistically significant difference was observed in individual radiosensitivity between males and females at either radiation dose. The present results indicated a correlation between the individual responsiveness of HSPCs to ionizing irradiation, especially to low dose irradiation, and aging. (author)

  13. Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces the aging of mesenchymal stem cells through the DNA damage response and the p53/p21 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-yong Zhang

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of cellular extrinsic factors in the aging of adult stem cells. However, the effects of an aged cell-extrinsic environment on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC aging and the factors involved remain unclear. In the current study, we examine the effects of old rat serum (ORS on the aging of MSCs, and explore the effects and mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on MSC aging induced by ORS treatment. Senescence-associated changes in the cells are examined with SA-β-galactosidase staining and ROS staining. The proliferation ability is detected by MTT assay. The surviving and apoptotic cells are determined using AO/EB staining. The results suggest that ORS promotes MSC senescence and reduces the proliferation and survival of cells. The immunofluorescence staining shows that the expression of β-catenin increases in MSCs of old rats. To identify the effects of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on MSC aging induced with ORS, the expression of β-catenin, GSK-3β, and c-myc are detected. The results show that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the cells is activated after ORS treatment. Then we examine the aging, proliferation, and survival of MSCs after modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The results indicate that the senescence and dysfunction of MSCs in the medium containing ORS is reversed by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor DKK1 or by β-catenin siRNA. Moreover, the expression of γ-H2A.X, a molecular marker of DNA damage response, p16(INK4a, p53, and p21 is increased in senescent MSCs induced with ORS, and is also reversed by DKK1 or by β-catenin siRNA. In summary, our study indicates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling may play a critical role in MSC aging induced by the serum of aged animals and suggests that the DNA damage response and p53/p21 pathway may be the main mediators of MSC aging induced by excessive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  14. Premature aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that radiation may accelerate aging phenomenon has been studied extensively, using the population of A-bomb survivors. In this paper, non-specific radiation-induced premature aging is discussed with a review of the literature. Cardiac lipofuscin, papillary fibrosis, aortic extensibility, hexamine/collagen ratio in the skin and aorta, testicular changes, giant hepatic cell nucleus, and neurofibril changes have so far been studied pathologically in the context of A-bomb radiation. Only testicular sclerosis has been found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter. Suggestive correlation was found to exist between the hexamine/collagen ratio in the skin and aorta and A-bomb radiation. Grip strength and hearing ability were decreased in the group of 100 rad and the group of 50-99 rad, respectively. The other physiological data did not definitely correlate with A-bomb radiation. Laboratory data, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, α and β globulin levels, phytohemagglutinin reaction, T cell counts, erythrocyte glycophorin-A, the incidence of cerebral stroke, ischemic heart disease, and cataract were age-dependent and correlated with A-bomb radiation. These findings indicated that the occurrence of arteriosclerosis-related diseases, changes in immunological competence, and some pathological and physiological findings altered with advancing age, suggesting the correlation with A-bomb radiation. In general, it cannot be concluded that there is a positive correlation between A-bomb radiation and the premature aging. (N.K.) 51 refs

  15. Clearance of autophagy-associated dying retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible source for inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmári-Tóth, M; Kristóf, E; Veréb, Z; Akhtar, S; Facskó, A; Fésüs, L; Kauppinen, A; Kaarniranta, K; Petrovski, G

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can undergo different forms of cell death, including autophagy-associated cell death during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Failure of macrophages or dendritic cells (DCs) to engulf the different dying cells in the retina may result in the accumulation of debris and progression of AMD. ARPE-19 and primary human RPE cells undergo autophagy-associated cell death upon serum depletion and oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Autophagy was revealed by elevated light-chain-3 II (LC3-II) expression and electron microscopy, while autophagic flux was confirmed by blocking the autophago-lysosomal fusion using chloroquine (CQ) in these cells. The autophagy-associated dying RPE cells were engulfed by human macrophages, DCs and living RPE cells in an increasing and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) decreased the engulfment of the autophagy-associated dying cells by macrophages, whereas sorting out the GFP-LC3-positive/autophagic cell population or treatment by the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (TC) enhanced it. Increased amounts of IL-6 and IL-8 were released when autophagy-associated dying RPEs were engulfed by macrophages. Our data suggest that cells undergoing autophagy-associated cell death engage in clearance mechanisms guided by professional and non-professional phagocytes, which is accompanied by inflammation as part of an in vitro modeling of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:27607582

  16. Studies on prolactin-secreting cells in aging rats of different strains. I. Alterations in pituitary histology and serum prolactin levels as related to ageing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van L.J.A.; Zwieten, van M.J.; Mattheij, J.A.M.; Kemenade, J.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Serum PRL levels and histologically tumor-free pituitary glands of 91 aging rats of the BN/BiRij strain, the WAG/Rij strain and their F1 hybrid were studied. In rats with pituitary glands without signs of hyperplasia, serum PRL levels were, in comparison to rats of 15-24 months, increased 25-29-mont

  17. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum SOD, TNF, CRP levels and T-cell subsets distribution type after treatment in aged patients with chronic bronchitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum SOD, TNF, CRP levels and T-cell subsets distribution type after treatment in aged patients with chronic bronchitis. Methods: Serum SOD, TNF levels (with RIA), CRP levels (with biochemistry) and T-cell subsets distribution type (with monoclonal antibody) were detected both before and after treatment in 42 aged patients with chronic bronchitis as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of SOD, CD4/CD8 ratios were significantly lower and serum TNF, CRP levels significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P4/CD8 ratios remained significantly higher than those in controls (P <0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum SOD, TNF, CRP levels and T-cell subsets distribution type is clinically meaningful in aged patients with chronic bronchitis. (authors)

  18. Anti-aging effects of Piper cambodianum P. Fourn. extract on normal human dermal fibroblast cells and a wound-healing model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyunji Lee,1 Youngeun Hong,1 So Hee Kwon,2 Jongsun Park,1 Jisoo Park1 1Department of Pharmacology and Medical Science, Metabolic Diseases and Cell Signaling Laboratory, Research Institute for Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 2Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yonsei University, Incheon, South Korea Background: Aging of skin is associated with environmental factors such as ultraviolet rays, air pollution, gravity, and genetic factors, all of which can lead to wrinkling of skin. Previous reports suggest that the wound repair is impaired by the aging process and strategies to manipulate the age-related wound healing are necessary in order to stimulate repair.Objective: Several traditional plant extracts are well-known for their properties of skin protection and care. Piper cambodianum P. Fourn. (PPF, a member of Piperacecae, is a plant found in Vietnam that might have therapeutic properties. Therefore, the effects of PPF stem and leaf extract on aging process were investigated in vitro and in vivo.Methods: PPF extract dissolved in methanol was investigated using Western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and cell wound-healing assays. We assessed the anti-aging effect of PPF in mouse using the wound-healing assay. The results were analyzed by Student’s unpaired t-test; *P<0.05 and **P<0.01 were considered to indicate significant and highly significant values, respectively, compared with corresponding controls.Results: PPF treatment demonstrated in vitro and in vivo anti-aging activity. Western blot analysis of PPF-treated normal human dermal fibroblast cells showed a dose-dependent increase in the expression of extracellular matrix genes such as collagen and elastin, but decreased expression of the aging gene matrix metalloproteinase-3. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed

  19. Reelin Signaling, Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Efficacy of Aspirin Intake & Stem Cell Transplantation in Aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2010-01-01

    Comprehending the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of aging and Alzheimer’s disease has immense value for developing strategies that promote successful aging and prevent or cure Alzheimer’s disease. The first issue of the new journal, “Aging & Disease” comprises articles that discuss the current knowledge pertaining to changes in reelin signaling in normal & pathological forms of aging, memory and neurogenesis in Aging & Alzheimer’s disease, the efficacy of a non-steroidal anti-infla...

  20. Regulation of microRNA expression in the neuronal stem cell niches during aging of the short-lived annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Baumgart; Alessandro Cellerino

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, our group has intensively studied the annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri as a new experimental model in Biology specifically applied to aging research. We previously studied adult neuronal stem cells of N. furzeri in vivo and we demonstrated an age-dependent decay in adult neurogenesis. More recently we identified and quantified the expression of miRNAs in the brain of N. furzeri and we detected 165 conserved miRNAs and found that brain aging in Nothobranchius furzeri is a...

  1. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-02-23

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining.The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process. PMID:26895224

  2. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Immune System ... Prevention To decrease the risks from immune system aging: Get the flu and pneumonia vaccines, and any ...

  3. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Immune System ...

  4. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in CD4+ T cells is associated with a unique IL-10-producing subset that increases with age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Qin

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, produced by the Aicda gene, is essential for the immunoglobulin gene (Ig alterations that form immune memory. Using a Cre-mediated genetic system, we unexpectedly found CD4(+ T cells that had expressed Aicda (exAID cells as well as B cells. ExAID cells increased with age, reaching up to 25% of the CD4(+ and B220(+ cell populations. ExAID B cells remained IgM(+, suggesting that class-switched memory B cells do not accumulate in the spleen. In T cells, AID was expressed in a subset that produced IFN-γ and IL-10 but little IL-4 or IL-17, and showed no evidence of genetic mutation. Interestingly, the endogenous Aicda expression in T cells was enhanced in the absence of B cells, indicating that the process is independent from the germinal center reaction. These results suggest that in addition to its roles in B cells, AID may have previously unappreciated roles in T-cell function or tumorigenesis.

  5. Analysis of a Battery Management System (BMS) Control Strategy for Vibration Aged Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) Lithium-Ion 18650 Battery Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Bruen; James Michael Hooper; James Marco; Miguel Gama; Gael Henri Chouchelamane

    2016-01-01

    Electric vehicle (EV) manufacturers are using cylindrical format cells as part of the vehicle’s rechargeable energy storage system (RESS). In a recent study focused at determining the ageing behavior of 2.2 Ah Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC) Lithium-Ion 18650 battery cells, significant increases in the ohmic resistance (RO) were observed post vibration testing. Typically a reduction in capacity was also noted. The vibration was representative of an automotive service life of 100,000 miles...

  6. Effects of food nutrient content, insect age and stage in the feeding cycle on the FMRFamide immunoreactivity of diffuse endocrine cells in the locust gut

    OpenAIRE

    Zudaire, E. (Enrique); Simpson, S J; Montuenga, L M

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in dietary protein and digestible carbohydrate content, of insect age and of time during the feeding cycle on the endocrine cells of the ampullar region of the midgut in the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria L. Morphometric analysis of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity was used as an indirect measure of the amount of FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) stored in the gut endocrine cells. There was a highly significant correlation between FaRP ...

  7. The effects of sex, age and cigarette smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in human buccal cells of healthy Bosnian subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hilada Nefić; Jasmin Mušanović; Kemajl Kurteshi; Enida Prutina; Elvira Turcalo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study was performed to establish a baseline value of micronucleus frequency in buccal cells and to estimate the impact of the most common factors (sex and age, and smoking) on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in the sample of healthy Bosnian subjects.Methods: The Buccal Micronucleus Cytome (BMCyt) assay, based on scoring not only micronucleus frequency but also other genome damage markers, dead or degenerated cells, provides a measure of cytotoxi...

  8. In vivo type II T-helper cells shift in schizophrenia compared to sex- and age-matched healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnig Sue Whei Chiang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Over-production of the type II T-helper cells (Th2-shfit has been suggested as a candidate mechanism for the etiology in at least one subgroup of schizophrenia. Hitherto, empirical evidence is derived mostly from in vitro cytokine production. Due to frequently undetectable serum levels of the major Th2 cytokine Interleukin-4 (IL-4, direct evidence, measured as a ratio between Th1/Th2 (type I/type II T-helper cells characteristic cytokines, is rare. This study aimed at examining whether a serum Th2-shift occurs in schizophrenia. Th2-shift was defined as markedly decreased serum IFN-γ/IL-4 and/or IFN-γ/IL-10 and/or IL-2/IL-4 ratios, compared with healthy subjects. Methods: Totally 74 subjects were recruited: 37 drug-free subjects with schizophrenia according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV as well as 37 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cytometric Bead Array, which enables a simultaneous measurement of 6 cytokines with the same volume of test sample, was used to assess serum Th1/Th2 ratios and cytokine levels. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was utilized to detect the diversities in serum Th1/Th2 ratios and cytokine levels between both diagnostic groups. Results: Subjects with schizophrenia showed significantly reduced serum IFN-γ/IL-4 and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratios if compared to healthy controls. If both sexes analyzed separately, males with schizophrenia had significantly reduced serum IFN-γ/IL-10 ratios, while female patients showed markedly decreased serum IFN-γ/IL-4 ratios. Conclusions: A clear Th2-shift was observed in schizophrenia. Males and females with schizophrenia seemed to have different profiles of Th2-shift. Th1/Th2 ratios appeared to play different roles in the pathology of males and females with schizophrenia.

  9. Multidendritic sensory neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen: origins, dendritic morphology, and segment- and age-dependent programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimura Kaoru

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the establishment of functional neural circuits that support a wide range of animal behaviors, initial circuits formed in early development have to be reorganized. One way to achieve this is local remodeling of the circuitry hardwiring. To genetically investigate the underlying mechanisms of this remodeling, one model system employs a major group of Drosophila multidendritic sensory neurons - the dendritic arborization (da neurons - which exhibit dramatic dendritic pruning and subsequent growth during metamorphosis. The 15 da neurons are identified in each larval abdominal hemisegment and are classified into four categories - classes I to IV - in order of increasing size of their receptive fields and/or arbor complexity at the mature larval stage. Our knowledge regarding the anatomy and developmental basis of adult da neurons is still fragmentary. Results We identified multidendritic neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen, visualized the dendritic arbors of the individual neurons, and traced the origins of those cells back to the larval stage. There were six da neurons in abdominal hemisegment 3 or 4 (A3/4 of the pharate adult and the adult just after eclosion, five of which were persistent larval da neurons. We quantitatively analyzed dendritic arbors of three of the six adult neurons and examined expression in the pharate adult of key transcription factors that result in the larval class-selective dendritic morphologies. The 'baseline design' of A3/4 in the adult was further modified in a segment-dependent and age-dependent manner. One of our notable findings is that a larval class I neuron, ddaE, completed dendritic remodeling in A2 to A4 and then underwent caspase-dependent cell death within 1 week after eclosion, while homologous neurons in A5 and in more posterior segments degenerated at pupal stages. Another finding is that the dendritic arbor of a class IV neuron, v'ada, was immediately reshaped during post

  10. Alterations of the intracellular water and ion concentrations in brain and liver cells during aging as revealed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of bulk specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustyik, G.; Nagy, I.

    1985-01-01

    Age dependence of the intracellular concentrations of monovalent ions (Na+, K+ and Cl-) was examined in 1, 11 and 25-month-old rat brain and liver cells by using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The in vivo concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions were calculated from two different measurements: The elemental concentrations were measured in freeze-dried tissue pieces, and the intracellular water content was determined by means of a recently developed X-ray microanalytic method, using frozen-hydrated and fractured bulk specimens as well as subsequent freeze-drying. All the single monovalent ion concentrations and consequently, also the total monovalent ion content showed statistically significant increases during aging in brain cortical neurons. A 3-6% loss of the intracellular water content was accompanied by a 25-45% increase of the monovalent ionic strengths by the age of 25 months. A membrane protective OH radical scavenger (centrophenoxine) reversed the dehydration in the nerve cells of old animals, resulting in a decrease of the intracellular ion concentrations. Aging has a less prominent effect on the water and ion contents of the hepatocytes. The degree of water loss of cytoplasm exceeds that of the nuclei in the liver, suggesting that dominantly the translational steps can be involved in the general age altered slowing down of the protein synthetic machinery, predicted by the membrane hypothesis of aging.

  11. INFLUENCE OF AGING ON ANTIBODY-FORMATION INVIVO AFTER IMMUNIZATION WITH THE PRIMARY T-CELL DEPENDENT ANTIGEN HELIX-POMATIA HEMOCYANIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGREEF, GE; KALLENBERG, CGM; VANSTAALDUINEN, GJ; REMARQUE, EJ; TJANDRA, YI; HIJMANS, W

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo antibody response to the primary T-cell dependent antigen Helix pomatia Haemocyanin (HPH) was studied, in order to detect the possible presence of a humoral immune deficiency in ageing. The IgG subclass distribution of the specific antibodies was also determined. In order to define a dos

  12. Age and CD161 expression contribute to inter-individual variation in interleukin-23 response in CD8+ memory human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shen

    Full Text Available The interleukin-23 (IL-23 pathway plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory disorders, however, inter-individual variability in IL-23-induced signal transduction in circulating human lymphocytes has not been well-defined. In this study, we observed marked, reproducible inter-individual differences in IL-23 responsiveness (measured by STAT3 phosphorylation in peripheral blood CD8+CD45RO+ memory T and CD3+CD56+ NKT cells. Age, but not gender, was a significant (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r = -0.37, p = 0.001 source of variability observed in CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells, with IL-23 responsiveness gradually decreasing with increasing age. Relative to cells from individuals demonstrating low responsiveness to IL-23 stimulation, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells from individuals demonstrating high responsiveness to IL-23 stimulation showed increased gene expression for IL-23 receptor (IL-23R, RORC (RORγt and CD161 (KLRB1, whereas RORA (RORα and STAT3 expression were equivalent. Similar to CD4+ memory T cells, IL-23 responsiveness is confined to the CD161+ subset in CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells, suggesting a similar CD161+ precursor as has been reported for CD4+ Th17 cells. We observed a very strong positive correlation between IL-23 responsiveness and the fraction of CD161+, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells (r = 0.80, p<0.001. Moreover, the fraction of CD161+, CD8+CD45RO+ memory T cells gradually decreases with aging (r = -0.34, p = 0.05. Our data define the inter-individual differences in IL-23 responsiveness in peripheral blood lymphocytes from the general population. Variable expression of CD161, IL-23R and RORC affects IL-23 responsiveness and contributes to the inter-individual susceptibility to IL-23-mediated defenses and inflammatory processes.

  13. Analysis of complications and outcomes after pulmonary resection in patients aged 80 years or over with non-small cell lung cancer

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    Wen-bing LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the therapeutic effect and degree of safety in patients aged 80 years or over with nonsmall cell lung cancer undergoing radical resection. Methods A retrospective survey of 97 elder patients aged 80 years or over, in whom non-small cell lung cancer was pathologically confirmed after partial resection of the lung in Chinese PLA General Hospital from Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2012. The peri-operative features were evaluated, including gender, age, history of smoking, pulmonary function, surgical procedure, histopathologic type, pathologic stage, etc. The relation of the postoperative complications and mortality with the factors mentioned above was analyzed. Results Among all patients, the surgical procedure comprised 36 lobectomies, 31 segmentectomies, and 30 wedge resections. The histopathologic diagnosis showed there were adenocarcinoma in 51 patients, squamous cell carcinoma in 29, large cell carcinoma in 9, adenosquamous cell carcinoma in 6 and neuro-endocrine cell carcinomas in 2. The disease stage was determined as ⅠA in 55 cases, ⅠB in 33, ⅡA in 7, ⅢA in 2. The post-operative complications (POC occurred in 14 of 97 patients (14.4%, and the most common complication was cardiovascular complication (9 cases, followed by pulmonary complication (5 cases. Only two patients died to the complications, one of them was post-operative pneumonia and respiratory failure, and the other one was acute myocardial infarction. The survival rate of the 97 patients was 91.7%, 70.2% and 52.8% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively, and in the patients with stage I disease, the survival rate was 93.9%, 73.6% and 54.1%, respectively. Conclusion Advanced age is not a contraindication to radical pulmonary resection in patients over 80 years old suffering from early stage non-small cell lung cancer. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.10.13

  14. Adaptations in pulsatile insulin secretion, hepatic insulin clearance, and β-cell mass to age-related insulin resistance in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Butler, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    In health insulin is secreted in discrete insulin secretory bursts from pancreatic β-cells, collectively referred to as β-cell mass. We sought to establish the relationship between β-cell mass, insulin secretory-burst mass, and hepatic insulin clearance over a range of age-related insulin sensitivity in adult rats. To address this, we used a novel rat model with chronically implanted portal vein catheters in which we recently established the parameters to permit deconvolution of portal vein i...

  15. L-carnitine Effectively Induces hTERT Gene Expression of Human Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from the Aged Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Fathi, Ezzatollah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are attractive candidates for cell therapy and regenerative medicine due to their multipotency and ready availability, but their application can be complicated by the factors such as age of the donors and senescence-associated growth arrest during culture conditions. The latter most likely reflects the fact that aging of hMSCs is associated with a rise in intracellular reactive oxygen species, loss of telomerase activity, decrease in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression and finally eroded telomere ends. Over-expression of telomerase in hMSCs leads to telomere elongation and may help to maintain replicative life–span of these cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate of the effect of L-carnitine (LC) as an antioxidant on the telomerase gene expression and telomere length in aged adipose tissue-derived hMSCs. Methods For this purpose, cells were isolated from healthy aged volunteers and their viabilities were assessed by MTT assay. Quantitative gene expression of hTERT and absolute telomere length measurement were also performed by real-time PCR in the absence and presence of different doses of LC (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mM). Results The results indicated that LC could significantly increase the hTERT gene expression and telomere length, especially in dose of 0.2 mM of LC and in 48 h treatment for the aged adipose tissue-derived hMSCs samples. Conclusion It seems that LC would be a good candidate to improve the lifespan of the aged adipose tissue-derived hMSCs due to over-expression of telomerase and lengthening of the telomeres. PMID:27426092

  16. Analysis of a Battery Management System (BMS Control Strategy for Vibration Aged Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC Lithium-Ion 18650 Battery Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bruen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electric vehicle (EV manufacturers are using cylindrical format cells as part of the vehicle’s rechargeable energy storage system (RESS. In a recent study focused at determining the ageing behavior of 2.2 Ah Nickel Manganese Cobalt Oxide (NMC Lithium-Ion 18650 battery cells, significant increases in the ohmic resistance (RO were observed post vibration testing. Typically a reduction in capacity was also noted. The vibration was representative of an automotive service life of 100,000 miles of European and North American customer operation. This paper presents a study which defines the effect that the change in electrical properties of vibration aged 18650 NMC cells can have on the control strategy employed by the battery management system (BMS of a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV. It also proposes various cell balancing strategies to manage these changes in electrical properties. Subsequently this study recommends that EV manufacturers conduct vibration testing as part of their cell selection and development activities so that electrical ageing characteristics associated with road induced vibration phenomena are incorporated to ensure effective BMS and RESS performance throughout the life of the vehicle.

  17. Influence of age and sex on the spontaneous DNA damage detected by micronucleus test and comet assay in mice peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Vanina Dahlström; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Peres, Alessandra; Gomes de Macedo Braga, Luisa Maria; Bogo Chies, José Arthur

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the normal variations in basal DNA damage detected by Comet assay in leukocytes and micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE) using the Micronucleus test (MN) in peripheral blood cells from 45 female and male mice from different age groups (newborns, 3.5, 12, and 104 weeks) to clarify age and sex-related changes. Comparison of basal DNA damage detected by Comet assay showed significantly increased values in 104 weeks old mice in relation to the other ages (P < or = 0.01), and newborn mice showed higher values in MNE frequency when compared to all the other groups (P < or = 0.01). A positive correlation was observed between Damage Frequency (r =0.382, P = 0.010) and Damage Index (r = 0.640, P < 0.001) and age. Age was also correlated with the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes/normachromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) (r = -0.473, P = 0.001), and the MNE frequency was positively correlated with the ratio of PCE/NCE (r = 0.454, P = 0.002). These results suggest an age-related slow down of DNA repair efficiency of DNA damage and/or DNA damage accumulation. Furthermore, data on the spontaneous MNE frequency indicate that the reticuloendothelial system matures with age, and there is a close relationship between erythropoiesis and micronucleus induction in erythrocytes. The influence of sex in the parameters analyzed was less clear. In conclusion, age seems to influence in basal DNA damage and should be considered in genotoxicity studies using mice. Finally, comparisons between assays must be made with care when different cells are compared (e.g. leukocytes and erythrocytes), as found with the Comet assay and MN test. PMID:18675925

  18. Unbalanced discharging and aging due to temperature differences among the cells in a lithium-ion battery pack with parallel combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Naixing; Zhang, Xiongwen; Shang, BinBin; Li, Guojun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the unbalanced discharging and aging due to temperature difference between the parallel-connected cells. A thermal-electrochemical model is developed for the parallel-connected battery pack. The effects of temperature difference on the unbalanced discharging performances are studied by simulations and experiments. For the parallel-connected cells, the cell at higher temperature experiences a larger current in the early discharging process before approximately 75% of depth of discharge (DOD). When the discharge process approaches the voltage turn point of the battery pack, the discharge current through the cell at higher temperature begins to decrease significantly. After the DOD reaches approximately 90%, the discharge current of the cell at higher temperature rises again. Correspondingly, the changes in the discharging current through the cell at lower temperature are opposite to that of the cell at higher temperature. Simulations also show that the temperature difference between the parallel-connected cells greatly aggravates the imbalance discharge phenomenon between the cells, which accelerates the losses of the battery pack capacity. For the parallel-connected battery pack, the capacity loss rate approximately increases linearly as the temperature difference between the cells increases. This trend is magnified with the increase of operating temperature.

  19. The effects of sex, age and cigarette smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in human buccal cells of healthy Bosnian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilada Nefić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to establish a baseline value of micronucleus frequency in buccal cells and to estimate the impact of the most common factors (sex and age, and smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in the sample of healthy Bosnian subjects.Methods: The Buccal Micronucleus Cytome (BMCyt assay, based on scoring not only micronucleus frequency but also other genome damage markers, dead or degenerated cells, provides a measure of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.Results: Our results showed the baseline buccal micronucleus frequency was 0.135% or 1.35‰, as well as positive correlations between micronucleus frequencies and formations of degenerative nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, karyolytic and karyorrhectic cells. The number of micronuclei in buccal cells was significantly higher in females than in males. There was positive association between the age and frequency of analysed cytogenetic biomarkers. Buccal cell micronuclei and degenerative nuclear alternations were more frequent among cigarette smokers than non-smokers and significantly higher in female smokers than in male smokers. Cytogenetic damages showed significantly positive correlation between intensity of smoking and the number of nuclear alterations. The years of smoking had a significant influence not only on the number of nuclear alterations but also in micronuclei and nuclear buds in buccal cells.Conclusions: The sex influences the number of micronuclei in human buccal cells. The ageing increased the number of micronuclei and other biomarkers of DNA damage. The cigarette smoking significantly increases the frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear buds, pyknotic, karyolytic and karyorrhectic cells.

  20. Age-related decrease in the responsiveness of rat articular chondrocytes to EGF is associated with diminished number and affinity for the ligand of cell surface binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribault, D; Habib, M; Abdel-Majid, K; Barbara, A; Mitrovic, D

    1998-01-12

    The effect of age on the responsiveness of articular chondrocytes (AC) to epidermal growth factor (EGF) was examined. Cells were isolated by digesting cartilage fragments from the humeral and femoral heads of 21-day old, 8- and 14-month old rats with collagenase. The cells were cultured under standard conditions, as monolayers. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation by the DNA content of subconfluent cultures. [125I]EGF binding and the amounts of EGF and EGF-receptor mRNAs were determined using confluent cells. DNA synthesis was decreased with age of animals. EGF stimulated DNA synthesis in cultures in 1- and 8-month old rats at low serum concentrations (< 5%), and in cultures in 14-month old animals at high serum concentrations. It also increased 5-day DNA content of cultures compared to serum-treated controls but this effect was weak in cultures in 14-month old rats. The number of high affinity binding sites for [125I]EGF decreased from 37,800 in the 1-month old to 1950 in the 14-month old rat AC. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) also decreased with age: 0.18 nmol/l in the 1-month old; 0.12 nmol/l in the 8-month old; and 0.07 nmol/l in the 14-month old cells. AC in older rats contained more EGF mRNA and less EGF-receptor mRNA. Incubation of the cells with EGF resulted in down regulation of the EGF- and upregulation of EGF-receptor mRNA expressions. These findings show the age-related quantitative and qualitative alterations in EGF and EGF-receptor which may account, at least in part, for the diminished responsiveness of senescent AC to EGF. PMID:9509392

  1. Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  2. Expression Levels of the Oxidative Stress Response Gene ALDH3A2 in Granulosa-Lutein Cells Are Related to Female Age and Infertility Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Hernández, Jairo; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo; Puopolo, Maria; Palumbo, Angela; Ávila, Julio

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in all physiological processes. The effect of OS on cellular processes is modulated by the ability of the cell to express genes implicated in the reversal of lipid, protein, and DNA injury. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3, member A2 (ALDH3A2) is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in lipid detoxification. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression ofALDH3A2in human granulosa-lutein (GL) cells of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and its relationship with age, infertility diagnosis, and IVF outcome variables. Relative expression levels ofALDH3A2were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To investigate the effect of age onALDH3A2expression, 72 women between 18 and 44 years of age with no ovarian factor (NOF) were analyzed. To evaluate the effect of infertility diagnosis onALDH3A2expression, the following groups were analyzed: 22 oocyte donors (ODs), 24 women >40 years old (yo) with tubal or male factor and no ovarian pathology, 18 poor responders (PRs), 19 cases with endometriosis (EM), and 18 patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). In NOF,ALDH3A2expression correlated positively with age and with the doses of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone administered and negatively with the number of total and mature oocytes. When different groups were analyzed,ALDH3A2expression levels were higher in patients >40 yo and in PR compared to OD. On the contrary, EM and PCOS levels were lower than expected for age. These data suggest that GL cellALDH3A2expression levels correlate with age, cause of infertility, and ovarian response to stimulation. PMID:26449735

  3. The effect of sex on immune cells in healthy aging: Elderly women have more robust natural killer lymphocytes than do elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attar, Ahmad; Presnell, Steven R; Peterson, Charlotte A; Thomas, D Travis; Lutz, Charles T

    2016-06-01

    Immune gender differences have been reported, but are little studied in elderly humans. We compared monocyte and lymphocyte subsets, along with soluble immune mediators in healthy men and women over the age of 70. We also measured natural killer (NK) lymphocyte cytotoxic granule exocytosis, chemokine synthesis, and cytokine synthesis in response to a variety of stimuli. Elderly women had significantly more circulating B cells than men, whereas men had more CD4 central memory T cells and higher monocyte levels. Plasma adiponectin levels were higher in women, plasma retinol-binding protein 4 levels were higher in men, but there were no significant gender differences in C-reactive protein, IL-15, or sphingosine-1-phosphate. Women had a higher ratio of immature CD56(bright) NK cells to mature CD56(dim) NK cells, indicating a gender difference in NK cell maturation in the elderly. Comparing sexes, female mature NK cells had more vigorous cytotoxic granule responses to K562 leukemia cells and IFN-γ responses to NKp46 crosslinking. Moreover, female NK cells were more likely to produce MIP-1β in response to a variety of stimuli. These data show that gender influences NK cell activity in elderly humans. PMID:27059724

  4. Use of age and CD4 cell count as criteria for identification of recent HIV infection in resource-limited countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Penazzato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of recent HIV infection is crucial for estimating HIV incidence and transmitted drug resistance (TDR prevalence. Due to limited availability of diagnostic assays, WHO TDR surveys use age <25 yrs and/or CD4 >500 cells/mm3 at HIV diagnosis as epidemiological criteria to maximize inclusion of recently infected (within 3 yrs and ARV-naïve individuals. Accuracy of these criteria and variation by geographical region is unknown. Methods: A literature review of studies on HIV seroconverters (SC published through March 2012 was performed. Age at SC and CD4 decline in absence of treatment were abstracted. Accuracy of alternative TDR survey criteria was explored. Results: 11 studies provided age at SC: 7 in Africa, 2 in Latin America, 2 in Asia. Median age at SC ranged between 24 and 33 years in studies in Kenya and Zambia, respectively and was 29 [interquantile range (IQR 24, 34] in a large cohort study from Africa. Median age at SC was 29 years in studies on MSM in Brazil and China. 7 studies reported CD4 count decline: 5 in Africa, 1 in Latin America and 1 in Asia. Studies used ordinary least square regression or mixed models. None described median CD4 count 3 yrs after SC. The estimated mean CD4 count 3 yrs after SC ranged from 350–420 cells/mm3 in Africa and was 237 and 282 cells/mm3 in Asia and Latin America, respectively. Conclusion: HIV SC occurs at all ages (median 29 yrs in the assessed geographical regions. Enhancing feasibility of TDR survey implementation by including individuals >25 yrs decreases specificity, particularly in low HIV prevalence settings (Table.Use of age <25 yrs can maximized specificity to detect recent infection, but misses almost 75% of recent infections thus limiting feasibility of TDR survey implementation, particularly in low HIV prevalence settings. Lower mean CD4 count 3 yrs after SC was observed in Asia and Latin America compared to Africa. Regional differences may be explained by

  5. Serum metabolites from walnut-fed aged rats attenuate stress-induced neurotoxicity in brain cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    The shift in equilibrium towards excess reactive oxygen or nitrogen species production from innate antioxidant defense in brain is a critical factor in the declining neural functions and cognitive deficits accompanying age. In aging, there are noticeable alterations in the membrane microenvironment,...

  6. Homeostatic imbalance between apoptosis and cell renewal in the liver of premature aging XpdTTD mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.Y. Park; M.O. Cho; S. Leonard (Shanique); B. Calder (Brent); I.S. Mian (Saira); W.H. Kim (Woo); S.W.P. Wijnhoven (Susan); H. van Steeg (Harry); J.R. Mitchell (James); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Cohen (Pinchas); J. Vijg (Jan); Y. Suh (Yousin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUnrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. XpdTTDmice, harboring defects in nucleotide excision repair and transcription due to a mutation in the Xpd gene (R722W), display severe symptoms of premature aging but have a rduced incidence

  7. Regulation of age-related structural integrity in neurons by protein with tau-like repeats (PTL-1) is cell autonomous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Yee Lian; Fan, Xiaochen; Götz, Jürgen; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2014-01-01

    PTL-1 is the sole homolog of the MAP2/MAP4/tau family in Caenorhabditis elegans. Accumulation of tau is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, reducing tau levels has been suggested as a therapeutic strategy. We previously showed that PTL-1 maintains age-related structural integrity in neurons, implying that excessive reduction in the levels of a tau-like protein is detrimental. Here, we demonstrate that the regulation of neuronal ageing by PTL-1 occurs via a cell-autonomous mechanism. We re-expressed PTL-1 in a null mutant background using a pan-neuronal promoter to show that PTL-1 functions in neurons to maintain structural integrity. We next expressed PTL-1 only in touch neurons and showed rescue of the neuronal ageing phenotype of ptl-1 mutant animals in these neurons but not in another neuronal subset, the ventral nerve cord GABAergic neurons. Knockdown of PTL-1 in touch neurons also resulted in premature neuronal ageing in these neurons but not in GABAergic neurons. Additionally, expression of PTL-1 in touch neurons alone was unable to rescue the shortened lifespan observed in ptl-1 mutants, but pan-neuronal re-expression restored wild-type longevity, indicating that, at least for a specific group of mechanosensory neurons, premature neuronal ageing and organismal ageing can be decoupled. PMID:24898126

  8. Aging mechanisms in lithium-ion batteries and PEM fuel cells and their influence on the properties of hybrid systems made thereof; Alterungsmechanismen in Lithium-Ionen-Batterien und PEM-Brennstoffzellen und deren Einfluss auf die Eigenschaften von daraus bestehenden Hybrid-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, Frieder

    2010-10-08

    The topic of this thesis is a systematic analysis of battery and fuel cell aging. Therefore aging mechanisms and aging failure modes were investigated and stress factors are identified focusing on specific aging tests. These tests are used to simulate the aging of battery and fuel cell individually as well as in a car model. The individual aging models of battery and fuel cell are validated. The car model allows to show the influence of different battery and fuel cell sizes to the aging of both components. Further, the balance of fuel cell and battery dynamics and their impact on the aging are investigated. (orig.)

  9. Age at which the long-cycling spermatogonial stem-cell population is established in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-cycling A5 spermatogonia are the cells of primary importance in estimating the reproductive and genetic hazards of radiation, chemicals, and pollutants in mammals. This addresses the following questions: (1) when do the long-cycling cells appear; (2) are they present at birth; and (3) from which cells do they arise

  10. Some enkephalin- or VIP-immunoreactive hippocampal pyramidal cells contain neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of aged humans and persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, H K

    1985-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are one of the histopathological neuronal abnormalities present in normal aging and especially in Alzheimer's Disease. We have utilized immunocytochemical staining for neuropeptides followed by Congo red with gallocyanin counterstaining and polarized illumination to determine whether enkephalin (Enk), somatostatin (Som), cholecystokinin (CCK), or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) are contained in neurons afflicted with such tangles. A few Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive pyramidal cells in field hl and subiculum were found to contain tangles. Many such Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive neurons and cells containing Som- or CCK-like immunoreactivity did not contain such tangles. PMID:2410823

  11. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Age Onset of Menarche in Sickle Cell Disease Females of India

    OpenAIRE

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Females with sickle cell disease (SCD) often show late onset of menarche. In transgenic sickle cell mouse, deficiency of gene encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been reported to be associated with late onset of menarche. Thus to explore the possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism with age of onset of menarche in SCD females, 3 important eNOS gene polymorphisms- eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T (rs1799983) and eNOS-786 T>C (rs2070744) and plasma nitrite...

  12. ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE (ENOS) GENE POLYMORPHISM IS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE ONSET OF MENARCHE IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE FEMALES OF INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhansu Sekhar Nishank

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Background and Objective :  Females with sickle cell disease (SCD) often show late onset of menarche. In transgenic sickle cell mouse, deficiency of gene encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been reported to be associated with late onset of menarche. Thus to explore the possible association of eNOS gene polymorphism with age of onset of menarche in SCD females, 3 important eNOS gene polymorphism- eNOS 4a/b, eNOS 894G>T and eNOS-786 T>C  and  plasma ...

  13. Homeostatic Imbalance between Apoptosis and Cell Renewal in the Liver of Premature Aging XpdTTD Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Yoon Park; Mi-Ook Cho; Shanique Leonard; Brent Calder; I Saira Mian; Woo Ho Kim; Susan Wijnhoven; Harry van Steeg; James Mitchell; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Jan Hoeijmakers; Pinchas Cohen; Jan Vijg; Yousin Suh

    2008-01-01

    Unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Xpd(TTD) mice, harboring defects in nucleotide excision repair and transcription due to a mutation in the Xpd gene (R722W), display severe symptoms of premature aging but have a reduced incidence of cancer. To gain further insight into the molecular basis of the mutant-specific manifestation of age-related phenotypes, we used comparative microarray analysis of young and old female livers to discov...

  14. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood cells declines with age and is associated with general health among elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Thinggaard, Mikael; Dalgård, Christine;

    2014-01-01

    The role of the mitochondria in disease, general health and aging has drawn much attention over the years. Several attempts have been made to describe how the numbers of mitochondria correlate with age, although with inconclusive results. In this study, the relative quantity of mitochondrial DNA...... compared to nuclear DNA, i.e. the mitochondrial DNA copy number, was measured by PCR technology and used as a proxy for the content of mitochondria copies. In 1,067 Danish twins and singletons (18-93 years of age), with the majority being elderly individuals, the estimated mean mitochondrial DNA copy...

  15. Calpain-1 Regulation of Matrix Metalloprotease 2 Activity in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Facilitates age-associated aortic wall Calcification and Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Jing; Monticone, Robert E.; Telljohann, Richard; Wu, James; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated central arterial wall stiffness is linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, including fibrosis and vascular calcification. Angiotensin II induces both matrix metalloproteinase type 2 (MMP2) and calpain-1 expression and activity in the arterial wall. But the role of calpain-1 in MMP2 activation and ECM remodeling remains unknown. Dual histo-immunolabeling demonstrates co-localization of calpain-1 and MMP2 within old rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Over-expression of ca...

  16. Age-dependent decline of beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes after diagnosis: a multi-centre longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, A.; Lauria, A.; Schloot, N.; Hosszufalusi, N.; Ludvigsson, J.; Mathieu, C.; Mauricio, D.; Nordwall, M.; Van der Schueren, B.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Scherbaum, W. A.; Weets, I.; Gorus, F. K.; Wareham, N.; Leslie, R. D.; Pozzilli, P.

    2014-01-01

    C-peptide secretion is currently the only available clinical biomarker to measure residual β-cell function in type 1 diabetes. However, the natural history of C-peptide decline after diagnosis can vary considerably dependent upon several variables. We investigated the shape of C-peptide decline...... over time from type 1 diabetes onset in relation to age at diagnosis, HbA1c levels and insulin dose....

  17. Nocturnal enuresis: prevalence and risk factors among school-aged children with sickle-cell anaemia in a South-east Nigerian city

    OpenAIRE

    Eneh, Chizoma I.; Okafor, Henrietta U.; Ikefuna, Anthony N; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N

    2015-01-01

    Background Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is the most common inherited haemoglobinopathy affecting the Negroid race. Renal complications such as enuresis can occur during childhood. Reports show that children and adolescents with SCA may be at a higher risk of nocturnal enuresis than their counterparts with normal haemoglobin genotype. Aims The study aims to determine the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and possible risk factors among school-aged children with SCA in a South-east Nigerian city. M...

  18. Age and CD161 Expression Contribute to Inter-Individual Variation in Interleukin-23 Response in CD8+ Memory Human T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Shen; Wei Zhang; Clara Abraham; Judy H Cho

    2013-01-01

    The interleukin-23 (IL-23) pathway plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory disorders, however, inter-individual variability in IL-23-induced signal transduction in circulating human lymphocytes has not been well-defined. In this study, we observed marked, reproducible inter-individual differences in IL-23 responsiveness (measured by STAT3 phosphorylation) in peripheral blood CD8+CD45RO+ memory T and CD3+CD56+ NKT cells. Age, but not gender, was a significant...

  19. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosseini-Sharifabad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG, shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs.

  20. Factors that influence age of type 1 diabetes onset and beta cell function in children and adults with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Giannopoulou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    This thesis investigates whether type 1 and type 2 diabetes associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence age of type 1 diabetes onset and residual beta cell function in children and adults with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In the second part, a pilot, non-randomized, controlled intervention trial is performed, in order to examine whether a single autologous cord blood infusion can change the natural course of metabolic and immune function in children type 1 diabetes. Di...

  1. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel;

    2008-01-01

    . Administration of FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule, during the 4 weeks of continuous stress not only prevented the deleterious effects of chronic stress on spatial memory, but also reduced the survival of the newly generated hippocampal cells in aging animals. FGL treatment did not......, however, prevent the decrease in the total number of granular neurons that resulted from prolonged exposure to stress. These findings suggest that the development of new drugs that mimic neural cell adhesion molecule activity might be of therapeutic relevance to treat stress-induced cognitive impairment....

  2. Augmentation of primary influenza A virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses in aged mice through blockade of an immunoinhibitory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMenna, Lauren; Latimer, Brian; Parzych, Elizabeth; Haut, Larissa H; Töpfer, Katrin; Abdulla, Sarah; Yu, Hong; Manson, Brian; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Zhou, Dongming; Lasaro, Marcio O; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2010-05-15

    Immune responses diminish with age resulting in an increased susceptibility of the elderly to infectious agents and an inability to mount protective immune responses to vaccines. Immunosenescence affects multiple aspects of the immune system, including CD8(+) T cells, which control viral infections and are assumed to prevent the development of cancers. In this study, we tested if CD8(+) T cell responses in aged mice could be enhanced through a vaccine that concomitantly expresses Ag and a molecule that blocks an immunoinhibitory pathway. Specifically, we tested a vaccine based on a replication-defective chimpanzee-derived adenovirus vector expressing the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus as a fusion protein with the HSV type 1 glycoprotein D, which through binding to the herpes virus entry mediator, blocks the immunoinhibitory herpes virus entry mediator B and T lymphocyte attenuator/CD160 pathways. Our results show that the vaccine expressing a fusion protein of NP and glycoprotein D induces significantly higher NP-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in young and aged mice compared with the vaccine expressing NP only. PMID:20410485

  3. Hippophae rhamnoides L.leaves extract enhances cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation through upregulation of intrinsic factors in the dentate gyrus of the aged gerbil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Hyeon Ahn; Bai Hui Chen; Joon Ha Park; In Hye Kim; Jeong-Hwi Cho; Jae-Chul Lee; Bing Chun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Hippophae rhamnoides L.(HL) exerts antioxidant activities against various oxidative stress conditions.In this study,we investigated effects of extract from HL leaves (HLE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of aged gerbils.Methods Aged gerbils (24 months) were divided into vehicle (saline)-treated-and HLE-treated-groups.The vehicle and HLE were orally administered with 200 mg/kg once a day for 20 days before sacrifice.Cell proliferation and neurobiast differentiation were examined in the DG using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX),respectively.We also observed changes in immunoreactivities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2),brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF),and phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta (p-GSK-3β) to examine their relation with neurogenesis using immunohistochemistry.Results The administration of HLE significantly increased the number of Ki67-positive cells and DCX-positive neuroblasts with well-developed processes in the SGZ of the DG of the HLE-treated-group.In addition,immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in granule and polymorphic cells of the DG in the HLE-treated-group compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group.Conclusions HLE treatment significantly increased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation,showing that immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in the DG.These indicate that increased neuroblast differentiation neurogenesis may be closely related to upregulation of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β in aged gerbils.

  4. Early-age feed restriction affects viability and gene expression of satellite cells isolated from the gastrocnemius muscle of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yue

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle growth depends on the fusion of proliferate satellite cells to existing myofibers. We reported previously that 0–14 day intermittent feeding led to persistent retardation in myofiber hypertrophy. However, how satellite cells respond to such nutritional insult has not been adequately elucidated. Results One-day-old broiler chicks were allocated to control (Con, ad libitum feeding, intermittent feeding (IF, feed provided on alternate days and re-feeding (RF, 2 days ad libitum feeding after 12 days of intermittent feeding groups. Chickens were killed on Day 15 and satellite cells were isolated. When cultured, satellite cells from the IF group demonstrated significant retardation in proliferation and differentiation potential, while RF partly restored the proliferation rate and differentiation potential of the satellite cells. Significant up-regulation of insulin like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR (P0.05 and thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα (P0.05, and down-regulation of growth hormone receptor (GHR (P0.01 and IGF-I (P0.01 mRNA expression was observed in freshly isolated IF satellite cells when compared with Con cells. In RF cells, the mRNA expression of IGF-I was higher (P0.05 and of TRα was lower (P0.01 than in IF cells, suggesting that RF restored the mRNA expression of TRα and IGF-I, but not of GHR and IGF-IR. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio tended to increase in the IF group, which was reversed in the RF group (P0.05, indicating that RF reduced the pro-apoptotic influence of IF. Moreover, no significant effect of T3 was detected on cell survival in IF cells compared with Con (PP0.05 cells. Conclusions These data suggest that early-age feed restriction inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells, induces changes in mRNA expression of the GH/IGF-I and thyroid hormone receptors in satellite cells, as well as blunted sensitivity of satellite cells to T3, and that RF partially reverses these effects. Thus

  5. Identification of Growth Phases and Influencing Factors in Cultivations with AGE1.HN Cells Using Set-Based Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Borchers, S.; Freund, S; Rath, A.; Streif, S; Reichl, U.; Findeisen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bio-pharmaceuticals in cell culture, such as mammalian cells, is challenging. Mathematical models can provide support to the analysis, optimization, and the operation of production processes. In particular, unstructured models are suited for these purposes, since they can be tailored to particular process conditions. To this end, growth phases and the most relevant factors influencing cell growth and product formation have to be identified. Due to noisy and erroneous experimenta...

  6. Total and Envelope Protein-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response in Pediatric Dengue Is Highly Modulated by Age and Subsequent Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Jessica F; Salgado, Doris M; Vega, Rocío; Rodríguez, Jairo A; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Greenberg, Harry B; Narváez, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    The response of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) induced by dengue has only recently started to be characterized. We propose that young age and previous infections could be simple factors that affect this response. Here, we evaluated the primary and secondary responses of circulating ASC in infants (6-12 months old) and children (1-14 years old) infected with dengue showing different degrees of clinical severity. The ASC response was delayed and of lower magnitude in infants, compared with older children. In primary infection (PI), the total and envelope (E) protein-specific IgM ASC were dominant in infants but not in children, and a negative correlation was found between age and the number of IgM ASC (rho = -0.59, P = 0.03). However, infants with plasma dengue-specific IgG detectable in the acute phase developed an intense ASC response largely dominated by IgG and comparable to that of children with secondary infection (SI). IgM and IgG produced by ASC circulating in PI or SI were highly cross-reactive among the four serotypes. Dengue infection caused the disturbance of B cell subsets, particularly a decrease in the relative frequency of naïve B cells. Higher frequencies of total and E protein-specific IgM ASC in the infants and IgG in the children were associated with clinically severe forms of infection. Therefore, the ASC response induced by dengue is highly influenced by the age at which infection occurs and previous immune status, and its magnitude is a relevant element in the clinical outcome. These results are important in the search for correlates of protection and for determining the ideal age for vaccinating against dengue. PMID:27560782

  7. Adipose stem cells' antagonism in glycosylation of D-galactose-induced skin aging of nude mice and its skin recovery function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Wei, Shuyue; Xue, Xinxin; You, Yuntian; Ma, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to discuss adipose stem cells' (ASCs) antagonism in glycosylation of D-galactose-induced skin aging of nude mice and its skin recovery function; the study also aims to explore a new mechanism of anti-aging to provide clinical anti-aging therapy with new thoughts and methods. We selected 40 healthy specific pathogen-free (SPF) nude mice and divided them randomly into four groups which were: blank control group; D-galactose + phosphate buffer saline (PBS) group; D-galactose + ASCs treatment group; and D-galactose + aminoguanidine (AG) group. Results showed that the superoxide dismutase (SOD) level of mice in the D-galactose-induced model group (87.15 ± 4.95 U/g) decreased significantly compared with that of control group (146.21 ± 4.76 U/g), while malonaldehyde (MDA) level of mice in D-galactose induced model group (11.12 ± 2.08 nmol/mg) increased significantly compared with that of control group (5.46 ± 2.05 nmol/mg) (P bioluminescence, and they survive for a short time in the skin after transplantation, which provides a basis for the application of ASC transplantation in clinical practices. Moreover, ASCs can control glycosylation level of D-galactose-induced skin aging of nude mice, reverse expression of aging-related biomarkers as well as restrain formation of advanced glycation end products, which are similar to the effects of AG inhibitors of advanced glycation end products. Thus, ASCs can prevent glycosylation-induced skin aging as well as recover functions of skin. PMID:26916459

  8. Swedish Lung Cancer Radiation Study Group. Predictive value of age at diagnosis for radiotherapy response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of age at diagnosis on prognosis in patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for NSCLC. Material and methods: This is a joint effort among all the Swedish Oncology Departments that includes all identified patients with a diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer that have been subjected to curatively intended irradiation (≥50 Gy) treated during 1990 to 2000. Included patients had a histopathological/cytological diagnosis date as well as a death date or a last follow-up date. The following variables were studied in relation to overall and disease-specific survival: age, gender, histopathology, time period, smoking status, stage and treatment. Results: The median overall survival of all 1146 included patients was 14.7 months, while the five-year overall survival rate was 9.5 %. Younger patients (<55 years), presented with a more advanced clinical stage but had yet a significantly better overall survival compared with patients in the age groups 55-64 years (p = 0.035) and 65-74 years (p = 0.0097) in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. The overall survival of patients aged ≥75 years was comparable to those aged <55 years. Conclusion: In this large retrospective study we describe that patients younger than 55 years treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for NSCLC have a better overall survival than patients aged 55-64 and 65-74 years and that younger patients seem to benefit more from the addition of surgery and/or chemotherapy to radiotherapy. Due to the exploratory nature of the study, these results should be confirmed in future prospective trials

  9. Menoprogen, a TCM Herbal Formula for Menopause, Increases Endogenous E2 in an Aged Rat Model of Menopause by Reducing Ovarian Granulosa Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Ma, Hong; Lu, Ye; Tan, B. J.; Xu, L.; Lawal, Temitope O.; Mahady, Gail B.; Liu, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Menoprogen (MPG) on ovarian granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis was investigated in vitro and in vivo in an aged rat model of menopause. Intragastric administration of Menoprogen or estradiol valerate to 14-month-old senile female rats for eight weeks increased plasma E2 levels, as well as the weight of both ovarian and uterine tissues. Flow cytometric (FCM) analysis of isolated GCs from MPG-treated aged rats showed reductions in the G0/G1 ratio and apoptotic peaks. Isolated GCs also exhibited an increase in cell size and the number of cytoplastic organelles and intracellular gap junctions, the reappearance of secretory granules, and a lack of apoptotic bodies as determined by TEM. Results from a TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay revealed a reduction in TUNEL-positive GCs after MPG treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a downregulation of proapoptotic Bax proteins and an upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The addition of MPG-medicated serum to the media of cultured GCs also reduced cadmium chloride-induced apoptosis and downregulated caspase-3 protein expression. This work demonstrates that Menoprogen inhibits GC apoptosis in aged female rats and thereby increases E2 production. This represents a novel mechanism of action for this herbal medicine in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26981526

  10. Menoprogen, a TCM Herbal Formula for Menopause, Increases Endogenous E2 in an Aged Rat Model of Menopause by Reducing Ovarian Granulosa Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Ma, Hong; Lu, Ye; Tan, B J; Xu, L; Lawal, Temitope O; Mahady, Gail B; Liu, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The effect of Menoprogen (MPG) on ovarian granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis was investigated in vitro and in vivo in an aged rat model of menopause. Intragastric administration of Menoprogen or estradiol valerate to 14-month-old senile female rats for eight weeks increased plasma E2 levels, as well as the weight of both ovarian and uterine tissues. Flow cytometric (FCM) analysis of isolated GCs from MPG-treated aged rats showed reductions in the G0/G1 ratio and apoptotic peaks. Isolated GCs also exhibited an increase in cell size and the number of cytoplastic organelles and intracellular gap junctions, the reappearance of secretory granules, and a lack of apoptotic bodies as determined by TEM. Results from a TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay revealed a reduction in TUNEL-positive GCs after MPG treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a downregulation of proapoptotic Bax proteins and an upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The addition of MPG-medicated serum to the media of cultured GCs also reduced cadmium chloride-induced apoptosis and downregulated caspase-3 protein expression. This work demonstrates that Menoprogen inhibits GC apoptosis in aged female rats and thereby increases E2 production. This represents a novel mechanism of action for this herbal medicine in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26981526

  11. Menoprogen, a TCM Herbal Formula for Menopause, Increases Endogenous E2 in an Aged Rat Model of Menopause by Reducing Ovarian Granulosa Cell Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Menoprogen (MPG on ovarian granulosa cell (GC apoptosis was investigated in vitro and in vivo in an aged rat model of menopause. Intragastric administration of Menoprogen or estradiol valerate to 14-month-old senile female rats for eight weeks increased plasma E2 levels, as well as the weight of both ovarian and uterine tissues. Flow cytometric (FCM analysis of isolated GCs from MPG-treated aged rats showed reductions in the G0/G1 ratio and apoptotic peaks. Isolated GCs also exhibited an increase in cell size and the number of cytoplastic organelles and intracellular gap junctions, the reappearance of secretory granules, and a lack of apoptotic bodies as determined by TEM. Results from a TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL assay revealed a reduction in TUNEL-positive GCs after MPG treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a downregulation of proapoptotic Bax proteins and an upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The addition of MPG-medicated serum to the media of cultured GCs also reduced cadmium chloride-induced apoptosis and downregulated caspase-3 protein expression. This work demonstrates that Menoprogen inhibits GC apoptosis in aged female rats and thereby increases E2 production. This represents a novel mechanism of action for this herbal medicine in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

  12. Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) prevents β-amyloid aggregation, generation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs), and acrolein-induced cytotoxicity on human neuronal-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Leonardo da Silva; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Yatsu, Francini Kiyono Jorge; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Kolling, Eduardo Antônio; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2014-11-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are considered potent molecules capable of promoting neuronal cell death and participating in the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that AGEs exacerbate β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and AGE-related cross-links are also detected in senile plaques. Acrolein (ACR) is an α, β-unsaturated aldehyde found in the environment and thermally processed foods, which can additionally be generated through endogenous metabolism. The role of ACR in AD is widely accepted in the literature. Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) is popularly consumed by the population in Brazil, mainly for its stimulant activity. In the present study, we showed that guarana (10, 100, and 1000 µg/mL) is able to prevent protein glycation, β-amyloid aggregation, in vitro methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and ACR (20 μM)-induced toxicity on neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). Since these are considered typical AD pathological hallmarks, we propose that guarana may deserve further research as a potential therapeutic agent in such a neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24840232

  13. Childhood growth, IQ and education as predictors of white blood cell telomere length at age 49-51 years: the Newcastle Thousand Families Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomere length is emerging as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether birth weight, infant growth, childhood cognition and adult height, as well as a range of lifestyle, socio-economic and educational factors, were associated with white blood cell telomere length at age 49-51 years. METHODS: The study included 318 members of the Newcastle Thousand Families Study, a prospectively followed birth cohort which includes all individuals born in Newcastle, England in May and June 1947, who attended for clinical examination at age 49-51 years, and had telomere length successfully measured using real-time PCR analyses of DNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. RESULTS: No association was found between birth weight and later telomere length. However, associations were seen with other factors from early life. Education level was the only predictor in males, while telomere length in females was associated with gestational age at birth, childhood growth and childhood IQ. CONCLUSIONS: While these findings may be due to chance, in particular where differing associations were seen between males and females, they do provide evidence of early life associations with telomere length much later in life. Our findings of sex differences in the education association may reflect the sex differences in achieved education levels in this generation where few women went to university regardless of their intelligence. Our findings do not support the concept of telomere length being on the pathway between very early growth and later disease risk.

  14. Dietary Polyphenols, Berries, and Age-Related Bone Loss: A Review Based on Human, Animal, and Cell Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice A. Hubert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss during aging has become an increasing public health concern as average life expectancy has increased. One of the most prevalent forms of age-related bone disease today is osteoporosis in which the body slows down bone formation and existing bone is increasingly being resorbed by the body to maintain the calcium balance. Some causes of this bone loss can be attributed to dysregulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity mediated by increased oxidative stress through the aging process. Due to certain serious adverse effects of the currently available therapeutic agents that limit their efficacy, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has garnered interest as a natural means for the prevention of this debilitating disease. Natural antioxidant supplementation, a type of CAM, has been researched to aid in reducing bone loss caused by oxidative stress. Naturally occurring polyphenols, such as anthocyanins rich in berries, are known to have anti-oxidative properties. Several studies have been reviewed to determine the impact polyphenol intake—particularly that of berries—has on bone health. Studies reveal a positive association of high berry intake and higher bone mass, implicating berries as possible inexpensive alternatives in reducing the risk of age related bone loss.

  15. Spatial distribution of human neocortical neurons and glial cells according to sex and age measured by the saucer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette Kirstine; Petersen, A O; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2007-01-01

    A new stereological probe, the saucer, was used for estimating three-dimensional (3D) spatial distributions of particles around particles. The advantages of the saucer include that the measurements and the results are in 3D and the size and design of the probe enables the investigator to sample a...... neurological disorders was independent of age and gender....

  16. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  17. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  18. UV, stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762