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Sample records for cell adhesion migration

  1. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  2. Cell Adhesion and Its Endocytic Regulation in Cell Migration during Neural Development and Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kawauchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a crucial event for tissue organization during development, and its dysregulation leads to several diseases, including cancer. Cells exhibit various types of migration, such as single mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, collective migration and scaffold cell-dependent migration. The migration properties are partly dictated by cell adhesion and its endocytic regulation. While an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-mediated mesenchymal cell migration requires the endocytic recycling of integrin-mediated adhesions after the disruption of cell-cell adhesions, an amoeboid migration is not dependent on any adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM or neighboring cells. In contrast, a collective migration is mediated by both cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions, and a scaffold cell-dependent migration is regulated by the endocytosis and recycling of cell-cell adhesion molecules. Although some invasive carcinoma cells exhibit an EMT-mediated mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, other cancer cells are known to maintain cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions and epithelial morphology during metastasis. On the other hand, a scaffold cell-dependent migration is mainly utilized by migrating neurons in normal developing brains. This review will summarize the structures of cell adhesions, including adherens junctions and focal adhesions, and discuss the regulatory mechanisms for the dynamic behavior of cell adhesions by endocytic pathways in cell migration in physiological and pathological conditions, focusing particularly on neural development and cancer metastasis.

  3. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  4. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  5. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  6. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S.K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics ...

  7. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

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    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  8. Running with neighbors: coordinating cell migration and cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated movement of large groups of cells is required for many biological processes, such as gastrulation and wound healing. During collective cell migration, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions must be integrated so that cells maintain strong interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying substratum. Initiation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions at cell-cell junctions and integrin-based cell-ECM adhesions require integration of mechanical cues, dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and input from specific signaling cascades, including Rho family GTPases. Here, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the interplay between these pathways at cadherin-based and integrin-based adhesions during collective cell migration and highlight outstanding questions that remain in the field. PMID:26201843

  9. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  10. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  11. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; Xiang, Ru; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were...

  12. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Aysegul Ocal; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most powerful treatment modality for a large number of hematopoietic malignancies, including leukemia. Successful hematopoietic recovery after transplantation depends on homing of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow and subsequent lodging of those cells in specific niches in the bone marrow. Migration of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow is a highly regulated process that requires correct regulation of the expression and activit...

  14. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

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    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  15. Maspin Regulates Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Migration through an Integrin Signaling Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Li; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Maspin has been identified as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for its anti-angiogenic property is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of maspin on endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration in a cell culture system. We found that maspin was expressed in blood vessels ECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Maspin significantly enhanced HUVEC cell adhesion to various matrix proteins. This effect was dependent on the ac...

  16. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components......Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration...... in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...

  17. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  18. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

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    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  19. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma

  20. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  1. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  2. DDRs: receptors that mediate adhesion, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Reyes-Uribe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native collagens and have an important role during cell adhesion, development, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. DDR deregulation is associated with progression of several different cancers. However, there is limited information about the role of DDRs in the progression of breast cancer. In this review we attempt to collect the most relevant information about DDR signaling and their role in various cancer-related processes such as adhesion, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and survival, with a focus on breast cancer.

  3. p62/IMP2 stimulates cell migration and reduces cell adhesion in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Francia, Giulio; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    p62/IMP2 is an oncofetal protein that is overexpressed in several types of cancer, and is a member of the family of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding proteins. We previously reported that high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody are present in sera from cancer patients, compared to healthy individuals. Here, we report the overexpression of p62/IMP2 in tumor tissues of 72 out of 104 cases of human breast cancer, and high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody in patients’ sera (in 63 out of 216 cases). To explore the role of p62/IMP2 in breast cancer progression, we generated p62/IMP2 transfected variants of two human breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231 and LM2-4. Using in vitro assays we found that overexpression of p62/IMP2 can increase cell migration, and reduce cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. A Human Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules qPCR array was performed with our generated variants, and it identified a group of mRNAs whose expression was altered with p62/IMP2 overexpression, including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA – which we show to be a p62/IMP2 binding partner. Overall, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which p62/IMP2 can contribute to breast cancer progression. PMID:26416451

  4. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  5. The disintegrin tzabcanin inhibits adhesion and migration in melanoma and lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, Anthony J; Burns, Patrick D; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets in drug development and design. Disintegrins are small (4-16kDa) viperid snake venom proteins that exhibit a canonical integrin-binding site (often RGD). These non-enzymatic proteins inhibit integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, making them potential candidates as therapeutics in cancer and numerous other human disorders. The present study examined the cytotoxic, anti-adhesion, and anti-migration effects of a recently characterized disintegrin, tzabcanin, towards melanoma (A-375) and lung (A-549) cancer cell lines. Tzabcanin inhibits adhesion of both cells lines to vitronectin and exhibited very weak cytotoxicity towards A-375 cells; however, it had no effect on cell viability of A-549 cells. Further, tzabcanin significantly inhibited migration of both cell lines in cell scratch/wound healing assays. Flow cytometric analysis indicates that both A-375 and A-549 cell lines express integrin αvβ3, a critical integrin in tumor motility and invasion, and a major receptor of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin. Flow cytometric analysis also identified αvβ3 as a binding site of tzabcanin. These results suggest that tzabcanin may have utility in the development of anticancer therapies, or may be used as a biomarker to detect neoplasms that over-express integrin αvβ3. PMID:27060015

  6. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

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    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  7. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  8. Alpha9beta1 integrin in melanoma cells can signal different adhesion states for migration and anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydolph, Magnus C; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Høye, Anette M;

    2009-01-01

    of endosomal vesicle recycling, but not inhibitors of protein kinase C or the small GTPase Rho. Our results demonstrated that although alpha9beta1 integrin can induce and localise to focal adhesions in a high activation state, its intermediate activity state normally supports cell adhesion consistent......Cell surface integrins are the primary receptors for cell migration on extracellular matrix, and exist in several activation states regulated in part by ectodomain conformation. The alpha9 integrin subunit, which pairs only with beta1, has specific roles in the immune system and may regulate cell...... migration. Melanoma cells express abundant alpha9beta1 integrin, and its role in cell migration was assessed. Ligands derived from Tenascin-C and ADAM12 supported alpha9beta1 integrin-mediated cell attachment and GTP-Rac dependent migration, but not focal adhesion formation. Manganese ions induced alpha9...

  9. Experimental study on the adhesion, migration and three-dimensional growth of Schwann cells on absorbable biological materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王光林; 林卫; 杨志明; 裴福兴; 刘雷

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the adhesion, migration and three-dimentional growth of Schwann cells on PLA (polylactic acid) nonspinning fibre cloth and polyglycolic/polylactic acid (PLGA) fibres.Methods: Schwann cells/ECM gel solution and PLA nonspinning fibre cloth and PLGA fibres pretreated by collagen, polylysine and ECM were co-cultured. Then the migration and three-dimensional growth of Schwann cells on the fibres were observed under phase contrast microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope.Conclusions: ECM gel can facilitate the adhesion, growth and migration of Schwann cells on the seteroframe. It is a good integrating material for tissue engineering bioartificial nerve.

  10. Rac function is crucial for cell migration but is not required for spreading and focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffen, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Dimchev, Georgi A;

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is commonly accompanied by protrusion of membrane ruffles and lamellipodia. In two-dimensional migration, protrusion of these thin sheets of cytoplasm is considered relevant to both exploration of new space and initiation of nascent adhesion to the substratum. Lamellipodium formation...... restored by expression of either Rac subfamily member, but not by Cdc42 or RhoG. Cells deficient in Rac showed strong reduction in wound closure and random cell migration and a notable loss of sensitivity to a chemotactic gradient. Despite these defects, Rac-deficient cells were able to spread, formed...... deficiency increased the mobility of different components in focal adhesions, potentially explaining how Rac - although not essential - can contribute to focal adhesion assembly. Together, our data demonstrate that Rac signaling is essential for lamellipodium protrusion and for efficient cell migration, but...

  11. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells.

  12. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  13. Differential Dynamics of α5 Integrin, Paxillin, and α-Actinin during Formation and Disassembly of Adhesions in Migrating Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Webb, Donna J.; Donais, Karen; Horwitz, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms by which adhesions form and disperse in migrating cells, we expressed α5 integrin, α-actinin, and paxillin as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. All localized with their endogenous counterparts and did not perturb migration when expressed at moderate levels. α5-GFP also rescued the adhesive defects in CHO B2 cells, which are α5 integrin deficient. In ruffling cells, α5-GFP and α-actinin–GFP localized prominently at the leading edge in membrane protrusions. ...

  14. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  15. Resveratrol and Estradiol Exert Disparate Effects on Cell Migration, Cell Surface Actin Structures, and Focal Adhesion Assembly in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas G. Azios

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a grape polyphenol, is thought to be a cancer preventive, yet its effects on metastatic breast cancer are relatively unknown. Since cancer cell invasion is dependent on cell migration, the chemotactic response of MDA-MB-231 metastatic human breast cancer cells to resveratrol, estradiol (E2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF was investigated. Resveratrol decreased while E2 and EGF increased directed cell migration. Resveratrol may inhibit cell migration by altering the cytoskeleton. Resveratrol induced a rapid global array of filopodia and decreased focal adhesions and focal adhesion kinase (FAK activity. E2 or EGF treatment did not affect filopodia extension but increased lamellipodia and associated focal adhesions that are integral for cell migration. Combined resveratrol and E2 treatment resulted in a filopodia and focal adhesion response similar to resveratrol alone. Combined resveratrol and EGF resulted in a lamellipodia and focal adhesion response similar to EGF alone. E2 and to a lesser extent resveratrol increased EGFR activity. The cytoskeletal changes and EGFR activity in response to E2 were blocked by EGFR1 inhibitor indicating that E2 may increase cell migration via crosstalk with EGFR signaling. These data suggest a promotional role for E2 in breast cancer cell migration but an antiestrogenic, preventative role for resveratrol.

  16. PEGylated human plasma fibronectin is proteolytically stable, supports cell adhesion, cell migration, focal adhesion assembly, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Hekmatfar, Sogol; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy W

    2013-01-01

    Delayed wound healing in many chronic wounds has been linked to the degradation of fibronectin (FN) by abnormally high protease levels. We sought to develop a proteolytically stable and functionally active form of FN. For this purpose, we conjugated 3.35 kDa polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) to human plasma fibronectin (HPFN). Conjugation of PEGDA to HPFN or HPFN PEGylation was characterized by an increase of approximately 16 kDa in the average molecular weight of PEGylated HPFN compared to native HPFN in SDS-PAGE gels. PEGylated HPFN was more resistant to α chymotrypsin or neutrophil elastase digestion than native HPFN: after 30 min incubation with α chymotrypsin, 56 and 90% of native and PEGylated HPFN respectively remained intact. PEGylated HPFN and native HPFN supported NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast adhesion and spreading, migration and focal adhesion formation in a similar manner. Fluorescence microscopy showed that both native and PEGylated HPFN in the culture media were assembled into extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrils. Interestingly, when coated on surfaces, native but not PEGylated HPFN was assembled into the ECM of fibroblasts. The proteolytically stable PEGylated HPFN developed herein could be used to replenish FN levels in the chronic wound bed and promote tissue repair.

  17. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells. PMID:27452906

  18. Dynamic actin polymerization on endosomes regulates integrin trafficking, cell adhesion and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Duleh, Steve Niessen

    2012-01-01

    Activators of the Arp2/3 complex, termed nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), are required for the proper spatial and temporal control of actin assembly in cells. Mammalian cells express several NPFs, each of which serve distinct functions in specific cellular processes, including N-WASP in phagocytosis and endocytosis, WAVE and JMY in cell migration, and WHAMM in ER-to-Golgi transport. Although another NPF termed WASH was recently identified, the cellular function and activity of this prot...

  19. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO2 particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi [Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Ichihara, Sahoko, E-mail: saho@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  1. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear.

  2. Engineering of silicon surfaces at the micro- and nanoscales for cell adhesion and migration control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Costa V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Torres-Costa1, Gonzalo Martínez-Muñoz2, Vanessa Sánchez-Vaquero3, Álvaro Muñoz-Noval1, Laura González-Méndez3, Esther Punzón-Quijorna1,4, Darío Gallach-Pérez1, Miguel Manso-Silván1, Aurelio Climent-Font1,4, Josefa P García-Ruiz3, Raúl J Martín-Palma11Department of Applied Physics, 2Department of Computer Science, 3Department of Molecular Biology, 4Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The engineering of surface patterns is a powerful tool for analyzing cellular communication factors involved in the processes of adhesion, migration, and expansion, which can have a notable impact on therapeutic applications including tissue engineering. In this regard, the main objective of this research was to fabricate patterned and textured surfaces at micron- and nanoscale levels, respectively, with very different chemical and topographic characteristics to control cell–substrate interactions. For this task, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D patterns combining silicon and nanostructured porous silicon were engineered by ion beam irradiation and subsequent electrochemical etch. The experimental results show that under the influence of chemical and morphological stimuli, human mesenchymal stem cells polarize and move directionally toward or away from the particular stimulus. Furthermore, a computational model was developed aiming at understanding cell behavior by reproducing the surface distribution and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells observed experimentally.Keywords: surface patterns, silicon, hMSCs, ion-beam patterning

  3. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  4. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  5. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  6. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob;

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which origin...... that the adhesion GPCR ADGRG2 is critically involved in the adhesion and migration of certain breast cancer cells through mechanisms including a non-canonical NFkB pathway and that ADGRG2 could be a target for treatment of certain types of cancer.......Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...

  7. Modulation of cell adhesion and migration by the histone methyltransferase subunit mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xia

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that a subset of mDpy-30, an accessory subunit of the nuclear histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase (H3K4MT complex, also localizes at the trans-Golgi network (TGN, where its recruitment is mediated by the TGN-localized ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ArfGEF BIG1. Depletion of mDpy-30 inhibits the endosome-to-TGN transport of internalized CIMPR receptors and concurrently promotes their accumulation at the cell protrusion. These observations suggest mDpy-30 may play a novel role at the crossroads of endosomal trafficking, nuclear transcription and adhesion/migration. Here we provide novel mechanistic and functional insight into this association. First, we demonstrate a direct interaction between mDpy-30 and BIG1 and locate the binding region in the N-terminus of BIG1. Second, we provide evidence that the depletion or overexpression of mDpy-30 enhances or inhibits cellular adhesion/migration of glioma cells in vitro, respectively. A similar increase in cell adhesion/migration is observed in cells with reduced levels of BIG1 or other H3K4MT subunits. Third, knockdown of mDpy-30, BIG1, or the RbBP5 H3K4MT subunit increases the targeting of beta1 integrin to cell protrusions, and suppression of H3K4MT activity by depleting mDpy-30 or RbBP5 leads to increased protein and mRNA levels of beta1 integrin. Moreover, stimulation of cell adhesion/migration via mDpy-30 knockdown is abolished after treating cells with a function-blocking antibody to beta1 integrin. Taken together, these data indicate that mDpy-30 and its interacting proteins function as a novel class of cellular adhesion/migration modulators partially by affecting the subcellular distribution of endosomal compartments as well as the expression of key adhesion/migration proteins such as beta1 integrin.

  8. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xiangyang [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang, Yao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Chengmei [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Lu, Quqin [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Tao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Chen, Guoan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Rao, Hai [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Luo, Shiwen, E-mail: shiwenluo@ncu.edu.cn [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  9. Interfering with CXCR4 expression inhibits proliferation, adhesion and migration of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shanyu; Xiao, Dan; LIU, HUIHUI; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Lei; LIU, SHOUGUI

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect and mechanism of the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) in the proliferation and migration of breast cancer, a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) eukaryotic expression vector targeting CXCR4 was constructed, and the impact of such on the proliferation, adhesion and migration of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells was observed. The fragments of CXCR4-shRNA were synthesized and cloned into a pGCsi-U6-Neo-green fluorescent protein vector. The recombinant plasmids were transfected...

  10. Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruei-Yu He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfaces and cannot produce the 3D submicron features to which cells respond. Here we used multiphoton excited (MPE phototochemistry to fabricate nano/microstructured gradients of laminin (LN as 2.5D models of the ovarian basal lamina to study the haptotaxis dynamics of a series of ovarian cancer cells. Using these models, we found that increased LN concentration increased migration speed and also alignment of the overall cell morphology and their cytoskeleton along the linear axis of the gradients. Both these metrics were enhanced on LN compared to BSA gradients of the same design, demonstrating the importance of both topographic and ECM cues on the adhesion/migration dynamics. Using two different gradient designs, we addressed the question of the roles of local concentration and slope and found that the specific haptotactic response depends on the cell phenotype and not simply the gradient design. Moreover, small changes in concentration strongly affected the migration properties. This work is a necessary step in studying haptotaxis in more complete 3D models of the tumor microenvironment for ovarian and other cancers.

  11. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase SHIP1 and PTEN coordinate to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Sakai, Jiro; Bajrami, Besnik; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3 (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) is formed by stimulation of various receptors, including G protein–coupled receptors and integrins. The lipid phosphatases PTEN and SHIP1 are critical in regulating the level of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 during chemotaxis. Observations that loss of PTEN had minor and loss of SHIP1 resulted in a severe chemotaxis defect in neutrophils led to the belief that SHIP1 rather than PTEN acts as a predominant phospholipid phosphatase in establishing a PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compass. In this study, we show that SHIP1 regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production in response to cell adhesion and plays a limited role when cells are in suspension. SHIP1−/− neutrophils lose their polarity upon cell adhesion and are extremely adherent, which impairs chemotaxis. However, chemo­taxis can be restored by reducing adhesion. Loss of SHIP1 elevates Akt activation following cell adhesion due to increased PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production. From our observations, we conclude that SHIP1 prevents formation of top-down PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 polarity to facilitate proper cell attachment and detachment during chemotaxis. PMID:22323291

  12. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C enhances dendritic cell migration and boosts the immune responses against Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ballet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1 response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2 response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response.

  13. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  14. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  15. A novel 2.5D culture platform to investigate the role of stiffness gradients on adhesion-independent cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark-Phillip Pebworth

    Full Text Available Current studies investigating the role of biophysical cues on cell migration focus on the use of culture platforms with static material parameters. However, migrating cells in vivo often encounter spatial variations in extracellular matrix stiffness. To better understand the effects of stiffness gradients on cell migration, we developed a 2.5D cell culture platform where cells are sandwiched between stiff tissue culture plastic and soft alginate hydrogel. Under these conditions, we observed migration of cells from the underlying stiff substrate into the alginate matrix. Observation of migration into alginate in the presence of integrin inhibition as well as qualitative microscopic analyses suggested an adhesion-independent cell migration mode. Observed migration was dependent on alginate matrix stiffness and the RhoA-ROCK-myosin-II pathway; inhibitors specifically targeting ROCK and myosin-II arrested cell migration. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of the 2.5D culture platform to advance our understanding of the effects of stiffness gradients and mechanotransductive signaling on adhesion-independent cell migration.

  16. Overexpression of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines: effects on apoptosis, migration and adhesion of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Mao, Lihong; Wang, Ruili; Zhu, Liqiang; Xue, Lexun

    2014-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is the sole enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in methylation reaction. Previous studies have shown that its inhibition or deficiency leads to several human disorders such as severe coagulopathy, hepatopathy and myopathy. However, the effects of SAHH on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells have not been explored so far. To determine whether SAHH is involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus, we investigated the expression of SAHH in ESCC and normal esophageal epithelial cells and found that SAHH was downregulated in ESCC cells compared with normal esophageal epithelial cells (P ESCC cells promoted cell apoptosis, inhibited cell migration and adhesion, but did not affect the cell proliferation and cell cycle. Furthermore, an interaction of SAHH with receptor of activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) protein was detected by coimmunoprecipitation and an increased RACK1, which is caused by overexpression of SAHH, was verified by Western blotting. The findings mentioned above demonstrate that SAHH can promote apoptosis, inhibit migration and adhesion of ESCC cells suggesting that it may be involved in carcinogenesis of the esophagus.

  17. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  18. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  19. HUWE1 Ubiquitylates and Degrades the RAC Activator TIAM1 Promoting Cell-Cell Adhesion Disassembly, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1, deregulated in carcinoma, has been implicated in tumor formation. Here, we uncover a role for HUWE1 in cell migration and invasion through degrading the RAC activator TIAM1, implying an additional function in malignant progression. In MDCKII cells in response to HGF, HUWE1 catalyzes TIAM1 ubiquitylation and degradation predominantly at cell-cell adhesions, facilitating junction disassembly, migration, and invasion. Depleting HUWE1 or mutating the TIAM1 ubiquitylation site prevents TIAM1 degradation, antagonizing scattering, and invasion. Moreover, simultaneous depletion of TIAM1 restores migration and invasion in HUWE1-depleted cells. Significantly, we show that HUWE1 stimulates human lung cancer cell invasion through regulating TIAM1 stability. Finally, we demonstrate that HUWE1 and TIAM1 protein levels are inversely correlated in human lung carcinomas. Thus, we elucidate a critical role for HUWE1 in regulating epithelial cell-cell adhesion and provide additional evidence that ubiquitylation contributes to spatiotemporal control of RAC.

  20. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  1. Ox-LDL Promotes Migration and Adhesion of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Regulation of MCP-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenxi Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs are the most important cell source for stem cell transplant therapy. The migration capacity of MSCs is one of the determinants of the efficiency of MSC-based transplant therapy. Our recent study has shown that low concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL can stimulate proliferation of bmMSCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of ox-LDL on bmMSC migration and adhesion, as well as the related mechanisms. Our results show that transmigration rates of bmMSCs and cell-cell adhesion between bmMSCs and monocytes are significantly increased by treatments with ox-LDL in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Expressions of ICAM-1, PECAM-1, and VCAM-1 as well as the levels of intracellular Ca2+ are also markedly increased by ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. Cytoskeleton analysis shows that ox-LDL treatment benefits to spreading of bmMSCs and organization of F-actin fibers after being plated for 6 hours. More interestingly, treatments with ox-LDL also markedly increase expressions of LOX-1, MCP-1, and TGF-β; however, LOX-1 antibody and MCP-1 shRNA markedly inhibit ox-LDL-induced migration and adhesion of bmMSCs, which suggests that ox-LDL-induced bmMSC migration and adhesion are dependent on LOX-1 activation and MCP-1 expression.

  2. Ganoderiol A-enriched extract suppresses migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells by inhibiting FAK-SRC-paxillin cascade pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Sheng Wu

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion, migration and invasion are critical steps for carcinogenesis and cancer metastasis. Ganoderma lucidum, also called Lingzhi in China, is a traditional Chinese medicine, which exhibits anti-proliferation, anti-inflammation and anti-metastasis properties. Herein, GAEE, G. lucidum extract mainly contains ganoderiol A (GA, dihydrogenated GA and GA isomer, was shown to inhibit the abilities of adhesion and migration, while have a slight influence on that of invasion in highly metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells at non-toxic doses. Further investigation revealed that GAEE decreased the active forms of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and disrupted the interaction between FAK and SRC, which lead to deactivating of paxillin. Moreover, GAEE treatment downregulated the expressions of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, and decreased the interaction between neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASP and Cdc42, which impair cell migration and actin assembly. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that G.lucidum triterpenoids could suppress cell migration and adhesion through FAK-SRC-paxillin signaling pathway. Our study also suggests that GAEE may be a potential agent for treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promotes cancer cell migration via mitogen activated protein kinase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohannessian Arthur

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions activate signaling cascades such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK. Integrin binding to extracellular matrix increases tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Inhibition of FAK activity by expression of its carboxyl terminus decreases cell motility, and cells from FAK deficient mice also show reduced migration. Paxillin is a focal adhesion protein which is also phosphorylated on tyrosine. FAK recruitment of paxillin to the cell membrane correlates with Shc phosphorylation and activation of MAPK. Decreased FAK expression inhibits papilloma formation in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model. We previously demonstrated that MAPK activation was required for growth factor induced in vitro migration and invasion by human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines. Methods Adapter protein recruitment to integrin subunits was examined by co-immunoprecipitation in SCC cells attached to type IV collagen or plastic. Stable clones overexpressing FAK or paxillin were created using the lipofection technique. Modified Boyden chambers were used for invasion assays. Results In the present study, we showed that FAK and paxillin but not Shc are recruited to the β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain following attachment of SCC cells to type IV collagen. Overexpression of either FAK or paxillin stimulated cancer cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane which was dependent on MAPK activity. Conclusions We concluded that recruitment of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin to β1 integrin promoted cancer cell migration via the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

  4. A SAP domain-containing protein shuttles between the nucleus and cell membranes and plays a role in adhesion and migration in D. discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S. Kelsey

    2013-02-01

    The AmpA protein reduces cell adhesion, thereby influencing cell migration in Dictyostelium. To understand how ampA influences cell migration, second site suppressors of an AmpA overexpressing cell line were created by REMI mutagenesis. Mutant candidates were identified by their ability to suppress the large plaques that the AmpA overexpressing cells form on bacterial lawns as a result of their increased rate of migration. One suppressor gene, sma, encodes an uncharacterized protein, which contains a SAP DNA-binding domain and a PTEN-like domain. Using sma gene knockouts and Sma-mRFP expressing cell lines, a role for sma in influencing cell migration was uncovered. Knockouts of the sma gene in a wild-type background enhanced chemotaxis. An additional role for Sma in influencing cell–cell adhesion was also demonstrated. Sma protein transitions between cytosolic and nuclear localizations as a function of cell density. In growing cells migrating to folic acid it is localized to regions of actin polymerization and absent from the nucleus. A role for Sma in influencing ampA mRNA levels is also demonstrated. Sma additionally appears to be involved in ampA pathways regulating cell size, actin polymerization, and cell substrate adhesion. We present insights to the SAP domain-containing group of proteins in Dictyostelium and provide evidence of a role for a SAP domain-containing protein shuttling from the nucleus to sites of actin polymerization during chemotaxis to folic acid and influencing the efficiency of migration.

  5. Imatinib and nilotinib inhibit hematopoietic progenitor cell growth, but do not prevent adhesion, migration and engraftment of human cord blood CD34+ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Belle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs has considerably changed the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib is also known to inhibit the tyrosine kinase of the stem cell factor receptor, c-Kit. Nilotinib is 30 times more potent than imatinib towards BCR-ABL in vitro. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or gastrointestinal stromal tumors have shown that therapeutic doses of nilotinib deliver drug levels similar to those of imatinib. The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effects of imatinib and nilotinib on proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration and engraftment capacities of human cord blood CD34(+ cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: After a 48-hour cell culture with or without TKIs, CFC, LTC-IC, migration, adhesion and cell cycle analysis were performed. In a second time, the impact of these TKIs on engraftment was assessed in a xenotransplantation model using NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ (null mice. RESULTS: TKIs did not affect LTC-IC frequencies despite in vitro inhibition of CFC formation due to inhibition of CD34(+ cell cycle entry. Adhesion of CD34(+ cells to retronectin was reduced in the presence of either imatinib or nilotinib but only at high concentrations. Migration through a SDF-1α gradient was not changed by cell culture in the presence of TKIs. Finally, bone marrow cellularity and human chimerism were not affected by daily doses of imatinib and nilotinib in a xenogenic transplantation model. No significant difference was seen between TKIs given the equivalent affinity of imatinib and nilotinib for KIT. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that combining non-myeloablative conditioning regimen with TKIs starting the day of the transplantation could be safe.

  6. Analysis of in vitro lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration by fluorescent-beads-based flow cytometric cell counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Ingrid; Mesander, G; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Helfrich, Wijnand; Meijer, D.K F; de Leij, Lou

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we describe a new and simple method for flow cytometric quantitation of lymphocyte numbers in lymphocute-endothelial adhesion/transendothelial migration assays. The method exploits fluorescent flow cytometer alignment beads as a counting reference. Known amounts of beads are added to

  7. Immature leukemic CD34+CXCR4+ cells from CML patients have lower integrin-dependent migration and adhesion in response to the chemokine SDF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Amnon; Hardan, Izhar; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Gur, Eyal; Magid, Michal; Darash-Yahana, Merav; Cohen, Ninette; Grabovsky, Valentin; Franitza, Suzana; Kollet, Orit; Lider, Ofer; Alon, Ronen; Rechavi, Gideon; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2002-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a malignant myeloproliferative disorder originating from a pluripotent stem cell expressing the bcr-abl oncogene, is characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow (BM) into the circulation. Moreover, immature CD34+ CML cells have lower adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin as well as lower engraftment potential in severe combined immunedeficient (SCID) and nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice than normal CD34+ cells. We report in this study that leukemic Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+)CD34+ cells from newly diagnosed CML patients that express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 migrate in response to stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). However, normal Ph-CD34+CXCR4+ cells derived from the same patient have significantly higher migration levels toward SDF-1. In contrast to their transwell migration potential, the SDF-1-mediated integrin-dependent polarization and migration of the Ph+CD34+CXCR4+ cells through extracellular matrix-like gels were significantly lower than for normal cells. Concomitantly, binding of these cells to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or fibronectin, in the presence of SDF-1, was also substantially lower. These findings suggest a major role for SDF-1-mediated, integrin-dependent BM retention of Ph+CD34+ cells. PMID:12004084

  8. Regulation of T cell migration during viral infection: role of adhesion molecules and chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, Anneline; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard;

    2003-01-01

    T cell mediated immunity and in particular CD8+ T cells are pivotal for the control of most viral infections. T cells exclusively exert their antiviral effect through close cellular interaction with relevant virus-infected target cells in vivo. It is therefore imperative that efficient mechanisms...

  9. Regulation of integrin trafficking, cell adhesion and cell migration by WASH and the Arp2/3 Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Duleh, Steve N.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    WASH is a nucleation-promoting factor for the Arp2/3 complex that is implicated in multiple endocytic trafficking pathways including receptor recycling, cargo degradation, and retromer-mediated receptor retrieval. We sought to examine whether WASH plays an important role in trafficking of specialized cargo molecules such as integrins, for which trafficking is highly regulated during cell migration. We observed that subdomains of early/sorting endosomes associated with dynamic WASH and filamen...

  10. Matrine inhibits the adhesion and migration of BCG823 gastric cancer cells by affecting the structure and function of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wei ZHANG; Ke SU; Wen-tao SHI; Ying WANG; Peng-chao HU; Yang WANG; Lei WEI

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) expression is upregulated in human cancers and correlates with more invasive advanced tumor stages.The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which matrine,an alkaloid derived from Sophora species plants,acted on the VASP protein in human gastric cancer cells in vitro.Methods:VASP was expressed and purified.Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the binding of matrine to VASP.CD spectroscopy was used to examine the changes in the VASP protein secondary structure.Human gastric carcinoma cell line BGC823 was tested.Scratch wound and cell adhesion assays were used to detect the cell migration and adhesion,respectively.Real-time PCR and Western blotting assays were used to measure mRNA and protein expression of VASP.Results:In the fluorescence assay,the dissociation constant for binding of matrine to VASP protein was 0.86 mmol/L,thus the direct binding between the two molecules was weak.However,matrine (50 μg/mL) caused obvious change in the secondary structure of VASP protein shown in CD spectrum.Treatments of BGC823 cells with matrine (50 μg/mL) significantly inhibited the cell migration and adhesion.The alkaloid changed the subcellular distribution of VASP and formation of actin stress fibers in BGC823 cells.The alkaloid caused small but statistically significant decreases in VASP protein expression and phosphorylation,but had no significant effect on VASP mRNA expression.Conclusion:Matrine modulates the structure,subcellular distribution,expression and phosphorylation of VASP in human gastric cancer cells,thus inhibiting the cancer cell adhesion and migration.

  11. Doxycycline Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Reorganization of Fibrillar Collagen Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Christopher; Ho, Bernard; Mulholland, Diane; Hou, Guangpei; Islam, Muzharul; Donaldson, Katey; Bendeck, Michelle Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Remodeling of injured blood vessels is dependent on smooth muscle cells and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Doxycycline is a broad spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and aneurysms. In the present study, we examine the mechanisms by which doxycycline inhibits smooth muscle cell responses using a series of in vitro assays that mimic critical steps in pathological vascular remodeling. Doxycycline treatment dram...

  12. Adhesion-related kinase induction of migration requires phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ras stimulation of rac activity in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Allen, Melissa P; Xu, Mei; Linseman, Daniel A; Pawlowski, John E; Bouchard, R J; Varnum, Brian C; Heidenreich, Kim A; Wierman, Margaret E

    2007-06-01

    GnRH neurons migrate into the hypothalamus during development. Although migratory defects may result in disordered activation of the reproductive axis and lead to delayed or absent sexual maturation, specific factors regulating GnRH neuronal migration remain largely unknown. The receptor tyrosine kinase, adhesion-related kinase (Ark) (also known as Axl, UFO, and Tyro7), has been implicated in the migration of GnRH neuronal cells. Binding of its ligand, growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and migration of NLT GnRH neuronal cells via Rac and p38 MAPK. Here, we examined the Axl effectors proximal to Rac in the signaling pathway. Gas6/Axl-induced lamellipodia formation and migration were blocked after phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells. The p85 subunit of PI3K coimmunoprecipitated with Axl and was phosphorylated in a Gas6-sensitive manner. In addition, PI3K inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells diminished Gas6-induced Rac activation. Exogenous expression of a dominant-negative form of Ras also decreased GnRH neuronal lamellipodia formation, migration, and Rac activation. PI3K inhibition blocked Ras in addition to Rac activation and migration. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the phospholipase C gamma effectors, protein kinase C or calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II, had no effect on Gas6/Axl signaling to promote Rac activation or stimulate cytoskeletal reorganization and migration. Together, these data show that the PI3K-Ras pathway is a major mediator of Axl actions upstream of Rac to induce GnRH neuronal cell migration. PMID:17332061

  13. Hyperactive RAS/PI3-K/MAPK Signaling Cascade in Migration and Adhesion of Nf1 Haploinsufficient Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene, which affect approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Patients with NF1 suffer from a range of malignant and nonmalignant manifestations such as plexiform neurofibromas and skeletal abnormalities. We previously demonstrated that Nf1 haploinsufficiency in mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs results in impaired osteoblastic differentiation, which may be associated with the skeletal manifestations in NF1 patients. Here we sought to further ascertain the role of Nf1 in modulating the migration and adhesion of MSPCs of the Nf1 haploinsufficient (Nf1+/− mice. Nf1+/− MSPCs demonstrated increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, increased migration, and increased actin polymerization as compared to wild-type (WT MSPCs. Additionally, Nf1+/− MSPCs were noted to have significantly enhanced cell adhesion to fibronectin with selective affinity for CH271 with an overexpression of its complimentary receptor, CD49e. Nf1+/− MSPCs also showed hyperactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways when compared to WT MSPCs, which were both significantly reduced in the presence of their pharmacologic inhibitors, LY294002 and PD0325901, respectively. Collectively, our study suggests that both PI3-K and MAPK signaling pathways play a significant role in enhanced migration and adhesion of Nf1 haploinsufficient MSPCs.

  14. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2-59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  15. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  16. The conveyor belt hypothesis for thymocyte migration: participation of adhesion and de-adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villa-Verde D.M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymocyte differentiation is the process by which bone marrow-derived precursors enter the thymus, proliferate, rearrange the genes and express the corresponding T cell receptors, and undergo positive and/or negative selection, ultimately yielding mature T cells that will represent the so-called T cell repertoire. This process occurs in the context of cell migration, whose cellular and molecular basis is still poorly understood. Kinetic studies favor the idea that these cells leave the organ in an ordered pattern, as if they were moving on a conveyor belt. We have recently proposed that extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, among others, produced by non-lymphoid cells both in the cortex and in the medulla, would constitute a macromolecular arrangement allowing differentiating thymocytes to migrate. Here we discuss the participation of both molecules with adhesive and de-adhesive properties in the intrathymic T cell migration. Functional experiments demonstrated that galectin-3, a soluble ß-galactoside-binding lectin secreted by thymic microenvironmental cells, is a likely candidate for de-adhesion proteins by decreasing thymocyte interaction with the thymic microenvironment.

  17. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  18. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  19. Alternagin-C, a disintegrin-like protein from the venom of Bothrops alternatus, modulates a2ß1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selistre-de-Araujo H.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha2ß1 integrin is a major collagen receptor that plays an essential role in the adhesion of normal and tumor cells to the extracellular matrix. Alternagin-C (ALT-C, a disintegrin-like protein purified from the venom of the Brazilian snake Bothrops alternatus, competitively interacts with the alpha2ß1 integrin, thereby inhibiting collagen binding. When immobilized in plate wells, ALT-C supports the adhesion of fibroblasts as well as of human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and does not detach cells previously bound to collagen I. ALT-C is a strong inducer of HUVEC proliferation in vitro. Gene expression analysis was done using an Affimetrix HU-95A probe array with probe sets of ~10,000 human genes. In human fibroblasts growing on collagen-coated plates, ALT-C up-regulates the expression of several growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as some cell cycle control genes. Up-regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene and other growth factors could explain the positive effect on HUVEC proliferation. ALT-C also strongly activates protein kinase B phosphorylation, a signaling event involved in endothelial cell survival and angiogenesis. In human neutrophils, ALT-C has a potent chemotactic effect modulated by the intracellular signaling cascade characteristic of integrin-activated pathways. Thus, ALT-C acts as a survival factor, promoting adhesion, migration and endothelial cell proliferation after binding to alpha2ß1 integrin on the cell surface. The biological activities of ALT-C may be helpful as a therapeutic strategy in tissue regeneration as well as in the design of new therapeutic agents targeting alpha2ß1 integrin.

  20. Overexpression of Polysialylated Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Improves the Migration Capacity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocyte Precursors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepiel, Marcin; Leicher, Lasse; Becker, Katja; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy aiming at the compensation of lost oligodendrocytes and restoration of myelination in acquired or congenital demyelination disorders has gained considerable interest since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Patient-derived iPSCs provide an inexhaustible

  1. Crk adaptor protein-induced phosphorylation of Gab1 on tyrosine 307 via Src is important for organization of focal adhesions and enhanced cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takuya Watanabe; Masumi Tsuda; Yoshinori Makino; Tassos Konstantinou; Hiroshi Nishihara; Tokifumi Majima; Akio Minami; Stephan M Feller; Shinya Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Upon growth factor stimulation, the scaffold protein, Gabl, is tyrosine phosphorylated and subsequently the adaptor protein, Crk, transmits signals from Gabl. We have previously shown that Crk overexpression, which is detectable in various human cancers, induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Gab1 without extraceilular stimuli. In the present study, the underlying mechanisms were further investigated. Mutational analyses of Crkll demonstrated that the SH2 domain, but not the SH3(N) or the regulatory Y221 residue of Crkll, is critical for the induction of Gabl-Y307 phosphorylation. SH2 mutation of Crkll also decreased the interaction with Gab1. In GST pull-down assay, Crk-SH2 bound to wild-type Gabl, whereas Crk-SH3(N) interacted with the Gabl mutant, which lacks the clus-tered tyrosine region (residues 242-410). Tyrosine phosphorylation of Gabl was induced by all Crk family proteins, but not other SH2-containing signalling adaptors. Src-family kinase inhibitor, PP2, abrogates Crk-induced tyrosine phosphorylations of Gabl. Y307 phosphorylation was undetectable in fibroblasts lacking Src, Yes, and Fyn, even upon overexpression of Crk, whereas cells lacking only Yes and Fyn still contained Gabl with phosphorylated Y307. Furthermore, Crk induced the phosphorylation of Src-Y416; accordingly the interaction between Crk and Csk was increased. The GabI-Y307F mutant failed to localize near the plasma membrane even upon HGF stimulation and decreased cell migration. Moreover, Gabl-Y307F disturbed the localization of Crk, FAK, and paxiilin, which are the typical components of focal adhesions. Taken together, these results indicate that Crk facilitates tyrosine phosphory-lation of Gabl-Y307 through Src, contributing to the organization of focal adhesions and enhanced cell migration, thereby possibly promoting human cancer development.

  2. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P.; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify

  3. Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E‑cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2‑Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2‑Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2‑Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti‑human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2‑Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E‑cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E‑cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2‑Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E‑cadherin. PMID:27431199

  4. 低氧对人肺腺癌A549细胞迁移和黏附的影响%Effect of hypoxia on migration, invasion and adhesion to endothelium of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weigan Shen; Jun Zhu; Zhiyong Yu; Qingyu Xue

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of hypoxia on migration,invasion and adhesion to endothelium of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells.Methods:Wound-healing and Transwell invasion assays were performed to study the effect of hypoxia on migration and invasion of A549 cells,and A549 cells were added to a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to test the ability to adhere to endothelium.Immunofluorescence assay and luciferase reporter gene assay were also used to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on distribution of E-cadherin,β-catenin,and actin,and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent transcription,respectively.Results:Hypoxia facilitated A549 cell migration,invasion,and A549 cell-endothelial cells adhesion,and modulated the distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin,and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement,and up-regulated HIF-1-dependent reporter gene expression in A549 cells.Conclusion:Promotion of A549 cell migration,invasion,and adhesion on endothelium by hypoxia might be modulated through its up-regulating HIF-l-dependent gene expression,which then induced the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin,and the actin cytoskeletal reorganization.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of primary schwann cells and a spontaneously immortalized schwann cell line RSC 96: a comprehensive overview with a focus on cell adhesion and migration related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuhua; Shen, Mi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shuqiang; Yu, Shu; Chen, Gang; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2012-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the principal glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). As a result of tissue heterogeneity and difficulties in the isolation and culture of primary SCs, a considerable understanding of SC biology is obtained from SC lines. However, the differences between the primary SCs and SC lines remain uncertain. In the present study, quantitative proteomic analysis based on isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling was conducted to obtain an unbiased view of the proteomic profiles of primary rat SCs and RSC96, a spontaneously immortalized rat SC line. Out of 1757 identified proteins (FDR RSC96. Bioinformatics analysis indicated the unique features of spontaneous immortalization, illustrated the dedifferentiated state of RSC96, and highlighted a panel of novel proteins associated with cell adhesion and migration including CADM4, FERMT2, and MCAM. Selected proteomic data and the requirement of these novel proteins in SC adhesion and migration were properly validated. Taken together, our data collectively revealed proteome differences between primary SCs and RSC96, validated several differentially expressed proteins with potential biological significance, and generated a database that may serve as a useful resource for studies of SC biology and pathology.

  6. In-vitro rescue and recovery studies of human melanoma (BLM) cell growth, adhesion and migration functions after treatment with progesterone

    OpenAIRE

    Leder, Douglas C; Brown, Jason R; Ramaraj, Pandurangan

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of human melanoma (BLM) cells for 48 hrs with progesterone resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth. The mechanism of growth inhibition was due to autophagy and this action of progesterone was not mediated through progesterone receptor. As cells were floating during treatment, adhesion assay was performed, which showed complete loss of adhesion. When cells were allowed to recover after treatment by culturing in growth medium without progesterone, there was recovery in cel...

  7. SDA, a DNA aptamer inhibiting E- and P-selectin mediated adhesion of cancer and leukemia cells, the first and pivotal step in transendothelial migration during metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassa Faryammanesh

    Full Text Available Endothelial (E- and platelet (P- selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment with a K(d value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29 and leukemia (EOL-1 cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNFα-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies.

  8. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  9. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle traffickin

  10. Controlled induction of focal adhesion disassembly and migration in primary fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunlevy, J R; Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is an integral component of biological processes such as wound healing and embryogenesis. Previous experiments examining fibroblast locomotion from tissue explants have shown that migrating fibroblasts lack, or contain only transient, focal adhesions (focal contacts). Focal...... adhesions are specialized regions of tight cell-matrix interaction, assembled by a complex process of transmembrane signalling. Although the explant model has been used for studying several aspects of fibroblast locomotion, it is limited by the lack of control over migration, and only a small percentage...

  11. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Vera P Krymskaya; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell m...

  12. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  13. On the theory of cell migration: durotaxis and chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Íñiguez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental element in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Alteration of its regulatory mechanisms leads to loss of adhesion and increased motility, critical steps in the initial stages of metastasis. Consequently, cell migration has become the focus of intensive experimental and theoretical studies; however the understanding many of its mechanisms remains elusive. Cell migration is the result of a periodic sequence of protrusion, adhesion remodeling and...

  14. Minocycline suppresses interleukine-6, its receptor system and signaling pathways and impairs migration, invasion and adhesion capacity of ovarian cancer cells: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Ataie-Kachoie

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-6 has been shown to be a major contributing factor in growth and progression of ovarian cancer. The cytokine exerts pro-tumorigenic activity through activation of several signaling pathways in particular signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2. Hence, targeting IL-6 is becoming increasingly attractive as a treatment option in ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of minocycline on IL-6 and its signaling pathways in ovarian cancer. In vitro, minocycline was found to significantly suppress both constitutive and IL-1β or 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OH-E2-stimulated IL-6 expression in human ovarian cancer cells; OVCAR-3, SKOV-3 and CAOV-3. Moreover, minocycline down-regulated two major components of IL-6 receptor system (IL-6Rα and gp130 and blocked the activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways leading to suppression of the downstream product MCL-1. In female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal OVCAR-3 tumors, acute administration (4 and 24 h of minocycline (30 mg/kg led to suppression of IL-6. Even single dose of minocycline was effective at significantly lowering plasma and tumor IL-6 levels. In line with this, tumoral expression of p-STAT3, p-ERK1/2 and MCL-1 were decreased in minocycline-treated mice. Evaluation of the functional implication of minocycline on metastatic activity revealed the capacity of minocycline to inhibit cellular migration, invasion and adhesion associated with down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and 9. Thus, the data suggest a potential role for minocycline in suppressing IL-6 expression and activity. These effects may prove to be an important attribute to the upcoming clinical trials of minocycline in ovarian cancer.

  15. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  16. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  17. Pivotal Role of AKAP12 in the Regulation of Cellular Adhesion Dynamics: Control of Cytoskeletal Architecture, Cell Migration, and Mitogenic Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Akakura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular dynamics are controlled by key signaling molecules such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA and protein kinase C (PKC. AKAP12/SSeCKS/Gravin (AKAP12 is a scaffold protein for PKA and PKC which controls actin-cytoskeleton reorganization in a spatiotemporal manner. AKAP12 also acts as a tumor suppressor which regulates cell-cycle progression and inhibits Src-mediated oncogenic signaling and cytoskeletal pathways. Reexpression of AKAP12 causes cell flattening, reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and the production of normalized focal adhesion structures. Downregulation of AKAP12 induces the formation of thickened, longitudinal stress fibers and the proliferation of adhesion complexes. AKAP12-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit hyperactivation of PKC, premature cellular senescence, and defects in cytokinesis, relating to the loss of PKC scaffolding activity by AKAP12. AKAP12-null mice exhibit increased cell senescence and increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced oncogenesis. The paper describes the regulatory and scaffolding functions of AKAP12 and how it regulates cell adhesion, signaling, and oncogenic suppression.

  18. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  19. Desmosome dynamics in migrating epithelial cells requires the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brett J.; Pashaj, Anjeza; Johnson, Keith R.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Re-modeling of epithelial tissues requires that the cells in the tissue rearrange their adhesive contacts in order to allow cells to migrate relative to neighboring cells. Desmosomes are prominent adhesive structures found in a variety of epithelial tissues that are believed to inhibit cell migration and invasion. Mechanisms regulating desmosome assembly and stability in migrating cells are largely unknown. In this study we established a cell culture model to examine the fate of desmosomal components during scratch wound migration. Desmosomes are rapidly assembled between epithelial cells at the lateral edges of migrating cells and structures are transported in a retrograde fashion while the structures become larger and mature. Desmosome assembly and dynamics in this system are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton prior to being associated with the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton. These studies extend our understanding of desmosome assembly and provide a system to examine desmosome assembly and dynamics during epithelial cell migration. PMID:21945137

  20. NDRG2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma adhesion, migration and invasion by regulating CD24 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of most hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients is poor due to the high metastatic rate of the disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC metastasis is extremely urgent. The role of CD24 and NDRG2 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2), a candidate tumor suppressor gene, has not yet been explored in HCC. The mRNA and protein expression of CD24 and NDRG2 was analyzed in MHCC97H, Huh7 and L-02 cells. Changes in cell adhesion, migration and invasion were detected by up- or down-regulating NDRG2 by adenovirus or siRNA. The expression pattern of NDRG2 and CD24 in HCC tissues and the relationship between NDRG2 and HCC clinical features was analyzed by immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with malignancy in HCC. NDRG2 exerted anti-tumor activity by regulating CD24, a molecule that mediates cell-cell interaction, tumor proliferation and adhesion. NDRG2 up-regulation decreased CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. By contrast, NDRG2 down-regulation enhanced CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 50 human HCC clinical specimens showed a strong correlation between NDRG2 down-regulation and CD24 overexpression (P = 0.04). In addition, increased frequency of NDRG2 down-regulation was observed in patients with elevated AFP serum level (P = 0.006), late TNM stage (P = 0.009), poor differentiation grade (P = 0.002), tumor invasion (P = 0.004) and recurrence (P = 0.024). Our findings indicate that NDRG2 and CD24 regulate HCC adhesion, migration and invasion. The expression level of NDRG2 is closely related to the clinical features of HCC. Thus, NDRG2 plays an important physiological role in HCC metastasis

  1. NDRG2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma adhesion, migration and invasion by regulating CD24 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yurong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of most hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients is poor due to the high metastatic rate of the disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC metastasis is extremely urgent. The role of CD24 and NDRG2 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, has not yet been explored in HCC. Methods The mRNA and protein expression of CD24 and NDRG2 was analyzed in MHCC97H, Huh7 and L-02 cells. Changes in cell adhesion, migration and invasion were detected by up- or down-regulating NDRG2 by adenovirus or siRNA. The expression pattern of NDRG2 and CD24 in HCC tissues and the relationship between NDRG2 and HCC clinical features was analyzed by immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. Results NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with malignancy in HCC. NDRG2 exerted anti-tumor activity by regulating CD24, a molecule that mediates cell-cell interaction, tumor proliferation and adhesion. NDRG2 up-regulation decreased CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. By contrast, NDRG2 down-regulation enhanced CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 50 human HCC clinical specimens showed a strong correlation between NDRG2 down-regulation and CD24 overexpression (P = 0.04. In addition, increased frequency of NDRG2 down-regulation was observed in patients with elevated AFP serum level (P = 0.006, late TNM stage (P = 0.009, poor differentiation grade (P = 0.002, tumor invasion (P = 0.004 and recurrence (P = 0.024. Conclusions Our findings indicate that NDRG2 and CD24 regulate HCC adhesion, migration and invasion. The expression level of NDRG2 is closely related to the clinical features of HCC. Thus, NDRG2 plays an important physiological role in HCC metastasis.

  2. Cell adhesion molecules during odontogenesis and tooth-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play essential roles in the development and disease of tooth and oral structures, as well as in the maintenance of adult tissue structure/function. It has been shown that different types of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play an important part in craniofacial development when ectomesenchymal cells migrate from the neural list to the primitive oral cavity, giving rise to the palatal processes and tooth germs. The role of CAMs in craniofacial developmen...

  3. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeudall, W Andrew; Wrighton, Katharine H; Deb, Sumitra

    2013-01-01

    Pro-oncogenic properties of mutant p53 were investigated with the aid of migration assays, adhesion assays, and soft agar growth assays using cells stably expressing gain-of-function p53 mutants. To determine cell migration, "wound-healing" (scratch) assays and haptotactic (chamber) assays were used. H1299 cells expressing mutant p53 were found to migrate more rapidly than cells transfected with empty vector alone. Results from both types of migration assay were broadly similar. Migratory ability differed for different p53 mutants, suggesting allele-specific effects. Cells expressing p53 mutants also showed enhanced adhesion to extracellular matrix compare to controls. Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. PMID:23150443

  5. Pyk2 Controls Integrin-Dependent CTL Migration through Regulation of De-Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Samuel M S; Ostergaard, Hanne L

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is required for T cell adhesion to ICAM-1; however, the mechanism by which it regulates adhesion remains unexplored. Pyk2 function in murine CTL clones and activated ex vivo CD8(+) T cells was disrupted by pharmacological inhibition, knockdown of expression with small interfering RNA, or expression of the dominant-negative C-terminal domain. We found that Pyk2 is not absolutely required for adhesion of CTL to ICAM-1, but rather delays the initial adhesion. Disruption of Pyk2 function caused cells to display an unusual elongated appearance after 1 h on ICAM-1, consistent with abnormally strong adhesion. Furthermore, the random mobility of CTL on ICAM-1 was severely compromised using all three methods of disrupting Pyk2 function. Live-cell imaging studies revealed that the decreased migration is the result of a defect in the detachment from ICAM-1 at the trailing edge when Pyk2 function is inhibited. Examination of Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation in normal polarized cells demonstrated that Pyk2 phosphorylated at Y579 and Y580 preferentially localizes to the leading edge, whereas Y881-phosphorylated Pyk2 is enriched at the trailing edge, suggesting that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 is spatially regulated in migrating CTL. Additionally, inhibition of Pyk2 caused cells to form multiple LFA-1-rich tails at the trailing edge, most likely resulting from a defect in LFA-1 release required for forward movement. Our results show that Pyk2 contributes to CTL migration by regulating detachment of CTL at the trailing edge, which could explain why Pyk2 is important for chemotactic and migratory responses. PMID:27456486

  6. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  7. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  8. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  9. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  10. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  11. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  12. The Cell Adhesion-associated Protein Git2 Regulates Morphogenetic Movements during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jianxin A.; Foley, Fiona C.; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Christopher E Turner

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through cell adhesion complexes plays a critical role in coordinating cytoskeletal remodeling necessary for efficient cell migration. During embryonic development, normal morphogenesis depends on a series of concerted cell movements; but the roles of cell adhesion signaling during these movements are poorly understood. The transparent zebrafish embryo provides an excellent system to study cell migration during development. Here, we have identified zebrafish git2a and git2b, two new ...

  13. The effect of antibodies against cell-surface adhesion molecules (LFA-1{alpha} and ICAM-1) on the migration and localization of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled leukocytes in acute infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amartey, J.K.; Parhar, R.S.; Al-Sedairy, S.T

    1997-08-01

    The deficiency of adhesion molecules on leukocytes could severely impair their ability to migrate and perform effective immunological functions leading to clinical situations such as LAD (leukocyte adhesion deficiency) syndrome. We investigated the effects of blocking anti-LFA-1{alpha} and ICAM-1 antibody-treated {sup 99m}Tc-labeled leukocytes on the migration and localization to the site of E. coli-induced acute infection in CBA/J mice. A significant inhibition of migration and localization of antibody-treated leukocytes to the site of infection was observed, reaffirming the vital role of these adhesion molecules, especially during scintigraphic examination of patients for deep infections or abscess using labeled leukocytes.

  14. Signal regulatory protein alpha negatively regulates beta2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration and phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Qing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal regulate protein alpha (SIRPalpha is involved in many functional aspects of monocytes. Here we investigate the role of SIRPalpha in regulating beta(2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration (TEM and phagocytosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THP-1 monocytes/macropahges treated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs resulted in a decrease of SIRPalpha expression but an increase of beta(2 integrin cell surface expression and beta(2 integrin-mediated adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha-stimulated human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1 monolayers. In contrast, SIRPalpha overexpression in THP-1 cells showed a significant less monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1-triggered cell surface expression of beta(2 integrins, in particular CD11b/CD18. SIRPalpha overexpression reduced beta(2 integrin-mediated firm adhesion of THP-1 cells to either TNFalpha-stimulated HMEC-1 monolayers or to immobilized intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. SIRPalpha overexpression also reduced MCP-1-initiated migration of THP-1 cells across TNFalpha-stimulated HMEC-1 monolayers. Furthermore, beta(2 integrin-mediated THP-1 cell spreading and actin polymerization in response to MCP-1, and phagocytosis of bacteria were both inhibited by SIRPalpha overexpression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SIRPalpha negatively regulates beta(2 integrin-mediated monocyte adhesion, transendothelial migration and phagocytosis, thus may serve as a critical molecule in preventing excessive activation and accumulation of monocytes in the arterial wall during early stage of atherosclerosis.

  15. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  16. Effects of Single Herbal Drugs on Adhesion and Migration of Melanocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xianqi; Feng Jie; Mu Kuanhou; Ma Huiqun; Niu Xinwu; Liu Chao; Dang Qianli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To find herbs with effects on adhesion and migration of melanocytes in vitro. Materials and Methods: Ethanol extracts from 14 herbs were tested. Normal human melanocytes were obtained from neonatal foreskin, and the 48-well culture dish covered with fibronectin was used for the melanocyte adhesion assay. Motility was assessed by using the micropore filter method. Results: The extracts of could promote both adhesion and migration of melanocytes. Conclusion: The above herbs may play a role through promoting adhesion and/or migration of melanocytes in the treatment of vitiligo.

  17. Effect of Linomide on adhesion molecules, TNF-alpha, nitrogen oxide, and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hai, A; Hershkoviz, R; Weiss, L; Lider, O; Slavin, S

    2005-02-01

    Linomide (quinoline-3-carboxamide) is an immunomodulator with anti-inflammatory effects in rodents with autoimmune diseases. Its mode of action still remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that an investigation of T cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of glycoproteins such as fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN), might provide better understanding of their in vivo mode of action in extravascular inflammatory sites. We examined the effect of Linomide on T cell adhesion to intact ECM, and separately to LN, and FN, and on the release and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and nitrogen oxide (NO) in relation to adhesive molecules in non-obese diabetic (NOD) female spleen cells, focusing on intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44. NOD female mice that developed spontaneous autoimmune insulitis, which destroys pancreatic islets and subsequently leads to insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus, were studied. Linomide, given in the drinking water or added to tissue cultures in vitro, inhibited the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of T cells to ECM, FN and LN, as well as the production and release of TNFalpha and NO, which play a major role in the induction and propagation of T cell-mediated insulitis. In addition, exposure of T cells to Linomide resulted in increased expression of CD44 and ICAM-1 molecules on spleen cells of Linomide-treated mice; such an increase in adhesion molecule expression may lead to more effective arrest of T cell migration in vivo. The regulation of T-cell adhesion, adhesion receptor expression, and inhibition of TNFalpha and NO secretion by Linomide may explain its beneficial role and provide a new tool for suppressing self-reactive T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases. PMID:15652754

  18. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  19. How Do Cells Make Decisions: Engineering Micro- and Nanoenvironments for Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hawa Ngalim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration contributes to cancer metastasis and involves cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM, force generation through the cell's cytoskeletal, and finally cell detachment. Both adhesive cues from the ECM and soluble cues from neighbouring cells and tissue trigger intracellular signalling pathways that are essential for cell migration. While the machinery of many signalling pathways is relatively well understood, how hierarchies of different and conflicting signals are established is a new area of cellular cancer research. We examine the recent advances in microfabrication, microfluidics, and nanotechnology that can be utilized to engineer micro- and nanoscaled cellular environments. Controlling both adhesive and soluble cues for migration may allow us to decipher how cells become motile, choose the direction for migration, and how oncogenic transformations influences these decision-making processes.

  20. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition-the roles of cell morphology, labile adhesion and junctional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Tariq; Luna-Zurita, Luis; de la Pompa, José Luis; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Summers, Ron

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental process during development and disease, including development of the heart valves and tumour metastases. An extended cellular Potts model was implemented to represent the behaviour emerging from autonomous cell morphology, labile adhesion, junctional coupling and cell motility. Computer simulations normally focus on these functional changes independently whereas this model facilitates exploration of the interplay between cell shape changes, adhesion and migration. The simulation model is fitted to an in vitro model of endocardial EMT, and agrees with the finding that Notch signalling increases cell-matrix adhesion in addition to modulating cell-cell adhesion. PMID:23787029

  1. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  2. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  3. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    molecule (NCAM) is a well characterized, ubiquitously expressed CAM that is highly expressed in the nervous system. In addition to mediating cell adhesion, NCAM participates in a multitude of cellular events, including survival, migration, and differentiation of cells, outgrowth of neurites, and formation...... and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two...

  4. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  5. Collective cell migration drives morphogenesis of the kidney nephron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue organization in epithelial organs is achieved during development by the combined processes of cell differentiation and morphogenetic cell movements. In the kidney, the nephron is the functional organ unit. Each nephron is an epithelial tubule that is subdivided into discrete segments with specific transport functions. Little is known about how nephron segments are defined or how segments acquire their distinctive morphology and cell shape. Using live, in vivo cell imaging of the forming zebrafish pronephric nephron, we found that the migration of fully differentiated epithelial cells accounts for both the final position of nephron segment boundaries and the characteristic convolution of the proximal tubule. Pronephric cells maintain adherens junctions and polarized apical brush border membranes while they migrate collectively. Individual tubule cells exhibit basal membrane protrusions in the direction of movement and appear to establish transient, phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase-positive adhesions to the basement membrane. Cell migration continued in the presence of camptothecin, indicating that cell division does not drive migration. Lengthening of the nephron was, however, accompanied by an increase in tubule cell number, specifically in the most distal, ret1-positive nephron segment. The initiation of cell migration coincided with the onset of fluid flow in the pronephros. Complete blockade of pronephric fluid flow prevented cell migration and proximal nephron convolution. Selective blockade of proximal, filtration-driven fluid flow shifted the position of tubule convolution distally and revealed a role for cilia-driven fluid flow in persistent migration of distal nephron cells. We conclude that nephron morphogenesis is driven by fluid flow-dependent, collective epithelial cell migration within the confines of the tubule basement membrane. Our results establish intimate links between nephron function, fluid flow, and morphogenesis.

  6. Cell adhesion on ligand gradient substrates: a thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-01-01

    Gradient distribution of bio-adhesive proteins can regulate multiple cellular processes, including adhesion, growth, and migration. The ability to control the cell function by changing the surface density of immobilized ligands has become increasingly important in design of implantable medical devices and tissue regenerating scaffolds. Recent techniques in fabrication of substrates with controlled surface properties allow the examination of cell sensitivity to a wide range of adhesion gradients. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to these directional cues warrants a quantitative assessment of macroscopic cellular response to the surface gradients, supported by predictive theoretical models. This article presents a theoretical basis to examine the effect of ligand gradients on cellular adhesion, using an equilibrium thermodynamic model. The model facilitates a systematic investigation of the complex interplay of cell-substrate specific adhesions, non-specific repulsions, and membrane elasticity. This purely mechanistic model predicts a biphasic dependence between the extent of cell spreading and its position across the gradient substrate. PMID:19701944

  7. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  8. Sympathetic stimulation facilitates thrombopoiesis by promoting megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shilei; Du, Changhong; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhao, Gaomei; Xu, Yang; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xinmiao; Li, Fengju; Zeng, Dongfeng; Chen, Fang; Wang, Song; Chen, Mo; Wang, Cheng; He, Ting; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-02-25

    The effect of sympathetic stimulation on thrombopoiesis is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that both continual noise and exhaustive exercise elevate peripheral platelet levels in normal and splenectomized mice, but not in dopamine β-hydroxylase-deficient (Dbh(-/-)) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Further investigation demonstrates that sympathetic stimulation via NE or EPI injection markedly promotes platelet recovery in mice with thrombocytopenia induced by 6.0 Gy of total-body irradiation and in mice that received bone marrow transplants after 10.0 Gy of lethal irradiation. Unfavorably, sympathetic stress-stimulated thrombopoiesis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by increasing both the amount and activity of platelets in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. In vitro studies reveal that both NE and EPI promote megakaryocyte adhesion, migration, and proplatelet formation (PPF) in addition to the expansion of CD34(+) cells, thereby facilitating platelet production. It is found that α2-adrenoceptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation is involved in NE- and EPI-induced megakaryocyte adhesion and migration, and PPF is regulated by ERK1/2 activation-mediated RhoA GTPase signaling. Our data deeply characterize the role of sympathetic stimulation in the regulation of thrombopoiesis and reevaluate its physiopathological implications. PMID:26644453

  9. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine;

    2008-01-01

    rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept......During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown...... to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...

  10. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell sprea...

  11. Exendin-4 induces cell adhesion and differentiation and counteracts the invasive potential of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Luciani

    Full Text Available Exendin-4 is a molecule currently used, in its synthetic form exenatide, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exendin-4 binds and activates the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R, thus inducing insulin release. More recently, additional biological properties have been associated to molecules that belong to the GLP-1 family. For instance, Peptide YY and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide have been found to affect cell adhesion and migration and our previous data have shown a considerable actin cytoskeleton rearrangement after exendin-4 treatment. However, no data are currently available on the effects of exendin-4 on tumor cell motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this molecule on cell adhesion, differentiation and migration in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS. We first demonstrated, by Extra Cellular Matrix cell adhesion arrays, that exendin-4 increased cell adhesion, in particular on a vitronectin substrate. Subsequently, we found that this molecule induced a more differentiated phenotype, as assessed by i the evaluation of neurite-like protrusions in 3D cell cultures, ii the analysis of the expression of neuronal markers and iii electrophysiological studies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exendin-4 reduced cell migration and counteracted anchorage-independent growth in neuroblastoma cells. Overall, these data indicate for the first time that exendin-4 may have anti-tumoral properties.

  12. Expression of aquaporin-1 in SMMC-7221 liver carcinoma cells promotes cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongming; FENG Xuechao; YANG Hong; MA Tonghui

    2006-01-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a crucial step in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here we provide evidence that aquaporin expression is involved in tumor cell migration. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated the AQP1 protein expression on the plasma membrane of SMMC-7221 human hepatoma cells. SMMC-7221 cell clones with high (SMMC-7221hPf) and low (SMMC-7221/Pf) water permeability were identified by functional assays with corresponding high and low AQP1 expression. Cell migration rate was remarkably higher in SMMC-7221hPf cells than SMMC-7221/Pf cells, assessed by Boyden chamber and wound healing assays, whereas cell growth and adhesion were not different. Adenovirus-mediated AQP1 expression in SMMC-7221/Pf cells increased their water permeability and migration rate. These results provide the first evidence that aquaporin-mediated membrane water permeability enhances tumor cell migration and may be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis.

  13. Hierarchical Nanopatterns for Cell Adhesion Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schwieder, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical nanopatterned interfaces are an intriguing tool to study clustering processes of proteins like for example integrins that mediate cell adhesion. The aim of this work is the development of innovative methods for the fabrication of hierarchical micro-nanopatterned surfaces and the use of such systems as platforms to study cell adhesion. In the first part of this work different approaches are presented which are suitable for preparing micro-nanopatterned interfaces at a large scale ...

  14. Exogenous Expression of N-Cadherin in Breast Cancer Cells Induces Cell Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazan, Rachel B.; Phillips, Greg R.; Qiao, Rui Fang; Norton, Larry; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2000-01-01

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell–cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin–mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findin...

  15. Micropatterning cell adhesion on polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wei-Hui; Rape, Andrew; Wang, Yu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Cell shape and substrate rigidity play critical roles in regulating cell behaviors and fate. Controlling cell shape on elastic adhesive materials holds great promise for creating a physiologically relevant culture environment for basic and translational research and clinical applications. However, it has been technically challenging to create high-quality adhesive patterns on compliant substrates. We have developed an efficient and economical method to create precise micron-scaled adhesive patterns on the surface of a hydrogel (Rape et al., Biomaterials 32:2043-2051, 2011). This method will facilitate the research on traction force generation, cellular mechanotransduction, and tissue engineering, where precise controls of both materials rigidity and adhesive patterns are important. PMID:23955741

  16. Podoplanin-mediated cell adhesion through extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), one of the representative mucin-like type-I transmembrane glycoproteins specific to lymphatic endothelial cells, is expressed in various cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). On the basis of our previous studies, we have developed the hypothesis that PDPN functions in association with the extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell surface side. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration in oral SCC cells. Forty-four surgical specimens of oral SCC were used for immunohistochemistry for PDPN, and the expression profiles were correlated with their clinicopathological properties. Using ZK-1, a human oral SCC cell system, and five other cell systems, we examined PDPN expression levels by immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR. The effects of transient PDPN knockdown by siRNA in ZK-1 were determined for cellular functions in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in association with CD44 and hyaluronan. Cases without PDPN-positive cells were histopathologically classified as less-differentiated SCC, and SCC cells without PDPN more frequently invaded lymphatics. Adhesive properties of ZK-1 were significantly inhibited by siRNA, and PDPN was shown to collaborate with CD44 in cell adhesion to tether SCC cells with hyaluronan-rich ECM of the narrow intercellular space as well as with the stromal ECM. There was no siRNA effect in migration. We have demonstrated the primary function of PDPN in cell adhesion to ECM, which is to secondarily promote oral SCC cell proliferation.

  17. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against c...

  18. Effect of Twist short hairpin RNA on adhesion, spreading and migration of human cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro%Twist shRNA对人宫颈癌细胞体外黏附、铺展及迁移能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周奇; 李婷; 王国增; 赵婧; 刘岚; 吴乾渝

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过RNA干扰抑制Twist基因在人宫颈癌HeLa细胞中的表达,观察Twist基因沉默对HeLa细胞体外黏附、铺展及迁移能力的影响.方法 根据shRNA设计原则,构建两种靶向Twist基因的短发夹RNA(shRNA)干扰质粒,稳定转染HeLa细胞.通过荧光定量PCR及Western印迹法检测HeLa细胞中Twist基因mRNA和蛋白的表达水平,利用黏附实验、铺展实验和划痕实验检测其对细胞黏附力和迁移力的影响.结果 成功构建的Twist shRNA真核表达载体稳定转染HeLa细胞后可显著降低Twist基因的表达.与对照组相比,Twist基因沉默组细胞的黏附、铺展及迁移能力明显下降(P<0.05).结论 成功构建的Twist shRNA真核表达载体,能有效抑制HeLa细胞黏附、铺展及迁移能力.%Objective To investigate the effect of shRNA of Twist gene on adhesion, spreading and migration of human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Methods Two kinds of shRNA vectors targeting to Twist gene were constructed and stably transfected into HeLa cells. The expressions of Twist gene and protein were detected by fluorescent quantitative PCR and Western blotting. The cell adhesion assay, cell spreading assay and cell migration assay were performed. Results The recombinant plasmids were successfully constructed and stably transfected into HeLa cells. The expression of Twist gene in HeLa cells was depressed significantly. The cell adhesion, spreading and migration activity were inhibited (P < 0.05). Conclusion The shRNA expressing plasmids targeting to Twist gene can inhibit the adhesion, spreading and migration activity of HeLa cells in vitro.

  19. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  20. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  1. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  2. New strategy to control cell migration and metastasis regulated by CCN2/CTGF

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; de Farias, Gabriel Correa; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; de Mattos Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana; Lobo, Julie Calixto; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite; Abreu, José Garcia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN family member 2 (CCN2) is a CCN family member of matricellular signaling modulators. It has been shown that CCN2/CTGF mediates cell adhesion, aggregation and migration in a large variety of cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, aortic smooth muscle and also pluripotent stem cells. Others matricellular proteins are capable of interacting with CCN2/CTGF to mediate its function. Cell migration is a key feature ...

  3. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2007-01-01

    CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM...... to be more than simple regulators of adhesion. Many CAMs are important mediators of intracellular signal transduction, and CAMs are involved in many biological phenomena including migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells, as well as axonal guidance, neurite outgrowth,and synaptic plasticity...

  4. Differential modulation of IL-1-induced endothelial adhesion molecules and transendothelial migration of granulocytes by G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissner, G; Lindner, H; Reisbach, G; Klauke, I; Holler, E

    1997-06-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used for mobilization of haemopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in mobilization and the immune modulatory effects of this growth factor. In this report we show that G-CSF down-regulated intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) induced by Interleukin-1 (IL-1) on human endothelial cells. Interestingly, the G-CSF-mediated down-modulation of IL-1-induced ICAM-1 appeared to be biphasic. In pharmacological concentrations (> 300 ng/ml), and in dose ranges of plasma G-CSF levels above that of nonfebrile healthy individuals (30 pg/ml), a significant decrease in surface ICAM-1 could be observed. This could be explained, at least in part, by an increased autocrine G-CSF production by endothelial cells in response to IL-1 and exogenous G-CSF. In contrast to ICAM-1, IL-1-triggered VCAM-1 expression was superinduced by G-CSF with the optimal concentration of 30 pg/ml. To evaluate the functional significance of these findings, 51Cr adhesion assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or granulocytes known to lack the VCAM-1 counter-receptor very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) and IL-1-stimulated endothelial cells, in the presence or absence of G-CSF, were performed. G-CSF could not inhibit the IL-1-induced adhesion of PBMC to endothelial cells, which may be due to the differential adhesion molecule modulation. In contrast, granulocyte adhesion induced by IL-1 could effectively be blocked by co-incubation with G-CSF. Finally, G-CSF also inhibited transendothelial migration of granulocytes through IL-1-activated endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

  5. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  6. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  7. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Salánki; Csaba Hős; Norbert Orgovan; Beatrix Péter; Noémi Sándor; Zsuzsa Bajtay; Anna Erdei; Robert Horvath; Bálint Szabó

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduc...

  8. To The Abercrombie Meeting and back again: a journey into the world of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Katarzyna Anna

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Abercrombie Meeting took place in Oxford this past summer. It was organized by The Royal Microscopical Society with the support of The British Society for Cell Biology. Michael Abercrombie was a pioneer in the field of investigating cell behavior using time-lapse microscopy. The meeting was focused on "multi-dimensional cell migration in development and disease" and it brought together many of the world's leading researchers in the area, providing an opportunity to discuss the very latest advances and possible future developments in the field. The meeting sessions included Invasive Migration, Invasive Adhesions in Migrating Cells, Signaling in Migration, Immune Cell Migration, Migrations during Morphogenesis and Migration and Disease. As with all Abercrombie meetings, the conference delegates were treated to a staggering array of live cell imaging, in vivo imaging and images generated by the latest developments in microscopy.

  9. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  10. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  11. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling. PMID:26779779

  12. Optical biosensors for cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Jeremy J; Horvath, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides offer an ideal substratum for cells on which to reside. The materials from which the waveguides are made--high refractive index transparent dielectrics--correspond to the coatings of medical implants (e.g., the oxides of niobium, tantalum, and titanium) or the high molecular weight polymers used for culture flasks (e.g., polystyrene). The waveguides can furthermore be modified both chemically and morphologically while retaining their full capability for generating an evanescent optical field that has its greatest strength at the interface between the solid substratum and the liquid phase with which it is invariably in contact (i.e., the culture medium bathing the cells), decaying exponentially perpendicular to the interface at a rate controllable by varying the material parameters of the waveguide. Analysis of the perturbation of the evanescent field by the presence of living cells within it enables their size, number density, shape, refractive index (linked to their constitution) and so forth to be determined, the number of parameters depending on the number of waveguide lightmodes analyzed. No labeling of any kind is necessary, and convenient measurement setups are fully compatible with maintaining the cells in their usual environment. If the temporal evolution of the perturbation is analyzed, even more information can be obtained, such as the amount of material (microexudate) secreted by the cell while residing on the surface. Separation of parallel effects simultaneously contributing to the perturbation of the evanescent field can be accomplished by analysis of coupling peak shape when a grating coupler is used to measure the propagation constants of the waveguide lightmodes. PMID:19635032

  13. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the...

  14. Characterization of a synthetic peptide from type IV collagen that promotes melanoma cell adhesion, spreading, and motility

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion and motility of tumor cells on basement membranes is a central consideration in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Basement membrane type IV collagen directly promotes the adhesion and migration of various tumor cell types in vitro. Our previous studies demonstrated that tumor cells adhered and spread on surfaces coated with intact type IV collagen or either of the two major enzymatically purified domains of this protein. Only one of these major domains, the pepsin-generated maj...

  15. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polyst...

  16. Surface wettability of plasma SiOx:H nanocoating-induced endothelial cells' migration and the associated FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Guixue; Huang, Xianliang; Zhang, Qin; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Chaojun; Yu, Qingsong; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2012-02-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration are essential processes in re-endothelialization of implanted biomaterials. There is no clear relationship and mechanism between EC adhesion and migration behaviour on surfaces with varying wettabilities. As model substrates, plasma SiO(x):H nanocoatings with well-controlled surface wettability (with water contact angles in the range of 98.5 ± 2.3° to 26.3 ± 4.0°) were used in this study to investigate the effects of surface wettability on cell adhesion/migration and associated protein expressions in FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways. It was found that EC adhesion/migration showed opposite behaviour on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces promoted EC migration but were anti-adhesions). The number of adherent ECs showed a maximum on hydrophilic surfaces, while cells adhered to hydrophobic surfaces exhibited a tendency for cell migration. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor targeting the Y-397 site of FAK could significantly inhibit cell adhesion/migration, suggesting that EC adhesion and migration on surfaces with different wettabilities involve (p)FAK and its downstream signalling pathways. Western blot results suggested that the FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways were correlative to EC migration on hydrophobic plasma SiO(x):H surfaces, but uncertain to hydrophilic surfaces. This work demonstrated that surface wettability could induce cellular behaviours that were associated with different cellular signalling events. PMID:21715399

  17. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  18. Crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28 modulates T cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Regulated adhesion enables T cells to migrate through tissue and transiently interact with an endless succession of cells. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) engagement of the CD3/T cell receptor (TCR) complex results in a rapid and transient augmentation of the adhesion function of LFA-1 and VLA integrin molecules on human T cells. We show in this study that mAb crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28, or treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, results in the rapid indu...

  19. Characterization of adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Avraham, H; Cowley, S; Chi, S. Y.; Jiang, S.; Groopman, J E

    1993-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is essential for many immunological functions and is believed to be important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes were characterized in vitro using the CMK megakaryocytic cell line as well as marrow megakaryocytes. Although there was no adhesion between unactivated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and megakaryocytes, treatment of HUVEC with inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 beta, tumor ...

  20. Migration of periodontal ligament fibroblasts on nanometric topographical patterns: influence of filopodia and focal adhesions on contact guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W Hamilton

    Full Text Available Considered to be the "holy grail" of dentistry, regeneration of the periodontal ligament in humans remains a major clinical problem. Removal of bacterial biofilms is commonly achieved using EDTA gels or lasers. One side effect of these treatment regimens is the etching of nanotopographies on the surface of the tooth. However, the response of periodontal ligament fibroblasts to such features has received very little attention. Using laser interference lithography, we fabricated precisely defined topographies with continuous or discontinuous nanogrooves to assess the adhesion, spreading and migration of PDL fibroblasts. PDL fibroblasts adhered to and spread on all tested surfaces, with initial spreading and focal adhesion formation slower on discontinuous nanogrooves. Cells had a significantly smaller planar area on both continuous and discontinuous nanogrooves in comparison with cells on non-patterned controls. At 24 h post seeding, cells on both types of nanogrooves were highly elongated parallel to the groove long axis. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed that PDL fibroblast movement was guided on both types of grooves, but migration velocity was not significantly different from cells cultured on non-patterned controls. Analysis of filopodia formation using time-lapse video microscopy and labeling of vinculin and F-actin revealed that on nanogrooves, filopodia were highly aligned at both ends of the cell, but with increasing time filopodia and membrane protrusions developed at the side of the cell perpendicular to the cell long axis. We conclude that periodontal ligament fibroblasts are sensitive to nanotopographical depths of 85-100 µm, which could be utilized in regeneration of the periodontal ligament.

  1. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. PMID:27344026

  2. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  3. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  4. Effects of high glucose on proliferation, migration, adhesion and secretion of rat late endothelial progenitor cells%高糖对大鼠晚期内皮祖细胞增殖、迁移、黏附及分泌功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 唐可欣; 李宏; 张杰; 成敏

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨不同浓度葡萄糖对骨髓来源的晚期内皮祖细胞(EPCs)增殖、迁移、黏附及分泌功能的影响.方法:密度梯度法获取大鼠骨髓单个核细胞,体外培养EPCs并进行鉴定.以传至第3代的EPCs,即晚期EPCs为靶细胞,分别给予不同浓度的葡萄糖(5、10、20、40 mmol/L)干预,采用MTT比色法、改良的Boyden小室、黏附能力测定实验及ELISA检测高糖对EPCs增殖、迁移、黏附及分泌单核细胞趋化蛋白-1(MCP-1)和白细胞介素-8(IL-8)的影响.结果:与5 mmol/L葡萄糖组(正常浓度组)相比,10 mmol/L﹑20 mmol/L和40 mmol/L葡萄糖处理可浓度依赖性地降低晚期EPCs的增殖、迁移能力.40 mmol/L葡萄糖处理有效地抑制了晚期EPCs的黏附,促进MCP-1和IL-8的释放.结论:高糖抑制晚期EPCs的增殖、迁移和黏附能力,促进EPCs释放炎症细胞因子.%AIM: To investigate the effects of high glucose on the proliferation, adhesion, migration and secretion potentials of late endothelial progenitor cells ( EPCs ) from bone marrow. METHODS: Mononuclear cells were collected from rat bone marrow by density gradient centrifugation and cultured with M199 medium. The early EPCs were identified by Dil - ac - LDL and FITC - UEA - 1 double staining. The late EPCs were identified by RT - PCR to detect the expression of von Willebrand factor( vWF ) and VE - cadherin. Moreover, the cells were identified by FACS to detect the expression of CD133 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor - 2( VEGFR - 2 ). The 3rd generation of EPCs was harvested and incubated with glucose in a series of concentrations ( 5, 10, 20 or 40 mmol/L ). The cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and the secretion of chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein - l( MCP - 1 ) and interleukin - 8 ( IL - 8 ) were assayed with MTT, adhesion test, modified Boyden chamber assay and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with normal glucose ( 5 mmol/L )treatment, high glucose (10

  5. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  6. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM/EGP-2) in developing and adult kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzpis, Monika; Popa, Eliane R.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Van Goor, Harry; Timmer, Albertus; Bosman, Gerrit W.; De Leij, Lou M. F. H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is expressed by most epithelia and is involved in processes fundamental for morphogenesis, including cell-cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Previously, a role for EpCAM in pancreatic morphogenesis was confirmed in

  7. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  8. Effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine on glioblastoma cell invasion and migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-hui MENG; Li-xin ZHOU; Jia-lin LUO; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, on cell growth, migration, and invasion in inva sive human glioblastoma U-87MG cells. Methods: PKC activity was determined based on the PKC-catalyzed transfer of the 32p-phosphate group from [g-32p]ATP into a PKC-specific peptide substrate. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay.Cell invasion and migration were evaluated by a Boyden chamber assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. Protein expression was analyzed using Western blot assay. The formation of 3-dimensional cellular aggregates was examined by a cell-cell aggregation assay. Results: UCN-01 treatment resulted in concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of U-87MG cell growth at higher doses (> 100 nmol/L), and reduced cell invasion and migration capability at less cytotoxic doses (<100 nmol/L). UCN-01 significantly repressed PKC activity. Consistent with this result, UCN-01 blocked cell invasion stimulated by phorbel 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) and ethanol (EtOH), 2 PKC activators. Enforced expression of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and PTEN increased the anti-invasion potential of UCN-01. Exposure to UCN-01 caused a dose-dependent increase in cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The effect of UCN-01 on the formation of cell-cell aggregation was significantly reduced by the addition of an anti-E-cadherin antibody. Conclusion: UCN-01 inhibits the invasion and migration of human glioma cells. Accordingly, UCN-01 can have potential clinical applications for the treatment of human glioma metastasis.

  9. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  10. The adhesion modulation protein, AmpA localizes to an endocytic compartment and influences substrate adhesion, actin polymerization and endocytosis in vegetative Dictyostelium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noratel Elizabeth F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AmpA is a secreted 24Kd protein that has pleiotropic effects on Dictyostelium development. Null mutants delay development at the mound stage with cells adhering too tightly to the substrate. Prestalk cells initially specify as prespore cells and are delayed in their migration to the mound apex. Extracellular AmpA can rescue these defects, but AmpA is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for anterior like cells (ALCs to migrate to the upper cup. The ALCs are only 10% of the developing cell population making it difficult to study the cell autonomous effect of AmpA on the migration of these cells. AmpA is also expressed in growing cells, but, while it contains a hydrophobic leader sequence that is cleaved, it is not secreted from growing cells. This makes growing cells an attractive system for studying the cell autonomous function of AmpA. Results In growing cells AmpA plays an environment dependent role in cell migration. Excess AmpA facilitates migration on soft, adhesive surfaces but hinders migration on less adhesive surfaces. AmpA also effects the level of actin polymerization. Knockout cells polymerize less actin while over expressing cells polymerize more actin than wild type. Overexpression of AmpA also causes an increase in endocytosis that is traced to repeated formation of multiple endocytic cups at the same site on the membrane. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that AmpA is found in the Golgi and colocalizes with calnexin and the slow endosomal recycling compartment marker, p25, in a perinuclear compartment. AmpA is found on the cell periphery and is endocytically recycled to the perinuclear compartment. Conclusion AmpA is processed through the secretory pathway and traffics to the cell periphery where it is endocytosed and localizes to what has been defined as a slow endosomal recycling compartment. AmpA plays a role in actin polymerization and cell substrate adhesion. Additionally AmpA influences cell

  11. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  12. Migration of Cells in a Social Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M.;

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. While this is essential for the basic processes of life such as embryonic development, wound healing and unregulated migration furthermore is implicated in diseases such as cancer, the influence of neighboring....... We quantified1 the migration of thousands of individual cells in their population context using time-lapse microscopy, microfluidic cell culture and automated image analysis, and discovered a much richer dynamics in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, displacement...

  13. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  14. Disaccharides generated from heparan sulphate or heparin modulate chemokine-induced T-cell adhesion to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Schor, H; Ariel, A; Hecht, I; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Cahalon, L

    2000-01-01

    We have found previously that disaccharides (DS) enzymatically generated from heparin or heparan sulphate can modulate tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from immune cells in vitro and cell-mediated immune reactions in vivo. Here, we show that such DS can modulate the adhesion and migration of human T cells. We found that certain heparin- and heparan sulphate-derived DS induced, in a dose-dependent manner, the adhesion of human T cells to both extracellular matrix (ECM) and immobilized fibronectin (FN); maximal T-cell adhesion occurred with 1 ng/ml of DS. The levels of T-cell adhesion to ECM that were induced by the tested DS molecules resembled those induced by the prototypic chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta). However, the kinetics of DS-induced T-cell adhesion to FN resembled that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not that induced by MIP-1beta. This adhesion appeared to involve beta1 integrin recognition and activation, and was associated with specific intracellular activation pathways. Although a first exposure of T cells to certain DS molecules appeared to result in cell adhesion, a subsequent exposure of T cells to pro-adhesive chemokines, such as MIP-1beta or RANTES, but not to other pro-adhesive stimuli, for example interleukin-2 or CD3 cross-linking, resulted in inhibition of T-cell adhesion to and chemotactic migration through FN. Hence, we propose that the breakdown products of tissues generated by inflammatory enzymes are part of an intrinsic functional programme, and not necessarily molecular waste. Moreover, because the DS molecules exert their modulatory functions within a limited time, it appears that the historical encounters of the tissue-invading cells with the constituents of inflamed loci may dictate the cells' behaviour upon subsequent exposure to proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10651945

  15. Adhesion of Aeromonas sp. to cell lines used as models for intestinal adhesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirov, S M; Hayward, L. J.; Nerrie, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion to HEp-2 cells has been shown to correlate with enteropathogenicity for Aeromonas species. Such adhesion is thought to reflect the ability of strains to adhere to human intestinal enterocytes, although HEp-2 cells are not of intestinal origin. In this study strains of Aeromonas veronii biotype sobria isolated from various sources were investigated in parallel assays for their ability to adhere to HEp-2 cells and to an intestinal cell line (Caco-2). Quantitative assays showed identica...

  16. Dynamic force spectroscopy to probe adhesion strength of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prechtel, K.; Bausch, A. R.; Marchi-Artzner, V.; Kantlehner, M.; Kessler, H; Merkel, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mechanical strength of the adhesion of living cells to model membranes. The latter contained a RGD lipopeptide which is a high affinity binding site for a cell adhesion molecule (integrin alpha(V)beta(3)). Cells adhered specifically to the vesicles. We used micropipette aspiration for breaking this adhesion with well defined forces. Systematic variation of the rate of force application revealed pronounced kinetic effects. The dependence of the detachment forces on the loading r...

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Melanoma Cell Migration with an Elastic Continuum Model for the Evaluation of the Influence of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Vianna Gallinaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An elastic continuum mathematical model was implemented to study collective C8161 melanoma cell migration during a “scratch wound” assay, in control and under the influence of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. The model has four constants: force that results from lamellipod formation (F, adhesion constant between cells and extracellular matrix (ECM (b, cell layer elasticity modulus (k, and growth rate (ρ. A nonlinear regression routine was used to obtain the parameters of the model with data from an experiment made with C8161 melanoma cells, with and without TNF-α. Coefficient of determination for both situations was R2=0.89 and R2=0.92, respectively. The parameters values obtained were similar to the ones found in the literature. However, the adhesion constant value decreased with the introduction of TNF-α, which is not in accordance with expected since the presence of TNF-α is associated with an increased expression of integrins that would promote an enhanced adhesion among cells. The model was used in a study relating to the adhesion constant and cell migration, and the results suggested that cell migration decreases with higher adhesion, which is also not in accordance with expected. These differences would not occur if it was considered that TNF-α increases the elasticity modulus of the cell layer.

  18. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  19. Effects on Cervical Cancer Cell Migration, Adhesion and Invasion Introduced by Microsecond Pulsed Electric Field%微秒脉冲电场对宫颈癌细胞粘附、侵袭和迁移能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成祥; 孙才新; 姚陈果; 米彦; 张琴; 熊正爱

    2011-01-01

    It is of great importance for physical tumor therapies, including the irreversible electroporation (IRE), to inhibit the migratiov; adhesion and invasion abilities of the residual cancer cells after treatment. Whether or not the inhibition can be achieved determines' to a large extent, the therapeutic effects and the success to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and metastasis. We investigate the effects of microsecond pulsed electric field (μsPEF) on cell migration, adhesion and invasion abilities with adhesion experiment, invasion and migration assays on human Hela cells. It is proved that/ISPEF can inhibit the three abilities above to a certain degree, and that the larger the.field strength applied is, the better inhibition can be resulted in. The experimental results demonstrate that t~sPEF has a good performance incancer recurrence and metastasis, which may serve to highlight the advantages of IRE for cancer treatment and promote its clinical application further.%摘要:对于不可逆电穿孔(irreversible electroporation,IRE)技术等治疗肿瘤的物理疗法而言,术后残存肿瘤细胞的粘附、侵袭和迁移能力能否被抑制,是关系到能否降低肿瘤复发和转移风险、巩固和保证治疗效果的重要问题。为探讨采用不可逆电穿孔治疗肿瘤时,所施加的μs脉冲电场对残存肿瘤细胞粘附、侵袭和迁移能力的抑制作用,以人宫颈癌细胞系Hela为对象,采用固定脉宽100/μs、频率1Hz、脉冲个数8个,电场强度分别为500、1000和1500V/cm的脉冲电场进行处理,通过基质胶的粘附实验、

  20. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  1. Chemistry and biology of the compounds that modulate cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental step for embryonic development, wound repair, immune responses, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Extensive studies have attempted to reveal the molecular mechanisms behind cell migration; however, they remain largely unclear. Bioactive compounds that modulate cell migration show promise as not only extremely powerful tools for studying the mechanisms behind cell migration but also as drug seeds for chemotherapy against tumor metastasis. Therefore, we have screened cell migration inhibitors and analyzed their mechanisms for the inhibition of cell migration. In this mini-review, we introduce our chemical and biological studies of three cell migration inhibitors: moverastin, UTKO1, and BU-4664L.

  2. Artemether Combined with shRNA Interference of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Significantly Inhibited the Malignant Biological Behavior of Human Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Bin Wang; Yi Hu; Zhen Li; Ping Wang; Yi-Xue Xue; Yi-Long Yao; Bo Yu; Yun-Hui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells. U87 human glioma ...

  3. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  4. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  5. Dynamic monitoring of changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness during leukocyte adhesion by microelectrical impedance assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun Ge; Tongle Deng; Xiaoxiang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells in inflammation processes leads to changes of endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness, and understanding of such changes will provide us with important information of inflammation processes. In this study, we used a non-invasive biosensor system referred to as real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system to monitor the changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness induced by human monoblastic cell line U937 cell adhesion in a dynamic and quantitative manner. This assay, which is based on cell-substrate impedance readout, is able to monitor transient changes in cell-substrate adhesiveness as a result of U937 cell adhesion. The U937 cell adhesion to endothelial cells was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the number of adherent U937 cells to the endothelial cells was verified by a standard assay, the adhesiveness of endothelial cells after addition of U937 cells was monitored by the RT-CES system. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase protein decrease and F-actin rearrangement in endothelial cells were observed after addition of U937 cells. Our results indicated that the adhesion of U937 cells to LPS-treated endothelial cells reduced the cell adhesiveness to the substrate, and such reduction might facilitate infiltration of leukocytes.

  6. IL-1β enhances cell adhesion to degraded fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1β is a prominent proinflammatory cytokine that mediates degradation of extracellular matrix proteins through increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, which involves a signaling pathway in adherent cells that is restricted by focal adhesions. Currently, the mechanism by which IL-1β affects cell adhesion to matrix proteins is not defined, and it is not known whether degraded matrix proteins affect IL-1β signaling. We examined adhesion-related IL-1β signaling in fibroblasts attachi...

  7. Cell Migration from Baby to Mother

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, Gavin S.; Tan, Xiao Wei; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Fetal cells migrate into the mother during pregnancy. Fetomaternal transfer probably occurs in all pregnancies and in humans the fetal cells can persist for decades. Microchimeric fetal cells are found in various maternal tissues and organs including blood, bone marrow, skin and liver. In mice, fetal cells have also been found in the brain. The fetal cells also appear to target sites of injury. Fetomaternal microchimerism may have important implications for the immune status of women, influen...

  8. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Qiong-yu [Department of Basic Medical Science, Yongzhou Vocational Technical College, Yong Zhou 425100 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: lingxiaocsu@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha 410018 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  9. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface.

  10. Proliferation,Migration and Adhesion Effects of Extracted Clastrus Orbiculatus Containing Serum on Hepatoma Cells Line SMMC 7721%南蛇藤提取物含药血清对人肝癌SMMC 7721细胞增殖、迁移和黏附作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 员林; 钱亚云; 侯莹; 郭试瑜; 久光正; 刘延庆

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This essay aims to prepare rabbit serum containing the Clastrus Orbiculatus extracts (COE) and to investigate preliminarily the effects on proliferation, migration and adhesion in human hepatic carcinoma SMMC 7721 cells. METHODS The New Zealand white rabbits received COE with dose of 20 mg/(kg. d) by gavage. The medicated rabbit serum was obtained with serum phamacological approach. SMMC 7721 cells were cultured in media with different dosages of COE-containing medicated serum (the low, medium, high dose groups containing 10 %, 20 %, 30 % medicated serum respectively). At the same time, the solvent vehicle control (DMSO) group and 5- Fu positive control group were set up. The proliferation inhibition effect of medicated serum containing COE on SMMC 7721 cells was detected by microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The migration and adhesion ability of SMMC 7721 cells were assayed by Borden chamber experiment and adhesion test. RESULTS COE-containing medicated serum of each dose could significantly inhibit cell proliferation (P<0.05). Cell migration ability of medium, high dose groups were decreased significantly. After being treated with COE-containing medicated serum, cell homogeneous adhesion ability was significantly promoted, while the heterogenous adhesion ability with Matrigel and human umbilical vein endothelial cell were decreased significantly (P <0.05, P<0.01) compared with the negative control group in a dose and time dependent manner. CONCLUSION COEcontaining medicated serum can significantly inhibit proliferation, migration and adhesion of SMMC 7721 cells in vitro.%目的 制备南蛇藤(Celastrus Orbiculatus)乙酸乙酯提取物兔含药血清,研究其对人肝癌SMMC 7721细胞株的增殖、迁移和黏附的影响.方法 取新西兰白兔,以20mg/kg·d南蛇藤提取物灌胃,按血清药理学方法制备含药血清.设低、中、高剂量组(分别含有10%,20%,30%的南蛇藤提取

  11. Cell adhesion molecules in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Togashi, Hideru; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion molecules play key roles at the intercellular junctions of a wide variety of cells, including interneuronal synapses and neuron-glia contacts. Functional studies suggest that adhesion molecules are implicated in many aspects of neural network formation, such as axon-guidance, synapse formation, regulation of synaptic structure and astrocyte-synapse contacts. Some basic cell biological aspects of the assembly of junctional complexes of neurons and glial cells resemble those ...

  12. Substrate Elastic Modulus Regulates the Morphology, Focal Adhesions, and alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression of Retinal Muller Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; van Putten, Sander M.; Wouters, Olaf; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix has been shown to regulate cell adhesion, migration, and transdifferentiation in fibrotic processes. Retinal Muller cells have been shown to be mechanosensitive; they are involved in fibrotic vitreoretinal diseases. Since fibrosis increases the rigi

  13. Constitutive activation of BMP signalling abrogates experimental metastasis of OVCA429 cells via reduced cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Trevor G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4 signalling in human ovarian cancer cells induces a number of phenotypic changes in vitro, including altered cell morphology, adhesion, motility and invasion, relative to normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells. From these in vitro analyses, we had hypothesized that active BMP signalling promotes the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer. Methods To test this directly, we engineered OVCA429 human ovarian cancer cells possessing doxycycline-inducible expression of a constitutively-active mutant BMP receptor, ALK3QD, and administered these cells to immunocompromised mice. Further characterization was performed in vitro to address the role of activated BMP signalling on the EOC phenotype, with particular emphasis on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell adhesion. Results Unexpectedly, doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression in OVCA429 cells reduced tumour implantation on peritoneal surfaces and ascites formation when xenografted into immunocompromised mice by intraperitoneal injection. To determine the potential mechanisms controlling this in vivo observation, we followed with several cell culture experiments. Doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression enhanced the refractile, spindle-shaped morphology of cultured OVCA429 cells eliciting an EMT-like response. Using in vitro wound healing assays, we observed that ALK3QD-expressing cells migrated with long, cytoplasmic projections extending into the wound space. The phenotypic alterations of ALK3QD-expressing cells correlated with changes in specific gene expression patterns of EMT, including increased Snail and Slug and reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression. In addition, ALK3QD signalling reduced β1- and β3-integrin expression, critical molecules involved in ovarian cancer cell adhesion. The combination of reduced E-cadherin and β-integrin expression correlates directly with the reduced EOC cell cohesion in spheroids and

  14. Inducible adhesion of mesenchymal cells to elastic fibers: elastonectin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hornebeck, W; Tixier, J M; L. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The addition of highly purified elastic fibers to confluent human skin fibroblast or porcine aorta smooth muscle cell cultures resulted in a time-dependent, strong adhesion of the fibrils to the cell surface. The kinetics of adhesion was studied by video/time-lapse cinematography. After a 0.5-1 hr lag period, adhesion progressed to a maximum amount in 3-6 hr in the described conditions. Adhesion is strongly accelerated by the prior addition of soluble elastin peptides (kappa-elastin) to the c...

  15. Novel pharmacologic targeting of tight junctions and focal adhesions in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Hensley

    Full Text Available Cancer cell resistance to anoikis driven by aberrant signaling sustained by the tumor microenvironment confers high invasive potential and therapeutic resistance. We recently generated a novel lead quinazoline-based Doxazosin® derivative, DZ-50, which impairs tumor growth and metastasis via anoikis. Genome-wide analysis in the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145 identified primary downregulated targets of DZ-50, including genes involved in focal adhesion integrity (fibronectin, integrin-α6 and talin, tight junction formation (claudin-11 as well as insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3 and the angiogenesis modulator thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1. Confocal microscopy demonstrated structural disruption of both focal adhesions and tight junctions by the downregulation of these gene targets, resulting in decreased cell survival, migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM components in two androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145. Stabilization of cell-ECM interactions by overexpression of talin-1 and/or exposing cells to a fibronectin-rich environment mitigated the effect of DZ-50. Loss of expression of the intracellular focal adhesion signaling effectors talin-1 and integrin linked kinase (ILK sensitized human prostate cancer to anoikis. Our findings suggest that DZ-50 exerts its antitumor effect by targeting the key functional intercellular interactions, focal adhesions and tight junctions, supporting the therapeutic significance of this agent for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  16. A role for E-cadherin in ensuring cohesive migration of a heterogeneous population of non-epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Kyra; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Collective cell migration is a key process underlying the morphogenesis of many organs as well as tumour invasion, which very often involves heterogeneous cell populations. Here we investigated how such populations can migrate cohesively in the Drosophila posterior midgut, comprised of epithelial and mesenchymal cells and show a novel role for the epithelial adhesion molecule E-cadherin (E-Cad) in mesenchymal cells. Despite a lack of j...

  17. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane C. Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  18. Tumor conditioned medium regulates the proliferation, adhesion and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells%肿瘤条件培养基对人脐静脉内皮细胞增殖、黏附、迁移能力的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 蒋春雷

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of tumor conditioned medium (TCM) on the proliferation, adhesion and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). Cells were divided into control group, TCM stock solution group, TCM monodilution group and TCM didilution group (n = 6), and MTT assay was used to determine endothelial cells proliferation level after being stimulated with TCM for 24 h. Coating culture dishes with Fn was used to detect the adhesion ability of endothelial cells to basement membrane in control group and TCM stock solution group (n = 6). Wound closure model was used to test the migration ability of endothelial cells in control group and TCM stock solution group at 12 h and 24 h (n = 6). The results showed that TCM at different concentrations influenced proliferation of endothelial cells in distinct degree. Compared to the control group (absor-bance value: 0.58 ± 0.04), the stock solution had no effect on proliferation of endothelial cells (absorbance value: 0.55 ± 0.01). However, the TCM monodilution and the TCM didilution enhanced the proliferation of endothelial cells significantly (absorbance value: 0.66 ± 0.03, P < 0.01 and 0.70 ± 0.02, P < 0.001 separately). TCM downregulated the adhesion of endothelial cells to basement membrane. Moreover, compared to the migration distance of control group at 12 h and 24 h [(14.05 ± 6.25) μm and (48.75 ± 16.37) |im separately], TCM upregulated the basement membrane migration [(68.25 ± 26.20) um and (119.70 ± 34.90) urn at 12 h and 24 h, bothP < 0.05 separately]. These results suggest that TCM downregulates the adhesion ability of endothelial cells and upregulates their migration ability, and thus facilitates tumor metastasis.%本文旨在研究肿瘤条件培养基(tumor conditioned medium,TCM)对人脐静脉内皮细胞(human umbilical vein endothelial cell,HUVEC)增殖、黏附和迁移能力的影响.采用MTT法测定TCM作用24 h后内皮细胞的增殖水平,

  19. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome. PMID:26137890

  20. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr Dzementsei

    2013-11-01

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17–19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28–30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  1. A new candidate substrate for cell-matrix adhesion study: the acellular human amniotic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianchen; Lu, Xuya; Xue, Yuan; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Xiaotao; Zhao, Huajian

    2012-01-01

    In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D) matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM) with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  2. A New Candidate Substrate for Cell-Matrix Adhesion Study: The Acellular Human Amniotic Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianchen Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  3. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    2013-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell, prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a, which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression.

  4. Differential adhesion of tumor cells to capillary endothelial cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Alby, L; Auerbach, R

    1984-01-01

    Adhesion studies were carried out to determine the relative ability of glioma cells and ovary-derived teratoma cells to adhere to endothelial cells obtained from mouse brain capillaries (designated MBE cell line) or mouse ovaries (designated MOE cell line). The teratoma cells showed preferential adhesion to MOE cells, whereas the glioma cells showed preferential adhesion to the MBE cell line. In contrast, the glioma and teratoma cells adhered equally to L929 and 3T3 fibroblasts. A testicular ...

  5. Tetrahydrocurcumin inhibits HT1080 cell migration and invasion via downregulation of MMPs and uPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supachai YODKEEREE; Spiridione GARBISA; Pomngarm LIMTRAKUL

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is an active metabolite of curcumin. It has been reported to have similar pharmacological activity to curcumin. The proteases that participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation are involved in cancer cell metastasis. The present study investigates the effect of an ultimate metabolite of curcumin, THC, on the invasion and motility of highly-metastatic HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Methods: The effect of THC on HTI080 cell invasion and migration was determined using Boyden chamber assay. Cell-adhesion assay was used for examining the binding of cells to ECM molecules. Zymography assay was used to analyze the effect of THC on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) secretion from HT1080 cells. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) proteins levels were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: Treatment with THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration in a dose-dependent manner. THC also decreased the cell adhesion to Matrigel and laminin-coated plates. Analysis by zymography demonstrated that treatment with THC reduced the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA. THC also inhibited the levels of MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 proteins detected by Western blot analysis. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration. The inhibition of cancer cell invasion is associated with the downregulation of ECM degradation enzymes and the inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM proteins.

  6. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  7. Identification of a novel agrin-dependent pathway in cell signaling and adhesion within the erythroid niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A; Lauranzano, E; Soldani, C; Ploia, C; Angioni, R; D'amico, G; Sarukhan, A; Mazzon, C; Viola, A

    2016-08-01

    Establishment of cell-cell adhesion is crucial in embryonic development as well as within the stem cell niches of an adult. Adhesion between macrophages and erythroblasts is required for the formation of erythroblastic islands, specialized niches where erythroblasts proliferate and differentiate to produce red blood cells throughout life. The Eph family is the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and controls cell adhesion, migration, invasion and morphology by modulating integrin and adhesion molecule activity and by modifying the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we identify the proteoglycan agrin as a novel regulator of Eph receptor signaling and characterize a novel mechanism controlling cell-cell adhesion and red cell development within the erythroid niche. We demonstrate that agrin induces clustering and activation of EphB1 receptors on developing erythroblasts, leading to the activation of α5β1 integrins. In agreement, agrin knockout mice display severe anemia owing to defective adhesion to macrophages and impaired maturation of erythroid cells. These results position agrin-EphB1 as a novel key signaling couple regulating cell adhesion and erythropoiesis. PMID:26990660

  8. A study of the cell adhesions molecules, E-Cadherin and C-CAM, and the intermediate filaments, nestin, in craniofacial and tooth development

    OpenAIRE

    Terling, Catharina

    1998-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE CELL ADHESION MOLECULES, E-CADHERIN AND C-CAM AND THE INTERMEDIATE FILAMENT NESTIN IN CRANIOFACIAL AND TOOTH DEVELOPMENT. Catharina Terling The Department of Basic Oral Sciences, The Center of Oral Biology, Novum Research Park and The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in cell migration, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation within the embryo, and ...

  9. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  10. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  11. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Málaga-Trillo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins (PrPs are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1 mediates Ca(+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2 modulates Ca(+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin-based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development.

  12. Migration of cells in a social context

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savaş; Johnston, Darius M.; Bruus, Henrik; Quake, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory behavior characterized by short-time directional persistence with long-time random movement. We discovered a much richer dynamic in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, di...

  13. Neurotensin is a Versatile Modulator of In Vitro Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell (PDAC Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While the neurotensin (NT roles in pancreatic cancer growth are well documented, its effects on pancreatic cancer cell migration have not been described. Methods: The NT-induced effects on the migration process of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells (PDACs were characterized by means of various assays including computer-assisted video-microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, ELISA-based, small GTPase pull-down and phosphorylation assays. Results: The NT-induced modifications on in vitro PDACs migration largely depended on the extra-cellular matrix environment and cell propensity to migrate collectively or individually. While NT significantly reduced the level of migration of collectively migrating PDACs on vitronectin, it significantly increased the level of individually migrating PDACs. These effects were mainly mediated through the sortilin/NTR3 receptor. Neurotensin both induced altered expression of αV and β5 integrin subunits in PDACs cultured on vitronectin resulting in modified adhesion abilities, and caused modifications to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton through the NT-mediated activation of small Rho GTPases. While the NT effects on individually migrating PDACs were mediated at least through the EGFR/ERK signaling pathways, those on collectively migrating PDACs appeared highly dependent on the PI 3-kinase pathway. Conclusion: This study strongly suggests the involvement of neurotensin in the modulation of human PDAC migration.

  14. Plasticity of cell migration: a multiscale tuning model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.H.A.; Wolf, K. van der

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration underlies tissue formation, maintenance, and regeneration as well as pathological conditions such as cancer invasion. Structural and molecular determinants of both tissue environment and cell behavior define whether cells migrate individually (through amoeboid or mesenchymal modes) or

  15. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  16. Migration of cells in a social context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M;

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory...... based on the experimentally identified "cellular traffic rules" and basic physics that revealed that these emergent behaviors are caused by the interplay of single-cell properties and intercellular interactions, the latter being dominated by a pseudopod formation bias mediated by secreted chemicals...... and pseudopod collapse following collisions. The model demonstrates how aspects of complex biology can be explained by simple rules of physics and constitutes a rapid test bed for future studies of collective migration of individual cells....

  17. Adhesive Micropatterns for Cells: A Microcontact Printing Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Manuel Théry and Matthieu Piel Corresponding authors ([](); []()) ### INTRODUCTION This protocol describes a simple, fast, and efficient method for making adhesive micropatterns that can be used to control individual cell shape and adhesion patterns. It is based on the use of an elastomeric stamp containing microfeatures to print proteins on the substrate of choice. The process can be subdiv...

  18. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    of contact. Staphylococcus xylosus DSM 20266 and Staphylococcus epidermidis DSM 20044 showed much higher adhesion forces than Pseudomonas fluorescens AH1, but bond strengthening by P. aeruginosa (2 s) was faster than for the staphylococci (10 s) . Escherichia coli DSM 429, which was the only strain unable...... to form biofilm, showed almost no adhesion to any surface. The differences between staphylococci and P. fluorescens in adhesion pattern reflects their differences in the composition of extracellular adhesins. Both adhesion force and rupture length were significantly smaller on mica compared to glass....... Staphylococci adhere stronger on fresh glass than on hydrophilic glass, while the weaker adhesion by P. fluorescens was similar on both types of glass. These results confirmed the importance of surface hydrophobicity in bacterial adhesion. This study has demonstrated that single-cell force spectroscopy allows...

  19. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  20. Evidence for heterophilic adhesion of embryonic retinal cells and neuroblastoma cells to substratum-adsorbed NCAM

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of embryonic chicken retinal cells and mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells to purified embryonic chicken retinal NCAM adsorbed on a solid substratum was examined using a quantitative centrifugal adhesion assay. Both cell types adhered to NCAM and the adhesion was specifically inhibited by monovalent anti-NCAM antibody fragments. N2A cell adhesion depended on the amount of NCAM applied to the substratum, was cation independent, and was insensitive to treatment with the cytoskeletal pert...

  1. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  2. Physics of adhesion and elasticity of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    Forces exerted by adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. By pulling on their environment, cells sense rigidity gradients, boundaries and strains induced by the presence of other cells. Many cell types respond to these signals by actively adjusting the magnitude and direction of the adhesions that connect cells to surfaces or to each other. These adhesions are formed from membrane-bound integrin proteins and other cytoplasmic proteins that form condensed domains that grow in the direction of externally applied or internal, cytoskeletal forces. We present a model for the adsorption of adhesion proteins from the cell interior to the adhesion site and the resulting, force-sensitive anisotropic growth. The theory couples the mechanical forces to the non- linear adsorption dynamics and predicts the growth velocities of the back and front of the adhesion in qualitative agreement with experiment. The adhesion forces generated by a collection of cells in a tissue significantly alter the overall elastic response of the system. We model an ensemble of cells by an extension of the treatment of dielectric response of polar molecules to elastic interactions. By introducing the elastic analogy of the dielectric constant of the medium, we are able to predict the average cell polarization, their orientational order, and the effective material constants.

  3. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: Inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-06-01

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, CPs have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of CPs with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-l-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized CP substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, amine functionality present on CPs can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  4. Soluble adhesion molecules in human cancers: sources and fates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Ruiter, D.J.; Swart, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion molecules endow tumor cells with the necessary cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. As such, adhesion molecules are involved in cell signalling, proliferation and tumor growth. Rearrangements in the adhesion repertoire allow tumor cells to migrate, invade and form metastases. Be

  5. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  6. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  7. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  8. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  9. The SHIP2 interactor Myo1c is required for cell migration in 1321 N1 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edimo, William's Elong; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Ghosh, Somadri; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Erneux, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases consist of several enzymes that have been shown to modulate cell migration and invasion. SHIP2, one family member, is known to interact with growth factor receptors and cytoskeletal proteins. In a human model of glioblastoma 1321 N1 cells, we recently identified Myo1c as a new interactor of SHIP2. This was shown in a complex of proteins also containing filamin A. We show here that SHIP2 localization at lamellipodia and ruffles is impaired in Myo1c depleted cells. In the absence of Myo1c, N1 cells tend to associate to form clusters. Cell migration is very much reduced in Myo1c depleted cells, concomitantly with a decrease in FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation, focal adhesion length and PI(4,5)P2 immunostaining. In N1 cells, Myo1c is thus important for lamellipodia formation to assemble a protein complex containing SHIP2 to facilitate cell migration. PMID:27246739

  10. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  11. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Mediates Prostate Tumor Cell Adhesion through α5 and β3 Integrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to prostate cancer metastasis are not understood completely. Although there is evidence that the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR 4 and its ligand CXCL12 may regulate tumor dissemination, their role in prostate cancer is controversial. We examined CXCR4 expression and functionality, and explored CXCL12-triggered adhesion of prostate tumor cells to human endothelium or to extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen, and fibronectin. Although little CXCR4 was expressed on LNCaP and DU-145 prostate tumor cells, CXCR4 was still active, enabling the cells to migrate toward a CXCL12 gradient. CXCL12 induced elevated adhesion to the endothelial cell monolayer and to immobilized fibronectin, laminin, and collagen. Anti-CXCR4 antibodies or CXCR4 knock out significantly impaired CXCL 12-triggered tumor cell binding. The effects observed did not depend on CXCR4 surface expression level. Rather, CXCR4-mediated adhesion was established by α5 and β3 integrin subunits and took place in the presence of reduced p38 and p38 phosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractive mechanisms are involved in adhesion processes of prostate cancer cells, and that binding of CXCL12 to its receptor leads to enhanced expression of α5 and β3. The findings provide a link between chemokine receptor expression and integrin-triggered tumor dissemination.

  12. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the body moves, tissues or organs inside are normally able to shift around each other. This is because these tissues have ... occur if the adhesions cause an organ or body part to: Twist Pull ... unable to move normally The risk of forming adhesions is high ...

  13. Microtubule Disruption in Keratinocytes Induces Cell-Cell Adhesion through Activation of Endogenous E-Cadherin

    OpenAIRE

    Kee, Sun-Ho; Steinert, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    The association of the cytoskeleton with the cadherin–catenin complex is essential for strong cell-cell adhesion in epithelial cells. In this study, we have investigated the effect of microtubule organization on cell-cell adhesion in differentiating keratinocytes. When microtubules of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) grown in low calcium media (0.05 mM) were disrupted with nocodazole or colcemid, cell-cell adhesion was induced through relocalization of the ...

  14. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew D; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as "tracks" that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a fibronectin-coated ventral surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface. PMID:25047626

  15. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  16. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  17. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  18. 紫杉醇对MDA-MB-435人乳腺癌高转移细胞粘附,侵袭及迁移能力的影响%Effect of taxol on adhesion, invasion and migration of MDA-MB-435 highly metastatic human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effect of taxol on adhesion, invasion andmigration of MDA-MB-435 highly metastatic human breast cancer cells, invasive capacity of MDA-MB-435 cells was evaluated by using reconstituted basement membrane invasion assay, the locomotion behavior of MDA-MB-435 cells in a three-dimensional collagen lattice was recorded by using time-lapse videomicroscopy and computer-assisted cell tracking system. It was found that taxol(0.01-0.1 mg.L-1) inhibited MDA-MB-435 cells to adhere to the basement membrane component fibronectin and laminin by 9.9%-51.2%, 66.8%-86.9%, respectively. At concentration of 0.01 and 0.03 mg.L-1, taxol suppressed MDA-MB-435 cells to invade the reconstituted basement membrane by 66.7%-74.4%. At the concentration of 0.02 and 0.1 mg.L-1, taxol significantly decreased the percentage of locomoting MDA-MB-435 cells and changed the pathway of migrating cells. The results indicate that taxol can significantly inhibit the adhesion, invasion and migration of MDA-MB-435 cells.%观察紫杉醇对人乳腺癌高转移细胞粘附,侵袭和迁移能力的影响.采用重组基底膜侵袭模型,三维空间胶原小室培养,时间推移摄像和计算机辅助细胞跟踪系统研究紫杉醇对MDA-MB-435人乳腺癌高转移细胞粘附,侵袭和迁移能力的影响.紫杉醇在0.01~0.1mg.L-1范围内可明显抑制MDA-MB-435细胞与纤维粘连蛋白或层粘连蛋白的粘附,抑制率分别为9.9%~51.2%和35.0%~49.8%;紫杉醇0.01和0.03mg.L-1对MDA-MB-435细胞侵袭重组基底膜抑制率为66.7%和74.4%;0.02和0.1mg.L-1时可明显抑制MDA-MB-435细胞在三维胶原中的迁移.结果表明紫杉醇具有较强的抑制MDA-MB-435细胞粘附,侵袭和迁移的作用,提示其在控制肿瘤转移方面可能具有应用前景.

  19. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, K. P.; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found...

  20. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Recek; Matic Resnik; Helena Motaln; Tamara Lah-Turnšek; Robin Augustine; Nandakumar Kalarikkal; Sabu Thomas; Miran Mozetič

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of p...

  1. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  2. Determinants of leader cells in collective cell migration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Collective migration is a basic mechanism of cell translocation during morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion. Collective movement requires cells to retain cell-cell contacts, exhibit group polarization with defined front-rear asymmetry, and consequently move as one multicellular unit. Depe

  3. Targeting Cx43 and N-cadherin, which are abnormally upregulated in venous leg ulcers, influences migration, adhesion and activation of Rho GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Mendoza-Naranjo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Venous leg ulcers can be very hard to heal and represent a significant medical need with no effective therapeutic treatment currently available. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In wound edge biopsies from human venous leg ulcers we found a striking upregulation of dermal N-cadherin, Zonula Occludens-1 and the gap junction protein Connexin43 (Cx43 compared to intact skin, and in stark contrast to the down-regulation of Cx43 expression seen in acute, healing wounds. We targeted the expression of these proteins in 3T3 fibroblasts to evaluate their role in venous leg ulcers healing. Knockdown of Cx43 and N-cadherin, but not Zonula Occludens-1, accelerated cell migration in a scratch wound-healing assay. Reducing Cx43 increased Golgi reorientation, whilst decreasing cell adhesion and proliferation. Furthermore, Connexin43 and N-cadherin knockdown led to profound effects on fibroblast cytoskeletal dynamics after scratch-wounding. The cells exhibited longer lamelipodial protrusions lacking the F-actin belt seen at the leading edge in wounded control cells. This phenotype was accompanied by augmented activation of Rac-1 and RhoA GTPases, as revealed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and pull down experiments. CONCLUSIONS: Cx43 and N-cadherin are potential therapeutic targets in the promotion of healing of venous leg ulcers, by acting at least in part through distinct contributions of cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and cytoskeletal dynamics.

  4. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. ► Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. ► TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. ► TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  5. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  6. Role of the PI3K regulatory subunit in the control of actin organization and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Concepción; Armas Portela, Rosario; Mellado, Mario; Rodríguez Frade, José M.; Collard, John; Serrano, Antonio; Martínez-Alonso, Carlos; Ávila, Jesús; Carrera, Ana C.

    2000-01-01

    Cell migration represents an important cellular response that utilizes cytoskeletal reorganization as its driving force. Here, we describe a new signaling cascade linking PDGF receptor stimulation to actin rearrangements and cell migration. We demonstrate that PDGF activates Cdc42 and its downstream effector N-WASP to mediate filopodia formation, actin stress fiber disassembly, and a reduction in focal adhesion complexes. Induction of the Cdc42 pathway is independent of phosphoinositide 3-kin...

  7. Optimal chemotaxis in animal cell intermittent migration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving, and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing a persistent random walk during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time, and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  8. Loss of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, A. K.; Savage, F. J.; Boulos, P. B.; Stamp, G W; D. Liu; Pignatelli, M.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesion molecules are thought to play a vital role in the induction and maintenance of tissue differentiation and their loss or down-regulation has been implicated in the neoplastic process. Recent studies have shown that the morphoregulatory activities are a consequence of interactive processes between several cell adhesion molecules rather than the function of a single molecule. Therefore, we have investigated a panel of adhesion molecules including members of the integrin, cadherin and im...

  9. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Gac, Le Severine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and r

  10. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  11. Loss of MLCK leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesion and invasive behavior of breast epithelial cells via increased expression of EGFR and ERK/JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D Y; Helfman, D M

    2016-08-25

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression is downregulated in breast cancer, including invasive ductal carcinoma compared with ductal breast carcinoma in situ and metastatic breast tumors. However, little is known about how loss of MLCK expression contributes to tumor progression. MLCK is a component of the actin cytoskeleton and its known role is the phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of myosin II. To gain insights into the role of MLCK in breast cancer, we perturbed its function using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or pharmacological inhibition in untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). Loss of MLCK by siRNAs led to increased cell migration and invasion, disruption of cell-cell adhesions and enhanced formation of focal adhesions at the leading edge of migratory cells. In addition, downregulation of MLCK cooperated with HER2 in MCF10A cells to promote cell migration and invasion and low levels of MLCK is associated with a poor prognosis in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Associated with these altered migratory behaviors were increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways in MLCK downregulated MCF10A cells. By contrast, inhibition of the kinase function of MLCK using pharmacological agents inhibited cell migration and invasion, and did not affect cellular adhesions. Our results show that loss of MLCK contributes to the migratory properties of epithelial cells resulting from changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings suggest that decreased expression of MLCK may have a critical role during tumor progression by facilitating the metastatic potential of tumor cells. PMID:26876209

  12. Taking Aim at Moving Targets in Computational Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Paola; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Fundamental understanding of cell migration can, for example, direct novel therapeutic strategies to control invasive tumor cells. However, the study of cell migration yields an overabundance of experimental data that require demanding processing and analysis for results extraction. Computational methods and tools have therefore become essential in the quantification and modeling of cell migration data. We review computational approaches for the key tasks in the quantification of in vitro cell migration: image pre-processing, motion estimation and feature extraction. Moreover, we summarize the current state-of-the-art for in silico modeling of cell migration. Finally, we provide a list of available software tools for cell migration to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate solution for their needs.

  13. Collective cell migration: Implications for wound healing and cancer invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion, cells often migrate collectively via tight cell-cell junctions, a process named collective migration. During such migration, cells move as coherent groups, large cell sheets, strands or tubes rather than individually. One unexpected finding regarding collective cell migration is that being a "multicellular structure" enables cells to better respond to chemical and physical cues, when compared with isolated cells. This is important because epithelial cells heal wounds via the migration of large sheets of cells with tight intercellular connections. Recent studies have gained some mechanistic insights that will benefit the clinical understanding of wound healing in general. In this review, we will briefly introduce the role of collective cell migration in wound healing, regeneration and cancer invasion and discuss its underlying mechanisms as well as implications for wound healing.

  14. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  15. Increasing mouse embryonic fibroblast cells adhesion on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil) and Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy (LEVB), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Marciano, F.R. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy LEVB, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UniVap), Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-10-10

    We have analyzed the adhesion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) genetically modified by green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene cultured on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) after 6 days. The VACNTs films grown on Ti were obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process using Fe catalyst and submitted to an oxygen plasma treatment, for 2 min, at 400 V and 80 mTorr, to convert them to superhydrophilic. Cellular adhesion and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron, fluorescence microscopy, and thermodynamics analysis. Characterizations of superhydrophilic VACNTs films were evaluated by contact angle and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Differences of crowd adhered cells, as well as their spreading on superhydrophilic VACNTs scaffolds, were evaluated using focal adhesion analysis. This study was the first to demonstrate, in real time, that the wettability of VACNTs scaffolds might have enhanced and differential adherence patterns to the MEF-GFP on VACNTs substrates. Highlights: {yields} A simple oxygen plasma treatment was used to obtain superhydrophilic CNT films. {yields} Superhydrophilic CNTs films were successfully produced by incorporation of carboxylic groups. {yields} Cellular adhesion on superhydrophilic VACNT films was analyzed in real time. {yields} Wettability of CNT films directly affects the cellular migration, proliferation and adhesion.

  16. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016. PMID:26581033

  17. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016.

  18. Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, and Regulated on Activation Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted Are Expressed by Human Breast Carcinoma Cells and Support Eosinophil Adhesion and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahina; Kaur, Jaswinder; Patel, Kamala D.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are usually associated with parasitic and allergic diseases; however, eosinophilia is also observed in several types of human tumors, including breast carcinomas. In this study we examined several human breast carcinoma cell lines for adhesion molecule expression and the ability to bind and activate eosinophils. MDA-MB-435S and MDA-MB-468 cells constitutively expressed both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and this expressio...

  19. Plakophilin3 downregulation leads to a decrease in cell adhesion and promotes metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Samrat T; Gosavi, Prajakta; Khapare, Nileema; Patel, Rachana; Hosing, Amol S; Maru, Girish B; Ingle, Arvind; Decaprio, James A; Dalal, Sorab N

    2008-11-15

    Plakophilin3 is a desmosomal plaque protein whose levels are reduced in poorly differentiated tumors of the oropharyngeal cavity and in invasive colon carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that plakophilin3 loss stimulates neoplastic progression, plakophilin3 expression was inhibited by DNA vector driven RNA interference in 3 epithelial cell lines, HCT116, HaCaT and fetal buccal mucosa. The plakophilin3-knockdown clones showed a decrease in cell-cell adhesion as assessed in a hanging drop assay, which was accompanied by an increase in cell migration. The HCT116 plakophilin3-knockdown clones showed a decrease in desmosome size as revealed by electron microscopy. These altered desmosomal properties were accompanied by colony formation in soft agar and growth to high density in culture. The HCT116-derived clones showed accelerated tumor formation in nude mice and increased metastasis to the lung, a phenotype consistent with the increased migration observed in vitro and is consistent with data from human tumors that suggests that plakophililn3 is lost in invasive and metastatic tumors. These data indicate that plakophilin3 loss leads to a decrease in cell-cell adhesion leading to the stimulation of neoplastic progression and metastasis. PMID:18729189

  20. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate affects directional migration of aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bartolini

    Full Text Available Aortic smooth muscle cells produce chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS proteoglycans that regulate extracellular matrix organization and cell behavior in normal and pathological conditions. A unique feature of CS/DS proteoglycans is the presence of iduronic acid (IdoA, catalyzed by two DS epimerases. Functional ablation of DS-epi1, the main epimerase in these cells, resulted in a major reduction of IdoA both on cell surface and in secreted CS/DS proteoglycans. Downregulation of IdoA led to delayed ability to re-populate wounded areas due to loss of directional persistence of migration. DS-epi1-/- aortic smooth muscle cells, however, had not lost the general property of migration showing even increased speed of movement compared to wild type cells. Where the cell membrane adheres to the substratum, stress fibers were denser whereas focal adhesion sites were fewer. Total cellular expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and phospho-FAK (pFAK was decreased in mutant cells compared to control cells. As many pathological conditions are dependent on migration, modulation of IdoA content may point to therapeutic strategies for diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis.

  1. Apicobasal Polarity Controls Lymphocyte Adhesion to Hepatic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Reglero-Real

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery.

  2. Osteoblast Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells with Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, C.; Mercer, R. R.; Mastro, A. M.

    Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adhere in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cellular adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days. With mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscopy, we were able to detect a change in the adhesive condition of the interface between the cell and the substrate, but not with optical microscopy

  3. Analysis of cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration in drosophila ovaries using GFP-actin and E-cadherin-GFP fusion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhusha, Vladyslav V.; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Oda, Hiroki

    1999-06-01

    Coordination of cell migration and adhesion is essential for movement of tissues during morphogenesis. During Drosophila oogenesis so called border cells (BCs) break from an anterior epithelium of egg chamber, acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology, and migrate posteriorly between nurse cells to oocyte. The confocal microscopic observation of BCs has revealed well-developed forepart lamellipodium stained with Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin), PS2 integrin, cytoplasmic myosin and F-actin. To investigate mechanism of BC migration in vivo we have constructed a DE-cadherin-GFP and a GFP-actin fusion proteins and induced their expression BCs utilizing the UAS/GAL4 system. The DE-cadherin-GFP signal as well as immunostaining of PS2 integrin visualized a track of migrating BCs providing an evidence that adhesive molecules are pulled out and left behind on the surface of nurse cells. Our data suggest that two distinct adhesive systems, DE-cadherins and PS2 integrins simultaneously mediate the migration of BCs. Release of adhesive contacts in the tail region is a rate- limited event in BC migration. The spatial-temporal sequence of actin-based events visualized by the GFP-actin suggest a treadmilling model for actin behavior in BC lamellipodium. BC migration can be considered as simultaneous reiterating processes of lamellipodium extension and adhesive attachment, cytoskeletal contraction, and rear detachment.

  4. Isoform-specific function of calpains in cell adhesion disruption: studies in postlactational mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Lucía; Ferrer-Vicens, Iván; García, Concha; Oltra, Sara S; Zaragozá, Rosa; Viña, Juan R; García-Trevijano, Elena R

    2016-09-15

    Cleavage of adhesion proteins is the first step for physiological clearance of undesired cells during postlactational regression of the mammary gland, but also for cell migration in pathological states such as breast cancer. The intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent proteases, calpains (CAPNs), are known to cleave adhesion proteins. The isoform-specific function of CAPN1 and CAPN2 was explored and compared in two models of cell adhesion disruption: mice mammary gland during weaning-induced involution and breast cancer cell lines according to tumor subtype classification. In both models, E-cadherin, β-catenin, p-120, and talin-1 were cleaved as assessed by western blot analysis. Both CAPNs were able to cleave adhesion proteins from lactating mammary gland in vitro Nevertheless, CAPN2 was the only isoform found to co-localize with E-cadherin in cell junctions at the peak of lactation. CAPN2/E-cadherin in vivo interaction, analyzed by proximity ligation assay, was dramatically increased during involution. Calpain inhibitor administration prevented the cytosolic accumulation of truncated E-cadherin cleaved by CAPN2. Conversely, in breast cancer cells, CAPN2 was restricted to the nuclear compartment. The isoform-specific expression of CAPNs and CAPN activity was dependent on the breast cancer subtype. However, CAPN1 and CAPN2 knockdown cells showed that cleavage of adhesion proteins and cell migration was mediated by CAPN1, independently of the breast cancer cell line used. Data presented here suggest that the subcellular distribution of CAPN1 and CAPN2 is a major issue in target-substrate recognition; therefore, it determines the isoform-specific role of CAPNs during disruption of cell adhesion in either a physiological or a pathological context. PMID:27402795

  5. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  6. The Exposure of Breast Cancer Cells to Fulvestrant and Tamoxifen Modulates Cell Migration Differently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysia Lymperatou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that there are increased benefits of hormonal therapy to breast cancer patients; however, current evidence suggests that estrogen receptor (ER blockage using antiestrogens is associated with a small induction of invasiveness in vitro. The mechanism by which epithelial tumor cells escape from the primary tumor and colonize to a distant site is not entirely understood. This study investigates the effect of two selective antagonists of the ER, Fulvestrant (Fulv and Tamoxifen (Tam, on the invasive ability of breast cancer cells. We found that 17β-estradiol (E2 demonstrated a protective role regarding cell migration and invasion. Fulv did not alter this effect while Tam stimulated active cell migration according to an increase in Snail and a decrease in E-cadherin protein expression. Furthermore, both tested agents increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and enhanced invasive potential of breast cancer cells. These changes were in line with focal adhesion kinase (FAK rearrangement. Our data indicate that the anti-estrogens counteracted the protective role of E2 concerning migration and invasion since their effect was not limited to antiproliferative events. Although Fulv caused a less aggressive result compared to Tam, the benefits of hormonal therapy concerning invasion and metastasis yet remain to be investigated.

  7. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  8. Adhesion in the stem cell niche: biological roles and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal is tightly controlled by the concerted action of stem cell-intrinsic factors and signals within the niche. Niche signals often function within a short range, allowing cells in the niche to self-renew while their daughters outside the niche differentiate. Thus, in order for stem cells to continuously self-renew, they are often anchored in the niche via adhesion molecules. In addition to niche anchoring, however, recent studies have revealed other important roles for adhe...

  9. Embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors transplanted to the hippocampus migrate on host vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea M. Lassiter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the migration of transplanted ESNPs either injected directly into the hippocampus of a mouse, seeded onto hippocampal slices, or under in vitro culture conditions. We show that transplanted mouse ESNPs associate with, and appear to migrate on the surface of the vasculature, and that human ESNPs also associate with blood vessels when seeded on hippocampal slices, and migrate towards BECs in vitro using a Boyden chamber assay. This initial adhesion to vessels is mediated, at least in part, via the integrin α6β1, as observed for SVZ neural progenitor cells. Our data are consistent with CXCL12, expressed by the astroglial-vasculature niche, playing an important role in the migration of transplanted neural progenitors within and outside of the hippocampus.

  10. The use of biomaterials for cell function enhancement: acceleration of fibroblast migration and promotion of stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sisi

    Wound healing and tissue regeneration proceed via fibroblast migration along three dimensional scaffolds composed of fibers with different diameters, spacing, and junction angles. In order to understand how each of these factors influences fibroblast migration, a technique for preparation of three dimensional fibrillar scaffolds was developed where the fiber diameters and the angles between adjacent fiber layers could be precisely controlled. In order to study the en-mass migration process, the agarose droplet method was chosen since it enabled accurate determinations of the dependence of the migration speed, focal adhesion distribution, and nuclear deformation on the fiber structures. Results showed that on oriented single fiber layers, if the fiber diameters exceeded 1microm, large focal adhesion complexes formed in a linear arrangement along the fiber axis and cell motion was highly correlated. For fibers 1microm or less, some cell alignment along the fiber direction was measured, but no correlation between the distribution of focal adhesion points and fiber orientation was found. On multi layered scaffolds the focal adhesion sites were found to concentrate at the junction points and the migration speed followed a parabolic function with a distinct minimum at 35°. When compared to fibroblasts plated on 90° fibers, fibroblasts plated on 30° fibers showed a decrease of 25% in the degree of nuclear deformation and an increase of 25% in the number of focal adhesion sites, indicating that cell migration speed was correlated to the angle and distance of approach to the junction point. The time dependence of the migration velocity on oriented fibers was measured for four days and compared to the value measured on flat surfaces. After the initial 24 hour incubation period, the cells on both the 8microm fibers and flat surfaces migrated with a similar speed. During the next three days the migration speed for the cells on the fibrillar surfaces doubled in magnitude

  11. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-07-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schwann cells migrate anodally in an applied electric field (EF). The directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the strength of the EF increased from 50 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. The EF did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. To explore the genes and signaling pathways that regulate cell migration in EFs, we performed a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between cells stimulated with an EF (100 mV/mm) and those without using next-generation RNA sequencing, verified by RT-qPCR. Based on the cut-off criteria (FC > 1.2, q < 0.05), we identified 1,045 up-regulated and 1,636 down-regulated genes in control cells versus EF-stimulated cells. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that compared to the control group, 21 pathways are down-regulated, while 10 pathways are up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes participate in multiple cellular signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cell migration, including pathways of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and PI3K-Akt. PMID:25557037

  12. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  13. Independent regulation of tumor cell migration by matrix stiffness and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are strongly regulated by biophysical interactions between tumor cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). While the influence of ECM stiffness on cell migration, adhesion, and contractility has been extensively studied in 2D culture, extension of this concept to 3D cultures that more closely resemble tissue has proven challenging, because perturbations that change matrix stiffness often concurrently change cellular confinement. This coupling is particularly problematic given that matrix-imposed steric barriers can regulate invasion speed independent of mechanics. Here we introduce a matrix platform based on microfabrication of channels of defined wall stiffness and geometry that allows independent variation of ECM stiffness and channel width. For a given ECM stiffness, cells confined to narrow channels surprisingly migrate faster than cells in wide channels or on unconstrained 2D surfaces, which we attribute to increased polarization of cell-ECM traction forces. Confinement also enables cells to migrate increasingly rapidly as ECM stiffness rises, in contrast with the biphasic relationship observed on unconfined ECMs. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II dissipates this traction polarization and renders the relationship between migration speed and ECM stiffness comparatively insensitive to matrix confinement. We test these hypotheses in silico by devising a multiscale mathematical model that relates cellular force generation to ECM stiffness and geometry, which we show is capable of recapitulating key experimental trends. These studies represent a paradigm for investigating matrix regulation of invasion and demonstrate that matrix confinement alters the relationship between cell migration speed and ECM stiffness. PMID:22689955

  14. Raman microspectroscopic study of biomolecular structure inside living adhesive cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guang; (李光); YANG; Hongying(杨红英); XU; Yiming; (许以明); ZHANG; Zhiyi(张志义)

    2002-01-01

    Cells adhesion is very important for many physiological processes. Using advanced Raman microspectroscopic technique, we selected T Leukemia cells (Jurkat) as the materials and obtained simultaneously conformation information of various biomolecules inside the whole living cells. By comparing the Raman microspectroscopic spectra of single and adhesive cancer cells, we found for the first time that when cells adhered, the conformation of the biomolecules (DNA, protein, carbohydrates and lipids) inside the cells had different changes: (i) the backbone of double-stranded DNA maintained orderly B-form or modified B-form conformation, whereas the groups of its deoxyribose and bases were modified; (ii) the conformational changes of the main chain and the side chain in the protein were obviously variant. The lines intensity belonging to α-helix andβ-sheet decreased, while that ofβ-turn increased. Tyrosine and tryptophane residues of the protein changed from "buried state" to "exposed state"; the lines intensity of its sulfhydryl group also increased; the conformation of its disulfide bond changed from two kinds to three kinds. These facts suggest that the cells adhesion causes changes in H-bonds organization of the main chain and environment of the side chain in the protein; (iii) the groups of the carbohydrates were also modified simultaneously; (iv) the conformation of the lipids bilayers of the membranes changed obviously; the order parameter for lateral interaction between chains decreased gradually with the increase of number of the adhesive cells. So cells adhesion resulted in an increase in fluidity of the membrane and ion permeability on the membrane.

  15. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC. The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of plasma treatment on cell adhesion and viability was evaluated with cell viability assay (MTT assay. The results showed the highest metabolic activity of HUVEC on PCL samples treated with O2 and NH3 plasma. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphology on O2 and NH3 plasma-treated PCL samples already at 3 h. Moreover, treatment with O2 and NH3 plasma even stimulated endothelial cell proliferation on PCL surfaces by 60% as measured at 24 h, showing significant improvement in endothelialization of this material. Contrarily, SO2 plasma appeared to be less promising in comparison with O2 and NH3 plasma; however, it was still better than without any plasma treatment. Thus, our results importantly contribute to the biocompatibility improvement of the PCL polymer, commonly used for scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  16. Pathogenic Actions of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 in Pulmonary Emphysema and Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneshige, Azusa; Hagiyama, Man; Fujita, Mitsugu; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion mediated by adhesion molecules is of central importance in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Therefore, altered expression of adhesion molecules leads to the development of various tissue disorders involving cell activation, degeneration, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear what initiates the altered expression of adhesion molecules and how the subsequent pathological cascades proceed. In this regard, cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is one of the candidat...

  17. Nanoparticle adhesion in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qianping; Joy, David C.; Keffer, David J.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) catalyst remains among the most preferable catalyst materials for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However, platinum (Pt) particles suffer from poor durability and encounter electrochemical surface area (ESA) loss under operation with the accompany of Pt nanoparticle coarsening. Several proposed mechanisms have involved the Pt detachment from its carbonate support as an initial step for the deactivation of Pt nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the detachment mechanism from the nano-adhesion point of view. Classic molecular dynamics simulations are performed on systems contain Pt nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. A thin Nafion film (1 nm) at different hydration levels is also included in the system to study the environmental effect on nanoparticle adhesion. We found that the adhesion force strengthens as the Pt size goes up. Pt nanoparticles of tetrahedral shape exhibit relatively stronger connection with the carbon substrate due to its unique ‘anchor-like’ structure. Adhesion is enhanced with the introduction of a Nafion. The humidity level in the Nafion film has a rather complicated effect on the strength of nanoparticle adhesion. The binding energies and maximum adhesive forces are reported for all systems studied.

  18. Collagen Promotes Higher Adhesion, Survival and Proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnapaka Somaiah

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can differentiate into several cell types and are desirable candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, due to poor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the patient, the therapy outcomes have not been satisfactory. Although several studies have been done to understand the conditions that promote proliferation, differentiation and migration of MSC in vitro and in vivo, still there is no clear understanding on the effect of non-cellular bio molecules. Of the many factors that influence the cell behavior, the immediate cell microenvironment plays a major role. In this context, we studied the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in controlling cell survival, proliferation, migration and directed MSC differentiation. We found that collagen promoted cell proliferation, cell survival under stress and promoted high cell adhesion to the cell culture surface. Increased osteogenic differentiation accompanied by high active RHOA (Ras homology gene family member A levels was exhibited by MSC cultured on collagen. In conclusion, our study shows that collagen will be a suitable matrix for large scale production of MSC with high survival rate and to obtain high osteogenic differentiation for therapy.

  19. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  20. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  1. Adhesion of human basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils to interleukin 1-activated human vascular endothelial cells: contributions of endothelial cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) promote adhesiveness in human umbilical vein endothelial cells for leukocytes including basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and induce expression of adherence molecules including ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), ELAM-1 (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In the present study, blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing ICAM-1, ELAM-1, and VCAM-1 have been used to compare their ...

  2. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    and is upregulated during SMC phenotypic modulation in cell culture. Moreover, treatments with peptides that block the interaction between versican and fibulin-2 inhibit SMC migration in vitro. Conclusions: Fibulin-2 can be produced by SMC as a response to injury and may participate in the ECM organisation......Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican....../hyaluronan complexes, an ECM network that has been suggested to be important during tissue repair. In this study we have analysed the presence of fibulin-2 in two different models of murine vascular lesions. We have also examined how the fibulin-2/versican network influences SMC migration. Methods: Presence of fibulin...

  3. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  4. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  5. A conserved Oct4/POUV-dependent network links adhesion and migration to progenitor maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livigni, Alessandra; Peradziryi, Hanna; Sharov, Alexei A;

    2013-01-01

    , the list of Oct4 transcriptional targets contains thousands of genes. Using evolutionary conservation, we identified a core set of functionally relevant factors that linked the maintenance of adhesion to Oct4/POUV. We found that the regulation of adhesion by the Oct4/POUV network occurred at both...

  6. Physics of cell adhesion: some lessons from cell-mimetic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sackmann, Erich; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a paradigm of the ubiquitous interplay of cell signalling, modulation of material properties and biological functions of cells. It is controlled by competition of short range attractive forces, medium range repellant forces and the elastic stresses associated with local and global deformation of the composite cell envelopes. We review the basic physical rules governing the physics of cell adhesion learned by studying cell-mimetic systems and demonstrate the importance of thes...

  7. Regulation of cell–cell adhesion by the cadherin–catenin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W. James

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent cell–cell adhesion is regulated by the cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins. Cadherins form trans-interactions on opposing cell surfaces which result in weak cell–cell adhesion. Stronger cell–cell adhesion occurs by clustering of cadherins and through changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Although cadherins were thought to bind directly to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic proteins, termed α- and β-catenin, recent studies with purified proteins in...

  8. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bingmei M Fu; Jinlin Yang; Bin Cai; Jie Fan; Lin Zhang; Min Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary v...

  9. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  10. EFFECTS OF BU GU ZHI(PSORALEA CORYLIFOLIA L) AND BAI ZHI (DAHURIAN ANGELICA ROOT) EXTRACTS ON MELANOCYTE ADHESION AND MIGRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Huiqun; Feng Jie; Zhang Xianqi; Mu Kuanhou; Liu Chao; Niu Xinwu; Dang Qianli

    2005-01-01

    Objective To find direct effect of Chinese herbs Bu Gu Zhi (Psoralea corylifolia L) and Bai Zhi (Dahurian angelica root) Extracts on melanocyte adhesion and migration in vitro. Methods Ethanol extracts obtained from two kind of Chinese medicinable herbs were tested. Human melanocytes were obtained from neonatal foreskins and 48-well culture dish covered with fibronectin were used to perform melanocyte adhesion assay; Motility was assessed using the micropore filter method. Results: The extracts of Bu Gu Zhi(Psoralea corylifolia L), Bai Zhi(Dahurian angelica root) obviously showed an effect in increasing of human melanocyte adhesion and migration on fibronectin. Conclusion It is suggested that Buguzhi(Fructus Psoraleae) and Baizhi(Radix Angelicae Dahuricae) might induce melanocyte adhesion and/or migration in the treatment of vitiligo.

  11. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chieh Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  12. Involvement of cAMP in the Human Serum-Induced Migration of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minji; Koh, Wonyoung; Kim, Bomee; Chung, Hyeju; Cho, Gahyang; Kim, Haekwon

    2016-06-01

    Previously we observed that human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) could form aggregation during culture in the presence of human serum (HS). In the present study, we have examined if the aggregation might result from the cell migration and analyzed the difference of cell adhesivity after culture in various conditions. When cells were cultured in fetal bovine serum (FBS) alone, there was no morphological change. Similarly, cells pretreated with FBS for 1 day or cultured in a mixture of FBS and HS showed little change. In contrast, cells cultured in HS alone exhibited formation of cell-free area (spacing) and/or cell aggregation. When cells cultured in FBS or pretreated with FBS were treated with 0.06% trypsin, almost cells remained attached to the dish surfaces. In contrast, when cells cultured in HS alone were examined, most cells detached from the dish by the same treatment. Treatment of cells with forskolin, isobutylmethyl xanthine (IBMX) or LY294002 inhibited the formation of spacing whereas H89 or Y27632 showed little effect. When these cells were treated with 0.06% trypsin after culture, most cells detached from the dishes as cells cultured in HS alone did. However, cells treated with IBMX exhibited weaker adhesivity than HS alone. Based on these observations, it is suggested that HS treatment might decrease the adhesivity and induce three-dimensional migration of hADSCs, in the latter of which cAMP signaling could be involved. PMID:27660827

  13. Analytical tools for identification of non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from polyurethane adhesives in multilayer packaging materials and their migration into food simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Juliana S; Isella, Francesca; Bosetti, Osvaldo; Nerín, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    Adhesives used in food packaging to glue different materials can provide several substances as potential migrants, and the identification of potential migrants and migration tests are required to assess safety in the use of adhesives. Solid-phase microextraction in headspace mode and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and ChemSpider and SciFinder databases were used as powerful tools to identify the potential migrants in the polyurethane (PU) adhesives and also in the individual plastic films (polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyethylene/ethyl vinyl alcohol). Migration tests were carried out by using Tenax(®) and isooctane as food simulants, and the migrants were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. More than 63 volatile and semivolatile compounds considered as potential migrants were detected either in the adhesives or in the films. Migration tests showed two non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from PU adhesives that migrated through the laminates into Tenax(®) and into isooctane. Identification of these NIAS was achieved through their mass spectra, and 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione and 1,4,7-trioxacyclotridecane-8,13-dione were confirmed. Caprolactam migrated into isooctane, and its origin was the external plastic film in the multilayer, demonstrating real diffusion through the multilayer structure. Comparison of the migration values between the simulants and conditions will be shown and discussed. PMID:22526644

  14. Analytical tools for identification of non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from polyurethane adhesives in multilayer packaging materials and their migration into food simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Juliana S; Isella, Francesca; Bosetti, Osvaldo; Nerín, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    Adhesives used in food packaging to glue different materials can provide several substances as potential migrants, and the identification of potential migrants and migration tests are required to assess safety in the use of adhesives. Solid-phase microextraction in headspace mode and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and ChemSpider and SciFinder databases were used as powerful tools to identify the potential migrants in the polyurethane (PU) adhesives and also in the individual plastic films (polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyethylene/ethyl vinyl alcohol). Migration tests were carried out by using Tenax(®) and isooctane as food simulants, and the migrants were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. More than 63 volatile and semivolatile compounds considered as potential migrants were detected either in the adhesives or in the films. Migration tests showed two non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) coming from PU adhesives that migrated through the laminates into Tenax(®) and into isooctane. Identification of these NIAS was achieved through their mass spectra, and 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione and 1,4,7-trioxacyclotridecane-8,13-dione were confirmed. Caprolactam migrated into isooctane, and its origin was the external plastic film in the multilayer, demonstrating real diffusion through the multilayer structure. Comparison of the migration values between the simulants and conditions will be shown and discussed.

  15. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham;

    2009-01-01

    of leukocyte adhesion deficiency who underwent hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Center for International......, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multilineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell-restricted chimerism in an additional 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation offers long-term benefit in leukocyte adhesion deficiency and should be considered as an early...... therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem-cell donation is available. Reduced-intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed-donor chimerism seems sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long-term monitoring will be required for these patients....

  17. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an "outside-in" mechanism. PMID:24366944

  18. [Adhesive cell interactions in the biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, O A

    2002-01-01

    The present review describes a hypothesis for a critical role of cell adhesive interactions in tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of tissue cell-cell interactions initiates first of all local (in the tissue) and then general (in whole body) conditions for tumor growth. Otherwise imbalance of tissue-specific adhesion factor at the very beginning of carcinogenesis is considered to trigger a cascade of pathological reactions responsible for more severe adhesive disorders that are in turn critical for the "totalitarian" behavior of a tumor and its "colonization" of other tissues and organs. Impaired disturbance is likely to be the key mechanism of carcinogenesis since it is significantly associated with the main features of a tumor: tissue proliferation control loss, anaplasia, invasion, metastasis, and immune surveillance deficit. The hypothesis is supported by evolutionary, biological, histological, immunological, and clinical arguments whose combination does not characterize any other known mechanisms of oncogenesis. The concept of adhesiveness opens new possibilities for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tumors and also improves a strategy for designing new drugs.

  19. Different effects of 25-kDa amelogenin on the proliferation, attachment and migration of various periodontal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiting [Department of Periodontology, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, No. 639 Zhi Zao Ju Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Shu, Rong, E-mail: shurong123@hotmail.com [Department of Periodontology, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, No. 639 Zhi Zao Ju Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Liu, Dali; Jiang, Shaoyun [Department of Periodontology, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, No. 639 Zhi Zao Ju Road, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2010-04-09

    Previous studies have assumed that amelogenin is responsible for the therapeutic effect of the enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in periodontal tissue healing and regeneration. However, it is difficult to confirm this hypothesis because both the EMD and the amelogenins are complex mixtures of multiple proteins. Further adding to the difficulties is the fact that periodontal tissue regeneration involves various types of cells and a sequence of associated cellular events including the attachment, migration and proliferation of various cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of a 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin (rPAm) on primarily cultured periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF), gingival fibroblasts (GF) and gingival epithelial cells (GEC). The cells were treated with 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/mL. We found that rPAm significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of PDLF, but not their adhesion. Similarly, the proliferation and adhesion of GF were significantly enhanced by treatment with rPAm, while migration was greatly inhibited. Interestingly, this recombinant protein inhibited the growth rate, cell adhesion and migration of GEC. These data suggest that rPAm may play an essential role in periodontal regeneration through the activation of periodontal fibroblasts and inhibition of the cellular behaviors of gingival epithelial cells.

  20. Different effects of 25-kDa amelogenin on the proliferation, attachment and migration of various periodontal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have assumed that amelogenin is responsible for the therapeutic effect of the enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in periodontal tissue healing and regeneration. However, it is difficult to confirm this hypothesis because both the EMD and the amelogenins are complex mixtures of multiple proteins. Further adding to the difficulties is the fact that periodontal tissue regeneration involves various types of cells and a sequence of associated cellular events including the attachment, migration and proliferation of various cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of a 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin (rPAm) on primarily cultured periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF), gingival fibroblasts (GF) and gingival epithelial cells (GEC). The cells were treated with 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin at a concentration of 10 μg/mL. We found that rPAm significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of PDLF, but not their adhesion. Similarly, the proliferation and adhesion of GF were significantly enhanced by treatment with rPAm, while migration was greatly inhibited. Interestingly, this recombinant protein inhibited the growth rate, cell adhesion and migration of GEC. These data suggest that rPAm may play an essential role in periodontal regeneration through the activation of periodontal fibroblasts and inhibition of the cellular behaviors of gingival epithelial cells.

  1. Computational modeling reveals that a combination of chemotaxis and differential adhesion leads to robust cell sorting during tissue patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhen Tan

    Full Text Available Robust tissue patterning is crucial to many processes during development. The "French Flag" model of patterning, whereby naïve cells in a gradient of diffusible morphogen signal adopt different fates due to exposure to different amounts of morphogen concentration, has been the most widely proposed model for tissue patterning. However, recently, using time-lapse experiments, cell sorting has been found to be an alternative model for tissue patterning in the zebrafish neural tube. But it remains unclear what the sorting mechanism is. In this article, we used computational modeling to show that two mechanisms, chemotaxis and differential adhesion, are needed for robust cell sorting. We assessed the performance of each of the two mechanisms by quantifying the fraction of correct sorting, the fraction of stable clusters formed after correct sorting, the time needed to achieve correct sorting, and the size variations of the cells having different fates. We found that chemotaxis and differential adhesion confer different advantages to the sorting process. Chemotaxis leads to high fraction of correct sorting as individual cells will either migrate towards or away from the source depending on its cell type. However after the cells have sorted correctly, there is no interaction among cells of the same type to stabilize the sorted boundaries, leading to cell clusters that are unstable. On the other hand, differential adhesion results in low fraction of correct clusters that are more stable. In the absence of morphogen gradient noise, a combination of both chemotaxis and differential adhesion yields cell sorting that is both accurate and robust. However, in the presence of gradient noise, the simple combination of chemotaxis and differential adhesion is insufficient for cell sorting; instead, chemotaxis coupled with delayed differential adhesion is required to yield optimal sorting.

  2. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Varadharajan Thiyagarajan; May-Jywan Tsai; Ching-Feng Weng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma ce...

  3. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  4. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Richard K Assoian; Rader, Daniel J; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD4...

  5. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye

    OpenAIRE

    Fetting, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90° rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echi...

  6. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  7. Sirolimus blocks the accumulation of hyaluronan (HA) by arterial smooth muscle cells and reduces monocyte adhesion to the ECM

    OpenAIRE

    Gouëffic, Yann; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Chan, Christina K.; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Braun, Kathleen; Evanko, Steven P.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2006-01-01

    Sirolimus (SRL), an inhibitor of human arterial smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation and migration, prevents in-stent restenosis (ISR). Little is known about the effect of SRL on the extracellular matrix (ECM) component, hyaluronan, a key macromolecule in neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation. In this study, we investigated SRL regulation of the synthesis of hyaluronan by cultured human ASMC and the effect of SRL on hyaluronan mediated monocyte adhesion to the ECM. Hyaluronan production ...

  8. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  9. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  10. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  11. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  12. Gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴荣谦; 徐迎新; 宋旭华; 孟宪钧

    2002-01-01

    To study the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis in mice. Methods: Male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and microvascular endothelial cells in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were harvested at 3 hours (early sepsis) and 12 hours (late sepsis) after CLP, respectively. Gene expression of the adhesion molecules was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Simultaneously, the alterations of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were also examined. Results: E-selectin mRNA levels markedly increased at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, then they returned to the normal level at 12 hours after CLP. Increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA levels were found at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, and these levels became higher at 12 hours after CLP. Adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expression of vascular cells also increased significantly at 3 hours and 12 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells. The level of VCAM-1 mRNA in hepatic microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 3 hours than that at 12 hours after CLP, while the level of VCAM-1 mRNA in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 12 hours than that at 3 hours after CLP. The MPO activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues increased at 3 hours after CLP, compared with that of the sham group. They both declined significantly at 12 hours after CLP, but they were still higher than that of the sham group. Conclusions: The up-regulation of the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells is an important step for the migration and accumulation of leukocytes at the site of inflammation, which plays a critical role in organ damage during sepsis. And the contribution

  13. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  14. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  15. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  16. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  17. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  18. Signaling through the G-protein-coupled receptor Rickets is important for polarity, detachment, and migration of the border cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anllo, Lauren; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2016-06-15

    Cell migration plays crucial roles during development. An excellent model to study coordinated cell movements is provided by the migration of border cell clusters within a developing Drosophila egg chamber. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated two alleles of the gene rickets (rk) encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor. The rk alleles result in border cell migration defects in a significant fraction of egg chambers. In rk mutants, border cells are properly specified and express the marker Slbo. Yet, analysis of both fixed as well as live samples revealed that some single border cells lag behind the main border cell cluster during migration, or, in other cases, the entire border cell cluster can remain tethered to the anterior epithelium as it migrates. These defects are observed significantly more often in mosaic border cell clusters, than in full mutant clusters. Reduction of the Rk ligand, Bursicon, in the border cell cluster also resulted in migration defects, strongly suggesting that Rk signaling is utilized for communication within the border cell cluster itself. The mutant border cell clusters show defects in localization of the adhesion protein E-cadherin, and apical polarity proteins during migration. E-cadherin mislocalization occurs in mosaic clusters, but not in full mutant clusters, correlating well with the rk border cell migration phenotype. Our work has identified a receptor with a previously unknown role in border cell migration that appears to regulate detachment and polarity of the border cell cluster coordinating processes within the cells of the cluster themselves.

  19. Changes in cell migration due to the combined effects of sonodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy on MDA-MB-231 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-photodynamic therapy is an emerging method with an increasing amount of research having demonstrated its anti-cancer efficacy. However, the impacts of cell migration ability after sono-photodynamic therapy have seldom been reported. In this study, we identified cell migration by wound healing and transwell assays. Significant inability of cell migration was observed in combined groups accompanied by the decline of cell adhesion. Cells in combined treatment groups showed serious microfilament network collapse as well as decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases-9. These results suggested that sono-photodynamic therapy could inhibit MDA-MB-231 cell migration and that the microfilament and matrix metalloproteinases-9 disorder might be involved. (letter)

  20. Changes in cell migration due to the combined effects of sonodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy on MDA-MB-231 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2015-03-01

    Sono-photodynamic therapy is an emerging method with an increasing amount of research having demonstrated its anti-cancer efficacy. However, the impacts of cell migration ability after sono-photodynamic therapy have seldom been reported. In this study, we identified cell migration by wound healing and transwell assays. Significant inability of cell migration was observed in combined groups accompanied by the decline of cell adhesion. Cells in combined treatment groups showed serious microfilament network collapse as well as decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases-9. These results suggested that sono-photodynamic therapy could inhibit MDA-MB-231 cell migration and that the microfilament and matrix metalloproteinases-9 disorder might be involved.

  1. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies that comp......It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved...

  2. Cancer cell migration:when red light switched to green

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seth J Corey; Jindan Yu

    2011-01-01

    @@ The doctrine of 'the golden mean'of the Confucian certainly applies at the molecular level to cell growth and migration.It is critically important for tissue architec-ture and homeostasis that cells stop prolifera-tion when reaching appropriate density and halt migration in a direction to avoid collision with others.

  3. Inhibition of the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway Restores Cultured Spinal Cord-Injured Neuronal Migration, Adhesion, and Dendritic Spine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongdong; Cao, Fujiang; Sun, Shiwei; Liu, Tao; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-08-01

    The Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway plays an important role in central and peripheral neurons in functions such as dendritic arborization, neuronal polarity, and axon assembly. However, emerging evidence also shows that up-regulation of this signaling pathway may lead to the development of spinal cord injury. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on properties of spinal cord-injured neurons. First, neurons from spinal cord-injured C57BL/6 J mouse pups and sham-operated C57BL/6 J mouse pups were harvested. Then, immunofluorescence, western blotting, cell adhesion and cell migration assays, and DiI labeling were employed to investigate the effect of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on spinal cord-injured neurons. Immunofluorescence results of synapse formation indicated that the experimental spinal cord injury model was successfully established. Western blot results identified upregulated Erk phosphorylation in the spinal cord-injured neurons, and also showed that U0126 inhibited phosphorylation of Erk, which is a downstream kinase in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. Additionally, cell migration and adhesion was significantly increased in the spinal cord-injured neurons. DiI labeling results also showed an increased formation of mature spines after inhibition of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling. Taken together, these results suggested that the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could serve as an effective treatment target for spinal cord injury.

  4. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  5. An easily accessible sulfated saccharide mimetic inhibits in vitro human tumor cell adhesion and angiogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Marano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides aberrantly expressed on tumor cells influence processes such as cell adhesion and modulation of the cell’s microenvironment resulting in an increased malignancy. Schmidt’s imidate strategy offers an effective method to synthesize libraries of various oligosaccharide mimetics. With the aim to perturb interactions of tumor cells with extracellular matrix proteins and host cells, molecules with 3,4-bis(hydroxymethylfuran as core structure were synthesized and screened in biological assays for their abilities to interfere in cell adhesion and other steps of the metastatic cascade, such as tumor-induced angiogenesis.The most active compound, (4-{[(β-D-galactopyranosyloxy]methyl}furan-3-ylmethyl hydrogen sulfate (GSF, inhibited the activation of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 as well as migration of the human melanoma cells of the lines WM-115 and WM-266-4 in a two-dimensional migration assay. GSF inhibited completely the adhesion of WM-115 cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, fibrinogen and fibronectin.In an in vitro angiogenesis assay with human endothelial cells, GSF very effectively inhibited endothelial tubule formation and sprouting of blood vessels, as well as the adhesion of endothelial cells to ECM proteins. GSF was not cytotoxic at biologically active concentrations; neither were 3,4-bis{[(β-D-galactopyranosyloxy]methyl}furan (BGF nor methyl β-D-galactopyranoside nor 3,4-bis(hydroxymethylfuran, which were used as controls, eliciting comparable biological activity. In silico modeling experiments, in which binding of GSF to the extracellular domain of the integrin αvβ3 was determined, revealed specific docking of GSF to the same binding site as the natural peptidic ligands of this integrin. The sulfate in the molecule coordinated with one manganese ion in the binding site.These studies show that this chemically easily accessible molecule GSF, synthesized in three steps from 3,4-bis

  6. An easily accessible sulfated saccharide mimetic inhibits in vitro human tumor cell adhesion and angiogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Grazia; Gronewold, Claas; Frank, Martin; Merling, Anette; Kliem, Christian; Sauer, Sandra; Wiessler, Manfred; Frei, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Summary Oligosaccharides aberrantly expressed on tumor cells influence processes such as cell adhesion and modulation of the cell’s microenvironment resulting in an increased malignancy. Schmidt’s imidate strategy offers an effective method to synthesize libraries of various oligosaccharide mimetics. With the aim to perturb interactions of tumor cells with extracellular matrix proteins and host cells, molecules with 3,4-bis(hydroxymethyl)furan as core structure were synthesized and screened in biological assays for their abilities to interfere in cell adhesion and other steps of the metastatic cascade, such as tumor-induced angiogenesis. The most active compound, (4-{[(β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]methyl}furan-3-yl)methyl hydrogen sulfate (GSF), inhibited the activation of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) as well as migration of the human melanoma cells of the lines WM-115 and WM-266-4 in a two-dimensional migration assay. GSF inhibited completely the adhesion of WM-115 cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibrinogen and fibronectin. In an in vitro angiogenesis assay with human endothelial cells, GSF very effectively inhibited endothelial tubule formation and sprouting of blood vessels, as well as the adhesion of endothelial cells to ECM proteins. GSF was not cytotoxic at biologically active concentrations; neither were 3,4-bis{[(β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]methyl}furan (BGF) nor methyl β-D-galactopyranoside nor 3,4-bis(hydroxymethyl)furan, which were used as controls, eliciting comparable biological activity. In silico modeling experiments, in which binding of GSF to the extracellular domain of the integrin αvβ3 was determined, revealed specific docking of GSF to the same binding site as the natural peptidic ligands of this integrin. The sulfate in the molecule coordinated with one manganese ion in the binding site. These studies show that this chemically easily accessible molecule GSF, synthesized in three steps from 3,4-bis

  7. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  8. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  9. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lu, Na [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  10. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  11. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  12. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of beta1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisense-Dp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the beta1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell beta1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of beta1-integrin, talin, paxillin, alpha-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the beta1-integrin complex components (beta1-integrin, FAK, alpha-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and beta1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance.

  13. Fibronectin adsorption, cell adhesion, and proliferation on nanostructured tantalum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, T; Kraft, David Christian; Foss, Morten; Kingshott, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Chevallier, Jacques; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-05-25

    The interaction between dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells (DP-MSCs) and three different tantalum nanotopographies with and without a fibronectin coating is examined: sputter-coated tantalum surfaces with low surface roughness tantalum surfaces were examined, as well as cellular attachment, proliferation, and vinculin focal adhesion spot assembly on the respective surfaces. The results showed the highest fibronectin mass uptake on the hut structures, with a slightly higher availability of cell-binding domains and the most pronounced formation of vinculin focal adhesion spots as compared to the other surfaces. The proliferation of DP-MSCs was found to be significantly higher on dome and hut surfaces coated with fibronectin compared to the uncoated flat tantalum surfaces. Consequently, the results presented in this study indicate that fibronectin-coated nanotopographies with a vertical dimension of less than 5 nm influence cell adhesion. This rather interesting behavior is argued to originate from the more available fibronectin cell-binding domains observed on the hut structures. PMID:20443575

  14. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakomori Senitiroh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.

  15. Cell surface localization and tissue distribution of a hepatocyte cell-cell adhesion glycoprotein (cell-CAM 105)

    OpenAIRE

    Ocklind, C; Forsum, U; Obrink, B

    1983-01-01

    We recently identified a 105,000-dalton plasma membrane glycoprotein, denoted cell-CAM 105 (CAM, cell adhesion molecule), that is involved in intercellular adhesion of reaggregating rat hepatocytes (Ocklind, C., and B. Obrink, 1982, J. Biol. Chem., 257:6788-6795). In this communication we used a monospecific rabbit antiserum against cell-CAM 105 to localize the antigen by indirect immunofluorescence on isolated rat cells and on frozen rat tissue sections. This antiserum stained the surface of...

  16. Non-viral gene delivery regulated by stiffness of cell adhesion substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun Joon; Liu, Jodi; Riddle, Kathryn; Matsumoto, Takuya; Leach, Kent; Mooney, David J.

    2005-06-01

    Non-viral gene vectors are commonly used for gene therapy owing to safety concerns with viral vectors. However, non-viral vectors are plagued by low levels of gene transfection and cellular expression. Current efforts to improve the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery are focused on manipulations of the delivery vector, whereas the influence of the cellular environment in DNA uptake is often ignored. The mechanical properties (for example, rigidity) of the substrate to which a cell adheres have been found to mediate many aspects of cell function including proliferation, migration and differentiation, and this suggests that the mechanics of the adhesion substrate may regulate a cell's ability to uptake exogeneous signalling molecules. In this report, we present a critical role for the rigidity of the cell adhesion substrate on the level of gene transfer and expression. The mechanism relates to material control over cell proliferation, and was investigated using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. This study provides a new material-based control point for non-viral gene therapy.

  17. Growth hormone increases vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Krarup; Fisker, Sanne; Dall, Rolf;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of GH administration on endothelial adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, in vivo and in vitro. Soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured before and after treatment in 25 healthy subjects...... and 25 adult GH-deficient (GHD) patients randomized to GH treatment or placebo. Furthermore, we studied the direct effect of GH and IGF-I and serum from GH-treated subjects on basal and TNF alpha-stimulated expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Baseline...... levels of VCAM-1, but not E-selectin, were significantly lower in GHD patients than in healthy subjects (362 +/- 15 microg/liter vs. 516 +/- 21 microg/liter, P treatment, compared with placebo [net difference between groups 151.8 microg/liter (95...

  18. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre P. Eleniste; Angela Bruzzaniti

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organiza...

  19. [Advances of the Role of Ezrin in Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ting-Huai

    2016-02-01

    Ezrin, also known as cytovillin or vilin 2, is one of the members of ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) protein family. Ezrin, which is a tyrosine kinase substrate, functions to bridge membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have demonstrated that Ezrin regulates the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. These processes are not only associated with changes in expression level and subcellular localization of Ezrin itself, but also influenced by alteration in microenvironment of primary breast cancer cells. The regulation of Ezrin in mammary carcinoma cells involves interactions among signaling pathways mediated by adhesion molecules (CD44, ICAM, E-cadherin) and the tyrosine kinase growth factors, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) and their receptors. The determination of the functions and mechanism(s) of action of Ezrin in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells will provide new information on the basic mechanisms of metastasis of breast cancer cells and has the potential to identify a novel drug target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. This article addresses the role of Ezrin in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. PMID:27424401

  20. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking

    CERN Document Server

    Pierres, Anne; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 second lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sens...

  1. Analysis of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons migrating from a polyolefin-based hot-melt adhesive into food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommatzsch, Martin; Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni; Simat, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Hot-melt adhesives are widely utilised to glue cardboard boxes used as food packaging material. They have to comply with the requirements of Article 3 of the European Framework Regulation for food contact materials (1935/2004). The hot melt raw materials analysed mainly consisted of paraffinic waxes, hydrocarbon resins and polyolefins. The hydrocarbon resins, functioning as tackifiers, were the predominant source of hydrocarbons of sufficient volatility to migrate into dry foods: the 18 hydrocarbon resins analysed contained 8.2-118 g kg(-1) saturated and up to 59 g kg(-1) aromatic hydrocarbons eluted from GC between n-C16 and n-C24, substantially more than the paraffinic waxes and the polyolefins. These tackfier resins, especially the oligomers ≤ C24, have been characterised structurally by GC×GC-MS and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Migration into food was estimated using a simulating system with polenta as food simulant, which was verified by the analysis of a commercial risotto rice sample packed in a virgin fibre folding box sealed with a hot melt. About 0.5-1.5% of the potentially migrating substances (between n-C16 and n-C24) of a hot melt were found to be transferred into food under storage conditions, which can result in a food contamination in the order of 1 mg kg(-1) food (depending on the amount of potentially migrating substances from the hot melt, the hot melt surface, amount of food, contact time etc.). Migrates from hot melts are easily mistaken for mineral oil hydrocarbons from recycled cardboard.

  2. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Eui-Suk; Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Hae-Hyoung LEE; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human...

  3. Reversing adhesion with light: a general method for functionalized bead release from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Magdesian, Margaret H; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Grutter, Peter; Barrett, Christopher J

    2016-07-19

    Coated beads retain great importance in the study of cell adhesion and intracellular communication; we present a generally applicable method permitting spatiotemporal control of bead adhesion from cells. Herein we demonstrate in vitro release of a poly-d-lysine (PDL) layer from anionic polystyrene beads, allowing complete bead release from rat cortical neurons post-adhesion. PMID:27165466

  4. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  5. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  6. Polyelectrolytes Multilayers to Modulate Cell Adhesion: A Study of the Influence of Film Composition and Polyelectrolyte Interdigitation on the Adhesion of the A549 Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, Nicolás E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Gregurec, Danijela; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Kosutic, Marija; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) with different polycation/polyanion pairs are fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique employing synthetic, natural, and both types of polyelectrolytes. The impact of the chemical composition of PEMs on cell adhesion is assessed by studying cell shape, spreading area, focal contacts, and cell proliferation for the A549 cell line. Cells exhibit good adhesion on PEMs containing natural polycations and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as polyanion, but limited adhesion is observed on PEMs fabricated from both natural polyelectrolytes. PEMs are then assembled, depositing a block of natural polyelectrolytes on top of a stiffer block with PSS as polyanion. Cell adhesion is enhanced on top of the diblock PEMs compared to purely natural PEMs. This fact could be explained by the interdigitation between polyelectrolytes from the two blocks. Diblock PEM assembly provides a simple means to tune cell adhesion on biocompatible PEMs. PMID:26663657

  7. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  8. Heparin-disaccharide affects T cells: inhibition of NF-kappaB activation, cell migration, and modulation of intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Iris; Hershkoviz, Rami; Shivtiel, Shoham; Lapidot, Tzvi; Cohen, Irun R; Lider, Ofer; Cahalon, Liora

    2004-06-01

    We previously reported that disaccharides (DS), generated by enzymatic degradation of heparin or heparan sulfate, inhibit T cell-mediated immune reactions in rodents and regulate cytokine [tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-1beta] secretion by T cells, macrophages, or intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we investigated the effects of a trisulfated heparin DS (3S-DS) on two aspects of T cell function: secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and migration to an inflamed site. 3S-DS down-regulated nuclear factor-kappaB activity and reduced the secretion of TNF-alpha and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by anti-CD3-activated T cells. In addition, 3S-DS inhibited CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12; stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha)-dependent migration in vitro and in vivo and decreased CXCL12-induced T cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix glycoprotein, fibronectin (FN). This inhibition was accompanied by attenuation of CXCL12-induced Pyk2 phosphorylation but did not involve internalization of the CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, or phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase. Despite inhibiting CXCL12-induced adhesion, 3S-DS, on its own, induced T cell adhesion to FN, which was accompanied by phosphorylation of Pyk2. A monosulfated DS showed no effect. Taken together, these data provide evidence that 3S-DS can regulate inflammation by inducing and modulating T cell-signaling events, desensitizing CXCR4, and modulating T cell receptor-induced responses. PMID:15020655

  9. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  10. Nuclear stiffening inhibits migration of invasive melanoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J. S.; Khanna, Payal; Sukumar, Aishwarya; Dong, Cheng; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    During metastasis, melanoma cells must be sufficiently deformable to squeeze through extracellular barriers with small pore sizes. We visualize and quantify deformability of single cells using micropipette aspiration and examine the migration potential of a population of melanoma cells using a flow migration apparatus. We artificially stiffen the nucleus with recombinant overexpression of Δ50 lamin A, which is found in patients with Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome and in aged individuals....

  11. Biomaterial arrays with defined adhesion ligand densities and matrix stiffness identify distinct phenotypes for tumorigenic and nontumorigenic human mesenchymal cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tyler D; Koepsel, Justin T; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Nguyen, Eric H; Zorn, Stefan; Parlato, Matthew; Loveland, Samuel G; Schwartz, Michael P; Murphy, William L

    2014-05-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate migration of a model tumor cell line (HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells, HT-1080s) using synthetic biomaterials to systematically vary peptide ligand density and substrate stiffness. A range of substrate elastic moduli were investigated by using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel arrays (0.34 - 17 kPa) and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays (~0.1-1 GPa), while cell adhesion was tuned by varying the presentation of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides. HT-1080 motility was insensitive to cell adhesion ligand density on RGD-SAMs, as they migrated with similar speed and directionality for a wide range of RGD densities (0.2-5% mol fraction RGD). Similarly, HT-1080 migration speed was weakly dependent on adhesion on 0.34 kPa PEG surfaces. On 13 kPa surfaces, a sharp initial increase in cell speed was observed at low RGD concentration, with no further changes observed as RGD concentration was increased further. An increase in cell speed ~ two-fold for the 13 kPa relative to the 0.34 kPa PEG surface suggested an important role for substrate stiffness in mediating motility, which was confirmed for HT-1080s migrating on variable modulus PEG hydrogels with constant RGD concentration. Notably, despite ~ two-fold changes in cell speed over a wide range of moduli, HT-1080s adopted rounded morphologies on all surfaces investigated, which contrasted with well spread primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Taken together, our results demonstrate that HT-1080s are morphologically distinct from primary mesenchymal cells (hMSCs) and migrate with minimal dependence on cell adhesion for surfaces within a wide range of moduli, whereas motility is strongly influenced by matrix mechanical properties.

  12. GTSE1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein that regulates EB1-dependent cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimilano Scolz

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell migration is a highly complex process that is often compromised when cancer cells become metastatic. The microtubule cytoskeleton is necessary for cell migration, but how microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins regulate multiple pathways promoting cell migration remains unclear. Microtubule plus-end binding proteins (+TIPs are emerging as important players in many cellular functions, including cell migration. Here we identify a +TIP, GTSE1, that promotes cell migration. GTSE1 accumulates at growing microtubule plus ends through interaction with the EB1+TIP. The EB1-dependent +TIP activity of GTSE1 is required for cell migration, as well as for microtubule-dependent disassembly of focal adhesions. GTSE1 protein levels determine the migratory capacity of both nontransformed and breast cancer cell lines. In breast cancers, increased GTSE1 expression correlates with invasive potential, tumor stage, and time to distant metastasis, suggesting that misregulation of GTSE1 expression could be associated with increased invasive potential.

  13. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In p...

  14. Migration of odorous compounds from adhesives used in market samples of food packaging materials by chromatography olfactometry and mass spectrometry (GC-O-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Paula; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-02-15

    Adhesives are commonly used in the manufacture of multilayer food packaging materials. Although they are not in direct contact with the packed food, their compounds may migrate from the adhesive through the substrates to the food. The aim of this work is to determine the migrant concentration in order to evaluate the possible human risk and also to determine if this migration could affect the organoleptic properties of packed food. For this purpose, a total of 12 market samples of multilayer materials (laminates) for packaging dry food (tomatoes, cakes, cookies, breadcrumbs, flour or salt) or fresh food (pizza and pastry) produced with 5 different adhesives were analysed by GC-O-MS. A total of 25 different compounds from adhesives were detected in these laminates. Seventy-six percentage of these compounds migrated into a dry food simulant (Tenax®). Furthermore, compounds with concentrations below the MS detection limit were detected by sniffers with a high modified frequency (MF%). Acetic acid, butyric acid and cyclohexanol with vinegar, cheese and camphor odours were the most abundant compounds. All migration data were below the specific migration limits (SML) and threshold toxicological concern (TTC) recommended values according to the Cramer classification. PMID:24128473

  15. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars;

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......, we show that a 5.0 kb CD44 mRNA contained multiple IMP-binding sites in its 3'UTR, and following IMP depletion this species became unstable. Direct knockdown of the CD44 transcript mimicked the effect of IMPs on invadopodia, and we infer that CD44 mRNA stabilization may be involved in IMP...

  16. Multiple effects of electroporation on the adhesive behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Pehlivanova Viktoria N; Tsoneva Iana H; Tzoneva Rumiana D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently electroporation using biphasic pulses was successfully applied in clinical developments for treating tumours in humans and animals. We evaluated the effects of electrical treatment on cell adhesion behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts. By applying bipolar electrical pulses we studied short- and long-lived effects on cell adhesion and survival, actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion contacts in adherent cancer cells and fibroblasts. Methods Two cancer cel...

  17. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration. (paper)

  18. Regulation of tumor cell migration by protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-proline-, glutamate-, serine-,and threonine-rich sequence (PEST)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua Zheng; Zhimin Lu

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-proline-,glutamate-,serine-,and threonine-rich sequence (PEST) is ubiquitously expressed and is a critical regulator of cell adhesion and migration.PTP-PEST activity can be regulated transcriptionally via gene deletion or mutation in several types of human cancers or via post-translational modifications,including phosphorylation,oxidation,and caspase-dependent cleavage.PTP-PEST interacts with and dephosphorylates cytoskeletal and focal adhesion-associated proteins.Dephosphorylation of PTP-PEST substrates regulates their enzymatic activities and/or their interaction with other proteins and plays an essential role in the tumor cell migration process.

  19. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  20. Quantifying the effect of electric current on cell adhesion studied by single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Leena; Young, Eleanore; Hyttinen, Jari; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Demkó, László

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the effect of external electric current on the cell adhesive and mechanical properties of the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line. Changes in cell morphology, viability, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion structure were studied by standard staining protocols, while single-cell force spectroscopy based on the fluidic force microscopy technology provided a rapid, serial quantification and detailed analysis of cell adhesion and its dynamics. The setup allowed measurements of adhesion forces up to the μN range, and total detachment distances over 40 μm. Force-distance curves have been fitted with a simple elastic model including a cell detachment protocol in order to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells, as well as to reveal changes in the dynamic properties as functions of the applied current dose. While the cell spreading area decreased monotonously with increasing current doses, small current doses resulted only in differences related to cell elasticity. Current doses above 11 As/m(2), however, initiated more drastic changes in cell morphology, viability, cellular structure, as well as in properties related to cell adhesion. The observed differences, eventually leading to cell death toward higher doses, might originate from both the decrease in pH and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

  1. Decorin-mediated inhibition of the migration of U87MG glioma cells involves activation of autophagy and suppression of TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ting; Zhang, Chen-Guang; Gong, Ming-Tao; Zhang, Min; Wang, Lei; Ding, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Decorin (DCN) is a major member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family that is critically involved in tumorigenesis and the development of metastasis of cancers, including glioma. Overexpression of DCN was indicated to suppress glioma cell growth. However, the role of DCN in the migration of glioma cells remain elusive. In this study, we found that treatment with exogenous DCN inhibited the adhesion and migration of U87MG glioma cells with down-regulation of TGF-β signaling. DCN also activated autophagy, as indicated by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, increase in LC3 I/LC3 II conversion, and p62/SQSTM1 degradation in U87MG cells. The increased activity of autophagy was found to be connected to the inhibition on glioma cell migration. Knockdown of DCN expression or the disruption of autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was able to reduce the suppression on cell adhesion and migration induced by DCN. When U87MG cells were treated with temozolomide (TMZ), induction of autophagy and up-regulation of DCN were observed, accompanied by suppressed cell adhesion and migration. Transfection of siRNA targeting DCN attenuated the suppressive effect of TMZ on glioma cell migration and adhesion. Our results indicated that the migration of glioma cells was under the control of the active status of autophagy, with DCN serving as a key player, as well as an indicator of the outcome. Therefore, it is suggested that autophagy-modulating reagents could be considered for the treatment of invasive glioma.

  2. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  3. Migration Suppression of Small Cell Lung Cancer by Polysaccharides from Nostoc commune Vaucher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Ding, Guo-Bin; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lichao; Wu, Haili; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-08-17

    Nostoc commune Vauch., classified into cyanobacteria, has been always well appreciated as a healthy food and medicine worldwide owing to its rich nutrition and potent bioactivities. Nevertheless, the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from N. commune Vauch. (NVPS) against cancer cell progression and metastasis is still being unraveled. The results in this study showed that NVPS remarkably suppressed cell migration through blocking the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program in NCI-H446 and NCI-H1688 human small cell lung cancer cells. The inhibitory effects were attributed to the suppression of integrin β1/FAK signaling through regulating cell-matrix adhesion. Furthermore, NVPS treatment could increase E-cadherin expression, but down-regulate N-cadherin, Vimentin, and MMP-9 expression, which resulted in the blockage of STAT3 nuclear translocation and JAK1 signaling. These findings suggest that NVPS may be a good candidate for development as a possible antitumor agent against small cell lung cancer. PMID:27465400

  4. 3D surface topology guides stem cell adhesion and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilizers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors.

  5. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  6. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  7. Polysialic acid modification of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 in human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Werneburg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs are the progenitors of myelinating oligodendrocytes in brain development and repair. Successful myelination depends on the control of adhesiveness during OPC migration and axon contact formation. The decoration of cell surface proteins with the glycan polysialic acid (polySia is a key regulatory element of OPC interactions during development and under pathological conditions. By far the major protein carrier of polySia is the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, but recently, polysialylation of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 has been detected in the developing mouse brain. In mice, polySia-SynCAM 1 is associated with cells expressing NG2, a marker of a heterogeneous precursor cell population, which is the primary source for oligodendrocytes in development and myelin repair but can also give rise to astrocytes and possibly neurons. It is not yet clear if polySia-SynCAM 1 is expressed by OPCs and its occurrence in humans is elusive. By generating uniform human embryonic stem cell-derived OPC cultures, we demonstrate that polySia is present on human OPCs but down-regulated during differentiation into myelin basic protein-positive oligodendrocytes. PolySia on NCAM resides on the isoforms NCAM-180 and NCAM-140, and SynCAM 1 is identified as a novel polySia acceptor in human OPCs.

  8. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...

  9. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  10. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  11. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  12. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A;

    1988-01-01

    sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from......In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...

  13. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Shin Nishitani; Adriano Mesquita Alencar; Yingxiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium i...

  14. Defective neuroepithelial cell cohesion affects tangential branchiomotor neuron migration in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockinger, Petra; Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-11-01

    Facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) in zebrafish and mouse embryonic hindbrain undergo a characteristic tangential migration from rhombomere (r) 4, where they are born, to r6/7. Cohesion among neuroepithelial cells (NCs) has been suggested to function in FBMN migration by inhibiting FBMNs positioned in the basal neuroepithelium such that they move apically between NCs towards the midline of the neuroepithelium instead of tangentially along the basal side of the neuroepithelium towards r6/7. However, direct experimental evaluation of this hypothesis is still lacking. Here, we have used a combination of biophysical cell adhesion measurements and high-resolution time-lapse microscopy to determine the role of NC cohesion in FBMN migration. We show that reducing NC cohesion by interfering with Cadherin 2 (Cdh2) activity results in FBMNs positioned at the basal side of the neuroepithelium moving apically towards the neural tube midline instead of tangentially towards r6/7. In embryos with strongly reduced NC cohesion, ectopic apical FBMN movement frequently results in fusion of the bilateral FBMN clusters over the apical midline of the neural tube. By contrast, reducing cohesion among FBMNs by interfering with Contactin 2 (Cntn2) expression in these cells has little effect on apical FBMN movement, but reduces the fusion of the bilateral FBMN clusters in embryos with strongly diminished NC cohesion. These data provide direct experimental evidence that NC cohesion functions in tangential FBMN migration by restricting their apical movement.

  15. Rab5 is required in metastatic cancer cells for Caveolin-1-enhanced Rac1 activation, migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, Natalia; Leyton, Lisette; Stupack, Dwayne; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-06-01

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that regulates early endosome trafficking and other cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, Rab5 promotes Rac1 activation and cancer cell migration, but little is known about the upstream regulators of Rab5. We have previously shown that the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) promotes Rac1 activation and migration of cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that CAV1 stimulates Rab5 activation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Expression of CAV1 in B16-F10 mouse melanoma and HT-29(US) human colon adenocarcinoma cells increased the GTP loading of Rab5, whereas shRNA-mediated targeting of endogenous CAV1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased Rab5-GTP levels. Accordingly, shRNA-mediated downregulation of Rab5 decreased CAV1-mediated Rac1 activation, cell migration and invasion in B16-F10 and HT-29(US) cells. Expression of CAV1 was accompanied by increased recruitment of Tiam1, a Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), to Rab5-positive early endosomes. Using the inhibitor NSC23766, Tiam1 was shown to be required for Rac1 activation and cell migration induced by CAV1 and Rab5. Mechanistically, we provide evidence implicating p85α (also known as PIK3R1), a Rab5 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), in CAV1-dependent effects, by showing that CAV1 recruits p85α, precluding p85α-mediated Rab5 inactivation and increasing cell migration. In summary, these studies identify a novel CAV1-Rab5-Rac1 signaling axis, whereby CAV1 prevents Rab5 inactivation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion.

  16. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  17. Biological length scale topography enhances cell-substratum adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Nancy W; Liliensiek, Sara; Teixeira, Ana I; Abrams, George; Campbell, Sean; Nealey, Paul F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2004-07-01

    The basement membrane possesses a rich 3-dimensional nanoscale topography that provides a physical stimulus, which may modulate cell-substratum adhesion. We have investigated the strength of cell-substratum adhesion on nanoscale topographic features of a similar scale to that of the native basement membrane. SV40 human corneal epithelial cells were challenged by well-defined fluid shear, and cell detachment was monitored. We created silicon substrata with uniform grooves and ridges having pitch dimensions of 400-4000 nm using X-ray lithography. F-actin labeling of cells that had been incubated for 24 hours revealed that the percentage of aligned and elongated cells on the patterned surfaces was the same regardless of pitch dimension. In contrast, at the highest fluid shear, a biphasic trend in cell adhesion was observed with cells being most adherent to the smaller features. The 400 nm pitch had the highest percentage of adherent cells at the end of the adhesion assay. The effect of substratum topography was lost for the largest features evaluated, the 4000 nm pitch. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the cells during and after flow indicated that the aligned and elongated cells on the 400 nm pitch were more tightly adhered compared to aligned cells on the larger patterns. Selected experiments with primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells produced similar results to the SV40 human corneal epithelial cells. These findings have relevance to interpretation of cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue engineering and prosthetic design.

  18. Silencing stem cell factor attenuates stemness and inhibits migration of cancer stem cells derived from Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Wang, JianTao; Li, Zhixi; Liu, YanYang; Jiang, Ming; Li, Yan; Cao, Dan; Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Feng; Luo, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the function of SCF in regulating stemness and migration of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains largely undefined. Here, we report that non-adhesive culture system can enrich and expand CSCs derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that the expression level of SCF in CSCs was higher than those in LLC cells. Silencing SCF via short hairpin (sh) RNA lentivirus transduction attenuated sphere formation and inhibited expressions of stemness genes, ALDH1, Sox2, and Oct4 of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SCF-silenced CSCs inhibited the migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with decreased expression of N-cadherin, Vimentin, and increased expression of E-cadherin in vitro and in vivo. Finally, SCF-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus transduction suppressed tumorigenicity of CSCs. Taken together, our findings unraveled an important role of SCF in CSCs derived from LLC cells. SCF might serve as a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26666817

  19. CXC chemokine ligand 12/Stromal cell-derived factor-1 regulates cell adhesion in human colon cancer cells by induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1

    OpenAIRE

    Tung Shui-Yi; Chang Shun-Fu; Chou Ming-Hui; Huang Wen-Shih; Hsieh Yung-Yu; Shen Chien-Heng; Kuo Hsing-Chun; Chen Cheng-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis is involved in human colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis and can promote the progression of CRC. Interaction between CRC cells and endothelium is a key event in tumor progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SDF-1 on the adhesion of CRC cells. Methods Human CRC DLD-1 cells were used to study the effect of SDF-1 on intercellular adhesion m...

  20. Adhesion of subsets of human blood mononuclear cells to porcine endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cellular immune response is a major barrier to xenotransplantation, and cell adhesion is the first step in intercellular recognition. Flow-cytometric adhesion assay has been used to investigate the differential adhesions of monocyte (Mo), natural killer cell (NK) and T lymphocyte (T) present within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), and to demonstrate the effect of human interferon-γ(hIFN-γ) or/and tumor necrosis factor-α (hTNF-α) pretreatment of PAEC on their adhesiveness for different PBMC subsets. The preferential sequence for PBMC subset binding to resting PAEC is Mo, NK and T cells, among which T cells show the slightest adherence; hTNF-α can act across the species, and augment Mo, NK and T cell adhesion ratios by 40%, 110% and 3 times, respectively. These results confirm at the cell level that host Mo and NK cells are major participants in the cellular xenograft rejection, thereby, providing a prerequisite for further studying the human Mo/NK-PAEC interactive mechanisms.

  1. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin (NWU, MED)

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  2. Cell adhesion to agrin presented as a nanopatterned substrate is consistent with an interaction with the extracellular matrix and not transmembrane adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Tobias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular spacing is important for cell adhesion in a number of ways, ranging from the ordered arrangement of matrix polymers extracellularly, to steric hindrance of adhesion/signaling complexes intracellularly. This has been demonstrated using nanopatterned RGD peptides, a canonical extracellular matrix ligand for integrin interactions. Cell adhesion was greatly reduced when the RGD-coated nanoparticles were separated by more than 60 nm, indicating a sharp spacing-dependent threshold for this form of cell adhesion. Results Here we show a similar dependence of cell adhesion on the spacing of agrin, a protein that exists as both a secreted, matrix-bound form and a type-2 transmembrane form in vivo. Agrin was presented as a substrate for cell adhesion assays by anchoring recombinant protein to gold nanoparticles that were arrayed at tunable distances onto glass coverslips. Cells adhered well to nanopatterned agrin, and when presented as uniformly coated substrates, adhesion to agrin was comparable to other well-studied adhesion molecules, including N-Cadherin. Adhesion of both mouse primary cortical neurons and rat B35 neuroblastoma cells showed a spacing-dependent threshold, with a sharp drop in adhesion when the space between agrin-coated nanoparticles increased from 60 to 90 nm. In contrast, adhesion to N-Cadherin decreased gradually over the entire range of distances tested (uniform, 30, 60, 90, and 160 nm. The spacing of the agrin nanopattern also influenced cell motility, and peptide competition suggested adhesion was partially integrin dependent. Finally, differences in cell adhesion to C-terminal agrin fragments of different lengths were detected using nanopatterned substrates, and these differences were not evident using uniformly coated substrates. Conclusion These results suggest nanopatterned substrates may provide a physiological presentation of adhesive substrates, and are consistent with cells adhering to agrin

  3. Augmentation of RANTES-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediated signaling and T cell adhesion by elastase-treated fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, A; Hershkoviz, R; Vaday, G G; Chowers, Y; Lider, O

    2001-06-15

    T cells migrating across extracellular matrix (ECM) barriers toward their target, the inflammatory site, should respond to chemoattractant cytokines and to the degradation of ECM by specific enzymes. In this study, we examined the effects of RANTES and ECM proteins treated with human leukocyte elastase on T cell activation and adhesion to the ECM. We found that human peripheral blood T cells briefly suspended with RANTES (0.1-100 ng/ml) had increased phosphorylation of their intracellular extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase involved in the activation of several intracellular downstream effector molecules implicated in cell adhesion and migration. Consequently, a small portion (12-20%) of the responding cells adhered to fibronectin (FN). However, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of native immobilized FN, laminin, or collagen type I, ERK phosphorylation was partially inhibited, suggesting that this form of the ECM proteins can down-regulate RANTES-induced intracellular signaling. In contrast, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of elastase-treated immobilized FN, but not to elastase-treated laminin, ERK phosphorylation was markedly increased. Furthermore, a large percentage (30%) of RANTES-activated T cells adhered to the enzymatically treated FN in a beta1 integrin-dependent fashion. Thus, while migrating along chemotactic gradients within the ECM, T cells can adapt their adhesive performance according to the level of cleavage induced by enzymes to the matrix. PMID:11390457

  4. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (P<0.001). SUSD3 was highly expressed in ERα-positive breast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target. PMID:24413080

  5. Glioma Cell Migration on Three-dimensional Nanofiber Scaffolds Is Regulated by Substrate Topography and Abolished by Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Agudelo-Garcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of malignant gliomas is their ability to disperse through neural tissue, leading to long-term failure of all known therapies. Identifying new antimigratory targets could reduce glioma recurrence and improve therapeutic efficacy, but screens based on conventional migration assays are hampered by the limited ability of these assays to reproduce native cell motility. Here, we have analyzed the motility, gene expression, and sensitivity to migration inhibitors of glioma cells cultured on scaffolds formed by submicron-sized fibers (nanofibers mimicking the neural topography. Glioma cells cultured on aligned nanofiber scaffolds reproduced the elongated morphology of cells migrating in white matter tissue and were highly sensitive to myosin II inhibition but only moderately affected by stress fiber disruption. In contrast, the same cells displayed a flat morphology and opposite sensitivity to myosin II and actin inhibition when cultured on conventional tissue culture polystyrene. Gene expression analysis indicated a correlation between migration on aligned nanofibers and increased STAT3 signaling, a known driver of glioma progression. Accordingly, cell migration out of glioblastoma-derived neurospheres and tumor explants was reduced by STAT3 inhibitors at subtoxic concentrations. Remarkably, these inhibitors were ineffective when tested at the same concentrations in a conventional two-dimensional migration assay. We conclude that migration of glioma cells is regulated by topographical cues that affect cell adhesion and gene expression. Cell migration analysis using nanofiber scaffolds could be used to reproduce native mechanisms of migration and to identify antimigratory strategies not disclosed by other in vitro models.

  6. Tumor suppressive microRNA-218 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through targeting laminin-332 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Nohata, Nijiro; Kikkawa, Naoko; Enokida, Hideki; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hidaka, Hideo; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Seki, Naohiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent our microRNA (miRNA) expression signature revealed that expression of microRNA-218 (miR-218) was reduced in cancer tissues, suggesting a candidate of tumor suppressor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-218 and its mediated moleculer pathways in HNSCC. Restoration of miR-218 in cancer cells led to significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion activities in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SAS). Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-218 transfectants and in silico database analysis showed that focal adhesion pathway was a promising candidate of miR-218 target pathways. The laminins are an important and biologically active part of the basal lamina, the function of that are various such as influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion as well as proliferation and cell survival. Interestingly, all components of laminin-332 (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) are listed on the candidate genes in focal adhesion pathway. Furthermore, we focused on LAMB3 which has a miR-218 target site and gene expression studies and luciferase reporter assays showed that LAMB3 was directly regulated by miR-218. Silencing study of LAMB3 demonstrated significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion. In clinical specimens with HNSCC, the expression levels of laminin-332 were significantly upregulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Our analysis data showed that tumor suppressive miR-218 contributes to cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating focal adhesion pathway, especially laminin-332. Tumor suppressive miRNA-mediated novel cancer pathways provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis. PMID:23159910

  7. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. ► HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. ► HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. ► HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  8. Involvement of cell surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in cell-cell adhesion of chick embryo myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    During myogenesis myoblasts fuse to form multinucleate cells that express muscle-specific proteins. A specific cell-cell adhesion process precedes lipid bilayer union during myoblast fusion (Knudsen, K. A., and A. F. Horwitz. 1977. Dev. Biol. 58:328-338) and is mediated by cell surface glycoproteins (Knudsen, K. A., 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:891- 897). In this paper we show that myoblast adhesion and myotube formation are inhibited by treating fusion-competent myoblasts with phosphatidylinosito...

  9. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties. PMID:27612825

  10. Cryptococcal Glucuronoxylomannan Inhibits Adhesion of Neutrophils to Stimulated Endothelium In Vitro by Affecting Both Neutrophils and Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ellerbroek, Pauline M.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Wolbers, Floor; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.

    2002-01-01

    Cryptococcal infections are often characterized by a paucity of leukocytes in the infected tissues. Previous research has shown that the capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) inhibits leukocyte migration. In this study we investigated whether the capsular polysaccharide GXM affects the migration of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN]) through the endothelium by interfering with adhesion in a static adhesion model. Pretreatment of PMN with GXM inhibited PMN adhesion to ...

  11. Hepatocyte adhesion to carbohydrate-derivatized surfaces. II. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Rat hepatic lectins mediate adhesion of isolated rat hepatocytes to synthetic surfaces derivatized with galactosides. Initial weak adhesion is followed by rapid adhesion strengthening. After hepatocytes contact galactose-derivatized gels, the hepatic lectins move rapidly into an inaccessible patch at the adhesive surface (Weisz, O. A., and R. L. Schnaar. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 115:485-493). Hepatic lectin patching, which occurs both at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, is not responsible for adhesio...

  12. Heterologous desensitization of T cell functions by CCR5 and CXCR4 ligands: inhibition of cellular signaling, adhesion and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Iris; Cahalon, Liora; Hershkoviz, Rami; Lahat, Adi; Franitza, Suzanne; Lider, Ofer

    2003-01-01

    T cells migrate into inflamed sites through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to chemotactic areas and are then simultaneously or sequentially exposed to multiple chemotactic ligands. We examined the responses of human peripheral blood T cells, present in an ECM-like context, to combinatorial signaling transduced by SDF-1alpha (CXCL12), and two CCR5 ligands, RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-1beta (CCL4). Separately, these chemokines, at G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulating concentrations, induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and T cell chemotaxis. However, the pro-adhesive and pro-migratory capacities of SDF-1alpha and RANTES or MIP-1beta were mutually suppressed by the simultaneous or sequential exposure of the cells to these CCR5 or CXCR4 ligands. This cross-talk did not involve the internalization of the SDF-1alpha receptor, CXCR4, but rather, a decrease in phosphorylation of ERK and Pyk-2, as well as inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization. Strikingly, early CXCR4 signaling of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, detected by SDF-1alpha-induced AKT phosphorylation, was insensitive to RANTES-CCR5 signals. Accordingly, early chemotaxis to SDF-1alpha was not susceptible to CCR5 occupancy, whereas late stages of T cell chemotaxis were markedly down-regulated. This is an example of a specialized functional desensitization of heterologous chemokine receptors that induces GPCR interference with T cell adhesion to ECM ligands and chemotaxis within chemokine-rich extravascular contexts. PMID:12502723

  13. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  14. The Tiam1 PDZ Domain Couples to Syndecan1 and Promotes Cell-Matrix Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, Tyson R; Klaus, Suzi M; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S; DeMali, Kris A; Fuentes, Ernesto J [Iowa

    2010-08-12

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a 'model' peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer.

  15. Functional nanoparticles translocation into cell and adhesion force curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haisung; Veerapandian, Murugan; Kim, Byung Tae; Yun, Kyusik; Seo, Soo-Won

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the cell translocation of two functional nanoparticles (barium sulfate (BaSO4NPs), europium (III) doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd2O3@EuNPs)) into A549 cells by Bio-Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Successful cell translocation of these two nanoparticles are ensured from the measurement of changes in the cell surface roughness and interaction (extension), retraction forces from the vertical deflection of tip towards substrate surfaces through force-distance curve slope analysis. Measurement of typical adhesion forces (i.e., extension and retraction) between the tip-substrate (0.0963 and 1.155 nN), tip-A549 cell substrate (0.1177 and 2.468 nN), tip-Gd2O3@EuNPs/A549 substrate (0.0785 and 0.4276 nN) and tip-BaSO4NPs/A549 substrate (0.518 and 6.838 nN) confirms the successful cell translocation of functional nanoparticles into A549 cells. Further the nanoscale resolution of topographical height and 3D images evinces the surface characteristics of normal A549 cells and nanoparticles translocated A549 cells. PMID:23421137

  16. Cell Wall Microstructure Analysis Implicates Hemicellulose Polysaccharides in Cell Adhesion in Tomato Fruit Pericarp Parenchyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose J. Ordaz-Ortiz; Susan E. Marcus; J. Paul Knox

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed to isolate intact cells from both unripe and ripe tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma have allowed the cell biological analysis of polysaccharide epitopes at the surface of separated cells. The LM7 pectic homoga-lacturonan epitope is a marker of the junctions of adhesion planes and intercellular spaces in parenchyma systems. The LM7 epitope persistently marked the former edge of adhesion planes at the surface of cells separated from unripe and ripened tomato fruit and also from fruits with the Cnr mutation. The LM 11 xylan epitope was associated, in sections, with cell walls lining intercellular space but the epitope was not detected at the surface of isolated cells, being lost during cell isolation. The LM15 xyloglucan epitope was present at the surface of cells isolated from unripe fruit in a pattern reflecting the former edge of cell adhesion planes/intercellular space but with gaps and apparent breaks, An equivalent pattern ofLM15 epitope occurrence was revealed at the surface of cells isolated by pectate lyase action but was not present in cells isolated from ripe fruit or from Cnr fruit. In contrast to wild-type cells, the LM5 galactan and LM21 mannan epitopes oc-curred predominantly in positions reflecting intercellular space in Cnr, suggesting a concerted alteration in cell wall mi-crostructure in response to this mutation. Galactanase and mannanase, along with pectic homogalacturonan-degrading enzymes, were capable of releasing cells from unripe fruit parenchyma. These observations indicate that hemicellulose polymers are present in architectural contexts reflecting cell adhesion and that several cell wall polysaccharide classes are likely to contribute to cell adhesion/cell separation in tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma.

  17. A Nanoprinted Model of Interstitial Cancer Migration Reveals a Link between Cell Deformability and Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakopoulou, Magdalini; Bergert, Martin; Taubenberger, Anna; Guck, Jochen; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic progression of tumors requires the coordinated dissemination of cancerous cells through interstitial tissues and their replication in distant body locations. Despite their importance in cancer treatment decisions, key factors, such as cell shape adaptation and the role it plays in dense tissue invasion by cancerous cells, are not well understood. Here, we employ a 3D electrohydrodynamic nanoprinting technology to generate vertical arrays of topographical pores that mimic interstitial tissue resistance to the mesenchymal migration of cancerous cells, in order to determine the effect of nuclear size, cell deformability, and cell-to-substrate adhesion on tissue invasion efficiency. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our analysis demonstrates that the ability of cells to deform depends on the cell cycle phase, peaks immediately after mitosis, and is key to the invasion process. Increased pore penetration efficiency by cells in early G1 phase also coincided with their lower nuclear volume and higher cell deformability, compared with the later cell cycle stages. Furthermore, artificial decondensation of chromatin induced an increase in cell and nuclear deformability and improved pore penetration efficiency of cells in G1. Together, these results underline that along the cell cycle cells have different abilities to dynamically remodel their actin cytoskeleton and induce nuclear shape changes, which determines their pore penetration efficiency. Thus, our results support a mechanism in which cell proliferation and pore penetration are functionally linked to favor the interstitial dissemination of metastatic cells. PMID:27268411

  18. Loss of cofilin 1 disturbs actin dynamics, adhesion between enveloping and deep cell layers and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, cohesive migration drives associated cell layers to the completion of epiboly in zebrafish. The association of different layers relies on E-cadherin based cellular junctions, whose stability can be affected by actin turnover. Here, we examined the effect of malfunctioning actin turnover on the epibolic movement by knocking down an actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin 1, using antisense morpholino oligos (MO. Knockdown of cfl1 interfered with epibolic movement of deep cell layer (DEL but not in the enveloping layer (EVL and the defect could be specifically rescued by overexpression of cfl1. It appeared that the uncoordinated movements of DEL and EVL were regulated by the differential expression of cfl1 in the DEL, but not EVL as shown by in situ hybridization. The dissociation of DEL and EVL was further evident by the loss of adhesion between layers by using transmission electronic and confocal microscopy analyses. cfl1 morphants also exhibited abnormal convergent extension, cellular migration and actin filaments, but not involution of hypoblast. The cfl1 MO-induced cell migration defect was found to be cell-autonomous in cell transplantation assays. These results suggest that proper actin turnover mediated by Cfl1 is essential for adhesion between DEL and EVL and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

  19. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony; Sarthok Sircar / Anthony Roberts Collaboration

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a select range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function g*) between the adhesion phase (when g*>0.5) and the fragmentation phase (when g*University startup funds and AR is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP150102385.

  20. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos-Asperilla, L.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.; Alonso, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10{sup -}3 min{sup -}1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days), due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been adsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti. (Author)

  1. Glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate synergize with photodynamic therapy respectively to inhibit cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Zhang, Ting; Mai, Bingjie; Wang, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Most cancer cells have the specially increased glycolytic phenotype, which makes this pathway become an attractive therapeutic target. Although glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) has been demonstrated to potentiate the cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT), the impacts on cell migration after the combined treatment has never been reported yet. The present study aimed to analyze the influence of glycolytic inhibitors 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) combined with Ce6-PDT on cell motility of Triple Negative Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. As determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium-bromide-Tetraz-olium (MTT) assay, more decreased cell viability was observed in 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT groups when compared with either monotherapy. Under optimal conditions, synergistic potentiation on cell membrane destruction and the decline of cell adhesion and cells migratory ability were observed in both 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT by electron microscope observation (SEM), wound healing and trans-well assays. Besides, serious microfilament network collapses as well as impairment of matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were notably improved after the combined treatments by immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that 2-DG and 3-BP can both significantly potentiated Ce6-PDT efficacy of cell migration inhibition. PMID:25631472

  2. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyu Li

    Full Text Available The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17 is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ. Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  3. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice. PMID:23755270

  4. IL-2 induces T cell adherence to extracellular matrix: inhibition of adherence and migration by IL-2 peptides generated by leukocyte elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Yavin, E J; Hershkoviz, R; Avron, A; Franitza, S; Hardan, I; Cahalon, L; Fridkin, M; Lider, O

    1998-09-01

    Migration of inflammatory cells requires cell adhesion and their subsequent detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Leukocyte activation and migration must be terminated to stop inflammation. Here, we report that IL-2 enhances human T cell adherence to laminin, collagen type IV, and fibronectin (FN). In contrast, neutrophil elastase, an enzyme activated during inflammation, degrades IL-2 to yield IL-2 fractions that inhibit IL-2-induced T cell adhesion to FN. The amino acid composition of two of these IL-2 fractions, which appear to block T cell adherence to FN, were analyzed, and three peptides were consequently synthesized. The three peptides IVL, RMLT, and EFLNRWIT, but not the corresponding inversely synthesized peptides, inhibited T cell adhesion to FN induced by a variety of activators: IL-2, IL-7, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, and PMA, as well as anti-CD3 and anti-beta1 integrin-activating mAb. Moreover, these IL-2 peptides inhibited T cell chemotaxis via FN-coated membranes induced by IL-2 and MIP-1beta. Inhibition of T cell adherence and migration apparently involves abrogation of the rearrangement of the T cell actin cytoskeleton. Thus, the migrating immune cells, the cytokines, and the ECM can create a functional relationship in which both inflammation-inducing signals and inhibitory molecules of immune responses can coexist; the enzymatic products of IL-2 may serve as natural feedback inhibitors of inflammation. PMID:9725245

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A Cα regulates proliferation, migration, and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Okamura, Hirohiko; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Teramachi, Jumpei; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2016-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary bone tumor. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) participates in regulating many important physiological processes, such as cell cycle, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction. In this study, we examined the expression and function of PP2A Cα in osteosarcoma cells. PP2A Cα expression was expected to be higher in malignant osteosarcoma tissues. PP2A Cα expression level and PP2A activity was higher in malignant osteosarcoma LM8 cells compared with that in primary osteoblasts and in the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A, reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in LM8 cells. PP2A Cα-knockdown LM8 cells (shPP2A) exhibited less striking filopodial and lamellipodial structures than that in original LM8 cells. Focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and NF-κB activity decreased in shPP2A-treated cells. Sensitivity to serum deprivation-induced apoptosis increased in shPP2A-treated cells, accompanied by a lower expression level of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 in these cells. Reduction of PP2A Cα resulted in a decrease in the migration ability of LM8 cells in vitro. Reduction in PP2A Cα levels in vivo suppressed proliferation and metastasis in LM8 cells. PP2A Cα expression was also higher in human osteosarcoma MG63 and SaOS-2 cells than that in primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, and reduction in PP2A Cα levels suppressed the cell proliferation rate and migration ability of MG63 cells. These results indicate that PP2A Cα has a critical role in the proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells; therefore, its inhibition could potentially suppress the malignancy of osteosarcoma cells. PMID:27617401

  6. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of signalling by adhesion and growth factor receptors in mammary epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and communication are essential for tissue morphogenesis and repair in healthy multicellular organisms. However, dysregulation of these processes can drive disease progression in conditions such as cancer. Selective cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrins, a family of transmembrane receptors that compartmentalise signalling and organise the cytoskeleton. Adhesion receptors provide spatial cues to cells to allow them to respond to growth factor and cyto...

  7. Effect of Zinc and Nitric Oxide on Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells under Shear Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Shah, Ankit K.; Schildmeyer, Lisa A.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm2 or 1 dyne/cm2) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm2) for 24 hours. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike o...

  8. Cell adhesion behavior on the silicone rubber surface modified by using ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Tae; Jung, Chan Hee; Nh, Young Chang; Choi, Jae Hak [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kuk, In Seol [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Mi Young [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    In this study we studied cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of a silicone rubber modified by ion beam irradiation. The surface property of the irradiated silicone rubber was characterized by water contact angle and FT-IR analyses. It was observed that human (HEK293) fibroblast cells exhibit strong adhesion to the irradiated silicone surface. This enhanced adhesion of mammalian cells can be attributed to the increase in the hydrophilicity of the silicone surface by ion beam irradiation.

  9. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  10. Multiple effects of electroporation on the adhesive behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pehlivanova Viktoria N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently electroporation using biphasic pulses was successfully applied in clinical developments for treating tumours in humans and animals. We evaluated the effects of electrical treatment on cell adhesion behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts. By applying bipolar electrical pulses we studied short- and long-lived effects on cell adhesion and survival, actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion contacts in adherent cancer cells and fibroblasts. Methods Two cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and one fibroblast cell line 3T3 were used. Cells were exposed to high field intensity (200 - 1000 V/cm. Cell adhesion and survival after electrical exposure were studied by crystal violet assay and MTS assay. Cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell adhesion contacts were visualized by actin staining and fluorescent microscope. Results The degree of electropermeabilization of the adherent cells elevated steadily with the increasing of the field intensity. Adhesion behaviour of fibroblasts and MCF-7 was not significantly affected by electrotreatment. Interestingly, treating the loosely adhesive cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with 200 V/cm and 500 V/cm resulted in increased cell adhesion. Cell replication of both studied cancer cell lines was disturbed after electropermeabilization. Electroporation influenced the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells and fibroblasts in different ways. Since it disturbed temporarily the actin cytoskeleton in 3T3 cells, in cancer cells treated with lower and middle field intensity actin cytoskeleton was well presented in stress fibers, filopodia and lamellipodia. The electrotreatment for cancer cells provoked preferentially cell-cell adhesion contacts for MCF-7 and cell-ECM contacts for MDA-MB- 231. Conclusions Cell adhesion and survival as well as the type of cell adhesion (cell-ECM or cell-cell adhesion induced by the electroporation process is cell specific. The application of suitable electric pulses can

  11. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasalkova, N. Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepicka, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [Department of Chemistry, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bacakova, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, S. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ({zeta}-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  12. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Bačáková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ζ-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  13. TNF-alpha associated with extracellular matrix fibronectin provides a stop signal for chemotactically migrating T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franitza, S; Hershkoviz, R; Kam, N; Lichtenstein, N; Vaday, G G; Alon, R; Lider, O

    2000-09-01

    The migration of T cells into extravascular sites of inflammation is regulated by information derived from the molecular structure of the invaded tissue and from chemokine and cytokine gradients in the context of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although recent studies have highlighted the role of particular chemoattractants in leukocyte migration, to date little is known about how specific combinations of contextual signals control the migration of leukocytes and their localization at sites of inflammation. Here we studied the interplay between a pleiotropic cytokine, TNF-alpha, and two prototypic chemoattractants, RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha), on human CD45RO+ T cells migrating within an ECM-like context. For this purpose, we used a newly constructed three-dimensional gel system designed to follow, in real time, the migration of individual leukocytes along chemotactic gradients in vitro. We found that TNF-alpha, which binds the ECM protein fibronectin and lacks adhesion- and migration-promoting effects of its own, can act as a proadhesive cytokine on T cells exposed to RANTES and SDF-1alpha. Furthermore, fibronectin-complexed TNF-alpha provided anchorage signals to the T cells as they moved directionally along chemoattractive gradients. This effect of TNF-alpha required an intact TNF-alpha receptor II subtype on the migrating T cells. The anchoring effect of TNF-alpha appears to be specific; IL-2, an integrin-activating proadhesive cytokine, does not transmit stoppage signals to T cell migration induced by RANTES. Thus, TNF-alpha present in the ECM at sites of inflammation may function to anchor T cells recruited to these sites by chemotactic signals. PMID:10946305

  14. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  15. Cyclic mechanical stretching promotes migration but inhibits invasion of rat bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyu Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also broadly known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. Mechanical stretching plays a vital role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. However, little is known about the effects of cyclic stretching on BMSC migration and invasion. In this study, using a custom-made cell-stretching device, we studied the effects of cyclic mechanical stretching on rat BMSC migration and invasion using a Transwell Boyden Chamber. The protein secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 was detected by gelatin zymography, and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 was measured by western blot. We found that cyclic mechanical stretching with 10% amplitude at 1 Hz frequency for 8 h promotes BMSC migration, but reduces BMSC invasion. FAK and ERK1/2 signals were activated in BMSCs after exposure to cyclic stretching. In the presence of the FAK phosphorylation blocker PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation blocker PD98059, the cyclic-stretch-promoted migration of BMSCs was completely suppressed. On the other hand, cyclic mechanical stretching reduced the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BMSCs, and PF573228 suppressed the cyclic-stretch-reduced secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The decrease of BMSC invasion induced by mechanical stretching is partially restored by PF573228 but remained unaffected by PD98059. Taken together, these data show that cyclic mechanical stretching promotes BMSC migration via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway, but reduces BMSC invasion by decreasing secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via FAK, independent of the ERK1/2 signal.

  16. Rapid Reversible Photoswitching of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion at the Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadem, Laith F; Holz, Michelle; Suana, Kristine Grace; Li, Qian; Lamprecht, Constanze; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and reversible photoswitching of cell adhesion is achieved by c(RGDfK)-azobenzenes embedded in a poly(ethylene glycol) background on surfaces. The light-induced cis-trans-isomerization of the azobenzene enables switching of cell adhesion on the surface. Reversibility of switching over several consecutive switching cycles is demonstrated by single-cell force spectroscopy. PMID:26685922

  17. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Ertan Gökbayrak, Merve; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 µg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. RESULTS The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  18. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrayani Waghmare

    Full Text Available Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib- surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells.

  19. Cells adhesion and growth on gold nanoparticle grafted glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Reznickova, Alena; Kvitek, Ondrej; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkyně University, Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    The surface of glass substrate was plasma treated, coated by gold nano-structures and subsequently grafted with nanoparticles. The samples were plasma treated, sputtered with Au nanostructures which was followed by grafting with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPD) and then gold nanoparticles. The wettability, optical and chemical properties and surface morphology were studied. The adhesion and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) on the samples were investigated in-vitro as well. Grafting of gold nanoparticles with the dithiol increases the UV–vis absorbance, the surface becomes more hydrophobic, rougher and more rugged compared to pristine, sputtered and only dithiol treated surface. Gold nano-particles bound over dithiol and Au nanostructures cause better cell proliferation than purely BPD treated or pristine glass.

  20. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  2. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  3. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating c...

  4. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  5. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  6. A simplified model for dynamics of cell rolling and cell-surface adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimrák, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.cimrak@fri.uniza.sk [Cell-in-fluid Research Group, http://cell-in-fluid.fri.uniza.sk Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Žilina Univerzitná 8215/1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2015-03-10

    We propose a three dimensional model for the adhesion and rolling of biological cells on surfaces. We study cells moving in shear flow above a wall to which they can adhere via specific receptor-ligand bonds based on receptors from selectin as well as integrin family. The computational fluid dynamics are governed by the lattice-Boltzmann method. The movement and the deformation of the cells is described by the immersed boundary method. Both methods are fully coupled by implementing a two-way fluid-structure interaction. The adhesion mechanism is modelled by adhesive bonds including stochastic rules for their creation and rupture. We explore a simplified model with dissociation rate independent of the length of the bonds. We demonstrate that this model is able to resemble the mesoscopic properties, such as velocity of rolling cells.

  7. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Maneet Bhatia; Kelly L. McGrath; Giovanna Di Trapani; Pornpimol Charoentong; Fenil Shah; Mallory M. King; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient ...

  8. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, M S; Spray, D C; Chanson, M; Montesano, R; Orci, L; Meda, P

    1989-12-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  9. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  10. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Mun Yun

    Full Text Available Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs and polycaprolactone (PCL, and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin, and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3 and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering.

  11. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  12. The effects of caveolin - 1/eNOS pathway in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiaoDuan-fang

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is the initiate event of atherosclerosis, which includes injury of endothelial cells, leukocyte rolling, adhesion and extravasation. Many adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, P-selectin,the adhesion process.ICAM-1, VCAM, L-selectin, CD18, PECAM, VLA and ECM participate in Many factors such as infection of pathogenic organism,

  13. Arp2/3 inhibition induces amoeboid-like protrusions in MCF10A epithelial cells by reduced cytoskeletal-membrane coupling and focal adhesion assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Beckham

    Full Text Available Here we demonstrate that Arp2/3 regulates a transition between mesenchymal and amoeboid protrusions in MCF10A epithelial cells. Using genetic and pharmacological means, we first show Arp2/3 inhibition impairs directed cell migration. Arp2/3 inhibition results in a dramatically impaired cell adhesion, causing deficient cell attachment and spreading to ECM as well as an 8-fold decrease in nascent adhesion assembly at the leading edge. While Arp2/3 does not play a significant role in myosin-dependent adhesion growth, mature focal adhesions undergo large scale movements against the ECM suggesting reduced coupling to the ECM. Cell edge protrusions occur at similar rates when Arp2/3 is inhibited but their morphology is dramatically altered. Persistent lamellipodia are abrogated and we observe a markedly increased incidence of blebbing and unstable pseuodopods. Micropipette-aspiration assays indicate that Arp2/3-inhibited cells have a weak coupling between the cell cortex and the plasma membrane, and suggest a potential mechanism for increased pseudopod and bleb formation. Pseudopods are not sensitive to reduced in formin or myosin II activity. Collectively, these results indicate that Arp2/3 is not necessary for rapid protrusion of the cell edge but plays a crucial role in assembling focal adhesions required for its stabilization.

  14. ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling increase endothelial cell surface PECAM-1 adhesivity and neutrophil transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T; Chen, Zhenlong; Brovkovych, Viktor M; Vogel, Stephen M; Muller, William A; Skidgel, Randal A; Malik, Asrar B; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-08-30

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) extravasation requires selectin-mediated tethering, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent firm adhesion, and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1)-mediated transendothelial migration. An important unanswered question is whether ICAM-1-activated signaling contributes to PMN transmigration mediated by PECAM-1. We tested this concept and the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Src activated by PMN ligation of ICAM-1 in mediating PECAM-1-dependent PMN transmigration. We observed that lung PMN infiltration in vivo induced in carrageenan-injected WT mice was significantly reduced in ICAM-1(-/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice. Crosslinking WT mouse ICAM-1 expressed in human endothelial cells (ECs), but not the phospho-defective Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant, induced SHP-2-dependent Src Tyr530 dephosphorylation that resulted in Src activation. ICAM-1 activation also stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser473) and eNOS (p-Ser1177), thereby increasing NO production. PMN migration across EC monolayers was abolished in cells expressing the Tyr(518)Phe ICAM-1 mutant or by pretreatment with either the Src inhibitor PP2 or eNOS inhibitor L-NAME. Importantly, phospho-ICAM-1 induction of Src signaling induced PECAM-1 Tyr686 phosphorylation and increased EC surface anti-PECAM-1 mAb-binding activity. These results collectively show that ICAM-1-activated Src and eNOS signaling sequentially induce PECAM-1-mediated PMN transendothelial migration. Both Src and eNOS inhibition may be important therapeutic targets to prevent or limit vascular inflammation. PMID:22806890

  15. Effect of serum concentration on adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells onto cultured EC monolayer and EC-SMC Co-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie FAN; Take-shi KARINO

    2008-01-01

    Background:The adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium following accumulation oflow-density lipoprotein(LDL) in subendothelial spaces is an important step in the development of intimal hyperplasia in arterially implanted vein grafts and atherosclerosis in both animals and humans.However.it iS not well known how serum factors affect the adhesion of monocytes.Methods:We have studied the efrect of fetal calf serum(FCS).which we considered a source of LDL.on the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells(Ecs)by using human monocytic THP-1 cells and both a monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells(EC monoculture)and a co-culture with bovine aortic smooth muscle cells(EC-SMC co-culture).Results:It was found that the addition of FCS to the medium greatly affected the adhesion of THP-1 cells,and the higher the concentration of FCS in the medium,the greater the adhesion of THP-1 cells to endothelial cells.Adhesion of THP-1 cells to an EC-SMC co-culture Was approximately twofold greater than that to an EC monoculture,and after adhering to endothelial cells,many THP-1 cells transmigrated into the layer of smooth muscle cells.Conclusion:The results suggest that the elevation of the LDL(cholesterol)level in blood provides a favorable condition for the development of intimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis by promoting the adhesion of monocytcs to the endothelium and their subsequent migration into subendothelial spaces.

  16. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  17. Modulation of lens cell adhesion molecules by particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M. P.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; Chou, W.; Lockett, S. J.; Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins which anchor cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but whose functions also include signal transduction, differentiation, and apoptosis. We are testing a hypothesis that particle radiations modulate CAM expression and this contributes to radiation-induced lens opacification. We observed dose-dependent changes in the expression of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 in exponentially-growing and confluent cells of a differentiating human lens epithelial cell model after exposure to particle beams. Human lens epithelial (HLE) cells, less than 10 passages after their initial culture from fetal tissue, were grown on bovine corneal endothelial cell-derived ECM in medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum and supplemented with 5 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). Multiple cell populations at three different stages of differentiation were prepared for experiment: cells in exponential growth, and cells at 5 and 10 days post-confluence. The differentiation status of cells was characterized morphologically by digital image analysis, and biochemically by Western blotting using lens epithelial and fiber cell-specific markers. Cultures were irradiated with single doses (4, 8 or 12 Gy) of 55 MeV protons and, along with unirradiated control samples, were fixed using -20 degrees C methanol at 6 hours after exposure. Replicate experiments and similar experiments with helium ions are in progress. The intracellular localization of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 was detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies specific for each CAM. Cells known to express each CAM were also processed as positive controls. Both exponentially-growing and confluent, differentiating cells demonstrated a dramatic proton-dose-dependent modulation (upregulation for exponential cells, downregulation for confluent cells) and a change in the intracellular distribution of the beta 1-integrin, compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast

  18. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lai, Yi-Liang; Chang, Wei-En; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Methods Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to hu...

  19. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present ...

  20. The niche-derived glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF induces migration of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dovere

    Full Text Available In mammals, the biological activity of the stem/progenitor compartment sustains production of mature gametes through spermatogenesis. Spermatogonial stem cells and their progeny belong to the class of undifferentiated spermatogonia, a germ cell population found on the basal membrane of the seminiferous tubules. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a Sertoli-derived factor, is essential for in vivo and in vitro stem cell self-renewal. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are not completely understood. In this study, we show that GDNF induces dose-dependent directional migration of freshly selected undifferentiated spermatogonia, as well as germline stem cells in culture, using a Boyden chamber assay. GDNF-induced migration is dependent on the expression of the GDNF co-receptor GFRA1, as shown by migration assays performed on parental and GFRA1-transduced GC-1 spermatogonial cell lines. We found that the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP is specifically expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. VASP belongs to the ENA/VASP family of proteins implicated in actin-dependent processes, such as fibroblast migration, axon guidance, and cell adhesion. In intact seminiferous tubules and germline stem cell cultures, GDNF treatment up-regulates VASP in a dose-dependent fashion. These data identify a novel role for the niche-derived factor GDNF, and they suggest that GDNF may impinge on the stem/progenitor compartment, affecting the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  1. The niche-derived glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) induces migration of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovere, Lisa; Fera, Stefania; Grasso, Margherita; Lamberti, Dante; Gargioli, Cesare; Muciaccia, Barbara; Lustri, Anna Maria; Stefanini, Mario; Vicini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, the biological activity of the stem/progenitor compartment sustains production of mature gametes through spermatogenesis. Spermatogonial stem cells and their progeny belong to the class of undifferentiated spermatogonia, a germ cell population found on the basal membrane of the seminiferous tubules. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a Sertoli-derived factor, is essential for in vivo and in vitro stem cell self-renewal. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are not completely understood. In this study, we show that GDNF induces dose-dependent directional migration of freshly selected undifferentiated spermatogonia, as well as germline stem cells in culture, using a Boyden chamber assay. GDNF-induced migration is dependent on the expression of the GDNF co-receptor GFRA1, as shown by migration assays performed on parental and GFRA1-transduced GC-1 spermatogonial cell lines. We found that the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is specifically expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. VASP belongs to the ENA/VASP family of proteins implicated in actin-dependent processes, such as fibroblast migration, axon guidance, and cell adhesion. In intact seminiferous tubules and germline stem cell cultures, GDNF treatment up-regulates VASP in a dose-dependent fashion. These data identify a novel role for the niche-derived factor GDNF, and they suggest that GDNF may impinge on the stem/progenitor compartment, affecting the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  2. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  3. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration. PMID:27612824

  4. Adhesion of different cell cycle human hepatoma cells to endothelial cells and roles of integrin β1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-Bin Song; Jian Qin; Qing Luo; Xiao-Dong Shen; Run-Bin Yan; Shao-Xi Cai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the adhesive mechanical properties of different cell cycle human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721)to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV-304),expression of adhesive molecule integrinβ1 in SMMC-7721cells and its contribution to this adhesive course.METHODS: Adhesive force of SMMC-7721 cells to endothelialcells was measured using micropipette aspiration technique.Synchronous G1 and S phase SMMC-7721 cells wereachieved by thymine-2-deoxyriboside and colchicinessequential blockage method and double thymine-2-deoxyriboside blockage method, respectively. Synchronousrates of SMMC-7721 cells and expression of integrinβ1 inSMMC-7721 cells were detected by flow cytometer.RESULTS: The percentage of cell cycle phases of generalSMMC-7721 cells was 11.01% in G2/M phases, 53.51% inG0/G1 phase, and 35.48% in S phase. The synchronous ratesof G1 and S phase SMMC-7721 cells amounted to 74.09%and 98.29%, respectively. The adhesive force of SMMC-7721cells to endothelial cells changed with the variations ofadhesive time and presented behavior characteristics ofadhesion and de-adhesion. S phase SMMC-7721 cells had higheradhesive forces than G1 phase cells [(307.65±92.10)× 10-10Nvs (195.42±60.72)×10-10N, P<0.01]. The expressivefluorescent intensity of integrinβ1 in G1 phase SMMC-7721cells was depressed more significantly than the values ofS phase and general SMMC-7721cells. The contribution ofadhesive integrinβ1 was about 53% in this adhesive course.CONCLUSION: SMMC-7721 cells can be synchronizedpreferably in G1 and S phases with thymine-2-deoxyribosideand colchicines. The adhesive molecule integrinβ1 expressesa high level in SMMC-7721 cells and shows differences invarious cell cycles, suggesting integrin β1 plays an importantrole in adhesion to endothelial cells. The change of adhesiveforces in different cell cycle SMMC-7721 cells indicatesthat S phase cells play predominant roles possibly whilethey interact with endothelial cells.

  5. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  6. Photon-induced cell migration and integrin expression promoted by DNA integration of HPV16 genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent human papilloma virus 16 (HPV16) infections are a major cause of cervical cancer. The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome causes E2 gene disruption which prevents apoptosis and increases host cell motility. In cervical cancer patients, survival is limited by local infiltration and systemic dissemination. Surgical control rates are poor in cases of parametrial infiltration. In these patients, radiotherapy (RT) is administered to enhance local control. However, photon irradiation itself has been reported to increase cell motility. In cases of E2-disrupted cervical cancers, this phenomenon would impose an additional risk of enhanced tumor cell motility. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying photon-increased migration in keratinocytes with differential E2 gene status. Isogenic W12 (intact E2 gene status) and S12 (disrupted E2 gene status) keratinocytes were analyzed in fibronectin-based and serum-stimulated migration experiments following single photon doses of 0, 2, and 10 Gy. Quantitative FACS analyses of integrin expression were performed. Migration and adhesion are increased in E2 gene-disrupted keratinocytes. E2 gene disruption promotes attractability by serum components, therefore, effectuating the risk of local infiltration and systemic dissemination. In S12 cells, migration is further increased by photon RT which leads to enhanced expression of fibronectin receptor integrins. HPV16-associated E2 gene disruption is a main predictor of treatment-refractory cancer virulence. E2 gene disruption promotes cell motility. Following photon RT, E2-disrupted tumors bear the risk of integrin-related infiltration and dissemination. (orig.)

  7. Subventricular zone cell migration: lessons from quantitative 2-photon microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJames

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblasts born in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ migrate long distances in the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulbs where they integrate into circuitry as functional interneurons. As very little was known about the dynamic parameters of SVZ neuroblast migration, we used two-photon time-lapse microscopy to analyze migration in acute slices. This involved analyzing 3-dimensional stacks of images over time and uncovered several novel aspects of SVZ migration: chains remain stable, cells can be immotile for extensive periods, morphology does not necessarily correlate with motility, neuroblasts exhibit local exploratory motility, dorsoventral migration occurs throughout the striatal SVZ and neuroblasts turn at distinctive angles. We investigated these novel findings in the SVZ and RMS from the population to the single cell level. In this review we also discuss some technical considerations when setting up a two-photon microscopic imaging system. Throughout the review we identify several unsolved questions about SVZ neuroblast migration that might be addressed with current or emerging techniques.

  8. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Rajendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States); Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Bin [Jeollanamdo Development Institute for Korean Traditional Medicine, Jangheung gun, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Wook, E-mail: dbkim@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  9. Heterogeneity of cell adhesion molecules in the developing nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Cell-surface molecules, especially glycoproteins, are believed to mediate interactions between developing neurons and their environment. These interactions include pathfinding by growing processes, recognition of appropriate targets, and formation of synaptic structures. In order to identify neuronal cell-surface molecules, monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) were prepared against synaptic fractions from adult rat brain. From this group three monoclonal antibodies, designated 3C5.59, 3G5.34, and 3G6.41, that react with cell-surface antigens of embryonic neurons were selected for further study. In immunofluoresence experiments each of these antibodies strongly reacted with the processes of cultured granule cell neurons, the major class of small cerebellar neurons, cultured from developing rat cerebellum. Mab's 3C5.59 and 3G5.34 reacted only with neurons in the cerebellar cultures. Mab 3G6.41, however, also reacted with cultured brain astrocytes. On frozen sections Mab's 3G5.34 and 3G6.41 also strongly stained the molecular layer, the site of active granule cell axon growth, in the developing cerebellum. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) were used to compare the two glycoproteins recognized by Mab 3G6.41 with N-CAM. Band 1, another large neuronal cell-surface glycoprotein was originally identified in mouse N18 neuroblastoma cells. In this study /sup 125/I-labeled N18-derived band 1 was tested for binding to 9 plant lectins and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin coupled to agarose beads. Band 1 solubilized from brain also specifically bound to LCA-agarose, indicating that mannose containing sugar moieties are present on band 1 from brain.

  10. Pharmacology of cell adhesion molecules of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    development. The majority of CAMs are signal transducing receptors. CAM-induced intracellular signalling is triggered via homophilic (CAM-CAM) and heterophilic (CAM - other counter-receptors) interactions, which both can be targeted pharmacologically. We here describe the progress in the CAM pharmacology...... focusing on cadherins and CAMs of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, such as NCAM and L1. Structural basis of CAM-mediated cell adhesion and CAM-induced signalling are outlined. Different pharmacological approaches to study functions of CAMs are presented including the use of specific antibodies......, recombinant proteins, and synthetic peptides. We also discuss how unravelling of the 3D structure of CAMs provides novel pharmacological tools for dissection of CAM-induced signalling pathways and offers therapeutic opportunities for a range of neurological disorders....

  11. Cell adhesion property affected by cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase: Opto-electric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Kim, Chul-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ho; English, Anthony; Kihm, Kenneth D; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-01-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed-time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopically expressing COX-1, COX-2, and 15LOX-1, to investigate whether expression of COX-1, COX-2, or 15LOX-1 would affect cell adhesion using our opto-electric methodology. In a fixed-time point experiment, only COX-1- and COX-2-expressing cells enhanced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, but all the transfected cells showed invasion activity. However, in a real-time experiment using opto-electric approaches, transmitted cellular morphology was much different with tight adhesion being shown in COX-2 expressing cells, as imaged by differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM) and interference reflection contrast microscopy (IRCM). Furthermore, micro-impedance measurements showed a continued increase in both resistance and reactance of COX- and LOX-transfected cells, consistent with the imaging data. Our data indicate that both COX- and LOX-expressing cells have strong cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesions, and that cell imaging analysis with cell impedance data generates fully reliable results on cell adhesion measurement. PMID:20026301

  12. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  13. Troglitazone, a PPAR-γ activator prevents endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and lymphocyte adhesion mediated by TNF-α

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh Makoto; Joh Takashi; Minagar Alireza; Welbourne Tomas; Jordan Paul; Sasaki Makoto; Elrod John W; Alexander J Steven

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Cytokine mediated induction of the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1(MAdCAM-1) expression is associated with the onset and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results Using western blotting and cell-based ELISA, we show in this study that troglitazone, an activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), widely used in the treatment of diabetes, has as well recently been highlighted as protective in models of inflammation and can...

  14. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  15. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  16. Nuclear envelope rupture and repair during cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denais, Celine M.; Gilbert, Rachel M.; Isermann, Philipp; McGregor, Alexandra L.; te Lindert, Mariska; Weigelin, Bettina; Davidson, Patricia M.; Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, tumor cells penetrate tissues through tight interstitial spaces, requiring extensive deformation of the cell and its nucleus. Here, we investigated tumor cell migration in confining microenvironments in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear deformation caused localized loss of nuclear envelope (NE) integrity, which led to the uncontrolled exchange of nucleo-cytoplasmic content, herniation of chromatin across the NE, and DNA damage. The incidence of NE rupture increased with cell confinement and with depletion of nuclear lamins, NE proteins that structurally support the nucleus. Cells restored NE integrity using components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery. Our findings indicate that cell migration incurs substantial physical stress on the NE and its content, requiring efficient NE and DNA damage repair for survival. PMID:27013428

  17. Simple and Biocompatible Ion Beam Micropatterning of a Cell-Repellent Polymer on Cell-Adhesive Surfaces to Manipulate Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Tae; Jung, Chan-Hee; Jung, Chang-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak; Shin, Kwanwoo; Yoo, Young-Do

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the simple and biocompatible micropatterning of cell-repellent poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) on a cell-adhesive substrate by ion beam micropatterning to control cell adhesion is described. Cell-repellent PNIPAAm films spin-coated on cell-adhesive tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) substrates were selectively irradiated by energetic proton ions at various fluences through a pattern mask, and subsequently developed to create the micropatterns of PNIPAAm. Well-defined negative-type PNIPAAm micropatterns were successfully created on the TCPS substrates at fluences higher than 5 x 10¹⁴ ions/cm², and their chemical properties were dependent on the fluence. Moreover, based on the results of the protein adsorption and in-vitro cell culture tests, 200 µm well-defined micropatterns of mammalian cells were clearly formed on the PNIPAAm-micropatterned TCPS substrates though the preferential adsorption and growth of cells on the TCPS regions due to the strong cell-repellency of PNIPAAm. PMID:27305772

  18. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  19. Cell migration in the developing rodent olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Dhananjay; Tole, Shubha

    2016-07-01

    The components of the nervous system are assembled in development by the process of cell migration. Although the principles of cell migration are conserved throughout the brain, different subsystems may predominantly utilize specific migratory mechanisms, or may display unusual features during migration. Examining these subsystems offers not only the potential for insights into the development of the system, but may also help in understanding disorders arising from aberrant cell migration. The olfactory system is an ancient sensory circuit that is essential for the survival and reproduction of a species. The organization of this circuit displays many evolutionarily conserved features in vertebrates, including molecular mechanisms and complex migratory pathways. In this review, we describe the elaborate migrations that populate each component of the olfactory system in rodents and compare them with those described in the well-studied neocortex. Understanding how the components of the olfactory system are assembled will not only shed light on the etiology of olfactory and sexual disorders, but will also offer insights into how conserved migratory mechanisms may have shaped the evolution of the brain. PMID:26994098

  20. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  1. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with