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Sample records for cell activation viral

  1. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

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    Yi Ma; Xiaojuan Li; Ersheng Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral...

  2. p53 Activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection contributes to cell death and viral production.

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    Dana Austin

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production.

  3. Activated iNKT cells promote memory CD8+ T cell differentiation during viral infection.

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    Emma C Reilly

    Full Text Available α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer is the prototypical lipid ligand for invariant NKT cells. Recent studies have proposed that α-GalCer is an effective adjuvant in vaccination against a range of immune challenges, however its mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. A variety of delivery methods have been examined including pulsing dendritic cells with α-GalCer to optimize the potential of α-GalCer. These methods are currently being used in a variety of clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer but cannot be used in the context of vaccine development against pathogens due to their complexity. Using a simple delivery method, we evaluated α-GalCer adjuvant properties, using the mouse model for cytomegalovirus (MCMV. We measured several key parameters of the immune response to MCMV, including inflammation, effector, and central memory CD8(+ T cell responses. We found that α-GalCer injection at the time of the infection decreases viral titers, alters the kinetics of the inflammatory response, and promotes both increased frequencies and numbers of virus-specific memory CD8(+ T cells. Overall, our data suggest that iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer promotes the development of long-term protective immunity through increased fitness of central memory CD8(+ T cells, as a consequence of reduced inflammation.

  4. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

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    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  5. HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell-mediated viral transmission to CD4+ T cells and promotes T-cell activation.

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    Corine St Gelais

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell (DC-mediated viral transmission to CD4(+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. It is also unknown whether HIV-1 infected DCs play a role in activating CD4(+ T cells and enhancing DC-mediated viral transmission. Here we investigated the role of HIV-1 Nef in DC-mediated viral transmission and HIV-1 infection of primary CD4(+ T cells using wild-type HIV-1 and Nef-mutated viruses. We show that HIV-1 Nef facilitated DC-mediated viral transmission to activated CD4(+ T cells. HIV-1 expressing wild-type Nef enhanced the activation and proliferation of primary resting CD4(+ T cells. However, when co-cultured with HIV-1-infected autologous DCs, there was no significant trend for infection- or Nef-dependent proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells. Our results suggest an important role of Nef in DC-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to activated CD4(+ T cells and in the activation and proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells, which likely contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  6. Glucocorticoid Insensitivity in Virally Infected Airway Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Transforming Growth Factor-β Activity

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    Radwan, Asmaa; Keenan, Christine R.; Langenbach, Shenna Y.; Li, Meina; Londrigan, Sarah L.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2017-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are commonly associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV) and influenza A virus (IAV) infection. The ensuing airway inflammation is resistant to the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs). Viral infection elicits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity, a growth factor we have previously shown to impair GC action in human airway epithelial cells through the activation of activin-like kinase 5 (ALK5), the type 1 receptor of TGF-β. In the current study, we examine the contribution of TGF-β activity to the GC-resistance caused by viral infection. We demonstrate that viral infection of human bronchial epithelial cells with RSV, RV or IAV impairs GC anti-inflammatory action. Poly(I:C), a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA, also impairs GC activity. Both viral infection and poly(I:C) increase TGF-β expression and activity. Importantly, the GC impairment was attenuated by the selective ALK5 (TGFβRI) inhibitor, SB431542 and prevented by the therapeutic agent, tranilast, which reduced TGF-β activity associated with viral infection. This study shows for the first time that viral-induced glucocorticoid-insensitivity is partially mediated by activation of endogenous TGF-β. PMID:28046097

  7. Premature Activation of the Paramyxovirus Fusion Protein before Target Cell Attachment with Corruption of the Viral Fusion Machinery*

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    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Palermo, Laura M.; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents. PMID:21799008

  8. Hiding Lipid Presentation: Viral Interference with CD1d-Restricted Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cell Activation

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    Maaike E. Ressing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a major role in protecting the host against viral infection. Rapid initial protection is conveyed by innate immune cells, while adaptive immunity (including T lymphocytes requires several days to develop, yet provides high specificity and long-lasting memory. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an unusual subset of T lymphocytes, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor together with markers of the innate NK cell lineage. Activated iNKT cells can exert direct cytolysis and can rapidly release a variety of immune-polarizing cytokines, thereby regulating the ensuing adaptive immune response. iNKT cells recognize lipids in the context of the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Intriguingly, CD1d-restricted iNKT cells appear to play a critical role in anti-viral defense: increased susceptibility to disseminated viral infections is observed both in patients with iNKT cell deficiency as well as in CD1d- and iNKT cell-deficient mice. Moreover, viruses have recently been found to use sophisticated strategies to withstand iNKT cell-mediated elimination. This review focuses on CD1d-restricted lipid presentation and the strategies viruses deploy to subvert this pathway.

  9. Direct TLR2 signaling is critical for NK cell activation and function in response to vaccinia viral infection.

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    Jennifer Martinez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an essential role in innate immune control of poxviral infections in vivo. However, the mechanism(s underlying NK cell activation and function in response to poxviruses remains poorly understood. In a mouse model of infection with vaccinia virus (VV, the most studied member of the poxvirus family, we identified that the Toll-like receptor (TLR 2-myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 pathway was critical for the activation of NK cells and the control of VV infection in vivo. We further showed that TLR2 signaling on NK cells, but not on accessory cells such as dendritic cells (DCs, was necessary for NK cell activation and that this intrinsic TLR2-MyD88 signaling pathway was required for NK cell activation and played a critical role in the control of VV infection in vivo. In addition, we showed that the activating receptor NKG2D was also important for efficient NK activation and function, as well as recognition of VV-infected targets. We further demonstrated that VV could directly activate NK cells via TLR2 in the presence of cytokines in vitro and TLR2-MyD88-dependent activation of NK cells by VV was mediated through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway. Taken together, these results represent the first evidence that intrinsic TLR signaling is critical for NK cell activation and function in the control of a viral infection in vivo, indicate that multiple pathways are required for efficient NK cell activation and function in response to VV infection, and may provide important insights into the design of effective strategies to combat poxviral infections.

  10. Integrin Activation and Viral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-dian GAO; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hua ZHOU; Hui-yun CHANG; Qing-ge XIE

    2008-01-01

    Integrins are members of a ubiquitous membrane receptor family which includes 18 different α subunits and 8 β subunits forming more than 20 α/β heterodimers. Integrins play key functions in vascular endothelial cell and tumour cell adhesion, lymphocyte trafficking, tumor growth and viral infection. Current understanding of the molecular basis of integrins as viral receptors has been achieved through many decades of study into the biology of transmembrane glycoproteins and their interactions with several viruses. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the molecular bases of interactions between viruses and integrins, which are of potential practical significance. Inhibition of virus-integrin interactions at the points of virus attachment or entry will provide a novel approach for the therapeutic treatment of viral diseases.

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

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    Maytawan Thanunchai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy.

  12. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

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    Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  13. Molecular basis for viral selective replication in cancer cells: activation of CDK2 by adenovirus-induced cyclin E.

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    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in cancer cells and have been used in cancer therapies. We have previously shown that Ad E1B55K protein is involved in induction of cyclin E for Ad replication, but this E1B55K function is not required in cancer cells in which deregulation of cyclin E is frequently observed. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cyclin E and CDK2 in Ad-infected cells. Ad infection significantly increased the large form of cyclin E (cyclin EL, promoted cyclin E/CDK2 complex formation and increased CDK2 phosphorylation at the T160 site. Activated CDK2 caused pRb phosphorylation at the S612 site. Repression of CDK2 activity with the chemical inhibitor roscovitine or with specific small interfering RNAs significantly decreased pRb phosphorylation, with concomitant repression of viral replication. Our results suggest that Ad-induced cyclin E activates CDK2 that targets the transcriptional repressor pRb to generate a cellular environment for viral productive replication. This study reveals a new molecular basis for oncolytic replication of E1b-deleted Ads and will aid in the development of new strategies for Ad oncolytic virotherapies.

  14. Mast cells in viral infections

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    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  15. Regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Billerbeck; Tobias B(o)ttler; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections are significantly influenced by the host immune response.The immune system is able to eliminate many viruses in the acute phase of infection. However, some viruses,like hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV),can evade the host immune responses and establish a persistent infection. HCV and HBV persistence is caused by various mechanisms, like subversion of innate immune responses by viral factors, the emergence of T cell escape mutations, or T cell dysfunction and suppression.Recently, it has become evident that regulatory T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis and outcome of viral infections by suppressing antiviral immune responses.Indeed, the control of HCV and HBV specific immune responses mediated by regulatory T cells may be one mechanism that favors viral persistence, but it may also prevent the host from overwhelming T cell activity and liver damage. This review will focus on the role of regulatory T cells in viral hepatitis.

  16. In vitro replication activity of bovine viral diarrhea virus in an epithelial cell line and in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

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    Turin, Lauretta; Lucchini, Barbara; Bronzo, Valerio; Luzzago, Camilla

    2012-11-01

    The present study focused on the in vitro infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from naÏve animals with non-cytopathic (ncp, BVDV-1b NY-1) and cytopathic (cp, BVDV-1a NADL) strains. Infections with 0.1 and 1 multiplicity of infections (MOI) and incubation times of 18 and 36 hr were compared. Twelve BVDV naÏve heifers were enrolled to collect PBMCs. The viral loads in MDBK cells and in PBMCs after in vitro infections were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The highest viral loads were measured at 1 MOI and 36 hr post infection in both cell systems and the lowest at 0.1 MOI and 18 hr with the exception of the cp strain NADL in PBMCs, for which the highest viral load was observed at 0.1 MOI and 36 hr. Viral load mean values were higher for the cp strain than the ncp strain irrespective of the extent of the infection period and MOI. The models of infection studied uncovered different replication activities respectively according to the biotype of virus, the cell substrate and the duration of infection. Replication tends to be higher in PBMCs, particularly at low MOIs and for the ncp strain.

  17. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

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    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  18. Mast cells in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Witczak; Ewa Brzezińska-Błaszczyk

    2012-01-01

     There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9), but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Fu...

  19. Activation of cytotoxic and regulatory functions of NK cells by Sindbis viral vectors.

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    Tomer Granot

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs represent a relatively novel anti-cancer modality. Like other new cancer treatments, effective OV therapy will likely require combination with conventional treatments. In order to design combinatorial treatments that work well together, a greater scrutiny of the mechanisms behind the individual treatments is needed. Sindbis virus (SV based vectors have previously been shown to target and kill tumors in xenograft, syngeneic, and spontaneous mouse models. However, the effect of SV treatment on the immune system has not yet been studied. Here we used a variety of methods, including FACS analysis, cytotoxicity assays, cell depletion, imaging of tumor growth, cytokine blockade, and survival experiments, to study how SV therapy affects Natural Killer (NK cell function in SCID mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma tumors. Surprisingly, we found that SV anti-cancer efficacy is largely NK cell-dependent. Furthermore, the enhanced therapeutic effect previously observed from Sin/IL12 vectors, which carry the gene for interleukin 12, is also NK cell dependent, but works through a separate IFNγ-dependent mechanism, which also induces the activation of peritoneal macrophages. These results demonstrate the multimodular nature of SV therapy, and open up new possibilities for potential synergistic or additive combinatorial therapies with other treatments.

  20. Tumor Antigen Specific Activation of Primary Human T-Cells Expressing a Virally Encoded Chimeric T-Cell Receptor Specific for p185HER2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建民; MichaelSFRIEDMAN; ChristopherMREYNOLDS; MarianneTHUBEN; LeeWILKE; JenniferFULLER; 李桥; ZeligESHHAR; JamesJMULE; KevimTMCDONAGH

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested chimeric T-cell receptors (TCR) specific for p185HER2. In these experiments,retroviral vectors expressing the N297 or N29ξ receptors were constructed in pRET6. Amphotropic viral producer cells were established in the GALV-based PG13 packaging cell line. Ficoll purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were vitally transduced using an optimized protocol incorporating activation with immobilized anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies, followed by viral infection in the presence of fibronectin fragment CH296. Transduced cells were co-cultured with human tumor cell lines that overexpress (SK-OV-3) or underexpress (MCF7) p185HER2 to assay for antigen specific immune responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells transduced with the N297 or N29ξ chTCR demonstrated HER2-specific antigen responses, as determined by release of Th1 like cytokines, and cellular cytotoxicity assays. Our results support the feasibility of adoptive immunothempy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chTCR specific for p185HER2.

  1. CXC chemokine ligand 10 controls viral infection in the central nervous system: evidence for a role in innate immune response through recruitment and activation of natural killer cells.

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    Trifilo, Matthew J; Montalto-Morrison, Cynthia; Stiles, Linda N; Hurst, Kelley R; Hardison, Jenny L; Manning, Jerry E; Masters, Paul S; Lane, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    How chemokines shape the immune response to viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been considered within the context of recruitment and activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, chemokines are expressed early following viral infection, suggesting an important role in coordinating innate immune responses. Herein, we evaluated the contributions of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in promoting innate defense mechanisms following coronavirus infection of the CNS. Intracerebral infection of RAG1(-/-) mice with a recombinant CXCL10-expressing murine coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus) resulted in protection from disease and increased survival that correlated with a significant increase in recruitment and activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the CNS. Accumulation of NK cells resulted in a reduction in viral titers that was dependent on gamma interferon secretion. These results indicate that CXCL10 expression plays a pivotal role in defense following coronavirus infection of the CNS by enhancing innate immune responses.

  2. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

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    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  3. Novel viral vectors utilizing intron splice-switching to activate genome rescue, expression and replication in targeted cells

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    El Andaloussi Samir

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outcome of virus infection depends from the precise coordination of viral gene expression and genome replication. The ability to control and regulate these processes is therefore important for analysis of infection process. Viruses are also useful tools in bio- and gene technology; they can efficiently kill cancer cells and trigger immune responses to tumors. However, the methods for constructing tissue- or cell-type specific viruses typically suffer from low target-cell specificity and a high risk of reversion. Therefore novel and universal methods of regulation of viral infection are also important for therapeutic application of virus-based systems. Methods Aberrantly spliced introns were introduced into crucial gene-expression units of adenovirus vector and alphavirus DNA/RNA layered vectors and their effects on the viral gene expression, replication and/or the release of infectious genomes were studied in cell culture. Transfection of the cells with splice-switching oligonucleotides was used to correct the introduced functional defect(s. Results It was demonstrated that viral gene expression, replication and/or the release of infectious genomes can be blocked by the introduction of aberrantly spliced introns. The insertion of such an intron into an adenovirus vector reduced the expression of the targeted gene more than fifty-fold. A similar insertion into an alphavirus DNA/RNA layered vector had a less dramatic effect; here, only the release of the infectious transcript was suppressed but not the subsequent replication and spread of the virus. However the insertion of two aberrantly spliced introns resulted in an over one hundred-fold reduction in the infectivity of the DNA/RNA layered vector. Furthermore, in both systems the observed effects could be reverted by the delivery of splice-switching oligonucleotide(s, which corrected the splicing defects. Conclusions Splice-switch technology, originally developed for

  4. Abortive infection of snakehead fish vesiculovirus in ZF4 cells was associated with the RLRs pathway activation by viral replicative intermediates.

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    Wang, Wenwen; Asim, Muhammad; Yi, Lizhu; Hegazy, Abeer M; Hu, Xianqin; Zhou, Yang; Ai, Taoshan; Lin, Li

    2015-03-18

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4) to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN) and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates.

  5. Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) up-regulates the cytotoxic activity and the perforin/granzyme pathway in the rainbow trout RTS11 cell line.

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    Ordás, M C; Cuesta, A; Mercado, L; Bols, N C; Tafalla, C

    2011-08-01

    A survey of immune-relevant genes that might be up-regulated in response to viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the rainbow trout monocyte-macrophage cell line, RTS11, unexpectedly revealed an increased expression of perforin (PRF) and granzyme (GRZ) genes, which represent components of the major cytotoxic pathway. The natural killer-enhancing factor (NKEF), also known to modulate cytotoxic activity, was up-regulated at the gene but strikingly down-regulated at protein level. The expression of these genes was not affected in head kidney leukocytes (HKLs) infected with VHSV, leading us to evaluate the potential cytotoxic activity of RTS11 and HKLs. For the first time, the cytotoxic activity of RTS11 against xenogeneic targets has been demonstrated, although this was modest relative to HKLs. Yet the activity in RTS11 was significantly increased by VHSV, as in HKLs. This cytotoxic activity elicited by viral infection appeared to require viral gene expression because inactivated VHSV failed to increase RTS11 cytotoxic activity. As for other immune functions, RTS11 cells provide a model for further studying cytotoxic activities of fish monocyte-macrophages.

  6. Innate immune activation by the viral PAMP poly I:C potentiates pulmonary graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnier, Christine V; Martinu, Tereza; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Nugent, Julia L; Kelly, Francine L; Palmer, Scott M

    2011-01-15

    Respiratory viral infections cause significant morbidity and increase the risk for chronic pulmonary graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Our overall hypothesis is that local innate immune activation potentiates adaptive alloimmunity. In this study, we hypothesized that a viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) alone can potentiate pulmonary GVHD after allogeneic HCT. We, therefore, examined the effect of pulmonary exposure to polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a viral mimetic that activates innate immunity, in an established murine HCT model. Poly I:C-induced a marked pulmonary T cell response in allogeneic HCT mice as compared to syngeneic HCT, with increased CD4+ cells in the lung fluid and tissue. This lymphocytic inflammation persisted at 2 weeks post poly I:C exposure in allogeneic mice and was associated with CD3+ cell infiltration into the bronchiolar epithelium and features of epithelial injury. In vitro, poly I:C enhanced allospecific proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. In vivo, poly I:C exposure was associated with an early increase in pulmonary monocyte recruitment and activation as well as a decrease in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in allogeneic mice as compared to syngeneic. In contrast, intrapulmonary poly I:C did not alter the extent of systemic GVHD in either syngeneic or allogeneic mice. Collectively, our results suggest that local activation of pulmonary innate immunity by a viral molecular pattern represents a novel pathway that contributes to pulmonary GVHD after allogeneic HCT, through a mechanism that includes increased recruitment and maturation of intrapulmonary monocytes.

  7. Neutralization of feline infectious peritonitis virus: preparation of monoclonal antibody that shows cell tropism in neutralizing activity after viral absorption into the cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, K; Hohdatsu, T; Kashimoto-Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    2000-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macro-phages is enhanced by mouse anti-FIPV monoclonal antibody (MAb). This anti-body-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection is dependent on mouse MAb subclass, and MAb of IgG2a subclass has a strong ADE activity. Furthermore, MAb showing strong neutralizing activity in Felis catus whole fetus (fcwf-4) cells and Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells shows strong enhancing activity in feline macrophages, indicating that the neutralizing epitope and the enhancing epitope are closely related. In this study, we prepared MAb FK50-4 that showed a strong neutralizing activity in feline macrophages, despite the fact that the MAb belonged to the IgG2a subclass. However, MAb FK50-4 did not exhibit neutralizing activity in CrFK cells or fcwf-4 cells, thus showing a very unusual property. MAb FK50-4 recognized FIPV small integral membrane glycoprotein (M protein). Even when feline macrophages were pretreated with MAb FK50-4 prior to FIPV inoculation, this antibody prevented FIPV infection. This reaction disappeared after treatment of FK50-4 with protein A. The neutralizing activity of FK50-4 was also effective on feline macrophages after the cells were inoculated with FIPV. These findings indicated that the FIPV replication mechanism differs between feline macrophages and CrFK/fcwf-4 cells and that a neutralizing epitope that can prevent FIPV infection of feline macrophages after viral absorption is present on M protein.

  8. Viral kinetics of Enterovirus 71 in human habdomyosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Lu; Ya-Qing He; Li-Na Yi; Hong Zan; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Ming-Liang He

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the viral kinetics of enterovirus 71 (EV71). METHODS: In this study, human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells were infected with EV71 at different multiplicity of infection (MOI). After infection, the cytopathic effect (CPE) was monitored and recorded using a phase contrast microscope associated with a CCD camera at different time points post viral infection (0, 6, 12, 24 h post infection). Cell growth and viability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in both EV71 infected and mock infected cells at each time point. EV71 replication kinetics in RD cells was determined by measuring the total intracellular viral RNA with real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Also, the intracellular and extracellular virion RNA was isolated and quantified at different time points to analyze the viral package and secretion. The expression of viral protein was determined by analyze the levels of viral structure protein VP1 with Western blotting. RESULTS: EV71 infection induced a significant CPE as early as 6 h post infection (p.i.) in both RD cells infected with high ratio of virus (MOI 10) and low ratio of virus (MOI 1). In EV71 infected cells, the cell growth was inhibited and the number of viable cells was rapidly decreased in the later phase of infection. EV71 virions were uncoated immediately after entry. The intracellular viral RNA began to increase at as early as 3 h p.i. and the exponential increase was found between 3 h to 6 h p.i. in both infected groups. For viral structure protein synthesis, results from western-blot showed that intracellular viral protein VP1 could not be detected until 6 h p.i. in the cells infected at either MOI 1 or MOI 10; and reached the peak at 9 h p.i. in the cells infected with EV71 at both MOI 1 and MOI 10. Simultaneously, the viral package and secretion were also actively processed as the virus underwent rapid replication. The viral package kinetics

  9. T cell activation but not polyfunctionality after primary HIV infection predicts control of viral load and length of the time without therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cossarizza

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Immune changes occurring after primary HIV infection (PHI have a pivotal relevance. Our objective was to characterize the polyfunctionality of immune response triggered by PHI, and to characterize immune activation and regulatory T cells, correlating such features to disease progression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We followed 11 patients experiencing PHI for 4 years. By polychromatic flow cytometry, we studied every month, for the first 6 months, T lymphocyte polyfunctionality after cell stimulation with peptides derived from HIV-1 gag and nef. Tregs were identified by flow cytometry, and T cell activation studied by CD38 and HLA-DR expression. RESULTS: An increase of anti-gag and anti-nef CD8+ specific T cells was observed 3 months after PHI; however, truly polyfunctional T cells, also able to produce IL-2, were never found. No gross changes in Tregs were present. T lymphocyte activation was maximal 1 and 2 months after PHI, and significantly decreased in the following period. The level of activation two months after PHI was strictly correlated to the plasma viral load 1 year after infection, and significantly influenced the length of period without therapy. Indeed, 80% of patients with less than the median value of activated CD8+ (15.5% or CD4+ (0.9% T cells remained free of therapy for >46 months, while all patients over the median value had to start treatment within 26 months. CONCLUSIONS: T cell activation after PHI, more than T cell polyfunctionality or Tregs, is a predictive marker for the control of viral load and for the time required to start treatment.

  10. Abortive Infection of Snakehead Fish Vesiculovirus in ZF4 Cells Was Associated with the RLRs Pathway Activation by Viral Replicative Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV is a negative strand RNA virus which can cause great economic losses in fish culture. To facilitate the study of SHVV-host interactions, the susceptibility of zebrafish embryonic fibroblast cell line (ZF4 to the SHVV was investigated in this report. The results showed that high amount of viral mRNAs and cRNAs were detected at the 3 h post-infection. However, the expressions of the viral mRNAs and cRNA were decreased dramatically after 6 h post-infection. In addition, the expressions of interferon (IFN and interferon-induced GTP-binding protein Mx were all up regulated significantly at the late stage of the infection. Meanwhile, the expressions of Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 were also all up-regulated significantly during the infection. Two isoforms of DrLGP2 from zebrafish were also cloned and analyzed. Interestingly, the expression of DrLGP2a but not DrLGP2b was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the two DrLGP2 isoforms might play different roles during the SHVV infection. Transfection experiment showed that viral replicative intermediates were required for the activation of IFN-α expression. Taken together, the abortive infection of SHVV in ZF4 cells was associated with the activation of RLRs pathway, which was activated by viral replicative intermediates.

  11. NK cell subset redistribution during the course of viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eLugli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 as well as cytomegalovirus (CMV infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment.

  12. Cell-based Assays to Identify Inhibitors of Viral Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Neil; Ott, Robert D.; Isaacs, Richard J.; Fang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Antagonizing the production of infectious virus inside cells requires drugs that can cross the cell membrane without harming host cells. Objective It is therefore advantageous to establish intracellular potency of anti-viral drug candidates early in the drug-discovery pipeline. Methods To this end, cell-based assays are being developed and employed in high-throughput drug screening, ranging from assays that monitor replication of intact viruses to those that monitor activity of specific viral proteins. While numerous cell-based assays have been developed and investigated, rapid counter screens are also needed to define the specific viral targets of identified inhibitors and to eliminate nonspecific screening hits. Results/Conclusions Here, we describe the types of cell-based assays being used in antiviral drug screens and evaluate the equally important counter screens that are being employed to reach the full potential of cell-based high-throughput screening. PMID:19750206

  13. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) activity decreases raltegravir disposition in primary CD4+P-gphigh cells and correlates with HIV-1 viral load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuesa, Gerard; Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Erkizia, Itziar; Cedeño, Samandhy; Moltó, José; Clotet, Bonaventura; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug-resistant-protein 1 (MRP1) on raltegravir intracellular drug disposition in CD4+ T cells, investigate the effect of HIV-1 infection on P-gp expression and correlate HIV-1 viraemia with P-gp activity in primary CD4+ T cell subsets. Methods The cellular accumulation ratio of [3H]raltegravir was quantified in CD4+ T cell lines overexpressing either P-gp (CEM-P-gp) or MRP1 (CEM-MRP1) and in primary CD3+CD4+ T cells with high (P-gphigh) and low P-gp activity (P-gplow); inhibition of efflux transporters was confirmed by the intracellular retention of calcein-AM. The correlation of P-gp activity with HIV-1 viraemia was assessed in naive and memory T cell subsets from 21 HIV-1-infected treatment-naive subjects. Results [3H]Raltegravir cellular accumulation ratio decreased in CEM-P-gp cells (P < 0.0001). XR9051 (a P-gp inhibitor) and HIV-1 PIs reversed this phenomenon. Primary CD4+P-gphigh cells accumulated less raltegravir (38.4% ± 9.6%) than P-gplow cells, whereas XR9051 also reversed this effect. In vitro HIV-1 infection of PBMCs and stimulation of CD4+ T cells increased P-gp mRNA and P-gp activity, respectively, while primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells sustained a higher HIV-1 replication than P-gplow cells. A significant correlation between HIV-1 viraemia and P-gp activity was found in different CD4+ T cell subsets, particularly memory CD4+ T cells (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Raltegravir is a substrate of P-gp in CD4+ T cells. Primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells eliminate intracellular raltegravir more readily than P-gplow cells and HIV-1 viraemia correlates with P-gp overall activity. Specific CD4+P-gphigh T cell subsets could facilitate the persistence of viral replication in vivo and ultimately promote the appearance of drug resistance. PMID:27334660

  14. Viral infections and cell cycle G2/M regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Y.ZHAO; Robert T.ELDER

    2005-01-01

    Progression of cells from G2 phase of the cell cycle to mitosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that requires activation of the Cdc2 kinase, which determines onset of mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. In both human and fission yeast(Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cells, the activity of Cdc2 is regulated in part by the phosphorylation status of tyrosine 15(Tyr15) on Cdc2, which is phosphorylated by Wee1 kinase during late G2 and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the Cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase to trigger entry into mitosis. These Cdc2 regulators are the downstream targets of two well-characterized G2/M checkpoint pathways which prevent cells from entering mitosis when cellular DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is inhibited. Increasing evidence suggests that Cdc2 is also commonly targeted by viral proteins,which modulate host cell cycle machinery to benefit viral survival or replication. In this review, we describe the effect of viral protein R (Vpr) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on cell cycle G2/M regulation. Based on our current knowledge about this viral effect, we hypothesize that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a mechanism that is to some extent different from the classic G2/M checkpoints. One the unique features distinguishing Vpr-induced G2 arrest from the classic checkpoints is the role of phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Vpr-induced G2 arrest.Interestingly, PP2A is targeted by a number of other viral proteins including SV40 small T antigen, polyomavirus T antigen, HTLV Tax and adenovirus E4orf4. Thus an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Vpr-induced G2 arrest will provide additional insights into the basic biology of cell cycle G2/M regulation and into the biological significance of this effect during host-pathogen interactions.

  15. Protective efficacy of cross-reactive CD8+ T cells recognising mutant viral epitopes depends on peptide-MHC-I structural interactions and T cell activation threshold.

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    Sophie A Valkenburg

    Full Text Available Emergence of a new influenza strain leads to a rapid global spread of the virus due to minimal antibody immunity. Pre-existing CD8(+ T-cell immunity directed towards conserved internal viral regions can greatly ameliorate the disease. However, mutational escape within the T cell epitopes is a substantial issue for virus control and vaccine design. Although mutations can result in a loss of T cell recognition, some variants generate cross-reactive T cell responses. In this study, we used reverse genetics to modify the influenza NP(336-374 peptide at a partially-solvent exposed residue (N->A, NPN3A mutation to assess the availability, effectiveness and mechanism underlying influenza-specific cross-reactive T cell responses. The engineered virus induced a diminished CD8(+ T cell response and selected a narrowed T cell receptor (TCR repertoire within two V beta regions (V beta 8.3 and V beta 9. This can be partially explained by the H-2D(bNPN3A structure that showed a loss of several contacts between the NPN3A peptide and H-2D(b, including a contact with His155, a position known to play an important role in mediating TCR-pMHC-I interactions. Despite these differences, common cross-reactive TCRs were detected in both the naïve and immune NPN3A-specific TCR repertoires. However, while the NPN3A epitope primes memory T-cells that give an equivalent recall response to the mutant or wild-type (wt virus, both are markedly lower than wt->wt challenge. Such decreased CD8(+ responses elicited after heterologous challenge resulted in delayed viral clearance from the infected lung. Furthermore, mice first exposed to the wt virus give a poor, low avidity response following secondary infection with the mutant. Thus, the protective efficacy of cross-reactive CD8(+ T cells recognising mutant viral epitopes depend on peptide-MHC-I structural interactions and functional avidity. Our study does not support vaccine strategies that include immunization against

  16. Concentrations of IL-15, IL-18, IFN-γ and activity of CD4(+), CD8(+) and NK cells at admission in children with viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grześk, Elżbieta; Kołtan, Sylwia; Dębski, Robert; Wysocki, Mariusz; Gruszka, Marzena; Kubicka, Małgorzata; Kołtan, Andrzej; Grześk, Grzegorz; Manysiak, Sławomir; Odrowąż-Sypniewska, Grażyna

    2010-09-01

    The pathogenesis of viral bronchiolitis is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze interleukin (IL)-15, IL-18 and interferon (IFN)-γ concentrations and the activity of NK cells and CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes in 23 children not older than 30 months of age with acute viral bronchiolitis using blood samples drawn within the first 24 h of their hospital admission, in comparison to a healthy group. In children with bronchiolitis, the mean concentrations of IL-15, IL-18 and IFN-γ were 9.39±11.55, 884.03±645.44 and 17.92±27.14 pg/ml, respectively, and were significantly higher than those in the control group [2.34±0.61 pg/ml (p<0.05), 248.69±98.73 pg/ml (p<0.001) and 2.75±1.72 pg/ml (p<0.005), respectively]. In the bronchiolitis group, mean z-scores were -1.15±1.9 for CD4(+) cells and -0.9±1.23 for CD8(+) cells; these scores were significantly lower than those of the general Polish population (p<0.001 and <0.01, respectively). However, the mean z-score of the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) and the NK cell count in children with bronchiolitis did not differ significantly from those of the controls. In conclusion, cytokines such as IL-15, IL-18 and IFN-γ play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis in children.

  17. CXC Chemokine Ligand 10 Controls Viral Infection in the Central Nervous System: Evidence for a Role in Innate Immune Response through Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trifilo, Matthew J.; Montalto-Morrison, Cynthia; Stiles, Linda N.; Hurst, Kelley R.; Hardison, Jenny L.; Manning, Jerry E.; Masters, Paul S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    How chemokines shape the immune response to viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been considered within the context of recruitment and activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, chemokines are expressed early following viral infection, suggesting an important role in coordinating innate immune responses. Herein, we evaluated the contributions of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in promoting innate defense mechanisms following coronavirus infection of the C...

  18. Optimizing viral and non-viral gene transfer methods for genetic modification of porcine mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Duch, Mogens R.; Mygind, Tina

    2006-01-01

    -old Danish landrace pigs by Ficoll step gradient separation and polystyrene adherence technique. Vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were transferred to the cells by different non-viral methods and by use of recombinant adeno...... viral and non-viral ex vivo gene delivery systems with respect to gene transfer efficiency, maintenance of transgene expression, and safety issues using primary porcine MSCs as target cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were purified from bone marrow aspirates from the proximal tibiae of four 3-month...... were evaluated by realtime quantitative RT-PCR and histochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity, respectively. RESULTS: Non-viral gene delivery methods resulted in transient eGFP expression by less than 2% of the cells. Using high titer rAAV-based vector up to 90% of the cells were...

  19. Cell-Associated Viral Burden Provides Evidence of Ongoing Viral Replication in Aviremic HIV-2-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rui S.; Tendeiro, Rita; Foxall, Russell B.; Baptista, António P.; Cavaleiro, Rita; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo; Valadas, Emília; Doroana, Manuela; Lucas, Margarida; Antunes, Francisco; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2011-01-01

    Viremia is significantly lower in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection, irrespective of disease stage. Nevertheless, the comparable proviral DNA burdens observed for these two infections indicate similar numbers of infected cells. Here we investigated this apparent paradox by assessing cell-associated viral replication. We found that untreated HIV-1-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-2+ individuals, matched for CD4 T cell depletion, exhibited similar gag mRNA levels, indicating that significant viral transcription is occurring in untreated HIV-2+ patients, despite the reduced viremia (undetectable to 2.6 × 104 RNA copies/ml). However, tat mRNA transcripts were observed at significantly lower levels in HIV-2+ patients, suggesting that the rate of de novo infection is decreased in these patients. Our data also reveal a direct relationship of gag and tat transcripts with CD4 and CD8 T cell activation, respectively. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-2+ patients showed persistent viral replication, irrespective of plasma viremia, possibly contributing to the emergence of drug resistance mutations, persistent hyperimmune activation, and poor CD4 T cell recovery that we observed with these individuals. In conclusion, we provide here evidence of significant ongoing viral replication in HIV-2+ patients, further emphasizing the dichotomy between amount of plasma virus and cell-associated viral burden and stressing the need for antiretroviral trials and the definition of therapeutic guidelines for HIV-2 infection. PMID:21159859

  20. Differential regulatory activities of viral protein X for anti-viral efficacy of nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in monocyte-derived macrophages and activated CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Schader, Susan M; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2015-11-01

    Vpx encoded by HIV-2 and SIVsm enhances retroviral reverse transcription in macrophages in vitro by mediating the degradation of the host SAMHD1 protein that hydrolyzes dNTPs and by elevating cellular dNTP levels. Here we employed RT-SHIV constructs (SIV encoding HIV-1 RT) to investigate the contribution of Vpx to the potency of NRTIs, which compete against dNTPs, in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and activated CD4(+) T cells. Relative to HIV-1, both SIV and RT-SHIV exhibited reduced sensitivities to AZT, 3TC and TDF in MDMs but not in activated CD4(+) T cells. However, when SIV and RT-SHIV constructs not coding for Vpx were utilized, we observed greater sensitivities to all NRTIs tested using activated CD4(+) T cells relative to the Vpx-coding counterparts. This latter phenomenon was observed for AZT only when using MDMs. Our data suggest that Vpx in RT-SHIVs may underestimate the antiviral efficacy of NRTIs in a cell type dependent manner.

  1. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses.

  2. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  3. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  4. Activation of the Antiviral Kinase PKR and Viral Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Dauber

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced double-stranded (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR limits viral replication by an eIF2α-mediated block of translation. Although many negative-strand RNA viruses activate PKR, the responsible RNAs have long remained elusive, as dsRNA, the canonical activator of PKR, has not been detected in cells infected with such viruses. In this review we focus on the activating RNA molecules of different virus families, in particular the negative-strand RNA viruses. We discuss the recently identified non-canonical activators 5’-triphosphate RNA and the vRNP of influenza virus and give an update on strategies of selected RNA and DNA viruses to prevent activation of PKR.

  5. Dynamic imaging of cell-free and cell-associated viral capture in mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Esteban, Olga; Rodriguez-Plata, Maria T; Erkizia, Itziar; Prado, Julia G; Blanco, Julià; García-Parajo, Maria F; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through a non-fusogenic mechanism that enables viral transmission to CD4(+) T cells, contributing to in vivo viral dissemination. Although previous studies have provided important clues to cell-free viral capture by mature DCs (mDCs), dynamic and kinetic insight on this process is still missing. Here, we used three-dimensional video microscopy and single-particle tracking approaches to dynamically dissect both cell-free and cell-associated viral capture by living mDCs. We show that cell-free virus capture by mDCs operates through three sequential phases: virus binding through specific determinants expressed in the viral particle, polarized or directional movements toward concrete regions of the cell membrane and virus accumulation in a sac-like structure where trapped viral particles display a hindered diffusive behavior. Moreover, real-time imaging of cell-associated viral transfer to mDCs showed a similar dynamics to that exhibited by cell-free virus endocytosis leading to viral accumulation in compartments. However, cell-associated HIV type 1 transfer to mDCs was the most effective pathway, boosted throughout enhanced cellular contacts with infected CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that in lymphoid tissues, mDC viral uptake could occur either by encountering cell-free or cell-associated virus produced by infected cells generating the perfect scenario to promote HIV pathogenesis and impact disease progression.

  6. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  7. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  8. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

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    Barry Peter A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals.

  9. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...

  10. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

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    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  11. Targeted killing of virally infected cells by radiolabeled antibodies to viral proteins.

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    Ekaterina Dadachova

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV epidemic is a major threat to health in the developing and western worlds. A modality that targets and kills HIV-1-infected cells could have a major impact on the treatment of acute exposure and the elimination of persistent reservoirs of infected cells. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy of targeting and eliminating HIV-1-infected cells with radiolabeled antibodies specific to viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 labeled with radioisotopes bismuth 213 ((213Bi and rhenium 188 ((188Re selectively killed chronically HIV-1-infected human T cells and acutely HIV-1-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs in vitro. Treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice harboring HIV-1-infected hPBMCs in their spleens with a (213Bi- or (188Re-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb to gp41 resulted in a 57% injected dose per gram uptake of radiolabeled mAb in the infected spleens and in a greater than 99% elimination of HIV-1-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The number of HIV-1-infected thymocytes decreased 2.5-fold in the human thymic implant grafts of SCID mice treated with the (188Re-labeled antibody to gp41 compared with those treated with the (188Re-control mAb. The treatment did not cause acute hematologic toxicity in the treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: The current study demonstrates the effectiveness of HIV-targeted radioimmunotherapy and may provide a novel treatment option in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV.

  12. The viral KSHV chemokine vMIP-II inhibits the migration of Naive and activated human NK cells by antagonizing two distinct chemokine receptors.

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    Rachel Yamin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate immune cells able to rapidly kill virus-infected and tumor cells. Two NK cell populations are found in the blood; the majority (90% expresses the CD16 receptor and also express the CD56 protein in intermediate levels (CD56(Dim CD16(Pos while the remaining 10% are CD16 negative and express CD56 in high levels (CD56(Bright CD16(Neg. NK cells also reside in some tissues and traffic to various infected organs through the usage of different chemokines and chemokine receptors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human virus that has developed numerous sophisticated and versatile strategies to escape the attack of immune cells such as NK cells. Here, we investigate whether the KSHV derived cytokine (vIL-6 and chemokines (vMIP-I, vMIP-II, vMIP-III affect NK cell activity. Using transwell migration assays, KSHV infected cells, as well as fusion and recombinant proteins, we show that out of the four cytokine/chemokines encoded by KSHV, vMIP-II is the only one that binds to the majority of NK cells, affecting their migration. We demonstrate that vMIP-II binds to two different receptors, CX3CR1 and CCR5, expressed by naïve CD56(Dim CD16(Pos NK cells and activated NK cells, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the binding of vMIP-II to CX3CR1 and CCR5 blocks the binding of the natural ligands of these receptors, Fractalkine (Fck and RANTES, respectively. Finally, we show that vMIP-II inhibits the migration of naïve and activated NK cells towards Fck and RANTES. Thus, we present here a novel mechanism in which KSHV uses a unique protein that antagonizes the activity of two distinct chemokine receptors to inhibit the migration of naïve and activated NK cells.

  13. iNKT Cells and Their potential Lipid Ligands during Viral Infection

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    Anunya eOpasawatchai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a unique population of lipid reactive CD1d restricted innate-like T lymphocytes. Despite being a minor population, they serve as an early source of cytokines and promote immunological crosstalk thus bridging innate and adaptive immunity. Diseases ranging from allergy, autoimmunity, and cancer as well as infectious diseases, including viral infection, have been reported to be influenced by iNKT cells. However, it remains unclear how iNKT cells are activated during viral infection, as virus derived lipid antigens have not been reported. Cytokines may activate iNKT cells during infections from influenza and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV, although CD1d dependent activation is evident in other viral infections. Several viruses, such as dengue virus (DENV, induce CD1d upregulation which correlates with iNKT cell activation. In contrast, Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Human papiloma virus (HPV promote CD1d downregulation as a strategy to evade iNKT cell recognition. These observations suggest the participation of a CD1d-dependent process in the activation of iNKT cells in response to viral infection. Endogenous lipid ligands, including phospholipids as well as glycosphingolipids, such as glucosylceramide have been proposed to mediate iNKT cell activation. Pro-inflammatory signals produced during viral infection may stimulate iNKT cells through enhanced CD1d dependent endogenous lipid presentation. Furthermore, viral infection may alter lipid composition and inhibit endogenous lipid degradation. Recent advances in this field are reviewed.

  14. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Facilitates Cell-to-Cell Viral Dissemination

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    Vanessa M. Noriega

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV encodes a number of viral proteins with homology to cellular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. These viral GPCRs, including US27, US28, UL33, and UL78, have been ascribed numerous functions during infection, including activating diverse cellular pathways, binding to immunomodulatory chemokines, and impacting virus dissemination. To investigate the role of US28 during virus infection, two variants of the clinical isolate TB40/E were generated: TB40/E-US28YFP expressing a C-terminal yellow fluorescent protein tag, and TB40/E-FLAGYFP in which a FLAG-YFP cassette replaces the US28 coding region. The TB40/E-US28YFP protein localized as large perinuclear fluorescent structures at late times post-infection in fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells. Interestingly, US28YFP is a non-glycosylated membrane protein throughout the course of infection. US28 appears to impact cell-to-cell spread of virus, as the DUS28 virus (TB40/E-FLAGYFP generated a log-greater yield of extracellular progeny whose spread could be significantly neutralized in fibroblasts. Most strikingly, in epithelial cells, where dissemination of virus occurs exclusively by the cell-to-cell route, TB40/E-FLAGYFP (DUS28 displayed a significant growth defect. The data demonstrates that HCMV US28 may contribute at a late stage of the viral life cycle to cell-to-cell dissemination of virus.

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Do Not Increase the Risk of Viral Reactivation Nor the Severity of Viral Events in Recipients of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Giovanna Lucchini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are tested in clinical trials to treat graft versus host disease (GvHD after stem cell transplantation (SCT. In vitro studies demonstrated MSC's broad immunosuppressive activity. As infections represent a major risk after SCT, it is important to understand the role of MSC in this context. We analyzed 24 patients (pts receiving MSC for GvHD in our Unit between 2009 and 2011. We recorded viral reactivations as measured in whole blood with polymerase chain reaction for 100 days following MSC administration. In patients with a documented viral reactivation in the first 3 days following MSCs infusion the frequency of virus-specific IFNgamma-producing cells was determined through enzyme-linked immunospot assay. In our cohort of patients viral reactivation after MSC infusion occurred in 45% of the cases, which did not significantly differ from the incidence in a historical cohort of patients affected by steroid resistant GvHD and treated with conventional immunosuppression. No patient presented severe form of infection. Two cases could be checked for immunological response to viral stimulus and demonstrated virus specific T-cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. In our experience MSC infusion did not prove to trigger more frequent or severer viral reactivations in the post transplantation setting.

  16. Dengue viral RNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are associated with disease severity and preexisting dengue immune status.

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    Anon Srikiatkhachorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with dengue viruses (DENV causes a wide range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a febrile illness called dengue fever (DF, to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. The in vivo targets of DENV and the relation between the viral burden in these cells and disease severity are not known. METHOD: The levels of positive and negative strand viral RNA in peripheral blood monocytes, T/NK cells, and B cells and in plasma of DF and DHF cases were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: Positive strand viral RNA was detected in monocytes, T/NK cells and B cells with the highest amounts found in B cells. Viral RNA levels in CD14+ cells and plasma were significantly higher in DHF compared to DF, and in cases with a secondary infection compared to those undergoing a primary infection. The distribution of viral RNA among cell subpopulations was similar in DF and DHF cases. Small amounts of negative strand RNA were found in a few cases only. The severity of plasma leakage correlated with viral RNA levels in plasma and in CD14+ cells. CONCLUSIONS: B cells were the principal cells containing DENV RNA in peripheral blood, but overall there was little active DENV RNA replication detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Secondary infection and DHF were associated with higher viral burden in PBMC populations, especially CD14+ monocytes, suggesting that viral infection of these cells may be involved in disease pathogenesis.

  17. IL-21 optimizes T cell and humoral responses in the central nervous system during viral encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phares, Timothy W.; DiSano, Krista D.; Hinton, David R.; Hwang, Mihyun; Zajac, Allan J.; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute coronavirus encephalomyelitis is controlled by T cells while humoral responses suppress virus persistence. This study defines the contribution of interleukin (IL)-21, a regulator of T and B cell function, to central nervous system (CNS) immunity. IL-21 receptor deficiency did not affect peripheral T cell activation or trafficking, but dampened granzyme B, gamma interferon and IL-10 expression by CNS T cells and reduced serum and intrathecal humoral responses. Viral control was already lost prior to humoral CNS responses, but demyelination remained comparable. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-21 in regulating CNS immunity, sustaining viral persistence and preventing mortality. PMID:23992866

  18. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-03-17

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3C(pro)s) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3C(pro) plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3C(pro) are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3C(pro) can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3C(pro) and these essential factors, 3C(pro) is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3C(pro) are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3C(pro) may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3C(pro) is summarized.

  19. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

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    Di Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized.

  20. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

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    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  1. ANTI-VIRAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCIRRHETINIC AND GLYCIRRHIZIC ACIDS

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    V. V. Zarubaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a highly contagious human disease. In the course of use of antiviral drugs drug-resistant strains of the virus are formed, resulting in reduced efficiency of the chemotherapy. The review describes the biological activity of glycirrhetinic (GLA and glycirrhizic (GA acids in terms of their use as a therapeutic agent for viral infections. So, these compounds are against a broad spectrum of viruses, including herpes, corona-, alphaand flaviviruses, human immunodeficiency virus, vaccinia virus, poliovirus type I, vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus. These data indicate that anti-viral effect of these compounds is due to several types of activity — direct antiviral effects, effects on cellular proand anti-viral and immunomodulating pathways, in particular by activation of innate immunity system. GA interferes with early steps of the viral reproductive cycle such as virus binding to its receptor, the absorption of the virus by endocytosis or virus decapsidation in the cytoplasm. This is due to the effect of GA-induced reduction of membrane fluidity. Thus, one mechanism for the antiviral activity of GA is that GA molecule increases the rigidity of cellular and viral membranes after incorporation in there. This results in increasing of energy threshold required for the formation of negative curvature at the fusion zones, as well as difficult lateral migration of the virus-receptor complexes. In addition, glycyrrhizin prevents interaction of viral nucleoprotein with cellular protein HMGB1, which is necessary for the viral life cycle. Glycyrrhizin also inhibits the induction of oxidative stress during influenza infection, exhibiting antioxidant properties, which leads to a reduction of virus-induced production of cytokines/chemokines, without affecting the replication of the virus. A wide spectrum of biological activity and effect on various aspects of the viral pathogenesis substantiate the effect of GA and GLA as a component

  2. T Cell Memory in the Context of Persistent Herpes Viral Infections

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    Nicole Torti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a functional memory T cell pool upon primary encounter with an infectious pathogen is, in combination with humoral immunity, an essential process to confer protective immunity against reencounters with the same pathogen. A prerequisite for the generation and maintenance of long-lived memory T cells is the clearance of antigen after infection, which is fulfilled upon resolution of acute viral infections. Memory T cells play also a fundamental role during persistent viral infections by contributing to relative control and immuosurveillance of active replication or viral reactivation, respectively. However, the dynamics, the phenotype, the mechanisms of maintenance and the functionality of memory T cells which develop upon acute/resolved infection as opposed to chronic/latent infection differ substantially. In this review we summarize current knowledge about memory CD8 T cell responses elicited during α-, β-, and γ-herpes viral infections with major emphasis on the induction, maintenance and function of virus-specific memory CD8 T cells during viral latency and we discuss how the peculiar features of these memory CD8 T cell responses are related to the biology of these persistently infecting viruses.

  3. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

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    Manjunatha M Venkataswamy

    Full Text Available Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag. We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  4. Improving Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a Vaccine Delivery Vector for Viral Antigens by Incorporation of Glycolipid Activators of NKT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Johnson, Alison J.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J.; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D.; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F.; Panas, Michael W.; Gillard, Geoffrey O.; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors. PMID:25255287

  5. Viral subversion of immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Tesniere, Antoine; Schlemmer, Frederic; Madeo, Frank; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-03-15

    While physiological cell death is non-immunogenic, pathogen induced cell death can be immunogenic and hence stimulate an immune response against antigens that derive from dying cells and are presented by dendritic cells (DCs). The obligate immunogenic "eat-me" signal generated by dying cells consists in the exposure of calreticulin (CRT) at the cell surface. This particular "eat-me" signal, which facilitates engulfment by DCs, can only be found on cells that succumb to immunogenic apoptosis, while it is not present on cells dying in an immunologically silent fashion. CRT normally resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), yet can translocate to the plasma membrane surface through a complex pathway that involves elements of the ER stress response (e.g., the eIF2alpha-phosphorylating kinase PERK), the apoptotic machinery (e.g., caspase-8 and its substrate BAP31, Bax, Bak), the anterograde transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, and SNARE-dependent exocytosis. A large panoply of viruses encodes proteins that inhibit eIF2alpha kinases, catalyze the dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha, bind to caspase-8, Bap31, Bax or Bak, or perturb exocytosis. We therefore postulate that obligate intracellular pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to subvert CRT exposure, thereby avoiding immunogenic cell death.

  6. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillestøl, Reidun K; Redder, Peter; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based) may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (si...

  7. EBV tegument protein BNRF1 disrupts DAXX-ATRX to activate viral early gene transcription.

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    Kevin Tsai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Productive infection by herpesviruses involve the disabling of host-cell intrinsic defenses by viral encoded tegument proteins. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV typically establishes a non-productive, latent infection and it remains unclear how it confronts the host-cell intrinsic defenses that restrict viral gene expression. Here, we show that the EBV major tegument protein BNRF1 targets host-cell intrinsic defense proteins and promotes viral early gene activation. Specifically, we demonstrate that BNRF1 interacts with the host nuclear protein Daxx at PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs and disrupts the formation of the Daxx-ATRX chromatin remodeling complex. We mapped the Daxx interaction domain on BNRF1, and show that this domain is important for supporting EBV primary infection. Through reverse transcription PCR and infection assays, we show that BNRF1 supports viral gene expression upon early infection, and that this function is dependent on the Daxx-interaction domain. Lastly, we show that knockdown of Daxx and ATRX induces reactivation of EBV from latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, suggesting that Daxx and ATRX play a role in the regulation of viral chromatin. Taken together, our data demonstrate an important role of BNRF1 in supporting EBV early infection by interacting with Daxx and ATRX; and suggest that tegument disruption of PML-NB-associated antiviral resistances is a universal requirement for herpesvirus infection in the nucleus.

  8. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is ......Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen....... There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte...... responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells....

  9. Apigenin inhibits enterovirus 71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaowen; Qiu, Min; Chen, Deyan; Zheng, Nan; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a member of genus Enterovirus in Picornaviridae family, which is one of the major causative agents for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and sometimes associated with severe central nervous system diseases in children. Currently there are no effective therapeutic medicines or vaccines for the disease. In this report, we found that apigenin and luteolin, two flavones that differ only in the number of hydroxyl groups could inhibit EV71-mediated cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and EV71 replication with low cytotoxicity. Both molecules also showed inhibitory effect on the viral polyprotein expression. They prevented EV71-induced cell apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytokines up-regulation. Time-of-drug addition study demonstrated that apigenin and luteolin acted after viral entry. We examined the effect of apigenin and luteolin on 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) activity, two viral proteases responsible for viral polyprotein processing, and found that they showed less inhibitory activity on 2A(pro) or 3C(pro). Further studies demonstrated that apigenin, but not luteolin could interfere with viral IRES activity. Also, apigenin inhibited EV71-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation which is critical for viral replication, in contrast to luteolin that did not. This study demonstrated that apigenin may inhibit EV71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway. It also provided evidence that one hydroxyl group difference in the B ring between apigenin and luteolin resulted in the distinct antiviral mechanisms. This study will provide the basis for better drug development and further identification of potential drug targets.

  10. Licensed and unlicensed NK cells: Differential roles in cancer and viral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Tu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I—which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy—as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the licensing hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors—Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans—and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially ‘unlicensed’. While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors.

  11. Human cytomegalovirus and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands: cell-specific localization of active viral and oncogenic signaling proteins is confirmatory of a causal relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Michael; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Allen, Carl M; Jaskoll, Tina

    2012-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection is common. Although still controversial, there is growing evidence that active hCMV infection is associated with a variety of malignancies, including brain, breast, lung, colon, and prostate. Given that hCMV is frequently resident in salivary gland (SG) ductal epithelium, we hypothesized that hCMV would be important to the pathogenesis of SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). This was initially supported by our finding that purified CMV induces malignant transformation in SG cells in an in vitro mouse model, and utilizes a pathogenic pathway previously reported for human MEC. Here we present the histologic and molecular characterizations of 39 human SG MECs selected randomly from a repository of cases spanning 2004-2011. Serial sections were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded, tissue blocks from previous incisional or excisional biopsies. Immunohistochemical assays were performed for active hCMV proteins (IE1 and pp65) and the activated COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK signaling pathway. All four prospective causal criteria for viruses and cancer are fully satisfied: (1) protein markers for active hCMV are present in 97% of MECs; (2) markers of active hCMV are absent in non-neoplastic SG tissues; (3) hCMV-specific proteins (IE1, pp65) are in specific cell types and expression is positively correlated with severity; (4) hCMV correlates and colocalizes with an upregulation and activation of an established oncogenic signaling pathway (COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK). Thus, the evidential support reported here and previously in a mouse model is strongly confirmatory of a causal relationship between hCMV and SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of hCMV's role in human oncogenesis that fully responds to all of Koch's Postulates as revised for viruses and cancer. In the absence of any contrary evidence, hCMV can reasonably be designated an "oncovirus."

  12. The Dual Role of Exosomes in Hepatitis A and C Virus Transmission and Viral Immune Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longatti, Andrea

    2015-12-17

    Exosomes are small nanovesicles of about 100 nm in diameter that act as intercellular messengers because they can shuttle RNA, proteins and lipids between different cells. Many studies have found that exosomes also play various roles in viral pathogenesis. Hepatitis A virus (HAV; a picornavirus) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV; a flavivirus) two single strand plus-sense RNA viruses, in particular, have been found to use exosomes for viral transmission thus evading antibody-mediated immune responses. Paradoxically, both viral exosomes can also be detected by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) leading to innate immune activation and type I interferon production. This article will review recent findings regarding these two viruses and outline how exosomes are involved in their transmission and immune sensing.

  13. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  14. Viral aggregating and opsonizing activity in collectin trimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2010-01-01

    Collectins are collagenous lectins present in blood, respiratory lining fluid, and other mucosal secretions, that play important roles in innate defense against infection. The collectin, surfactant protein D (SP-D), limits infection by viruses and bacteria in the respiratory tract, eye and female...... genital tract. Multimeric SP-D has strong antiviral activity and is a potent viral and bacterial agglutinin and opsonin; however, trimers composed of the neck and carbohydrate recognition domain (hSP-D-NCRD) of SP-D lack these activities. We now show that, in contrast, a trimeric neck and CRD construct...... serum collectins conferred opsonizing activity. The most effective substitution involved replacement of arginine 343 with valine (hSP-D-NCRD/R343V). hSP-D-NCRD/R343V greatly increased viral uptake by neutrophils and monocytes and also potentiated neutrophil respiratory burst responses. These effects...

  15. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  16. DNA-AuNP networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier to inhibit viral attachment, entry and budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Mei; Zheng, Lin Ling; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wan, Xiao Yan; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Luo, Ling Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have caused numerous diseases and deaths worldwide. Due to the emergence of new viruses and frequent virus variation, conventional antiviral strategies that directly target viral or cellular proteins are limited because of the specificity, drug resistance and rapid clearance from the human body. Therefore, developing safe and potent antiviral agents with activity against viral infection at multiple points in the viral life cycle remains a major challenge. In this report, we propose a new modality to inhibit viral infection by fabricating DNA conjugated gold nanoparticle (DNA-AuNP) networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier. The DNA-AuNPs networks were found, via a plaque formation assay and viral titers, to have potent antiviral ability and protect host cells from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Confocal immunofluorescence image analysis showed 80 ± 3.8% of viral attachment, 91.1 ± 0.9% of viral entry and 87.9 ± 2.8% of viral budding were inhibited by the DNA-AuNP networks, which were further confirmed by real-time fluorescence imaging of the RSV infection process. The antiviral activity of the networks may be attributed to steric effects, the disruption of membrane glycoproteins and limited fusion of cell membrane bilayers, all of which play important roles in viral infection. Therefore, our results suggest that the DNA-AuNP networks have not only prophylactic effects to inhibit virus attachment and entry, but also therapeutic effects to inhibit viral budding and cell-to-cell spread. More importantly, this proof-of-principle study provides a pathway for the development of a universal, broad-spectrum antiviral therapy.

  17. LCMV glycosylation modulates viral fitness and cell tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille J Bonhomme

    Full Text Available The glycoprotein (GP of arenaviruses is glycosylated at 11 conserved N-glycosylation sites. We constructed recombinant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV featuring either additions or deletions of these N-glycans to investigate their role in the viral life cycle. N-glycosylation at two sites, T87 and S97, were found to be necessary to rescue rLCMV. Three of nine successfully rescued mutants, S116A, T234A, and S373A, under selective pressures in either epithelial, neuronal, or macrophage cells reverted to WT sequence. Of the seven stable N-glycan deletion mutants, five of these led to altered viral fitness and cell tropism, assessed as growth in either mouse primary cortical neurons or bone marrow derived macrophages. These results demonstrate that the deletion of N-glycans in LCMV GP may confer an advantage to the virus for infection of neurons but a disadvantage in macrophages.

  18. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-12-02

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance.

  19. Viral oncogene-induced DNA damage response is activated in Kaposi sarcoma tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Koopal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma is a tumor consisting of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV-infected tumor cells that express endothelial cell (EC markers and viral genes like v-cyclin, vFLIP, and LANA. Despite a strong link between KSHV infection and certain neoplasms, de novo virus infection of human primary cells does not readily lead to cellular transformation. We have studied the consequences of expression of v-cyclin in primary and immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs. We show that v-cyclin, which is a homolog of cellular D-type cyclins, induces replicative stress in ECs, which leads to senescence and activation of the DNA damage response. We find that antiproliferative checkpoints are activated upon KSHV infection of ECs, and in early-stage but not late-stage lesions of clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens. These are some of the first results suggesting that DNA damage checkpoint response also functions as an anticancer barrier in virally induced cancers.

  20. Clonal selection for transcriptionally active viral oncogenes during progression to cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine, BA Van; Kappes, JC; Banerjee, NS; Knops, J; Lai, L; Steenbergen, R.D.M.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Chatis, P; Broker, TR; Moen, PTJr; Chow, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    Primary keratinocytes immortalized by human papillomaviruses (HPVs), along with HPV-induced cervical carcinoma cell lines, are excellent models for investigating neoplastic progression to cancer. By simultaneously visualizing viral DNA and nascent viral transcripts in interphase nuclei, we demonstra

  1. Relevance of Viroporin Ion Channel Activity on Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-07-03

    Modification of host-cell ionic content is a significant issue for viruses, as several viral proteins displaying ion channel activity, named viroporins, have been identified. Viroporins interact with different cellular membranes and self-assemble forming ion conductive pores. In general, these channels display mild ion selectivity, and, eventually, membrane lipids play key structural and functional roles in the pore. Viroporins stimulate virus production through different mechanisms, and ion channel conductivity has been proved particularly relevant in several cases. Key stages of the viral cycle such as virus uncoating, transport and maturation are ion-influenced processes in many viral species. Besides boosting virus propagation, viroporins have also been associated with pathogenesis. Linking pathogenesis either to the ion conductivity or to other functions of viroporins has been elusive for a long time. This article summarizes novel pathways leading to disease stimulated by viroporin ion conduction, such as inflammasome driven immunopathology.

  2. Relevance of Viroporin Ion Channel Activity on Viral Replication and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Nieto-Torres

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modification of host-cell ionic content is a significant issue for viruses, as several viral proteins displaying ion channel activity, named viroporins, have been identified. Viroporins interact with different cellular membranes and self-assemble forming ion conductive pores. In general, these channels display mild ion selectivity, and, eventually, membrane lipids play key structural and functional roles in the pore. Viroporins stimulate virus production through different mechanisms, and ion channel conductivity has been proved particularly relevant in several cases. Key stages of the viral cycle such as virus uncoating, transport and maturation are ion-influenced processes in many viral species. Besides boosting virus propagation, viroporins have also been associated with pathogenesis. Linking pathogenesis either to the ion conductivity or to other functions of viroporins has been elusive for a long time. This article summarizes novel pathways leading to disease stimulated by viroporin ion conduction, such as inflammasome driven immunopathology.

  3. Regulation of the tumor marker Fascin by the viral oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) depends on promoter activation and on a promoter-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Caroline F; Gross, Christine; Bros, Matthias; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Biesinger, Brigitte; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a highly infiltrative neoplasia of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes that occurs in about 5% of carriers infected with the deltaretrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral oncoprotein Tax perturbs cellular signaling pathways leading to upregulation of host cell factors, amongst them the actin-bundling protein Fascin, an invasion marker of several types of cancer. However, transcriptional regulation of Fascin by Tax is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a triple mode of transcriptional induction of Fascin by Tax, which requires (1) NF-κB-dependent promoter activation, (2) a Tax-responsive region in the Fascin promoter, and (3) a promoter-independent mechanism sensitive to the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Thus, Tax regulates Fascin by a multitude of signals. Beyond, using Tax-expressing and virus-transformed lymphocytes as a model system, our study is the first to identify the invasion marker Fascin as a novel target of PP2, an inhibitor of metastasis.

  4. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, Andrea E; Bosse, Jens B; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-09-10

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy.

  5. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tajima, Shigeru [Department of Virology I, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko [Influenza and Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Aida, Yoko, E-mail: aida@riken.jp [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  6. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  7. Definition of the viral targets of protective HIV-1-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothe Beatriz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of the CTL component of a future HIV-1 vaccine will depend on the induction of responses with the most potent antiviral activity and broad HLA class I restriction. However, current HIV vaccine designs are largely based on viral sequence alignments only, not incorporating experimental data on T cell function and specificity. Methods Here, 950 untreated HIV-1 clade B or -C infected individuals were tested for responses to sets of 410 overlapping peptides (OLP spanning the entire HIV-1 proteome. For each OLP, a "protective ratio" (PR was calculated as the ratio of median viral loads (VL between OLP non-responders and responders. Results For both clades, there was a negative relationship between the PR and the entropy of the OLP sequence. There was also a significant additive effect of multiple responses to beneficial OLP. Responses to beneficial OLP were of significantly higher functional avidity than responses to non-beneficial OLP. They also had superior in-vitro antiviral activities and, importantly, were at least as predictive of individuals' viral loads than their HLA class I genotypes. Conclusions The data thus identify immunogen sequence candidates for HIV and provide an approach for T cell immunogen design applicable to other viral infections.

  8. Active cAMP-dependent protein kinase incorporated within highly purified HIV-1 particles is required for viral infectivity and interacts with viral capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Christine; Hemonnot, Bénédicte; Gay, Bernard; Bardy, Martine; Sanchiz, Céline; Devaux, Christian; Briant, Laurence

    2003-09-12

    Host cell components, including protein kinases such as ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase, incorporated within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions play a pivotal role in the ability of HIV to infect and replicate in permissive cells. The present work provides evidence that the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (C-PKA) is packaged within HIV-1 virions as demonstrated using purified subtilisin-digested viral particles. Virus-associated C-PKA was shown to be enzymatically active and able to phosphorylate synthetic substrate in vitro. Suppression of virion-associated C-PKA activity by specific synthetic inhibitor had no apparent effect on viral precursor maturation and virus assembly. However, virus-associated C-PKA activity was demonstrated to regulate HIV-1 infectivity as assessed by single round infection assays performed by using viruses produced from cells expressing an inactive form of C-PKA. In addition, virus-associated C-PKA was found to co-precipitate with and to phosphorylate the CAp24gag protein. Altogether our results indicate that virus-associated C-PKA regulates HIV-1 infectivity, possibly by catalyzing phosphorylation of the viral CAp24gag protein.

  9. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV, in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC. Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4, 258M(1, 298M(4, 313(2, 331M(2, 367M(1 and 397(1 appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2 shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  10. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Yang, Yongbo; Barlow, Russell; Trapido-Rosenthal, Hank; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-08-07

    Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV) and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV), in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC). Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4), 258M(1), 298M(4), 313(2), 331M(2), 367M(1) and 397(1) appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2) shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  11. Global dynamics of cell mediated immunity in viral infection models with distributed delays

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate global dynamics for a system of delay differential equations which describes a virus-immune interaction in \\textit{vivo}. The model has two distributed time delays describing time needed for infection of cell and virus replication. Our model admits three possible equilibria, an uninfected equilibrium and infected equilibrium with or without immune response depending on the basic reproduction number for viral infection $R_{0}$ and for CTL response $R_{1}$ such that $R_{1}1$. The immune activation has a positive role in the reduction of the infection cells and the increasing of the uninfected cells if $R_{1}>1$.

  12. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Ying, E-mail: peiying-19802@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Chen, Zhen-Ping, E-mail: 530670663@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Ju, Huai-Qiang, E-mail: 344464448@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Laboratory of Frontier Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Ji, Yu-hua, E-mail: tjyh@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu, Ge, E-mail: lggege_15@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Guo, Chao-wan, E-mail: chaovan_kwok@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Zhang, Ying-Jun, E-mail: zhangyj@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Yang, Chong-Ren, E-mail: cryang@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Wang, Yi-Fei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Kitazato, Kaio, E-mail: kkholi@msn.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  13. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  14. Two separate mechanisms of enforced viral replication balance innate and adaptive immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaabani, Namir; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Zhou, Fan; Tur, Rita Ferrer; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Tumanov, Alexei V; Hardt, Cornelia; Pinschewer, Daniel; Christen, Urs; Lang, Philipp A; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Karl S

    2016-02-01

    The induction of innate and adaptive immunity is essential for controlling viral infections. Limited or overwhelming innate immunity can negatively impair the adaptive immune response. Therefore, balancing innate immunity separately from activating the adaptive immune response would result in a better antiviral immune response. Recently, we demonstrated that Usp18-dependent replication of virus in secondary lymphatic organs contributes to activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Whether specific mechanisms can balance innate and adaptive immunity separately remains unknown. In this study, using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and replication-deficient single-cycle LCMV vectors, we found that viral replication of the initial inoculum is essential for activating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits is necessary for inducing systemic levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Although enforced virus replication is driven primarily by Usp18, B cell-derived lymphotoxin beta contributes to the extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits. Therefore, lymphotoxin beta regulates IFN-I induction independently of CD8(+) T-cell activity. We found that two separate mechanisms act together in the spleen to guarantee amplification of virus during infection, thereby balancing the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system.

  15. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  16. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Sowd

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  17. Reduced interleukin-4 receptor α expression on CD8+ T cells correlates with higher quality anti-viral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available With the hope of understanding how interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 modulated quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cells, we evaluated the expression of receptors for these cytokines following a range of viral infections (e.g. pox viruses and influenza virus. Results clearly indicated that unlike other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα was significantly down-regulated on anti-viral CD8(+ T cells in a cognate antigen dependent manner. The infection of gene knockout mice and wild-type (WT mice with vaccinia virus (VV or VV expressing IL-4 confirmed that IL-4, IL-13 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 were required to increase IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells, but not interferon (IFN-γ. STAT6 dependent elevation of IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells was a feature of poor quality anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity as measured by the production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α in response to VV antigen stimulation in vitro. We propose that down-regulation of IL-4Rα, but not the other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, is a mechanism by which CD8(+ T cells reduce responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13. This can improve the quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity. Our findings have important implications in understanding anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity and designing effective vaccines against chronic viral infections.

  18. Memory CD8+ T cell differentiation in viral infection: A cell for all seasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Radziewicz; Luke Uebelhoer; Bertram Bengsch; Arash Grakoui

    2007-01-01

    Chronic viral infections such as hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are major global health problems affecting more than 500 million people worldwide. Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play an important role in the course and outcome of these viral infections and it is hypothesized that altered or impaired differentiation of virusspecific CD8+ T cells contributes to the development of persistence and/or disease progression. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms responsible for functional differentiation of CD8+ T cells is essential for the generation of successful therapies aiming to strengthen the adaptive component of the immune system.

  19. In vivo delivery of interleukin-35 relieves coxsackievirus-B3-induced viral myocarditis by inhibiting Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yadong; Dong, Chunsheng; Yue, Yan; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a new member of the IL-12 cytokine family. The suppressive role of IL-35 in the immune response to parasitic and bacterial infections and in autoimmunity has been demonstrated in terms of its anti-inflammatory properties. However, the functional role of IL-35 in viral myocarditis has not been investigated. In this study, IL-35 expression was measured in heart tissues with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis. It was significantly reduced in the late stage of viral infection and correlated negatively with disease severity. To examine the therapeutic role of IL-35 in viral myocarditis, an IL-35-expressing plasmid (pIL-35-FC) was packaged with polyethyleneimine and delivered intraperitoneally to BALB/c male mice before and after CVB3 infection. The severity of myocarditis was assessed 7 days after infection. The in vivo delivery of IL-35 significantly ameliorated the severity of viral myocarditis, reflected in an increased survival rate and increased bodyweights, and reduced serum creatine kinase (CK) and CK-MB activities, cardiac pathological scores, and viral replication. We also show that the overexpression of IL-35 reduced splenic Th17 cells and Th17-related proinflammatory cytokines in heart tissues. In conclusion, our data indicate that IL-35 effectively protects the myocardium from the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced viral myocarditis, which may be attributable to reduced Th17 production. This suggests that supplementation with IL-35 could be a novel therapeutic treatment for viral myocarditis.

  20. A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidun Lillestøl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of regularly spaced direct repeats, separated by unconserved spacer sequences, are ubiquitous in archaeal chromosomes and occur in some plasmids. Some clusters constitute around 1% of chromosomal DNA. Similarly structured clusters, generally smaller, also occur in some bacterial chromosomes. Although early studies implicated these clusters in segregation/partition functions, recent evidence suggests that the spacer sequences derive from extrachromosomal elements, and, primarily, viruses. This has led to the proposal that the clusters provide a defence against viral propagation in cells, and that both the mode of inhibition of viral propagation and the mechanism of adding spacer-repeat units to clusters, are dependent on RNAs transcribed from the clusters. Moreover, the putative inhibitory apparatus (piRNA-based may be evolutionarily related to the interference RNA systems (siRNA and miRNA, which are common in eukarya. Here, we analyze all the current data on archaeal repeat clusters and provide some new insights into their diverse structures, transcriptional properties and mode of structural development. The results are consistent with larger cluster transcripts being processed at the centers of the repeat sequences and being further trimmed by exonucleases to yield a dominant, intracellular RNA species, which corresponds approximately to the size of a spacer. Furthermore, analysis of the extensive clusters of Sulfolobus solfataricus strains P1 and P2B provides support for the presence of a flanking sequence adjoining a cluster being a prerequisite for the incorporation of new spacer-repeat units, which occurs between the flanking sequence and the cluster. An archaeal database summarizing the data will be maintained at http://dac.molbio.ku.dk/dbs/SRSR/.

  1. Adenovirus protein IX sequesters host-cell promyelocytic leukaemia protein and contributes to efficient viral proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Lutz, Pierre; Dreyer, Dominique; de Thé, Hugues; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2003-10-01

    The product of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) gene IX, protein IX (pIX), is a multifunctional protein that stabilizes the viral capsid and has transcriptional activity. We show that pIX also contributes to the Ad5-induced reorganization of the host-cell nuclear ultrastructure: pIX induces the formation of specific and dynamic nuclear inclusions, and the host promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein, which is the main structural organizer of PML bodies, is stably relocated and confined within the pIX-induced inclusions late in infection. Our results suggest that Ad5 has evolved a unique strategy that leads to the sustained neutralization of PML bodies throughout infection, thereby ensuring optimal viral proliferation.

  2. Increment of DNA topoisomerases in chemically and virally transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.D.; Mladovan, A.G.; Baldi, A. (Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1988-03-01

    The activities of topoisomerases I and II were assayed in subcellular extracts obtained from nontumorigenic BALB/c 3T3 A31 and normal rat kidney (NRK) cell lines and from the same cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene (BP-A31), Moloney (M-MSV-A31) and Kirsten (K-A31) sarcoma viruses, and simian virus 40 (SV-NRK). The enzymatic activity of topoisomerase I was monitored by the relaxation of negatively supercoiled pBR322 DNA and by the formation of covalent complexes between {sup 32}P-labeled DNA and topoisomerase I. Topoisomerase II activity was determined by decatenation of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA). It was found that nuclear and cytoplasmic type I topoisomerase specific activities were higher in every transformed cell line than in the normal counterparts. These differences cannot be attributed to an inhibitory factor present in A31 cells. When chromatin was treated at increasing ionic strengths, the 0.4 M NaCl extract showed the highest topoisomerase I specific activity. Spontaneously transformed A31 cells showed topoisomerase I activity similar to that of extracts of cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene. Topoisomerase II specific activity was also increased in SV-NRK cells, as judged by the assay for decatenation of k-DNA to yield minicircle DNA.

  3. HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Viral Suppression Correlates With the Expression of CD57

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne S; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are believed to play an important role in the control of HIV-1 infection; however, what constitutes an effective HIV-1 CD8(+) T-cell response remains a topic of debate. The ex vivo viral suppressive capacity was measured of CD8(+) T cells from 44....... METHOD: Ex vivo suppression assay was used to evaluate the ability of CD8(+) T cells to suppress HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4(+) T cells. The CD107a, interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) responses to HIV-1 were evaluated...... significantly higher in individuals with ex vivo suppressive activity compared with individuals without suppressive activity. CONCLUSIONS: Standard in vitro assays measuring one or several cytokines do not correlate with the functional viral suppressive capacity of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-positive individuals...

  4. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhara-Bell Jarred; Yang Yongbo; Barlow Russell; Trapido-Rosenthal Hank; Lu Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These ex...

  5. Proteasome inhibitors induce apoptosis and reduce viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Chiaki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Higashi, Chizuka; Niinaka, Yasufumi [Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Chuoh-shi 409-3898 (Japan); Yamada, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Noguchi, Kohji [Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shiba-koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Fujimuro, Masahiro, E-mail: fuji2@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of PEL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by the proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress NF-{kappa}B signaling and induce apoptosis in PEL cells through stabilization of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress viral replication in PEL cells during lytic KSHV infection. -- Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This study provides evidence that proteasomal activity is required for both survival of PEL cells stably harboring the KSHV genome and viral replication of KSHV. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors on PEL cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132, lactacystin, and proteasome inhibitor I dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of PEL cells through the accumulation of p21 and p27. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors induced the stabilization of NF-{kappa}B inhibitory molecule (I{kappa}B{alpha}) and suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in PEL cells. The NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 also induced apoptosis in PEL cells. The constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of B cell lymphoma cells, including PEL cells. NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B signaling by proteasome inhibitors may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in PEL cells. In addition, proteasome activity is required for KSHV replication in KSHV latently infected PEL cells. MG132 reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells at low concentrations, which do not affect PEL cell growth. These findings suggest that proteasome

  6. Cutting edge: the mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Her, Min J; Benedict, Chris A; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-10-01

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-gamma upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but it does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-gamma in response to mouse CMV infection. Their mechanism of mouse CMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring both TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an Ag-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in antipathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire.

  7. The mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J.; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Her, Min J.; Benedict, Chris A.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Invariant (i)NKT cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-γ upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-γ in response to mouse CMV (MCMV) infection. Their mechanism of MCMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring bothTLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in anti-pathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire. PMID:18802047

  8. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  9. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  10. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  11. Cytomegalovirus m154 hinders CD48 cell-surface expression and promotes viral escape from host natural killer cell control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Zarama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Receptors of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecules (SLAM family are involved in the functional regulation of a variety of immune cells upon engagement through homotypic or heterotypic interactions amongst them. Here we show that murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV dampens the surface expression of several SLAM receptors during the course of the infection of macrophages. By screening a panel of MCMV deletion mutants, we identified m154 as an immunoevasin that effectively reduces the cell-surface expression of the SLAM family member CD48, a high-affinity ligand for natural killer (NK and cytotoxic T cell receptor CD244. m154 is a mucin-like protein, expressed with early kinetics, which can be found at the cell surface of the infected cell. During infection, m154 leads to proteolytic degradation of CD48. This viral protein interferes with the NK cell cytotoxicity triggered by MCMV-infected macrophages. In addition, we demonstrate that an MCMV mutant virus lacking m154 expression results in an attenuated phenotype in vivo, which can be substantially restored after NK cell depletion in mice. This is the first description of a viral gene capable of downregulating CD48. Our novel findings define m154 as an important player in MCMV innate immune regulation.

  12. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gero Hütter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9, transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN, short hairpin RNA (shRNA, and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  13. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-07-27

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  14. A Single-Cell Platform for Monitoring Viral Proteolytic Cleavage in Different Cellular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbadessa, Darin; Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Reed, Connor W.; Wolkowicz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases affect human health despite advances in biomedical research and drug discovery. Among these, viruses are especially difficult to tackle due to the sudden transfer from animals to humans, high mutational rates, resistance to current treatments, and the intricacies of their molecular interactions with the host. As an example of these interactions, we describe a cell-based approach to monitor specific proteolytic events executed by either the viral-encoded protease or by host proteins on the virus. We then emphasize the significance of examining proteolysis within the subcellular compartment where cleavage occurs naturally. We show the power of stable expression, highlighting the usefulness of the cell-based multiplexed approach, which we have adapted to two independent assays previously developed to monitor (a) the activity of the HIV-1-encoded protease or (b) the cleavage of the HIV-1-encoded envelope protein by the host. Multiplexing was achieved by mixing cells each carrying a different assay or, alternatively, by engineering cells expressing two assays. Multiplexing relies on the robustness of the individual assays and their clear discrimination, further enhancing screening capabilities in an attempt to block proteolytic events required for viral infectivity and spread. PMID:27688710

  15. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  16. The olive leaf extract exhibits antiviral activity against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micol, Vicente; Caturla, Nuria; Pérez-Fons, Laura; Más, Vicente; Pérez, Luis; Estepa, Amparo

    2005-06-01

    A commercial plant extract derived from olive tree leaf (Olea europaea) (LExt) and its major compound, oleuropein (Ole), inhibited the in vitro infectivity of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), a salmonid rhabdovirus. Incubation of virus with LExt or Ole before infection reduced the viral infectivity to 10 and 30%, respectively. Furthermore, LExt drastically decreased VHSV titers and viral protein accumulation (virucidal effect) in a dose dependent manner when added to cell monolayers 36 h post-infection. On the other hand, both the LExt and Ole were able to inhibit cell-to-cell membrane fusion induced by VHSV in uninfected cells, suggesting interactions with viral envelope. Therefore, we propose that O. europaea could be used as a potential source of promising natural antivirals, which have demonstrated to lack impact on health and environment. In addition, Ole could be used to design other related antiviral agents.

  17. IMMUNE INHIBITION OF VIRUS RELEASE FROM HUMAN AND NONHUMAN CELLS BY ANTIBODY TO VIRAL AND HOST-CELL DETERMINANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHARIFF, DM; DESPERBASQUES, M; BILLSTROM, M; GEERLIGS, HJ; WELLING, GW; WELLINGWESTER, S; BUCHAN, A; SKINNER, GRB

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA virues, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and su

  18. Role of Cellular Components of Mosquito Cells in Viral Replication and Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-17

    replicating in mosquito cells, experiments similar to those described above were conducted employing Eastern equine encephalitis virus ( alphavirus ...7 D-R126 612 ROLE OF CELLULAR COMPONENTS OF MOSQUITO CELLS IN VIRAL 1/1 REPLICATION AND TRANSMISSION(U) INDIANA UNIV AT INDIANAPOLIS SCHOOL OF...MOSQUITO CELLS IN VIRAL REPLICATION AND TRANSMISSION Annual Report Final Report Robert H. Schloemer March 17, 1981 Supported by U.S. Army Medical

  19. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutartre, Hélène; Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4(+) T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs ("cis-infection") and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs.

  20. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea

  1. Kupffer cells hasten resolution of liver immunopathology in mouse models of viral hepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sitia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs are widely considered important contributors to liver injury during viral hepatitis due to their pro-inflammatory activity. Herein we utilized hepatitis B virus (HBV-replication competent transgenic mice and wild-type mice infected with a hepatotropic adenovirus to demonstrate that KCs do not directly induce hepatocellular injury nor do they affect the pathogenic potential of virus-specific CD8 T cells. Instead, KCs limit the severity of liver immunopathology. Mechanistically, our results are most compatible with the hypothesis that KCs contain liver immunopathology by removing apoptotic hepatocytes in a manner largely dependent on scavenger receptors. Apoptotic hepatocytes not readily removed by KCs become secondarily necrotic and release high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1 protein, promoting organ infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. Overall, these results indicate that KCs resolve rather than worsen liver immunopathology.

  2. De novo identification of viral pathogens from cell culture hologenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patowary Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fast, specific identification and surveillance of pathogens is the cornerstone of any outbreak response system, especially in the case of emerging infectious diseases and viral epidemics. This process is generally tedious and time-consuming thus making it ineffective in traditional settings. The added complexity in these situations is the non-availability of pure isolates of pathogens as they are present as mixed genomes or hologenomes. Next-generation sequencing approaches offer an attractive solution in this scenario as it provides adequate depth of sequencing at fast and affordable costs, apart from making it possible to decipher complex interactions between genomes at a scale that was not possible before. The widespread application of next-generation sequencing in this field has been limited by the non-availability of an efficient computational pipeline to systematically analyze data to delineate pathogen genomes from mixed population of genomes or hologenomes. Findings We applied next-generation sequencing on a sample containing mixed population of genomes from an epidemic with appropriate processing and enrichment. The data was analyzed using an extensive computational pipeline involving mapping to reference genome sets and de-novo assembly. In depth analysis of the data generated revealed the presence of sequences corresponding to Japanese encephalitis virus. The genome of the virus was also independently de-novo assembled. The presence of the virus was in addition, verified using standard molecular biology techniques. Conclusions Our approach can accurately identify causative pathogens from cell culture hologenome samples containing mixed population of genomes and in principle can be applied to patient hologenome samples without any background information. This methodology could be widely applied to identify and isolate pathogen genomes and understand their genomic variability during outbreaks.

  3. Cross-reactive anti-viral T cells increase prior to an episode of viral reactivation post human lung transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H O Nguyen

    Full Text Available Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV reactivation continues to influence lung transplant outcomes. Cross-reactivity of anti-viral memory T cells against donor human leukocyte antigens (HLA may be a contributing factor. We identified cross-reactive HLA-A*02:01-restricted CMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL co-recognizing the NLVPMVATV (NLV epitope and HLA-B27. NLV-specific CD8+ T cells were expanded for 13 days from 14 HLA-A*02:01/CMV seropositive healthy donors and 11 lung transplant recipients (LTR then assessed for the production of IFN-γ and CD107a expression in response to 19 cell lines expressing either single HLA-A or -B class I molecules. In one healthy individual, we observed functional and proliferative cross-reactivity in response to B*27:05 alloantigen, representing approximately 5% of the NLV-specific CTL population. Similar patterns were also observed in one LTR receiving a B27 allograft, revealing that the cross-reactive NLV-specific CTL gradually increased (days 13-193 post-transplant before a CMV reactivation event (day 270 and reduced to basal levels following viral clearance (day 909. Lung function remained stable with no acute rejection episodes being reported up to 3 years post-transplant. Individualized immunological monitoring of cross-reactive anti-viral T cells will provide further insights into their effects on the allograft and an opportunity to predict sub-clinical CMV reactivation events and immunopathological complications.

  4. COPI activity coupled with fatty acid biosynthesis is required for viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cherry

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available During infection by diverse viral families, RNA replication occurs on the surface of virally induced cytoplasmic membranes of cellular origin. How this process is regulated, and which cellular factors are required, has been unclear. Moreover, the host-pathogen interactions that facilitate the formation of this new compartment might represent critical determinants of viral pathogenesis, and their elucidation may lead to novel insights into the coordination of vesicular trafficking events during infection. Here we show that in Drosophila cells, Drosophila C virus remodels the Golgi apparatus and forms a novel vesicular compartment, on the surface of which viral RNA replication takes place. Using genome-wide RNA interference screening, we found that this step in the viral lifecycle requires at least two host encoded pathways: the coat protein complex I (COPI coatamer and fatty acid biosynthesis. Our results integrate, clarify, and extend numerous observations concerning the cell biology of viral replication, allowing us to conclude that the coupling of new cellular membrane formation with the budding of these vesicles from the Golgi apparatus allows for the regulated generation of this new virogenic organelle, which is essential for viral replication. Additionally, because these pathways are also limiting in flies and in human cells infected with the related RNA virus poliovirus, they may represent novel targets for antiviral therapies.

  5. A temporal gate for viral enhancers to co-opt Toll-like-receptor transcriptional activation pathways upon acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Kai A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Isern, Elena; Forster, Thorsten; Krause, Eva; Brune, Wolfram; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2015-04-01

    series of pharmacologic, siRNA and genetic loss-of-function experiments we determined that signalling mediated by the TLR-adaptor protein MyD88 plays a vital role for governing the inflammatory activation of the CMV enhancer in macrophages. Downstream TLR-regulated transcription factor binding motif disruption for NFκB, AP1 and CREB/ATF in the CMV enhancer demonstrated the requirement of these inflammatory signal-regulated elements in driving viral gene expression and growth in cells as well as in primary infection of neonatal mice. Thus, this study shows that the prototypical CMV enhancer, in a restricted time-gated manner, co-opts through DNA regulatory mimicry elements, innate-immune transcription factors to drive viral expression and replication in the face of on-going pro-inflammatory antiviral responses in vitro and in vivo and; suggests an unexpected role for inflammation in promoting acute infection and has important future implications for regulating latency.

  6. A temporal gate for viral enhancers to co-opt Toll-like-receptor transcriptional activation pathways upon acute infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai A Kropp

    2015-04-01

    macrophages. In a series of pharmacologic, siRNA and genetic loss-of-function experiments we determined that signalling mediated by the TLR-adaptor protein MyD88 plays a vital role for governing the inflammatory activation of the CMV enhancer in macrophages. Downstream TLR-regulated transcription factor binding motif disruption for NFκB, AP1 and CREB/ATF in the CMV enhancer demonstrated the requirement of these inflammatory signal-regulated elements in driving viral gene expression and growth in cells as well as in primary infection of neonatal mice. Thus, this study shows that the prototypical CMV enhancer, in a restricted time-gated manner, co-opts through DNA regulatory mimicry elements, innate-immune transcription factors to drive viral expression and replication in the face of on-going pro-inflammatory antiviral responses in vitro and in vivo and; suggests an unexpected role for inflammation in promoting acute infection and has important future implications for regulating latency.

  7. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte subsets.The carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) method described in this chapter has been adapted to chicken cells. In this test, cells of interest are stained with CFSE. The succinimidyl ester group covalently binds to cellular amines forming fluorescent conjugates that are retained in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells.

  8. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  9. Sensitization to lipopolysaccharide in mice with asymptomatic viral infection: role of T cell-dependent production of interferon-gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1997-01-01

    The interplay between viral infection and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. Infection with a noncytopathogenic virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), was found to sensitize mice to low doses of LPS. In vivo, this hypersensitivity correlated with hyperproduction of tumor necrosis...... was observed in LCMV-infected, T cell-deficient mice and in mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, a virus that induces much less T cell activation than does LCMV. Finally, LCMV infection was much less efficient in priming IFN-gamma knockout mice for hyperproduction of TNF-alpha. These findings...... indicate that clinically silent viral infections may induce hypersensitivity to LPS through T cell activation and subsequent production of IFN-gamma; this sensitizes monocytes/macrophages for hyperproduction of TNF-alpha....

  10. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayla K Shorter

    Full Text Available T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL, have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4 are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  11. Generation of Transgene-free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Non-viral Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Hua-shan Zhao; Qiu-ling Zhang; Chang-lin Xu; Chang-bai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were originally generated from mouse fibroblasts by enforced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct3/4,Sox2,Klf4,and c-Myc). The technique was quickly re-produced with human fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. Although having been showed therapeutic po-tential in animal models of sickle cell anemia and Parkinson's disease,iPS cells generated by viral methods do not suit all the clinical applications. Various non-viral methods have appeared in recent years for application of iPS cells in cell transplantation therapy. These methods mainly include DNA vector-based approaches,transfection of mRNA,and transduction of reprogramming proteins. This review summarized these non-viral methods and compare the advantages,disadvantages,efficiency,and safety of these methods.

  12. TCF1 Is Required for the T Follicular Helper Cell Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available T follicular helper (TFH and T helper 1 (Th1 cells generated after viral infections are critical for the control of infection and the development of immunological memory. However, the mechanisms that govern the differentiation and maintenance of these two distinct lineages during viral infection remain unclear. We found that viral-specific TFH and Th1 cells showed reciprocal expression of the transcriptions factors TCF1 and Blimp1 early after infection, even before the differential expression of the canonical TFH marker CXCR5. Furthermore, TCF1 was intrinsically required for the TFH cell response to viral infection; in the absence of TCF1, the TFH cell response was severely compromised, and the remaining TCF1-deficient TFH cells failed to maintain TFH-associated transcriptional and metabolic signatures, which were distinct from those in Th1 cells. Mechanistically, TCF1 functioned through forming negative feedback loops with IL-2 and Blimp1. Our findings demonstrate an essential role of TCF1 in TFH cell responses to viral infection.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  14. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  15. Persistent activation of an innate immune response translates respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edy Y; Battaile, John T; Patel, Anand C; You, Yingjian; Agapov, Eugene; Grayson, Mitchell H; Benoit, Loralyn A; Byers, Derek E; Alevy, Yael; Tucker, Jennifer; Swanson, Suzanne; Tidwell, Rose; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Morton, Jeffrey D; Castro, Mario; Polineni, Deepika; Patterson, G Alexander; Schwendener, Reto A; Allard, John D; Peltz, Gary; Holtzman, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    To understand the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease, we analyzed an experimental mouse model of chronic lung disease with pathology that resembles asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. In this model, chronic lung disease develops after an infection with a common type of respiratory virus is cleared to only trace levels of noninfectious virus. Chronic inflammatory disease is generally thought to depend on an altered adaptive immune response. However, here we find that this type of disease arises independently of an adaptive immune response and is driven instead by interleukin-13 produced by macrophages that have been stimulated by CD1d-dependent T cell receptor-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells. This innate immune axis is also activated in the lungs of humans with chronic airway disease due to asthma or COPD. These findings provide new insight into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease with the discovery that the transition from respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease requires persistent activation of a previously undescribed NKT cell-macrophage innate immune axis.

  16. Efficient generation of rat induced pluripotent stem cells using a non-viral inducible vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Merkl

    Full Text Available Current methods of generating rat induced pluripotent stem cells are based on viral transduction of pluripotency inducing genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc and Klf4 into somatic cells. These activate endogenous pluripotency genes and reprogram the identity of the cell to an undifferentiated state. Epigenetic silencing of exogenous genes has to occur to allow normal iPS cell differentiation. To gain more control over the expression of exogenous reprogramming factors, we used a novel doxycycline-inducible plasmid vector encoding Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. To ensure efficient and controlled generation of iPS cells by plasmid transfection we equipped the reprogramming vector with a bacteriophage φC31 attB site and used a φC31 integrase expression vector to enhance vector integration. A series of doxycycline-independent rat iPS cell lines were established. These were characterized by immunocytochemical detection of Oct4, SSEA1 and SSEA4, alkaline phosphatase staining, methylation analysis of the endogenous Oct4 promoter and RT-PCR analysis of endogenous rat pluripotency genes. We also determined the number of vector integrations and the extent to which reprogramming factor gene expression was controlled. Protocols were developed to generate embryoid bodies and rat iPS cells demonstrated as pluripotent by generating derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro, and teratoma formation in vivo. All data suggest that our rat iPS cells, generated by plasmid based reprogramming, are similar to rat ES cells. Methods of DNA transfection, protein transduction and feeder-free monolayer culture of rat iPS cells were established to enable future applications.

  17. Host and viral factors contributing to CD8+ T cell failure in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Hans Christian Spangenberg; Hubert E Blum; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells are thought to be the major anti-viral effector cells in hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection. Indeed, viral clearance is associated with vigorous CD8+ T cell responses targeting multiple epitopes. In the chronic phase of infection, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses are usually weak, narrowly focused and display often functional defects regarding cytotoxicity, cytokine production, and proliferative capacity. In the last few years, different mechanisms which might contribute to the failure of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in chronic infection have been identified,including insufficient CD4+ help, deficient CD8+ T cell differentiation, viral escape mutations, suppression by viral factors, inhibitory cytokines, inhibitory ligands, and regulatory T cells. In addition, host genetic factors such as the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) background may play an important role in the efficiency of the HCVspecific CD8+ T cell response and thus outcome of infection. The growing understanding of the mechanisms contributing to T cell failure and persistence of HCV infection will contribute to the development of successful immunotherapeutical and -prophylactical strategies.

  18. Fas-FasL expression and myocardial cell apoptosis in patients with viral myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T F; Wu, X H; Wang, X; Lu, I J

    2016-06-20

    The aim of the current study was to investigate Fas and FasL expression and myocardial cell apoptosis in viral myocarditis patients. Human heart specimens were selected from patients who were autopsied between February 2012 and February 2015; of these, 25 patients were diagnosed with viral myocarditis. Another 15 cases with no diagnosis of myocarditis were selected for the control group. All tissue specimens were divided into two parts, one for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and the other for immunohistochemical and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analyses. In situ detection of apoptosis was performed by the TUNEL method, which revealed that myocardial cells from the viral myocarditis group exhibited significant apoptosis, whereas no apoptotic cells were observed in the control group. The number of cells staining positive for Fas and FasL protein in the viral myocarditis group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P myocarditis group than in the control group (P myocarditis. Furthermore, cytotoxic T lymphocytes may mediate cardiac muscle cells apoptosis via Fas-FasL signaling, and thus participate in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis.

  19. Vectofusin-1, a new viral entry enhancer, strongly promotes lentiviral transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-05-07

    Gene transfer into hCD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34(+) cell-based gene therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e90; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.17; published online 7 May 2013.

  20. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS, we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activatedcells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments.

  1. Higher Viral Load and Prolonged Viral Shedding Period is Associated with Impaired Th17 Cell Response in Patients with H1N1 Influenza A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-lin; Yang; Ying-xia; Liu; Mu-tong; Fang; Wei-long; Liu; Xin-chun; Chen; John; Nunnari; Jing-jing; Xie; Ming-feng; Liao; Ming-xia; Zhang; Guo-bao; Li; Pei-ze; Zhang; Yi; Guan; Bo-ping; Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore whether age,disease severity,cytokines and lymphocytes in H1N1 influenza A patients correlate with viral load and clearance.Methods Total of 70 mild and 16 severe patients infected with H1N1 influenza A virus were enrolled in this study.Results It was found that the patients under 14 years old and severe patients displayed significantly higher viral loads and prolonged viral shedding periods compared with the patients over 14 years old and mild patients,respectively(P < 0.05).Moreover,the patients under 14 years old and severe patients displayed significantly lower Th17 cell frequency than the patients over 14 years old and mild patients(P < 0.01).The viral shedding period inversely correlated with the frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ-CD4+ T cells.Additionally,the decreased concentration of serum TGF-β correlated with the decreased frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ-CD4+ T cells.Conclusions Both younger and severe patients are associated with higher viral loads and longer viral shedding periods,which may partially be attributed to the impaired Th17 cell response.

  2. Suppression of injuries caused by a lytic RNA virus (mengovirus) and their uncoupling from viral reproduction by mutual cell/virus disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikitas, Olga V; Ivin, Yuri Y; Golyshev, Sergey A; Povarova, Natalia V; Galkina, Svetlana I; Pletjushkina, Olga Y; Nadezhdina, Elena S; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Agol, Vadim I

    2012-05-01

    Viruses often elicit cell injury (cytopathic effect [CPE]), a major cause of viral diseases. CPE is usually considered to be a prerequisite for and/or consequence of efficient viral growth. Recently, we proposed that viral CPE may largely be due to host defensive and viral antidefensive activities. This study aimed to check the validity of this proposal by using as a model HeLa cells infected with mengovirus (MV). As we showed previously, infection of these cells with wild-type MV resulted in necrosis, whereas a mutant with incapacitated antidefensive ("security") viral leader (L) protein induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that several major morphological and biochemical signs of CPE (e.g., alterations in cellular and nuclear shape, plasma membrane, cytoskeleton, chromatin, and metabolic activity) in cells infected with L(-) mutants in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor were strongly suppressed or delayed for long after completion of viral reproduction. These facts demonstrate that the efficient reproduction of a lytic virus may not directly require development of at least some pathological alterations normally accompanying infection. They also imply that L protein is involved in the control of many apparently unrelated functions. The results also suggest that the virus-activated program with competing necrotic and apoptotic branches is host encoded, with the choice between apoptosis and necrosis depending on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Implementation of this defensive suicidal program could be uncoupled from the viral reproduction. The possibility of such uncoupling has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of viral diseases.

  3. Immunohistochemical study of hepatic oval cells in human chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Ma; De Kai Qiu; Yan Shen Peng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To detect immunohistochemically the presence of oval cells in chronic viral hepatitis with antibody against c-kit.METHODS We detected oval cells in paraffin-embedded liver sections of 3 normal controls and 26 liver samples from patients with chronic viral hepatitis, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against c-kit, π-class glutathione Stransferase ( Tr-GST ) and cytokeratins 19(CK19).RESULTS Oval cells were not observed in normal livers. In chronic viral hepatitis, hepatic oval cells were located predominantly in the periportal . region and fibrosis septa,characterized by an ovoid nucleus, small size,and scant cytoplasm. Antibody against stem cell factor receptor, c-kit, had higher sensitivity and specificity than π-GST and CK19. About 50% -70% of c-kit positive oval cells were stained positively for either π-GST or CK19.CONCLUSION Oval cells are frequently detected in human livers with chronic viral hepatitis, suggesting that oval cell proliferation is associated with the liver regeneration in this condition.

  4. Efficiency of retroviral transduction into hematopoietic cells by cocultivation procedure does not correlate with viral titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnis, C; Chischportich, C; Imbert, A M; Van den Broeke, A; Cornet, V; Mannoni, P

    1997-01-01

    Relative transduction efficiency with retroviral vector-producing clones was assayed by cocultivating TF-1, a human CD34+ hematopoietic cell line and YR-2, a sheep B-lymphoid cell line, with LacZ containing vector-producing cells, and then by scoring the percentage of X-Gal+ cells. At the same time, viral titer was estimated by titration assay with murine fibroblasts. Results clearly demonstrated a lack of correlation between viral titer and efficiency of transduction into hematopoietic cells, which depends neither on the type of packaging cell line, PG-13 and GP-envAM12 in this study, nor on the type of LacZ containing retroviral vector. These results strongly favor consideration of interactions between producers and target cells of the study for the screening of producing cell lines.

  5. Modulation of Microglial Cell Fcγ Receptor Expression Following Viral Brain Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Priyanka; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Prasad, Sujata; Lokensgard, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) for IgG couple innate and adaptive immunity through activation of effector cells by antigen-antibody complexes. We investigated relative levels of activating and inhibitory FcγRs on brain-resident microglia following murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Flow cytometric analysis of microglial cells obtained from infected brain tissue demonstrated that activating FcγRs were expressed maximally at 5 d post-infection (dpi), while the inhibitory receptor (FcγRIIB) remained highly elevated during both acute and chronic phases of infection. The highly induced expression of activating FcγRIV during the acute phase of infection was also noteworthy. Furthermore, in vitro analysis using cultured primary microglia demonstrated the role of interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-4 in polarizing these cells towards a M1 or M2 phenotype, respectively. Microglial cell-polarization correlated with maximal expression of either FcγRIV or FcγRIIB following stimulation with IFNγ or IL-4, respectively. Finally, we observed a significant delay in polarization of microglia towards an M2 phenotype in the absence of FcγRs in MCMV-infected Fcer1g and FcgR2b knockout mice. These studies demonstrate that neuro-inflammation following viral infection increases expression of activating FcγRs on M1-polarized microglia. In contrast, expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIB receptor promotes M2-polarization in order to shut-down deleterious immune responses and limit bystander brain damage. PMID:28165503

  6. Trehalose-mediated autophagy impairs the anti-viral function of human primary airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5 effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations.

  7. Atypical Epstein-Barr viral genomic structure in lymphoma tissue and lymphoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihua; Fan, Hongxin; Schroeder, Jane; Dunphy, Cherie H; Bryant, Ronald J; Fedoriw, Yuri; Gulley, Margaret L

    2013-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found within the malignant cells of some subtypes of lymphoma, and viral presence is being exploited for improved diagnosis, monitoring, and management of affected patients. Recent work suggests that viral genomic polymorphism, such as partial deletion of the viral genome, could interfere with virus detection in tumor tissues. To test for atypical forms of the EBV genome, 98 lymphomas and 6 infected cell lines were studied using a battery of 6 quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting disparate sections of EBV DNA. Fifty of the lymphomas (51%) had no amplifiable EBV DNA, and 38 lymphomas (39%) had low-level EBV infection that was deemed incidental based on EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization results. The remaining 10 lymphomas (10%) had high EBV loads and EBER localization to malignant cells by EBER in situ hybridization. All 10 represented lymphoma subtypes were previously associated with EBV (Burkitt, diffuse large B-cell, or T-cell type), whereas no remnants of EBV were detected in other lymphoma subtypes (follicular, small lymphocytic, mantle cell, or marginal zone type). Interestingly, 4 of the 10 infected lymphomas had evidence of atypical viral genomes, including 3 of 4 infected T-cell lymphomas with aberrant loss of LMP2 amplicons, and a single diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lacking the central part of the viral genome spanning BamH1W, BZLF1, and EBNA1 gene segments. A reasonable screening strategy for infected malignancy involves applying EBER1 and LMP1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirming that values exceeding 2000 copies of EBV per 100,000 cells have EBER localization to malignant cells.

  8. Determining the cellular diversity of hepatitis C virus quasispecies by single-cell viral sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; McLauchlan, John

    2013-12-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants.

  9. Isolation of a mutant MDBK cell line resistant to bovine viral diarrhea virus infection due to a block in viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E F; Donis, R O

    1995-04-20

    A cell line, termed CRIB, resistant to infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been derived from the MDBK bovine kidney cell line. CRIB cells were obtained by selection and cloning of cells surviving infection with a highly cytolytic BVDV strain. CRIB cells contain no detectable infectious or defective BVDV as ascertained by cocultivation, animal inoculation, indirect immunofluorescence, Western immunoblot, Northern hybridization, and RNA PCR. Inoculation of CRIB cells with 24 cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV strains does not result in expression of viral genes or amplification of input virus. Karyotype and isoenzyme analyses demonstrated that CRIB are genuine bovine cells. CRIB cells are as susceptible as the parental MDBK cells to 10 other bovine viruses, indicating that these cells do not have a broad defect blocking viral replication. Transfection of CRIB cells with BVDV RNA or virus inoculation in the presence of polyethylene-glycol results in productive infection, indicating that the defect of CRIB cells is at the level of virus entry. CRIB cells are the first bovine cells reported to be resistant to BVDV infection in vitro and may be a useful tool for studying the early interactions of pestiviruses with host cells.

  10. Viral Protein Kinetics of Piscine Orthoreovirus Infection in Atlantic Salmon Blood Cells

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    Hanne Merethe Haatveit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV is ubiquitous in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and the cause of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation. Erythrocytes are important target cells for PRV. We have investigated the kinetics of PRV infection in salmon blood cells. The findings indicate that PRV causes an acute infection of blood cells lasting 1–2 weeks, before it subsides into persistence. A high production of viral proteins occurred initially in the acute phase which significantly correlated with antiviral gene transcription. Globular viral factories organized by the non-structural protein µNS were also observed initially, but were not evident at later stages. Interactions between µNS and the PRV structural proteins λ1, µ1, σ1 and σ3 were demonstrated. Different size variants of µNS and the outer capsid protein µ1 appeared at specific time points during infection. Maximal viral protein load was observed five weeks post cohabitant challenge and was undetectable from seven weeks post challenge. In contrast, viral RNA at a high level could be detected throughout the eight-week trial. A proteolytic cleavage fragment of the µ1 protein was the only viral protein detectable after seven weeks post challenge, indicating that this µ1 fragment may be involved in the mechanisms of persistent infection.

  11. The role of interleukin-1 and interleukin-18 in pro-inflammatory and anti-viral responses to rhinovirus in primary bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân C Piper

    Full Text Available Human Rhinovirus (HRV is associated with acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease. In healthy individuals, innate viral recognition pathways trigger release of molecules with direct anti-viral activities and pro-inflammatory mediators which recruit immune cells to support viral clearance. Interleukin-1alpha (IL-1α, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β and interleukin-18 (IL-18 have critical roles in the establishment of neutrophilic inflammation, which is commonly seen in airways viral infection and thought to be detrimental in respiratory disease. We therefore investigated the roles of these molecules in HRV infection of primary human epithelial cells. We found that all three cytokines were released from infected epithelia. Release of these cytokines was not dependent on cell death, and only IL-1β and IL-18 release was dependent on caspase-1 catalytic activity. Blockade of IL-1 but not IL-18 signaling inhibited up-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil chemoattractants but had no effect on virus induced production of interferons and interferon-inducible genes, measured at both mRNA and protein level. Similar level of virus mRNA was detected with and without IL-1RI blockade. Hence IL-1 signaling, potentially involving both IL-1β and IL-1α, downstream of viral recognition plays a key role in induction of pro-inflammatory signals and potentially in recruitment and activation of immune cells in response to viral infection instigated by the epithelial cells, whilst not participating in direct anti-viral responses.

  12. [Presence of autocomplementary RNA with viral specificity in cells infected with herpes virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchet, J M; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1975-01-13

    RNA from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus contain a higher percentage of double-stranded RNA than non-infected cells. This percentage increases three-fold upon self-annealing. The complementary RNA sequences were shown to be virus-specific by the following criteria: (1) high melting temperature than double-stranded RNA from non infected cells; (2) higher density in caesium sulphate; (3) specific hybridization with viral DNA.

  13. Arenavirus budding resulting from viral-protein-associated cell membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, David; Whittaker, Robert J; Neuman, Benjamin W

    2013-09-06

    Viral replication occurs within cells, with release (and onward infection) primarily achieved through two alternative mechanisms: lysis, in which virions emerge as the infected cell dies and bursts open; or budding, in which virions emerge gradually from a still living cell by appropriating a small part of the cell membrane. Virus budding is a poorly understood process that challenges current models of vesicle formation. Here, a plausible mechanism for arenavirus budding is presented, building on recent evidence that viral proteins embed in the inner lipid layer of the cell membrane. Experimental results confirm that viral protein is associated with increased membrane curvature, whereas a mathematical model is used to show that localized increases in curvature alone are sufficient to generate viral buds. The magnitude of the protein-induced curvature is calculated from the size of the amphipathic region hypothetically removed from the inner membrane as a result of translation, with a change in membrane stiffness estimated from observed differences in virion deformation as a result of protein depletion. Numerical results are based on experimental data and estimates for three arenaviruses, but the mechanisms described are more broadly applicable. The hypothesized mechanism is shown to be sufficient to generate spontaneous budding that matches well both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental observations.

  14. Expression of a humanized viral 2A-mediated lux operon efficiently generates autonomous bioluminescence in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xu

    Full Text Available Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines.The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations.Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity

  15. Viral induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    oligodendroglia or the myelin sheath; or 4) infection initiates activation of an immune response specific for either oligodendroglia or myelin components. Virus-induced inflammation may be associated with the processing of myelin or oligodendroglial components and their presentation to the host's own T cell compartment. Alternatively, antigenic epitopes derived from the viral proteins may exhibit sufficient homology to host components that the immune response to the virus activates autoreactive T cells, i.e. molecular mimicry. Although it is not clear that each of these potential mechanisms participates in the pathogenesis of human demyelinating disease, analysis of the diverse demyelinating viral infections of both humans and rodents provides examples of many of these potential mechanisms.

  16. Absence of cross-presenting cells in the salivary gland and viral immune evasion confine cytomegalovirus immune control to effector CD4 T cells.

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    Senta M Walton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transmission of cytomegaloviruses (CMV occurs via prolonged excretion from mucosal surfaces. We used murine CMV (MCMV infection to investigate the mechanisms of immune control in secretory organs. CD4 T cells were crucial to cease MCMV replication in the salivary gland (SG via direct secretion of IFNγ that initiated antiviral signaling on non-hematopoietic cells. In contrast, CD4 T cell helper functions for CD8 T cells or B cells were dispensable. Despite SG-resident MCMV-specific CD8 T cells being able to produce IFNγ, the absence of MHC class I molecules on infected acinar glandular epithelial cells due to viral immune evasion, and the paucity of cross-presenting antigen presenting cells (APCs prevented their local activation. Thus, local activation of MCMV-specific T cells is confined to the CD4 subset due to exclusive presentation of MCMV-derived antigens by MHC class II molecules on bystander APCs, resulting in IFNγ secretion interfering with viral replication in cells of non-hematopoietic origin.

  17. High levels of T lymphocyte activation in Leishmania-HIV-1 co-infected individuals despite low HIV viral load

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    Grinsztejn Beatriz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant infections may influence HIV progression by causing chronic activation leading to decline in T-cell function. In the Americas, visceral (AVL and tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL have emerged as important opportunistic infections in HIV-AIDS patients and both of those diseases have been implicated as potentially important co-factors in disease progression. We investigated whether leishmaniasis increases lymphocyte activation in HIV-1 co-infected patients. This might contribute to impaired cellular immune function. Methods To address this issue we analyzed CD4+ T absolute counts and the proportion of CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 in Leishmania/HIV co-infected patients that recovered after anti-leishmanial therapy. Results We found that, despite clinical remission of leishmaniasis, AVL co-infected patients presented a more severe immunossupression as suggested by CD4+ T cell counts under 200 cells/mm3, differing from ATL/HIV-AIDS cases that tends to show higher lymphocytes levels (over 350 cells/mm3. Furthermore, five out of nine, AVL/HIV-AIDS presented low CD4+ T cell counts in spite of low or undetectable viral load. Expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in AVL or ATL/HIV-AIDS cases compared to HIV/AIDS patients without leishmaniasis or healthy subjects. Conclusions Leishmania infection can increase the degree of immune system activation in individuals concomitantly infected with HIV. In addition, AVL/HIV-AIDS patients can present low CD4+ T cell counts and higher proportion of activated T lymphocytes even when HIV viral load is suppressed under HAART. This fact can cause a misinterpretation of these laboratorial markers in co-infected patients.

  18. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    % of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation...

  19. The generation of iPS cells using non-viral magnetic nanoparticle based transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Joo; Jeon, Kilsoo; Lim, HyeJin; Choi, Hye yeon; Lee, Eung-Ryoung; Park, Seung Hwa; Park, Jae-Yong; Hong, Sunghoi; Kim, Soonhag; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2011-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from various somatic cells; however, a major restriction of the technology is the use of potentially harmful genome-integrating viral DNAs. Here, without a viral vector, we generated iPS cells from fibroblasts using a non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection method that employs biodegradable cationic polymer PEI-coated super paramagnetic nanoparticles (NP). Our findings support the possible use of transient expression of iPS genes in somatic cells by magnet-based nanofection for efficient generation of iPS cells. Results of dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis and TEM analyses demonstrated efficient conjugation of NP with iPS genes. After transfection, nanofection-mediated iPS cells showed ES cell-like characteristics, including expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, differentiation of three germ layer lineages, and formation of teratomas. Our results demonstrate that magnet-based nanofection may provide a safe method for use in generation of virus-free and exogenous DNA-free iPS cells, which will be crucial for future clinical applications in the field of regenerative medicine.

  20. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune dise... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases....iral infection andautoimmune diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  1. Direct presentation is sufficient for an efficient anti-viral CD8+ T cell response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Huan Xu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which direct- and cross-presentation (DP and CP contribute to the priming of CD8(+ T cell (T(CD8+ responses to viruses is unclear mainly because of the difficulty in separating the two processes. Hence, while CP in the absence of DP has been clearly demonstrated, induction of an anti-viral T(CD8+ response that excludes CP has never been purposely shown. Using vaccinia virus (VACV, which has been used as the vaccine to rid the world of smallpox and is proposed as a vector for many other vaccines, we show that DP is the main mechanism for the priming of an anti-viral T(CD8+ response. These findings provide important insights to our understanding of how one of the most effective anti-viral vaccines induces immunity and should contribute to the development of novel vaccines.

  2. Sex and the eukaryotic cell cycle is consistent with a viral ancestry for the eukaryotic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Philip John Livingstone

    2006-11-07

    The origin of the eukaryotic cell cycle, including mitosis, meiosis, and sex are as yet unresolved aspects of the evolution of the eukaryotes. The wide phylogenetic distribution of both mitosis and meiosis suggest that these processes are integrally related to the origin of the earliest eukaryotic cells. According to the viral eukaryogenesis (VE) hypothesis, the eukaryotes are a composite of three phylogenetically unrelated organisms: a viral lysogen that evolved into the nucleus, an archaeal cell that evolved into the eukaryotic cytoplasm, and an alpha-proteobacterium that evolved into the mitochondria. In the extended VE hypothesis presented here, the eukaryotic cell cycle arises as a consequence of the derivation of the nucleus from a lysogenic DNA virus.

  3. Viral contamination of a mosquito cell line, Aedes albopictus, associated with syncytium formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, H; Hirumi, K; Speyer, G; Yunker, C E; Thomas, L A; Cory, J; Sweet, B H

    1976-02-01

    Viral contamination associated with syncytium formation in two sbulines of Singh's Aedes albopictus cell cultures was investigated. Electron microscopy of the syncytia revealed the presence of five different types of virus-like particles, which morphologically resembled the parvo-, picorna-, toga-, and orbi-, and bacterial viruses. When a virus-free subline of the A. albopictus cells (SL3) was inoculated with extracts of the syncytium-forming A. albopictus cells, the parvo-, toga-, and orbi-type viral agents were consistently observed. Among these three agents, the togavirus-type agent is most likely responsible for the syncytium induction. Serological examination of the infected cell extract indicated that at least one of three virus-like agents, presumably the togavirus-type agent, was related to Chikungunya. O'nyong-nyong, and Western equine encephalomyelitis viruses (alphaviruses of the Togaviridae), but separable from these.

  4. Interleukin-1 mediates long-term hippocampal dentate granule cell loss following postnatal viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Anna G; Sharma, Anup; Binder, Nikolaus B; Miller, Andrew H; Pearce, Bradley D

    2010-05-01

    Viral infections of the developing CNS can cause long-term neuropathological sequela through undefined mechanisms. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta have gained attention in mediating neurodegeneration in corticohippocampal structures due to a variety of insults in adults, though there is less information on the developing brain. Little is known concerning the spatial-temporal pattern of IL-1beta induction in the developing hippocampus following live virus infection, and there are few studies addressing the long-term consequences of this cytokine induction. We report that infection of rats with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus on postnatal day 4 induces IL-1beta protein in select regions of the hippocampus on 6, 15, 21, and 45 days after infection. This infection resulted in a 71% reduction of dentate granule cell neurons by the time the rats reached mid-adulthood. We further investigated the causative role of IL-1 in this dentate granule cell loss by blocking IL-1 activity using an IL-1ra-expressing adenoviral vector administered at the time of infection. Blockade of IL-1 abrogated the infection-associated neuron loss in this vivo model. Considering that IL-1 can be triggered by multiple perinatal insults, our findings suggest that early therapy with anti-inflammatory agents that block IL-1 may be effective for reducing adulthood neuropathology.

  5. Mechanisms of Beta Cell Dysfunction Associated With Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Antje; Solimena, Michele; Knoch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from genetic predisposition and environmental factors leading to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Recently, a rapid increase in the incidence of childhood T1D has been observed worldwide; this is too fast to be explained by genetic factors alone, pointing to the spreading of environmental factors linked to the disease. Enteroviruses (EVs) are perhaps the most investigated environmental agents in relationship to the pathogenesis of T1D. While several studies point to the likelihood of such correlation, epidemiological evidence in its support is inconclusive or in some instances even against it. Hence, it is still unknown if and how EVs are involved in the development of T1D. Here we review recent findings concerning the biology of EV in beta cells and the potential implications of this knowledge for the understanding of beta cell dysfunction and autoimmune destruction in T1D.

  6. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors.

  7. Prevention of cytotoxic T cell escape using a heteroclitic subdominant viral T cell determinant.

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    Noah S Butler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available High affinity antigen-specific T cells play a critical role during protective immune responses. Epitope enhancement can elicit more potent T cell responses and can subsequently lead to a stronger memory pool; however, the molecular basis of such enhancement is unclear. We used the consensus peptide-binding motif for the Major Histocompatibility Complex molecule H-2K(b to design a heteroclitic version of the mouse hepatitis virus-specific subdominant S598 determinant. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution at a secondary anchor residue (Q to Y at position 3 increased the stability of the engineered determinant in complex with H-2K(b. The structural basis for this enhanced stability was associated with local alterations in the pMHC conformation as a result of the Q to Y substitution. Recombinant viruses encoding this engineered determinant primed CTL responses that also reacted to the wildtype epitope with significantly higher functional avidity, and protected against selection of virus mutated at a second CTL determinant and consequent disease progression in persistently infected mice. Collectively, our findings provide a basis for the enhanced immunogenicity of an engineered determinant that will serve as a template for guiding the development of heteroclitic T cell determinants with applications in prevention of CTL escape in chronic viral infections as well as in tumor immunity.

  8. Viral abundance and activity in the deep sub-seafloor biosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Glud, Ronnie N.; Filippini, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    10(8) viruses cm(-3) and 3.8 x 10(6) cells cm-3 at 4 mbsf to 4.9 x 10(6) viruses cm-3 and 9.8 x 10(5) cells cm(-3) at 96 mbsf. The age of the sediment ranges from ca. 0.5 million yr before present (Ma) at 4 mbsf to ca. 2 Ma at 96 mbsf. Assuming that the decline in viral abundance with depth reflects...... hypothesize that most of the deep subsurface viral communities inhabit a microenvironment where the viruses are protected against decay, and can therefore persist in undisturbed sediments for hundreds of thousands, perhaps even millions, of years....

  9. Building and optimizing a virus-specific T cell receptor library for targeted immunotherapy in viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Nasirah; Chia, Adeline; Ho, Zi Zong; Garcia, Alfonso Tan; Paravasivam, Komathi; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Bertoletti, Antonio; Gehring, Adam J

    2014-02-25

    Restoration of antigen-specific T cell immunity has the potential to clear persistent viral infection. T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy can reconstitute CD8 T cell immunity in chronic patients. We cloned 10 virus-specific TCRs targeting 5 different viruses, causing chronic and acute infection. All 10 TCR genetic constructs were optimized for expression using a P2A sequence, codon optimization and the addition of a non-native disulfide bond. However, maximum TCR expression was only achieved after establishing the optimal orientation of the alpha and beta chains in the expression cassette; 9/10 TCRs favored the beta-P2A-alpha orientation over alpha-P2A-beta. Optimal TCR expression was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma+ T cells. In addition, activating cells for transduction in the presence of Toll-like receptor ligands further enhanced IFN-gamma production. Thus, we have built a virus-specific TCR library that has potential for therapeutic intervention in chronic viral infection or virus-related cancers.

  10. Understanding MHC class I presentation of viral antigens by human dendritic cells as a basis for rational design of therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Montfoort, Nadine; van der Aa, Evelyn; Woltman, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Since dendritic cells (DC) have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allow direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL. Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the dendritic cells (DC) subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated toward the role of human DC in MHC class I-antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated. We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy.

  11. Establishment and characterization of a rainbow trout heart endothelial cell line with susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Alfonso; González Granja, Aitor; González, Lucia; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    In the current work, we have established and characterized a novel cell line from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The cell line, designated as RTH (rainbow trout heart), was obtained by immortalizing heart cells with recombinant retroviruses that transduced polyoma middle T antigen. This is the first time such a strategy is used to obtain an immortalized fish cell line. The cells showed an endothelial-like morphology and characteristics, constitutively transcribing collagen, selectin and VCAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule), as well as different chemokines and chemokine receptors, but not cytokeratin. As already described for heart endothelial cells, RTH cells actively phagocytized latex beads. Furthermore, RTH cells showed a high susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). VHSV modulated the transcription of Mx, major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II), VCAM and many of the chemokine and chemokine receptors expressed in these cells. Therefore, RTH cells constitute an excellent model to study the immune regulation of endothelial cells in fish and their role in leukocyte extravasation.

  12. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, infected with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, K.; Bergmann, S.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cytotoxic T cells as part of the adaptive immune system recognize virus-infected target cells by binding of their T-cell receptors (TCR) to classical MHC class I molecules loaded with viral peptides. Our previous studies have shown that the allele of the single dominant polymorphic...... classical MHC class I locus Onmy-UBA is identical in the rainbow trout clone C25 and in the permanent rainbow trout cell line RTG-2. This enabled us to develop an assay to measure antiviral cytotoxicity in rainbow trout using a system of MHC class I-matched effector and target cells. Peripheral blood...... level of the CD8 alpha gene which is a typical marker for mammalian cytotoxic T cells. Concurrently, the expression of the natural killer cell enhancement factor (NKEF)-like gene was enhanced as measured by real-time RT-PCR. Taken together, these results suggest that both innate and adaptive cell...

  13. A functional selection of viral genetic elements in cultured cells to identify hepatitis C virus RNA translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrelo, Loic; Chabas, Sandrine; Reigadas, Sandrine; Pflieger, Aude; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rumi, Julie; Ventura, Michel; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Staedel, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    We developed a functional selection system based on randomized genetic elements (GE) to identify potential regulators of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA translation, a process initiated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). A retroviral HCV GE library was introduced into HepG2 cells, stably expressing the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) under the control of the HCV IRES. Cells that expressed transduced GEs inhibiting HSV-TK were selected via their resistance to ganciclovir. Six major GEs were rescued by PCR on the selected cell DNA and identified as HCV elements. We validated our strategy by further studying the activity of one of them, GE4, encoding the 5' end of the viral NS5A gene. GE4 inhibited HCV IRES-, but not cap-dependent, reporter translation in human hepatic cell lines and inhibited HCV infection at a post-entry step, decreasing by 85% the number of viral RNA copies. This method can be applied to the identification of gene expression regulators.

  14. Infection of Polarized MDCK Cells with Herpes Simplex Virus 1: Two Asymmetrically Distributed Cell Receptors Interact with Different Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Amy E.; McGwire, Bradford S.; Roizman, Bernard

    1991-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 attaches to at least two cell surface receptors. In polarized epithelial (Madin-Darby canine kidney; MDCK) cells one receptor is located in the apical surface and attachment to the cells requires the presence of glycoprotein C in the virus. The second receptor is located in the basal surface and does not require the presence of glycoprotein C. Exposure of MDCK cells at either the apical or basal surface to wild-type virus yields plaques and viral products whereas infection by a glycoprotein C-negative mutant yields identical results only after exposure of MDCK cells to virus at the basal surface. Multiple receptors for viral entry into cells expand the host range of the virus. The observation that glycoprotein C-negative mutants are infectious in many nonpolarized cell lines suggests that cells in culture may express more than one receptor and explains why genes that specify the viral proteins that recognize redundant receptors, like glycoprotein C, are expendable.

  15. Targeting APOBEC3A to the viral nucleoprotein complex confers antiviral activity

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    Strebel Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background APOBEC3 (A3 proteins constitute a family of cytidine deaminases that provide intracellular resistance to retrovirus replication and to transposition of endogenous retroelements. A3A has significant homology to the C-terminus of A3G but has only a single cytidine deaminase active site (CDA, unlike A3G, which has a second N-terminal CDA previously found to be important for Vif sensitivity and virus encapsidation. A3A is packaged into HIV-1 virions but, unlike A3G, does not have antiviral properties. Here, we investigated the reason for the lack of A3A antiviral activity. Results Sequence alignment of A3G and A3A revealed significant homology of A3A to the C-terminal region of A3G. However, while A3G co-purified with detergent-resistant viral nucleoprotein complexes (NPC, virus-associated A3A was highly detergent-sensitive leading us to speculate that the ability to assemble into NPC may be a property conveyed by the A3G N-terminus. To test this model, we constructed an A3G-3A chimeric protein, in which the N-terminal half of A3G was fused to A3A. Interestingly, the A3G-3A chimera was packaged into HIV-1 particles and, unlike A3A, associated with the viral NPC. Furthermore, the A3G-3A chimera displayed strong antiviral activity against HIV-1 and was sensitive to inhibition by HIV-1 Vif. Conclusion Our results suggest that the A3G N-terminal domain carries determinants important for targeting the protein to viral NPCs. Transfer of this domain to A3A results in A3A targeting to viral NPCs and confers antiviral activity.

  16. An emerging role for p21-activated kinases (Paks) in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Broeke, Celine; Radu, Maria; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    p21-activated protein kinases (Paks) are cytosolic serine/threonine protein kinases that act as effectors for small (p21) GTPases of the Cdc42 and Rac families. It has long been established that Paks play a major role in a host of vital cellular functions such as proliferation, survival...... in antiviral immunity will be pivotal to evaluate thoroughly the potential of agents that inhibit Pak as a new class of anti-viral therapeutics....

  17. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations in mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with Sindbis virus: implications to viral replication and neuronal death.

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    Leandro Silva da Costa

    Full Text Available The metabolic resources crucial for viral replication are provided by the host. Details of the mechanisms by which viruses interact with host metabolism, altering and recruiting high free-energy molecules for their own replication, remain unknown. Sindbis virus, the prototype of and most widespread alphavirus, causes outbreaks of arthritis in humans and serves as a model for the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases induced by alphaviruses in mice. In this work, respirometric analysis was used to evaluate the effects of Sindbis virus infection on mitochondrial bioenergetics of a mouse neuroblastoma cell lineage, Neuro 2a. The modulation of mitochondrial functions affected cellular ATP content and this was synchronous with Sindbis virus replication cycle and cell death. At 15 h, irrespective of effects on cell viability, viral replication induced a decrease in oxygen consumption uncoupled to ATP synthesis and a 36% decrease in maximum uncoupled respiration, which led to an increase of 30% in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Decreased proton leak associated to complex I respiration contributed to the apparent improvement of mitochondrial function. Cellular ATP content was not affected by infection. After 24 h, mitochondria dysfunction was clearly observed as maximum uncoupled respiration reduced 65%, along with a decrease in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Suppressed respiration driven by complexes I- and II-related substrates seemed to play a role in mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite the increase in glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, these changes were followed by a 30% decrease in ATP content and neuronal death. Taken together, mitochondrial bioenergetics is modulated during Sindbis virus infection in such a way as to favor ATP synthesis required to support active viral replication. These early changes in metabolism of Neuro 2a cells may form the molecular basis of neuronal

  18. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  19. Understanding MHC class I presentation of viral antigens by human dendritic cells as a basis for rational design of therapeutic vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eVan Montfoort

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. Since dendritic cells (DC have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allows direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL.Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the DC subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated towards the role of human DC in MHC class I antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated.We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy.

  20. Cardiac Fibroblasts Aggravate Viral Myocarditis: Cell Specific Coxsackievirus B3 Replication

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    Diana Lindner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease caused by viral infection. Different subpopulations of leukocytes enter the cardiac tissue and lead to severe cardiac inflammation associated with myocyte loss and remodeling. Here, we study possible cell sources for viral replication using three compartments of the heart: fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes, and macrophages. We infected C57BL/6j mice with Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 and detected increased gene expression of anti-inflammatory and antiviral cytokines in the heart. Subsequently, we infected cardiac fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes, and macrophages with CVB3. Due to viral infection, the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, and IFN-β was significantly increased in cardiac fibroblasts compared to cardiomyocytes or macrophages. We found that in addition to cardiomyocytes cardiac fibroblasts were infected by CVB3 and displayed a higher virus replication (132-fold increase compared to cardiomyocytes (14-fold increase between 6 and 24 hours after infection. At higher virus concentrations, macrophages are able to reduce the viral copy number. At low virus concentration a persistent virus infection was determined. Therefore, we suggest that cardiac fibroblasts play an important role in the pathology of CVB3-induced myocarditis and are another important contributor of virus replication aggravating myocarditis.

  1. PREPARATION OF GENE-VIRAL THERAPEUTIC SYSTEM CNHK200-HA AND ITS ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY ON LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop a novel adenoviral vector system, which combines the advantages of the antiangiogenic gene therapy and virus therapy, and to investigate its antitumor activity on lung cancer. Methods: A new kind of viral vector CNHK200, in which the E1b55kDa gene was deleted and the whole E1a gene was preserved, was constructed. Human angiostatin gene Kringle 1(5 (hA) was amplified and inserted into the genome of the replicative virus CNHK200, generating CNHK200-hA. The expression of hA and its effect on lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo were studied. Results: The novel vector system CNHK200-hA, just like the replicative virus ONYX-015, replicated in p53-deficient tumor cells but not in normal cells, and thus specifically killed tumor cells. In in vitro experiment, both CNHK200-hA and the non-replicative virus Ad-hA could kill tumor cells but the latter needed 100 times more MOI to achieve the same level of cell killing. In in vivo experiment, the therapeutic effect of CNHK200-hA on human lung cancer A549 xenografts in nude mice was significantly better than that of Ad-hA or that of ONYX-015. Conclusion: CNHK200-hA, which carries the angiostatin gene, has the advantages of specific tumor targeting, high expression of transgene in tumor cells and potent antitumor activity.

  2. Know Thyself: NK cell inhibitory receptors prompt self-tolerance, education, and viral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eNash

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells (NK provide essential protection against viral infections. One of the defining features of this lymphocyte population is the expression of a wide array of variable cell surface stimulatory and inhibitory NK receptors (sNKR and iNKR respectively. The iNKR are particularly important in terms of NK cell education. As receptors specific for MHC class I (MHC I molecules, they are responsible for self-tolerance and adjusting NK cell reactivity based the expression level of self-MHC I. The end result of this education is two-fold: 1 inhibitory signaling tunes the functional capacity of the NK cell, endowing greater potency with greater education, and 2 education on self allows the NK cell to detect aberrations in MHC I expression, a common occurrence during many viral infections. Many studies have indicated an important role for iNKR and MHC I in disease, making these receptors attractive targets for manipulating NK cell reactivity in the clinic. A greater understanding of iNKR and their ability to regulate NK cells will provide a basis for future attempts at translating their potential utility into benefits for human health.

  3. Examination of a Viral Infection Mimetic Model in Human iPS Cell-Derived Insulin-Producing Cells and the Anti-Apoptotic Effect of GLP-1 Analogue.

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    Megu Yamaguchi Baden

    Full Text Available Viral infection is associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the acceleration and protective mechanisms of beta cell destruction by establishing a model of viral infection in pancreatic beta cells.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid was transfected into MIN6 cells and insulin-producing cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells via small molecule applications. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining. The anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4 was also evaluated.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection led to elevated expression of the genes encoding IFNα, IFNβ, CXCL10, Fas, viral receptors, and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors in MIN6 cells. Exendin-4 treatment suppressed the elevated gene expression levels and reduced polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-induced apoptosis both in MIN6 cells and in insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of Exendin-4.Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid transfection can mimic viral infection, and Exendin-4 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect both in MIN6 and insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Visualization of plant viral suppressor silencing activity in intact leaf lamina by quantitative fluorescent imaging

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    Francis Kevin P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient expression of proteins in plants has become a favoured method over the production of stably transformed plants because, in addition to enabling high protein yields, it is both fast and easy to apply. An enhancement of transient protein expression can be achieved by plant virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins. Since viral suppressor proteins differ in their efficiency to enhance transient protein expression in plants, we developed a whole-leaf green fluorescent protein (GFP-based imaging assay to quantitatively assess suppressor protein activity. Results In a transient GFP-expression assay using wild-type and GFP-transgenic N. benthamiana, addition of the plant viral suppressors Beet mild yellowing virus (BMYV-IPP P0 or Plum pox virus (PPV HC-Pro was shown to increase fluorescent protein expression 3-4-fold, 7 days post inoculation (dpi when compared to control plants. In contrast, in agroinfiltrated patches without suppressor activity, near complete silencing of the GFP transgene was observed in the transgenic N. benthamiana at 21 dpi. Both co-infiltrated suppressors significantly enhanced GFP expression over time, with HC-Pro co-infiltrations leading to higher short term GFP fluorescence (at 7 dpi and P0 giving higher long term GFP fluorescence (at 21 dpi. Additionally, in contrast to HC-Pro co-infiltrations, an area of complete GFP silencing was observed at the edge of P0 co-infiltrated areas. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging of whole intact leaves proved to be an easy and effective method for spatially and quantitatively observing viral suppressor efficiency in plants. This suppressor assay demonstrates that plant viral suppressors greatly enhanced transient GFP expression, with P0 showing a more prolonged suppressor activity over time than HC-Pro. Both suppressors could prove to be ideal candidates for enhancing target protein expression in plants.

  5. Cell cycle G2/M arrest through an S phase-dependent mechanism by HIV-1 viral protein R

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    Liang Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cycle G2 arrest induced by HIV-1 Vpr is thought to benefit viral proliferation by providing an optimized cellular environment for viral replication and by skipping host immune responses. Even though Vpr-induced G2 arrest has been studied extensively, how Vpr triggers G2 arrest remains elusive. Results To examine this initiation event, we measured the Vpr effect over a single cell cycle. We found that even though Vpr stops the cell cycle at the G2/M phase, but the initiation event actually occurs in the S phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, Vpr triggers activation of Chk1 through Ser345 phosphorylation in an S phase-dependent manner. The S phase-dependent requirement of Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation by Vpr was confirmed by siRNA gene silencing and site-directed mutagenesis. Moreover, downregulation of DNA replication licensing factors Cdt1 by siRNA significantly reduced Vpr-induced Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation and G2 arrest. Even though hydroxyurea (HU and ultraviolet light (UV also induce Chk1-Ser345 phosphorylation in S phase under the same conditions, neither HU nor UV-treated cells were able to pass through S phase, whereas vpr-expressing cells completed S phase and stopped at the G2/M boundary. Furthermore, unlike HU/UV, Vpr promotes Chk1- and proteasome-mediated protein degradations of Cdc25B/C for G2 induction; in contrast, Vpr had little or no effect on Cdc25A protein degradation normally mediated by HU/UV. Conclusions These data suggest that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a unique molecular mechanism that regulates host cell cycle regulation in an S-phase dependent fashion.

  6. Enhancement of the influenza A hemagglutinin (HA-mediated cell-cell fusion and virus entry by the viral neuraminidase (NA.

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    Bin Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major role of the neuraminidase (NA protein of influenza A virus is related to its sialidase activity, which disrupts the interaction between the envelope hemagglutinin (HA protein and the sialic acid receptors expressed at the surface of infected cells. This enzymatic activity is known to promote the release and spread of progeny viral particles following their production by infected cells, but a potential role of NA in earlier steps of the viral life cycle has never been clearly demonstrated. In this study we have examined the impact of NA expression on influenza HA-mediated viral membrane fusion and virion infectivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The role of NA in the early stages of influenza virus replication was examined using a cell-cell fusion assay that mimics HA-mediated membrane fusion, and a virion infectivity assay using HIV-based pseudoparticles expressing influenza HA and/or NA proteins. In the cell-cell fusion assay, which bypasses the endocytocytosis step that is characteristic of influenza virus entry, we found that in proper HA maturation conditions, NA clearly enhanced fusion in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, expression of NA at the surface of pseudoparticles significantly enhanced virion infectivity. Further experiments using exogenous soluble NA revealed that the most likely mechanism for enhancement of fusion and infectivity by NA was related to desialylation of virion-expressed HA. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The NA protein of influenza A virus is not only required for virion release and spread but also plays a critical role in virion infectivity and HA-mediated membrane fusion.

  7. Pharmacoelectrophysiology of viral-free induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish; Chung, YingYing; Sequiera, Glen Lester; Wong, Philip; Liew, Reginald; Shim, Winston

    2013-02-01

    Development of pharmaceutical agents for cardiac indication demands elaborate safety screening in which assessing repolarization of cardiac cells remains a critical path in risk evaluations. An efficient platform for evaluating cardiac repolarization in vitro significantly facilitates drug developmental programs. In a proof of principle study, we examined the effect of antiarrhythmogenic drugs (Vaughan Williams class I-IV) and noncardiac active drugs (terfenadine and cisapride) on the repolarization profile of viral-free human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). Extracellular field potential (FP) recording using microelectrode arrays demonstrated significant delayed repolarization as prolonged corrected FP durations (cFPDs) by class I (quinidine and flecainide), class III (sotalol and amiodarone), and class IV (verapamil), whereas class II drugs (propranolol and nadolol) had no effects. Consistent with their sodium channel-blocking ability, class I drugs also significantly reduced FPmin and conduction velocity. Although lidocaine (class IB) had no effects on cFPDs, verapamil shortened cFPD and FPmin by 25 and 50%, respectively. Furthermore, verapamil reduced beating frequencies drastically. Importantly, the examined drugs exhibited dose-response curve on prolongation of cFPDs at an effective range that correlated significantly with therapeutic plasma concentrations achieved clinically. Consistent with clinical outcomes, drug-induced arrhythmia of tachycardia and bigeminy-like waveforms by quinidine, flecainide, and sotalol was demonstrated at supraphysiological concentrations. Furthermore, off-target effects of terfenadine and cisapride on cFPD and Na( + ) channel blockage were similarly revealed. These results suggest that hiPSC-CMs may be useful for safety evaluation of cardioactive and noncardiac acting drugs for personalized medicine.

  8. The latent origin of replication of Epstein-Barr virus directs viral genomes to active regions of the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Manuel J; Ott, Elisabeth; Papior, Peer; Schepers, Aloys

    2010-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus efficiently infects human B cells. The EBV genome is maintained extrachromosomally and replicates synchronously with the host's chromosomes. The latent origin of replication (oriP) guarantees plasmid stability by mediating two basic functions: replication and segregation of the viral genome. While the segregation process of EBV genomes is well understood, little is known about its chromatin association and nuclear distribution during interphase. Here, we analyzed the nuclear localization of EBV genomes and the role of functional oriP domains FR and DS for basic functions such as the transformation of primary cells, their role in targeting EBV genomes to distinct nuclear regions, and their association with epigenetic domains. Fluorescence in situ hybridization visualized the localization of extrachromosomal EBV genomes in the regions adjacent to chromatin-dense territories called the perichromatin. Further, immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated a preference of the viral genome for histone 3 lysine 4-trimethylated (H3K4me3) and histone 3 lysine 9-acetylated (H3K9ac) nuclear regions. To determine the role of FR and DS for establishment and subnuclear localization of EBV genomes, we transformed primary human B lymphocytes with recombinant mini-EBV genomes containing different oriP mutants. The loss of DS results in a slightly increased association in H3K27me3 domains. This study demonstrates that EBV genomes or oriP-based extrachromosomal vector systems are integrated into the higher order nuclear organization. We found that viral genomes are not randomly distributed in the nucleus. FR but not DS is crucial for the localization of EBV in perichromatic regions that are enriched for H3K4me3 and H3K9ac, which are hallmarks of transcriptionally active regions.

  9. Viral and murine interleukin-10 are correctly processed and retain their biological activity when produced in tobacco

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    Avesani Linda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, with therapeutic applications in several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Oral administration of this cytokine alone, or in combination with disease-associated autoantigens could confer protection form the onset of a specific autoimmune disease through the induction of oral tolerance. Transgenic plants are attractive systems for production of therapeutic proteins because of the ability to do large scale-up at low cost, and the low maintenance requirements. They are highly amenable to oral administration and could become effective delivery systems without extensive protein purification. We investigated the ability of tobacco plants to produce high levels of biologically-active viral and murine IL-10. Results Three different subcellular targeting strategies were assessed in transient expression experiments, and stable transgenic tobacco plants were generated with the constructs that yielded the highest accumulation levels by targeting the recombinant proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. The best yields using this strategy in T1 plants were 10.8 and 37.0 μg/g fresh leaf weight for viral and murine IL-10, respectively. The recombinant proteins were purified from transgenic leaf material and characterized in terms of their N-glycan composition, dimerization and biological activity in in vitro assays. Both molecules formed stable dimers, were able to activate the IL-10 signaling pathway and to induce specific anti-inflammatory responses in mouse J774 macrophage cells. Conclusion Tobacco plants are able to correctly process viral and murine IL-10 into biologically active dimers, therefore representing a suitable platform for the production for these cytokines. The accumulation levels obtained are high enough to allow delivery of an immunologically relevant dose of IL-10 in a reasonable amount of leaf material, without extensive purification. This study paves the

  10. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

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    Jessica eLabonté

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a three km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32 % of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment.

  11. Viral vaccines and their manufacturing cell substrates: New trends and designs in modern vaccinology.

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    Rodrigues, Ana F; Soares, Hugo R; Guerreiro, Miguel R; Alves, Paula M; Coroadinha, Ana S

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective interventions in global health. The worldwide vaccination programs significantly reduced the number of deaths caused by infectious agents. A successful example was the eradication of smallpox in 1979 after two centuries of vaccination campaigns. Since the first variolation administrations until today, the knowledge on immunology has increased substantially. This knowledge combined with the introduction of cell culture and DNA recombinant technologies revolutionized vaccine design. This review will focus on vaccines against human viral pathogens, recent developments on vaccine design and cell substrates used for their manufacture. While the production of attenuated and inactivated vaccines requires the use of the respective permissible cell substrates, the production of recombinant antigens, virus-like particles, vectored vaccines and chimeric vaccines requires the use - and often the development - of specific cell lines. Indeed, the development of novel modern viral vaccine designs combined with, the stringent safety requirements for manufacture, and the better understanding on animal cell metabolism and physiology are increasing the awareness on the importance of cell line development and engineering areas. A new era of modern vaccinology is arriving, offering an extensive toolbox to materialize novel and creative ideas in vaccine design and its manufacture.

  12. Statistical mechanics of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K

    2015-01-09

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements-yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy-ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together-is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  13. RUNX2 Mediates Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Egress from the Bone Marrow and Controls Viral Immunity

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    Michaël Chopin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs represent a unique immune cell type that responds to viral nucleic acids through the rapid production of type I interferons. Within the hematopoietic system, the transcription factor RUNX2 is exclusively expressed in pDCs and is required for their peripheral homeostasis. Here, we show that RUNX2 plays an essential role in promoting pDC localization and function. RUNX2 is required for the appropriate expression of the integrin-mediated adhesion machinery, as well as for the down-modulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which allows pDC egress into the circulation. RUNX2 also facilitates the robust response to viral infection through the control of IRF7, the major regulator of type I interferon production. Mice lacking one copy of Runx2 have reduced numbers of peripheral pDCs and IFN-α expression, which might contribute to the reported difficulties of individuals with cleidocranial dysplasia, who are haploinsufficient for RUNX2, to clear viral infections.

  14. RUNX2 Mediates Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Egress from the Bone Marrow and Controls Viral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Preston, Simon P; Lun, Aaron T L; Tellier, Julie; Smyth, Gordon K; Pellegrini, Marc; Belz, Gabrielle T; Corcoran, Lynn M; Visvader, Jane E; Wu, Li; Nutt, Stephen L

    2016-04-13

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a unique immune cell type that responds to viral nucleic acids through the rapid production of type I interferons. Within the hematopoietic system, the transcription factor RUNX2 is exclusively expressed in pDCs and is required for their peripheral homeostasis. Here, we show that RUNX2 plays an essential role in promoting pDC localization and function. RUNX2 is required for the appropriate expression of the integrin-mediated adhesion machinery, as well as for the down-modulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which allows pDC egress into the circulation. RUNX2 also facilitates the robust response to viral infection through the control of IRF7, the major regulator of type I interferon production. Mice lacking one copy of Runx2 have reduced numbers of peripheral pDCs and IFN-α expression, which might contribute to the reported difficulties of individuals with cleidocranial dysplasia, who are haploinsufficient for RUNX2, to clear viral infections.

  15. A versatile viral system for expression and depletion of proteins in mammalian cells.

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    Eric Campeau

    Full Text Available The ability to express or deplete proteins in living cells is crucial for the study of biological processes. Viral vectors are often useful to deliver DNA constructs to cells that are difficult to transfect by other methods. Lentiviruses have the additional advantage of being able to integrate into the genomes of non-dividing mammalian cells. However, existing viral expression systems generally require different vector backbones for expression of cDNA, small hairpin RNA (shRNA or microRNA (miRNA and provide limited drug selection markers. Furthermore, viral backbones are often recombinogenic in bacteria, complicating the generation and maintenance of desired clones. Here, we describe a collection of 59 vectors that comprise an integrated system for constitutive or inducible expression of cDNAs, shRNAs or miRNAs, and use a wide variety of drug selection markers. These vectors are based on the Gateway technology (Invitrogen whereby the cDNA, shRNA or miRNA of interest is cloned into an Entry vector and then recombined into a Destination vector that carries the chosen viral backbone and drug selection marker. This recombination reaction generates the desired product with >95% efficiency and greatly reduces the frequency of unwanted recombination in bacteria. We generated Destination vectors for the production of both retroviruses and lentiviruses. Further, we characterized each vector for its viral titer production as well as its efficiency in expressing or depleting proteins of interest. We also generated multiple types of vectors for the production of fusion proteins and confirmed expression of each. We demonstrated the utility of these vectors in a variety of functional studies. First, we show that the FKBP12 Destabilization Domain system can be used to either express or deplete the protein of interest in mitotically-arrested cells. Also, we generate primary fibroblasts that can be induced to senesce in the presence or absence of DNA damage

  16. Expression of a Humanized Viral 2A-Mediated lux Operon Efficiently Generates Autonomous Bioluminescence in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.; Close, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines

  17. Determination of platelet-activating factor by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and its application in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Cui Cao; Xiao-Ming Chen; Wei Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the plasma or serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) malondialdehyde (MDA), endotoxin (ET) and to discuss their significance in various types of viral hepatitis.METHODS: PAF, TNF-α, MDA, and ET levels in 60 controls, 16 cases of acute viral hepatitis, 71 cases of chronic viral hepatitis, 19 cases of severe viral hepatitis were detected by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (rHPLC), bio-assay, ELISA, thiobarbituric acid (TBA), and limulus lysate test (LLT), respectively.RESULTS: The rHPLC was more sensitive and specific than bio-assay (r = 0.912, P<0.01). The plasma levels of PAF, TNF-α, MDA, and ET in patients with viral hepatitis were higher than those in controls (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: rHPLC is more reliable and accurate for the detection of PAF.

  18. Viral meningitis, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Viruses are the most common causes of meningitis, a condition characterized by inflammation of the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. During the 10-year surveillance period, there were 3,205 confirmed cases, 724 probable cases, and 2,495 suspected cases of viral meningitis among active and reserve component members. In all three categories of cases, the most common diagnoses were meningitis due to enteroviruses; however a majority of these were unspecified enteroviruses. Nearly two-thirds (64.2%) of all cases due to enteroviral infection were hospitalized; on average, cases were hospitalized for 3.2 days. Numbers of cases peaked in late summer/early fall; and higher than average numbers of cases in 2003 reflected several outbreaks that occurred in civilian populations that year. Six states (Texas, California, Virginia, North Carolina, Florida, Georgia) reported the most cases in 2003 and overall during the period. Prevention of viral meningitis relies upon the interruption of viral transmission, e.g., thorough hand washing and disinfection of contaminated surfaces.

  19. Detection of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 in peripheral blood cells of silver crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch), suggests its potential in viral diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Xu, Lj; Lu, Lq

    2016-02-01

    Epidemics caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) in domestic cyprinid species have been reported in both European and Asian countries. Although the mechanisms remain unknown, acute CyHV-2 infections generally result in high mortality, and the surviving carps become chronic carriers displaying no external clinical signs. In this study, in situ hybridization analysis showed that CyHV-2 tended to infect peripheral blood cells during either acute or chronic infections in silver crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch). Laboratory challenge experiments coupled with real-time PCR quantification assays further indicated that steady-state levels of the viral genomic copy number in fish serum exhibited a typical 'one-step' growth curve post-viral challenge. Transcriptional expression of open reading frames (ORF) 121, which was selected due to its highest transcriptional levels in almost all tested tissues, was monitored to represent the replication kinetics of CyHV-2 in peripheral blood cells. Similar kinetic curve of active viral gene transcription in blood cells was obtained as that of serum viral load, indicating that CyHV-2 replicated in peripheral blood cells as well as in other well-characterized tissues. This study should pave the way for designing non-invasive and cost-effective serum diagnostic methods for quick detection of CyHV-2 infection.

  20. Non-Viral Generation of Neural Precursor-like Cells from Adult Human Fibroblasts

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    Maucksch C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts to mature neurons by the introduction of defined neural genes. This technology has potential use in the areas of neurological disease modeling and drug development. However, use of induced neurons for large-scale drug screening and cell-based replacement strategies is limited due to their inability to expand once reprogrammed. We propose it would be more desirable to induce expandable neural precursor cells directly from human fibroblasts. To date several pluripotent and neural transcription factors have been shown to be capable of converting mouse fibroblasts to neural stem/precursor-like cells when delivered by viral vectors. Here we extend these findings and demonstrate that transient ectopic insertion of the transcription factors SOX2 and PAX6 to adult human fibroblasts through use of non-viral plasmid transfection or protein transduction allows the generation of induced neural precursor (iNP colonies expressing a range of neural stem and pro-neural genes. Upon differentiation, iNP cells give rise to neurons exhibiting typical neuronal morphologies and expressing multiple neuronal markers including tyrosine hydroxylase and GAD65/67. Importantly, iNP-derived neurons demonstrate electrophysiological properties of functionally mature neurons with the capacity to generate action potentials. In addition, iNP cells are capable of differentiating into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-expressing astrocytes. This study represents a novel virus-free approach for direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts to a neural precursor fate.

  1. Viral glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion assays using vaccinia virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N; Broder, Christopher C

    2004-01-01

    The vaccinia virus-based expression of viral envelope glycoprotein genes-derived from enveloped viruses that infect their respective host cells through a pH-independent mechanism of membrane fusion-has been a powerful tool in helping to characterize these important attachment and fusion proteins. The cellular expression of these viral envelope glycoproteins has allowed for the measurement of membrane fusion events using cell-cell fusion or syncytia formation. This method has been enhanced by the addition of a reporter-gene system to the vaccinia virus-based cell-cell fusion assay. This improvement has provided a high-throughput and quantitative aspect to this assay, which can serve as a surrogate for virus entry and is therefore ideally suited in the characterization of numerous enveloped viruses, including biological safety level-4 (BSL-4) agents. This chapter will detail the methods of the vaccinia virus-based reporter-gene fusion assay and how it may be used to characterize the fusion mediated by the BSL-4-classified Hendra and Nipah viruses.

  2. Efficient non-viral reprogramming of myoblasts to stemness with a single small molecule to generate cardiac progenitor cells.

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    Zeeshan Pasha

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The current protocols for generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells involve genome integrating viral vectors which may induce tumorgenesis. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a non-viral method without genetic manipulation for reprogramming of skeletal myoblasts (SMs using small molecules. METHODS AND RESULTS: SMs from young male Oct3/4-GFP(+ transgenic mouse were treated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitor, RG108. Two weeks later, GFP(+ colonies of SM derived iPS cells (SiPS expressing GFP and with morphological similarity of mouse embryonic stem (ESCs were formed and propagated in vitro. SiPS were positive for alkaline phosphatase activity, expressed SSEA1, displayed ES cell specific pluripotency markers and formed teratoma in nude mice. Optimization of culture conditions for embryoid body (EBs formation yielded spontaneously contracting EBs having morphological, molecular, and ultra-structural similarities with cardiomyocytes and expressed early and late cardiac markers. miR profiling showed abrogation of let-7 family and upregulation of ESCs specific miR-290-295 cluster thus indicating that SiPS were similar to ESCs in miR profile. Four weeks after transplantation into the immunocompetent mice model of acute myocardial infarction (n = 12 per group, extensive myogenesis was observed in SiPS transplanted hearts as compared to DMEM controls (n = 6 per group. A significant reduction in fibrosis and improvement in global heart function in the hearts transplanted with SiPS derived cardiac progenitor cells were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Reprogramming of SMs by DNMT inhibitor is a simple, reproducible and efficient technique more likely to generate transgene integration-free iPS cells. Cardiac progenitors derived from iPS cells propagated extensively in the infarcted myocardium without tumorgenesis and improved cardiac function.

  3. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  4. Hepatitis A virus-encoded miRNAs attenuate the accumulation of viral genomic RNAs in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of persistent infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the common result of most HAV/cell culture systems. Previous observations show that the synthesis of viral RNAs is reduced during infection. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We characterized three HAV-encoded miRNAs in our previous study. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of these miRNAs on the accumulation of viral RNAs. The results indicated that the synthesis of viral genomic RNAs was dramatically reduced (more than 75 % reduction, P < 0.05) when transfected with one or two viral miRNA mimics. Conversely, they were significantly increased (more than 3.3-fold addition, P < 0.05) when transfected with one or two viral miRNA inhibitors. The luciferase reporter assay of miRNA targets showed that viral miRNAs were fully complementary to specific sites of the viral plus or minus strand RNA and strongly inhibited their expressions. Further data showed that the relative abundance of viral genomic RNA fragments that contain miRNA targets was also dramatically reduced (more than 80 % reduction, P < 0.05) when viral miRNAs were overexpressed with miRNA mimics. In contrast, they were significantly increased (approximately 2-fold addition, P < 0.05) when viral miRNAs were inhibited with miRNA inhibitors. In conclusion, these data suggest a possible mechanism for the reduction of viral RNA synthesis during HAV infection. Thus, we propose that it is likely that RNA virus-derived miRNA could serve as a self-mediated feedback regulator during infection.

  5. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  6. Small terminase couples viral DNA binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-08-08

    Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ∼23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essential for binding to DNA and assembly to L-terminase. Upon binding to its own DNA, S-terminase functions as a specific activator of L-terminase ATPase activity. The DNA-dependent stimulation of ATPase activity thus rationalizes the exclusive specificity of genome-packaging motors for viral DNA in the crowd of host DNA, ensuring fidelity of packaging and avoiding wasteful ATP hydrolysis. This posits a model for DNA-dependent activation of genome-packaging motors of general interest in virology.

  7. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

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    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  8. Adeno-associated viral vector transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Murphy, Mary; O'Brien, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have received considerable attention in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. One aspect of MSC research focuses on genetically modifying the cells with the aim of enhancing their regenerative potential. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise as a vector...... in human MSCs and to assess whether AAV transduction affects MSC multipotentiality. The results indicated that human MSCs could indeed be transiently transduced in vitro by the AAV2 vector with efficiencies of up to 65%. The percentage of GFP-positive cells peaked at 4 days post-transduction and declined...... rapidly towards 0% after day 8. The level of transgene expression in the GFP-positive population increased 4-fold over a 10,000 fold viral dose increase. This dose-response contrasted with the 200-fold increase observed in similarly transduced 293-cells, indicating a relatively restricted transgene...

  9. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  10. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr...... human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs) in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. CONCLUSION: These studies......-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein....

  11. Human T cell aging and the impact of persistent viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas eFulop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a dysregulation of the immune response, loosely termed immunosenescence. Each part of the immune system is influenced to some extent by the aging process. However, adaptive immunity seems more extensively affected and among all participating cells it is the T cells that are most altered. There is a large body of experimental work devoted to the investigation of age-associated differences in T cell phenotypes and functions in young and old individuals, but few longitudinal studies in humans actually delineating changes at the level of the individual. In most studies, the number and proportion of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, is reported to be higher in the elderly than in the young. Limited longitudinal studies suggest that accumulation of these cells is a dynamic process and does indeed represent an age-associated change. Accumulations of such late-stage cells may contribute to the enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory milieu commonly seen in older people. We do not know exactly what causes these observed changes, but an understanding of the possible causes is now beginning to emerge. A favored hypothesis is that these events are at least partly due to the effects of the maintenance of essential immune surveillance against persistent viral infections, notably Cytomegalovirus (CMV, which may exhaust the immune system over time. It is still a matter of debate as to whether these changes are compensatory and beneficial or pathological and detrimental to the proper functioning of the immune system and whether they impact longevity. Here, we will review present knowledge of T cell changes with aging and their relation to chronic viral and possibly other persistent infections.

  12. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  13. AMINOTRANSFERASE ACTIVITY IN THE LIVER OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS UNDER VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dragan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effect of the use of indirect (express- method for the detection of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus of trout by investigating aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in fish liver, as the most sensitive enzymes for the diagnostics of many pathological conditions of human and animal organisms associated with liver diseases. Methodology. The determination of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in trout liver was performed by Reitman-Frankel method. The functional status of liver was also evaluated using De Ritis coefficient (AST/ALT ratio, which serves as an integral index of the changes related to the degree of the damage of this organ. Findings. The determination of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss found out a considerable increase in the activity of these enzymes under the effect of the virus of infectious pancreatic necrosis. It is set that direction of aspartate aminotransferase reactions in the conditions of viral infection takes place mainly in the side of formation of keto-acids, providing the synthesis of glucose which is needed above all things for energetic supply of synthetic processes. The increase of activity of AsAT plays an important role in synchronization of energetic and nitrous exchange which is carried out at the level of mitochondrias. Increase of DeRitisa (DRr coefficient in the conditions of our experiment characteristic for viral hepatitis and can specify on activating of synthesis of glucose which is needed for support of adequate level in the conditions of viral intoxication and determines the orientation of metabolic streams toward predominance of catabolytic reactions. According to the results of the performed tests, the most informative was the test of the determination of alanine aminotransferase activity. Originality. Evaluation of the effect of

  14. Experimental depletion of CD8+ cells in acutely SIVagm-Infected African Green Monkeys results in increased viral replication

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    Apetrei Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo CD8+ cell depletions in pathogenic SIV infections identified a key role for cellular immunity in controlling viral load (VL and disease progression. However, similar studies gave discordant results in chronically-infected SMs, leading some authors to propose that in natural hosts, SIV replication is independent of cellular immunity. To assess the role of cellular immune responses in the control of SIV replication in natural hosts, we investigated the impact of CD8+ cell depletion during acute SIV infection in AGMs. Results Nine AGMs were infected with SIVagm.sab and were followed up to day 225 p.i. Four were intravenously infused with the cM-T807 antibody on days 0 (50 mg/kg, 6, and 13 (10 mg/kg, respectively post infection (p.i.. CD8+ cells were depleted for up to 28 days p.i. in peripheral blood and LNs in all treated AGMs. Partial CD8+ T cell depletion occurred in the intestine. SIVagm VLs peaked at similar levels in both groups (107-108 RNA copies/ml. However, while VLs were controlled in undepleted AGMs, reaching set-point levels (104-105 RNA copies/ml by day 28 p.i., high VLs (>106 RNA copies/ml were maintained by day 21 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs. By day 42 p.i., VLs were comparable between the two groups. The levels of immune activation and proliferation remained elevated up to day 72 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs and returned to preinfection levels in controls by day 28 p.i. None of the CD8-depleted animals progressed to AIDS. Conclusion CD8+ cells are responsible for a partial control of postacute viral replication in SIVagm.sab-infected AGMs. In contrast to macaques, the SIVagm-infected AGMs are able to control viral replication after recovery of the CD8+ T cells and avoid disease progression.

  15. Direct infection of dendritic cells during chronic viral infection suppresses antiviral T cell proliferation and induces IL-10 expression in CD4 T cells.

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    Carmen Baca Jones

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of systemic IL-10 have been associated with several chronic viral infections, including HCV, EBV, HCMV and LCMV. In the chronic LCMV infection model, both elevated IL-10 and enhanced infection of dendritic cells (DCs are important for viral persistence. This report highlights the relationship between enhanced viral tropism for DCs and the induction of IL-10 in CD4 T cells, which we identify as the most frequent IL-10-expressing cell type in chronic LCMV infection. Here we report that infected CD8αneg DCs express elevated IL-10, induce IL-10 expression in LCMV specific CD4 T cells, and suppress LCMV-specific T cell proliferation. DCs exposed in vivo to persistent LCMV retain the capacity to stimulate CD4 T cell proliferation but induce IL-10 production by both polyclonal and LCMV-specific CD4 T cells. Our study delineates the unique effects of direct infection versus viral exposure on DCs. Collectively these data point to enhanced infection of DCs as a key trigger of the IL-10 induction cascade resulting in maintenance of elevated IL-10 expression in CD4 T cells and inhibition of LCMV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation.

  16. SILVER NANOPARTICLES AND EXPERESSION OF MOLECULAR MARKERS IN LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION AND MARKER OF AUTOIMMUNE PROCESSES IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH VIRAL CORNEAL PATHOLOGY

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    Ulyanov V.A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the nanoparticles of silver on the expression of molecular markers activation of lymphoid cells CD7+, CD25+, CD38+, CD45+, CD54+, CD95+, CD150+ and CD5+ – marker of the autoimmune process, as well as on phagocytic activity of neutrophils in patients with viral pathologies of the cornea was studied in vitro. In the Laboratory of Immunology, SI Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy NAMS of Ukraine was developed technique of cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes with immunomodulation drugs, followed by determination of changes in the level of expression of molecular markers of lymphocyte activation. Assessment of the level of expression of molecular markers of activation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed method using a panel of monoclonal antibodies, CD5+, CD7+, CD25+, CD38+, CD45+, CD54+, CD95+ and CD 150+. The study was conducted in vitro with the peripheral lymphocytes the blood of 23 patients of viral pathology of the cornea. Our studies of the effects of nanosilver particles in vitro on the state of expression of molecular markers of activation of peripheral blood lymphocytes and phagocytic activity of neutrophils in patients with viral corneal pathology, showed a significant increase in the level of expression of the CD7+, CD25+, CD45+ and phagocytic activity of neutrophils after application silver nanoparticles.

  17. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

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    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  18. Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, D

    2013-02-26

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 26 February 2013; doi:10.1038\\/ijo.2013.16.

  19. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  20. Viral quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections.

  1. Establishment, characterization and viral susceptibility of 3 new cell lines from snakehead, Channa striatus (Blooch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengshan; Montgomery-Brock, Dee; Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Yuanan

    2003-01-01

    Three cell lines were established from muscle (SHMS), heart (SHHT) and swim bladder (SHSB) of snakehead (Channa striatus). The cells grew initially at 25 degrees C in L15 medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum and have been subcultured 13-18 times since their initiation on June 25, 2002. Growth of the snakehead cells was serum-dependent and plating efficiencies ranged from 22-29%. These snakehead cells grew well in RPMI 1640 and L-15 media, which are commonly used for cultivation of animal and mammalian cells and retained 95.9-96.6% cell viability following storage for 4 months in liquid nitrogen. Karyotyping indicated that these snakehead-derived cell lines remained diploid with a chromosome count of 44 at their early passage (passage 8-14). These cell lines were sensitive to CCV, VHSV, SVCV, IPN and SHRV; they were refractory to IHNV. These newly established cell lines are currently being used for the investigation of snakehead viral diseases in Hawaii and will be available for future isolation and study of snakehead viruses.

  2. Cell-mediated immune responses in rainbow trout after DNA immunization against the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, Katrin; Kock, Holger; Schuetze, Heike

    2008-01-01

    To identify viral proteins that induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-infected cells, rainbow trout were immunized with DNA vectors encoding the glycoprotein G or the nucleocapsid protein N of VHSV. The G protein was a more potent trigger...... injection site rather than to injection sites of heterologous vaccines, suggesting the antigen specificity of homing. By demonstrating CMC responses to distinct viral proteins and homing in rainbow trout, these results substantially contribute to the understanding of the teleost immune system....... of cytotoxic cells than the N protein. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from trout immunized against the G protein killed both VHSV-infected MHC class I matched (RTG-2) and VHSV-infected xenogeneic (EPC) target cells, suggesting the involvement of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells...

  3. Apigenin Restricts FMDV Infection and Inhibits Viral IRES Driven Translational Activity

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    Suhong Qian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is caused by FMD virus (FMDV. FMD outbreaks have occurred in livestock-containing regions worldwide. Apigenin, which is a flavonoid naturally existing in plant, possesses various pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antioxidant and antiviral activities. Results show that apigenin can inhibit FMDV-mediated cytopathogenic effect and FMDV replication in vitro. Further studies demonstrate the following: (i apigenin inhibits FMDV infection at the viral post-entry stage; (ii apigenin does not exhibit direct extracellular virucidal activity; and (iii apigenin interferes with the translational activity of FMDV driven by internal ribosome entry site. Studies on applying apigein in vivo are required for drug development and further identification of potential drug targets against FDMV infection.

  4. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  5. Immune Activation and Viral Replication after Vaccination with an Influenza A H1N1 2009 Vaccine in HIV-Infected Children Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattawat Onlamoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with a pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 was recommended for HIV-infected patients. However, there is limited information concerning the impact of immunization with this vaccine on immune activation and HIV viral replication. In this study, 45 HIV-infected children and adolescents receiving antiretroviral therapy were immunized with a 2-dose series of nonadjuvated monovalent influenza A H1N1 2009 vaccine upon enrollment and approximately 1 month later. Immunogenicity was determined by haemagglutination inhibition assay. The level of immune activation was determined by identification of CD38 and HLA-DR on CD8+ T cells. Patients were divided into 2 groups which include patients who had an undetectable HIV viral load (HIV detectable group and patients who show virological failure (HIV nondetectable group. The results showed seroconversion rate of 55.2% in HIV nondetectable group, whereas 31.3% was found in HIV detectable group. Both groups of patients showed no major increase in immune activation after immunization. Interestingly, a decrease in the frequency of CD8+ T cells that coexpressed CD38 and HLA-DR was observed after immunization in both groups of patients. We suggested that immunization with influenza A H1N1 2009 vaccine can induce immune response to the pandemic virus without major impact on HIV viral replication and immune activation.

  6. Development of a walleye spleen stromal cell line sensitive to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV IVb) and to protection by synthetic dsRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Bender, Aaron W; Ammendolia, Dustin A; Lumsden, John S; Dixon, Brian; Bols, Niels C

    2015-07-01

    A cell line, WE-spleen6, has been developed from the stromal layer of primary spleen cell cultures. On conventional plastic, WE-spleen6 cells had a spindle-shaped morphology at low cell density but grew to become epithelial-like at confluency. On the commercial extracellular matrix (ECM), Matrigel, the cells remained spindle-shaped and formed lumen-like structures. WE-spleen6 cells had intermediate filament protein, vimentin and the ECM protein, collagen I, but not smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) and lacked alkaline phosphatase and phagocytic activities. WE-spleen6 was more susceptible to infection with VHSV IVb than a fibroblast and epithelial cell lines from the walleye caudal fin, WE-cfin11f and WE-cfin11e, respectively. Viral transcripts and proteins appeared earlier in WE-spleen6 cultures as did cytopathic effect (CPE) and significant virus production. The synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (pIC), induced the antiviral protein Mx in both cell lines. Treating WE-spleen6 cultures with pIC prior to infection with VHSV IVb inhibited the early accumulation of viral transcripts and proteins and delayed the appearance of CPE and significant viral production. Of particular note, pIC caused the disappearance of viral P protein 2 days post infection. WE-spleen6 should be useful for investigating the impact of VHSV IVb on hematopoietic organs and the actions of pIC on the rhabdovirus life cycle.

  7. A protein G fragment from the salmonid viral hemorrhagic septicemia rhabdovirus induces cell-to-cell fusion and membrane phosphatidylserine translocation at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A M; Rocha, A I; Mas, V; Pérez, L; Encinar, J A; Nuñez, E; Fernandez, A; Gonzalez Ros, J M; Gavilanes, F; Coll, J M

    2001-12-07

    The fusion-related properties of segments p9, p3, p4, and p9 + p2 surrounding the p2 phospholipid-binding domain of the protein G (pG) of the salmonid rhabdovirus of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) (Nuñez, E., Fernandez, A. M., Estepa, A., Gonzalez-Ros, J. M., Gavilanes, F., and Coll, J. M. (1998) Virology 243, 322-330; Estepa, A., and Coll, J. M. (1996) Virology 216, 60-70), have been studied at neutral and fusion (low) pH values by using its derived peptides. Cell-to-cell fusion, translocation of phosphatidylserine, and inhibition of fusion of pG-transfected cells defined the p9 + p2 (fragment 11, sequence 56-110) as a fragment with higher specific activity for anionic phospholipid aggregation than the previously reported p2. While fragment 11, p2, and p3 showed interactions with anionic phospholipids, p9 and p4 showed no interactions with any phospholipids. When added to a cell monolayer model at low pH, fragment 11 induced pH-dependent cell-to-cell fusion and translocated phosphatidylserine from the inner to the outer leaflet of the membrane. At low pH and in the presence of anionic phospholipids, fragment 11 showed more than 80% beta-sheet conformation (IR and CD spectroscopies). Finally, anti-fragment 11 antibodies inhibited low pH-dependent pG-transfected cell-to-cell fusion. All of the data support the conclusion that fragment 11 is a primary determinant of some of the viral cell fusion events in VHSV.

  8. Schrödinger’s Cheshire Cat: Are Haploid Emiliania huxleyi Cells Resistant to Viral Infection or Not?

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    Gideon J. Mordecai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi is the main calcite producer on Earth and is routinely infected by a virus (EhV; a double stranded DNA (dsDNA virus belonging to the family Phycodnaviridae. E. huxleyi exhibits a haplodiploid life cycle; the calcified diploid stage is non-motile and forms extensive blooms. The haploid phase is a non-calcified biflagellated cell bearing organic scales. Haploid cells are thought to resist infection, through a process deemed the “Cheshire Cat” escape strategy; however, a recent study detected the presence of viral lipids in the same haploid strain. Here we report on the application of an E. huxleyi CCMP1516 EhV-86 combined tiling array (TA that further confirms an EhV infection in the RCC1217 haploid strain, which grew without any signs of cell lysis. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and PCR verified the presence of viral RNA in the haploid cells, yet indicated an absence of viral DNA, respectively. These infected cells are an alternative stage of the virus life cycle deemed the haplococcolithovirocell. In this instance, the host is both resistant to and infected by EhV, i.e., the viral transcriptome is present in haploid cells whilst there is no evidence of viral lysis. This superimposed state is reminiscent of Schrödinger’s cat; of being simultaneously both dead and alive.

  9. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  10. Structural basis for the antiviral activity of BST-2/tetherin and its viral antagonism

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    Juan F. eArias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible host restriction factor bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. In turn, these viruses have evolved specific antagonists to counteract this host antiviral molecule, such as the HIV-1 protein Vpu. BST-2 is a type II transmembrane protein with an unusual topology consisting of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail (CT followed by a single transmembrane (TM domain, a coiled-coil extracellular (EC domain, and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor at the C terminus. We and others showed that BST-2 restricts enveloped virus release by bridging the host and virion membranes with its two opposing membrane anchors and that deletion of either one completely abrogates antiviral activity. The EC domain also shows conserved structural properties that are required for antiviral function. It contains several destabilizing amino acids that confer the molecule with conformational flexibility to sustain the protein's function as a virion tether, and three conserved cysteine residues that mediate homodimerization of BST-2, as well as acting as a molecular ruler that separates the membrane anchors. Conversely, the efficient release of virions is promoted by the HIV-1 Vpu protein and other viral antagonists. Our group and others provided evidence from mutational analyses indicating that Vpu antagonism of BST-2-mediated viral restriction requires a highly specific interaction of their mutual TM domains. This interpretation is further supported and expanded by the findings of the latest structural modeling studies showing that critical amino acids in a conserved helical face of these TM domains are required for Vpu-BST-2 interaction and antagonism. In this review, we summarize the current advances in our understanding of the structural basis for BST-2 antiviral function as well as BST-2-specific viral antagonism.

  11. microRNA control of interferons and interferon induced anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedger, Lisa M

    2013-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are spontaneously produced in response to virus infection. They act by binding to IFN-receptors (IFN-R), which trigger JAK/STAT cell signalling and the subsequent induction of hundreds of IFN-inducible genes, including both protein-coding and microRNA genes. IFN-induced genes then act synergistically to prevent virus replication and create an anti-viral state. miRNA are therefore integral to the innate response to virus infection and are important components of IFN-mediated biology. On the other hand viruses also encode miRNAs that in some cases interfere directly with the IFN response to infection. This review summarizes the important roles of miRNAs in virus infection acting both as IFN-stimulated anti-viral molecules and as critical regulators of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes. It also highlights how recent knowledge in RNA editing influence miRNA control of virus infection.

  12. Recovery of known T-cell epitopes by computational scanning of a viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logean, Antoine; Rognan, Didier

    2002-04-01

    A new computational method (EpiDock) is proposed for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC proteins, from the amino acid sequence of any protein of immunological interest. Starting from the primary structure of the target protein, individual three-dimensional structures of all possible MHC-peptide (8-, 9- and 10-mers) complexes are obtained by homology modelling. A free energy scoring function (Fresno) is then used to predict the absolute binding free energy of all possible peptides to the class I MHC restriction protein. Assuming that immunodominant epitopes are usually found among the top MHC binders, the method can thus be applied to predict the location of immunogenic peptides on the sequence of the protein target. When applied to the prediction of HLA-A*0201-restricted T-cell epitopes from the Hepatitis B virus, EpiDock was able to recover 92% of known high affinity binders and 80% of known epitopes within a filtered subset of all possible nonapeptides corresponding to about one tenth of the full theoretical list. The proposed method is fully automated and fast enough to scan a viral genome in less than an hour on a parallel computing architecture. As it requires very few starting experimental data, EpiDock can be used: (i) to predict potential T-cell epitopes from viral genomes (ii) to roughly predict still unknown peptide binding motifs for novel class I MHC alleles.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the specific T cell response to a viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bidot, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    T cell is one of the most important cells in specific immunity. In order to devise a tool for understanding and predicting some mechanisms of the immune system, a model for T cell response is proposed. The T lymphocyte activation by the recognition of a peptide carried by an antigen presenting cell is an essential step of this immune response. T cell activation was modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations of chemical kinetics type, representing the temporal evolution of the con...

  14. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Trevisan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance.

  15. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesic Matthew

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF II (p30 and p28, respectively acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Results In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Δp28 was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Δp28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Δp28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for

  16. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Sahana

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya. We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome, associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54, which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  17. Magnetically enhanced adeno-associated viral vector delivery for human neural stem cell infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunmi; Oh, Ji-Seon; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Park, Kook In; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy technology is a powerful tool to elucidate the molecular cues that precisely regulate stem cell fates, but developing safe vehicles or mechanisms that are capable of delivering genes to stem cells with high efficiency remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a magnetically guided adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery system for gene delivery to human neural stem cells (hNSCs). Magnetically guided AAV delivery resulted in rapid accumulation of vectors on target cells followed by forced penetration of the vectors across the plasma membrane, ultimately leading to fast and efficient cellular transduction. To combine AAV vectors with the magnetically guided delivery, AAV was genetically modified to display hexa-histidine (6xHis) on the physically exposed loop of the AAV2 capsid (6xHis AAV), which interacted with nickel ions chelated on NTA-biotin conjugated to streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NiStNPs). NiStNP-mediated 6xHis AAV delivery under magnetic fields led to significantly enhanced cellular transduction in a non-permissive cell type (i.e., hNSCs). In addition, this delivery method reduced the viral exposure times required to induce a high level of transduction by as much as to 2-10 min of hNSC infection, thus demonstrating the great potential of magnetically guided AAV delivery for numerous gene therapy and stem cell applications.

  18. Regulation of U6 Promoter Activity by Transcriptional Interference in Viral Vector-Based RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linghu Nie; Meghna Das Thakur; Yumei Wang; Qin Su; Yongliang Zhao; Yunfeng Feng

    2010-01-01

    The direct negative impact of the transcriptional activity of one component on the second one in c/s is referred to as transcriptional interference (TI).U6 is a type Ⅲ RNA polymerase Ⅲ promoter commonly used for driving small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression in vector-based RNAi.In the design and construction of viral vectors,multiple transcription units may be arranged in close proximity in a space-limited vector.Determining if U6 promoter activity can be affected by TI is critical for the expression of target shRNA in gene therapy or loss-of-function studies.In this research,we designed and implemented a modified retroviral system where shRNA and exogenous gene expressions were driven by two independent transcriptional units.We arranged U6 promoter driving.shRNA expression and UbiC promoter in two promoter arrangements.In primary macrophages,we found U6 promoter activity was inhibited by UbiC promoter when in the divergent arrangement but not in tandem.In contrast,PKG promoter had no such negative impact.Instead of enhancing U6 promoter activity,CMV enhancer had significant negative impact on U6 promoter activity in the presence of UbiC promoter.Our results indicate that U6 promoter activity can be affected by TI in a proximal promoter-specific and arrangement-dependent manner.

  19. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Aiello Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  20. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression in oral epithelial cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chiang, Hsiao-Han; Lai, Yu-Lin; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) function in the anti-apoptotic pathway, and are commonly exploited by various viruses to accomplish the viral life cycle. This study examined the role of the PI3K pathway in human oral epithelial cells following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The results showed that HSV-1 induced the phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). Phosphorylation of Akt, but not GSK-3, induced by HSV-1 was PI3K-dependent. The expression of HSV-1 immediate-early genes may be involved in the initial phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3. Inhibition of HSV-1-induced PI3K activity increased DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 7 compared with infected alone. Inhibition of PI3K attenuated the expression of HSV-1-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), but not thymidine kinase (TK) and viral replication. Collectively, these data suggested that, in oral epithelial cells, the HSV-1-induced PI3K/Akt activation was involved in the regulation of apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression.

  1. NKG2D stimulation of CD8+ T cells during priming promotes their capacity to produce cytokines in response to viral infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazović, Inga; Lenartić, Maja; Jelenčić, Vedrana; Jurković, Slaven; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Jonjić, Stipan; Polić, Bojan; Wensveen, Felix M

    2017-04-04

    NKG2D is an activating receptor that is expressed on most cytotoxic cells of the immune system, including NK cells, γδ and CD8(+) T cells. It is still a matter of debate whether and how NKG2D mediates priming of CD8(+) T cells in vivo, due to a lack of studies where NKG2D is eliminated exclusively in these cells. Here we studied the impact of NKG2D on effector CD8(+) T-cell formation. NKG2D-deficiency that is restricted to murine CD8(+) T cells did not impair antigen-specific T-cell expansion following mCMV and LCMV infection, but reduced their capacity to produce cytokines. Upon infection, conventional dendritic cells induce NKG2D ligands, which drive cytokine production on CD8(+) T cells via the Dap10 signaling pathway. T-cell development, homing and proliferation were not affected by NKG2D deficiency and cytotoxicity was only impaired when strong T-cell receptor stimuli were used. Transfer of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated that NKG2D-deficiency attenuated their capacity to reduce viral loads. The inability of NKG2D-deficient cells to produce cytokines could be overcome with injection of IL-15 super-agonist during priming. In summary, our data shows that NKG2D has a non-redundant role in priming of CD8(+) T cells to produce antiviral cytokines. Upon viral infection, classical Dendritic cells induce expression of the NKG2D ligand H60. NKG2D stimulation during priming enhances the ability of CD8 T cells to produce cytokines but not increases cytotoxic potential upon T cell receptor engagement in the periphery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeted imaging of ovarian cancer cells using viral nanoparticles doped with indocyanine green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Yadir; Bahmani, Baharak; Jung, Bonsu; Vullev, Valentine; Kundra, Vikas; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-03-01

    Our group has constructed a new type of viral nanoparticles (VNPs) from genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) that encapsulates the FDA-approved near infrared (NIR) indocyanine green (ICG)[1]. We refer to these VNPs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since the constructs lack the genomic content of wild-type BMV. One of our areas of interest is the application of OVGs for real-time intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging of small peritoneal ovarian tumor nodules. We target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) expression in ovarian cancer as a biomarker associated with ovarian cancer, since its over-expression is linked to the disease's progression to death. We functionalize the OVGs with anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibodies using reductive amination methods. We used fluorescence imaging to visualize the SKOV-3 cells (high HER-2 expression) after incubation with free ICG, OVGs, and functionalized OVGs. Our results suggest the possibility of using anti-HER2 conjugated OVGs in conjunction with cytoreductive surgery to detect small tumor nodules (<5cm) which currently are not excised during surgery.

  3. DMPD: The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086372 The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive anti...ritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. PubmedID 18086372 Title Th...e role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. Autho

  4. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Upkar S.; Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Singh, Harsimran D.; Carey, Ivana; Foster, Graham R.; Maini, Mala K.; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.

    2016-01-01

    NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are ‘primed’ with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(t)ides (sequential NUC therapy), an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB. PMID:27487232

  5. Optical manipulation of a single human virus for study of viral-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ximiao; DeSantis, Michael C.; Tian, Chunjuan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in suspension as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, we have recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. The capability to optically trap a single virion in suspension not only allows us to determine, for the first time, the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, but also quantitate the heterogeneity among individual virions with single-molecule resolution, the results of which shed light on the molecular mechanisms of virion infectivity. Here we report the further development of a set of microscopic techniques to physically deliver a single HIV-1 virion to a single host cell in solution. Combined with simultaneous epifluorescence imaging, the attachment and dissociation events of individual manipulated virions on host cell surface can be measured and the results help us understand the role of diffusion in mediating viral attachment to host cells. The establishment of these techniques opens up new ways for investigation of a wide range of virion-cell interactions, and should be applicable for study of B cell interactions with particulate antigens such as viruses.

  6. Internalization of novel non-viral vector TAT-streptavidin into human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulomaa Markku S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell-penetrating peptide derived from the Human immunodeficiency virus-1 transactivator protein Tat possesses the capacity to promote the effective uptake of various cargo molecules across the plasma membrane in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this study was to characterize the uptake and delivery mechanisms of a novel streptavidin fusion construct, TAT47–57-streptavidin (TAT-SA, 60 kD. SA represents a potentially useful TAT-fusion partner due to its ability to perform as a versatile intracellular delivery vector for a wide array of biotinylated molecules or cargoes. Results By confocal and immunoelectron microscopy the majority of internalized TAT-SA was shown to accumulate in perinuclear vesicles in both cancer and non-cancer cell lines. The uptake studies in living cells with various fluorescent endocytic markers and inhibiting agents suggested that TAT-SA is internalized into cells efficiently, using both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lipid-raft-mediated macropinocytosis. When endosomal release of TAT-SA was enhanced through the incorporation of a biotinylated, pH-responsive polymer poly(propylacrylic acid (PPAA, nuclear localization of TAT-SA and TAT-SA bound to biotin was markedly improved. Additionally, no significant cytotoxicity was detected in the TAT-SA constructs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that TAT-SA-PPAA is a potential non-viral vector to be utilized in protein therapeutics to deliver biotinylated molecules both into cytoplasm and nucleus of human cells.

  7. Endogenous type C viral gene expression in cultures of fetal diploid baboon cells treated with 5'-bromodeoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, G.; Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.

    1981-04-30

    Cultures of fetal diploid baboon fibroblasts treated with 5-bromodeoxyuridine synthesized protein antigenically related to baboon endogenous type C viral gag gene product, p28. Radioimmunoassays detected p28 antigenic specificities indistinguishable from those of purified virus. However, viral RNA-dependent DNA polymerase was not detected in culture fluids, and infectious virus was rarely recovered by cocultivation with susceptible heterologous cells. Extracellular particles containing p28 were not readily detected, further indicating that viral gag gene-coded proteins were synthesized independently of whole virus. Normal cultures of the same baboon cells exhibited endogenous expression of a glycoprotein antigenically related to BEV gp70, suggesting differential regulation of the endogenous gag and env gene-coded products. Baboon cell cultures exogenously infected with BEV produced extracellular particles having viral p28 and gp70 as measured by radioimmunoassays of culture fluids. Since induced cultures have about 10% positive cells versus close to 100% for infected culture, the amount of p28 per producing cell was about the same in both cell populations.

  8. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  9. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V S; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-08-02

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  10. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M. Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  11. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Swadling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA, or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3 vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA, encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut, used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy, determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells

  12. Iron increases HMOX1 and decreases hepatitis C viral expression in HCV-expressing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Hou; Lisa Rossi; Ying Shan; Jian-Yu Zheng; Richard W Lambrecht; Herbert L Bonkovsky

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of iron on oxidative stress,heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) and hepatitis C viral (HCV) expression in human hepatoma cells stably expressing HCV proteins.METHODS: Effects of iron on oxidative stress, HMOX1,and HCV expression were assessed in CON1 cells.Measurements included mRNA by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels by Western blots.RESULTS: Iron, in the form of ferric nitrilotriacetate,increased oxidative stress and up-regulated HMOX1 gene expression. Iron did not affect mRNA or protein levels of Bach1, a repressor of HMOX1. Silencing the up-regulation of HMOX1 nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by Nrf2-siRNA decreased FeNTA-mediated up-regulation of HMOX1 mRNA levels. These iron effects were completely blocked by deferoxamine (DFO). Iron also significantly decreased levels of HCV core mRNA and protein by 80%-90%,nonstructural 5A mRNA by 90% and protein by about 50% in the Con1 full length HCV replicon cells,whereas DFO increased them.CONCLUSION: Excess iron up-regulates HMOX1 and down-regulates HCV gene expression in hepatoma cells. This probably mitigates liver injury caused by combined iron overload and HCV infection.

  13. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy before detection of colonic infiltration by HIV reduces viral reservoirs, inflammation and immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Trevor A; Fletcher, James LK; Sereti, Irini; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Dewar, Robin; Krebs, Shelly J; Chomchey, Nitiya; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Schuetz, Alexandra; Michael, Nelson L; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Chomont, Nicolas; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colonic infiltration by HIV occurs soon after infection, establishing a persistent viral reservoir and a barrier to cure. We investigated virologic and immunologic correlates of detectable colonic HIV RNA during acute HIV infection (AHI) and their response to antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods From 49,458 samples screened for HIV, 74 participants were enrolled during AHI and 41 consented to optional sigmoidoscopy, HIV RNA was categorized as detectable (≥50 copies/mg) or undetectable in homogenized colon biopsy specimens. Biomarkers and HIV burden in blood, colon and cerebrospinal fluid were compared between groups and after 24 weeks of ART. Results Colonic HIV RNA was detectable in 31 participants (76%) and was associated with longer duration since HIV exposure (median 16 vs. 11 days, p=0.02), higher median plasma levels of cytokines and inflammatory markers (CXCL10 476 vs. 148 pg/mL, p=0.02; TNF-RII 1036 vs. 649 pg/mL, p<0.01; neopterin 2405 vs. 1368 pg/mL, p=0.01) and higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation in the blood (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR)/CD38 expression 14.4% vs. 7.6%, p <0.01) and colon (8.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.01). After 24 weeks of ART, participants with baseline detectable colonic HIV RNA demonstrated persistent elevations in total HIV DNA in colonic mucosal mononuclear cells (CMMCs) (median 61 vs. 0 copies/106 CMMCs, p=0.03) and a trend towards higher total HIV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (41 vs. 1.5 copies/106 PBMCs, p=0.06). There were no persistent differences in immune activation and inflammation. Conclusions The presence of detectable colonic HIV RNA at the time of ART initiation during AHI is associated with higher levels of proviral DNA after 24 weeks of treatment. Seeding of HIV in the gut may have long-lasting effects on the size of persistent viral reservoirs and may represent an important therapeutic target in eradication strategies. PMID:27637172

  14. Exposure to the viral by-product dsRNA or Coxsackievirus B5 triggers pancreatic beta cell apoptosis via a Bim / Mcl-1 imbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel L Colli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rise in type 1 diabetes (T1D incidence in recent decades is probably related to modifications in environmental factors. Viruses are among the putative environmental triggers of T1D. The mechanisms regulating beta cell responses to viruses, however, remain to be defined. We have presently clarified the signaling pathways leading to beta cell apoptosis following exposure to the viral mimetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and a diabetogenic enterovirus (Coxsackievirus B5. Internal dsRNA induces cell death via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In this process, activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis inhibition, leading to downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1. Mcl-1 decrease results in the release of the BH3-only protein Bim, which activates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Indeed, Bim knockdown prevented both dsRNA- and Coxsackievirus B5-induced beta cell death, and counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Mcl-1 silencing. These observations indicate that the balance between Mcl-1 and Bim is a key factor regulating beta cell survival during diabetogenic viral infections.

  15. Up-regulation effect of hepatitis B virus genome A1846T mutation on viral replication and core promoter activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling JIANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV genome nucleotide A1846T mutation on the viral replication capacity and the transcription activity of HBV core promoter (CP in vitro. Methods  A total of 385 patients with hepatitis B admitted to the 302 Hospital of PLA were enrolled in the study, including 116 with moderate chronic hepatitis B (CHB-M, 123 with severe chronic hepatitis B (CHB-S, and 146 with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF. Serum HBV DNA was isolated and full-length HBV genome was amplified. The incidence of A1846T was analyzed. Full-length HBV genomes containing 1846T mutation were cloned into pGEM-T easy vector, and the counterpart wild-type 1846A plasmids were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The full-length HBV genome was released from recombinant plasmid by BspQ Ⅰ/Sca Ⅰ digestion, and then transfected into HepG2 cells. Secreted HBsAg level and intracellular HBV core particles were measured 72 hours post-transfection to analyze the replication capacity (a 1.0-fold HBV genome model. 1846 mutant and wild-type full-length HBV genomes were extracted to amplify the fragment of HBV CP region, and the dual luciferase reporter of the pGL3-CP was constructed. The luciferase activity was detected 48 hours post-transfection. Results  The incidence of A1846T mutation gradually increased with the severity of hepatitis B, reaching 31.03%, 42.27%, and 55.48% in CHB-M, CHB-S and ACLF patients respectively (P<0.01. The replication capacity of 1846T mutants, level of secreted HBsAg, and transcriptional activity of CP promoter were increased by 320%, 28% and 85% respectively, compared with 1846A wild-type strains. While the more common double mutation A1762T/G1764A in CP region was increased by 67%, 9% and 72% respectively, compared with its counterpart wild-type strains. A1846T had a greater influence on viral replication capacity in vitro. Conclusions A1846T mutation could significantly increase the

  16. Dual role of novel ingenol derivatives from Euphorbia tirucalli in HIV replication: inhibition of de novo infection and activation of viral LTR.

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    Celina M Abreu

    Full Text Available HIV infection is not cleared by antiretroviral drugs due to the presence of latently infected cells that are not eliminated with current therapies and persist in the blood and organs of infected patients. New compounds to activate these latent reservoirs have been evaluated so that, along with HAART, they can be used to activate latent virus and eliminate the latently infected cells resulting in eradication of viral infection. Here we describe three novel diterpenes isolated from the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli, a tropical shrub. These molecules, identified as ingenols, were modified at carbon 3 and termed ingenol synthetic derivatives (ISD. They activated the HIV-LTR in reporter cell lines and human PBMCs with latent virus in concentrations as low as 10 nM. ISDs were also able to inhibit the replication of HIV-1 subtype B and C in MT-4 cells and human PBMCs at concentrations of EC50 0.02 and 0.09 µM respectively, which are comparable to the EC50 of some antiretroviral currently used in AIDS treatment. Control of viral replication may be caused by downregulation of surface CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4 observed after ISD treatment in vitro. These compounds appear to be less cytotoxic than other diterpenes such as PMA and prostratin, with effective dose versus toxic dose TI>400. Although the mechanisms of action of the three ISDs are primarily attributed to the PKC pathway, downregulation of surface receptors and stimulation of the viral LTR might be differentially modulated by different PKC isoforms.

  17. A Critical Role of IL-21-Induced BATF in Sustaining CD8-T-Cell-Mediated Chronic Viral Control

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    Gang Xin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of chronic viral infections by CD8 T cells is critically dependent on CD4 help. In particular, helper-derived IL-21 plays a key role in sustaining the CD8 T cell response; however, the molecular pathways by which IL-21 sustains CD8 T cell immunity remain unclear. We demonstrate that IL-21 causes a phenotypic switch of transcription factor expression in CD8 T cells during chronic viral infection characterized by sustained BATF expression. Importantly, BATF expression during chronic infection is both required for optimal CD8 T cell persistence and anti-viral effector function and sufficient to rescue “unhelped” CD8 T cells. Mechanistically, BATF sustains the response by cooperating with IRF4, an antigen-induced transcription factor that is also critically required for CD8 T cell maintenance, to preserve Blimp-1 expression and thereby sustain CD8 T cell effector function. Collectively, these data suggest that CD4 T cells “help” the CD8 response during chronic infection via IL-21-induced BATF expression.

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  19. Defining CD8+ T cell determinants during human viral infection in populations of Asian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Tan, Anthony T; Chia, Adeline; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A P; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; MacAry, Paul A; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The identification of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell determinants is a fundamental requirement for our understanding of viral disease pathogenesis. T cell epitope mapping strategies increasingly rely on algorithms that predict the binding of peptides to MHC molecules. There is, however, little information on the reliability of predictive algorithms in the context of human populations, in particular, for those expressing HLA class I molecules for which there are limited experimental data available. In this study, we evaluate the ability of NetMHCpan to predict antiviral CD8(+) T cell epitopes that we identified with a traditional approach in patients of Asian ethnicity infected with Dengue virus, hepatitis B virus, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We experimentally demonstrate that the predictive power of algorithms defining peptide-MHC interaction directly correlates with the amount of training data on which the predictive algorithm has been constructed. These results highlight the limited applicability of the NetMHCpan algorithm for populations expressing HLA molecules for which there are little or no experimental binding data, such as those of Asian ethnicity.

  20. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

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    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  1. Non-viral bone morphogenetic protein 2 transfection of rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Dolder, J. van den; Yang, F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles have shown potential as non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The aim of this study was to induce bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)2 transfection in rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as a gene vector and then to evaluate the efficiency and

  2. Viral suppressors of RNA interference impair RNA silencing induced by a Semliki Forest virus replicon in tick cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, S.; Billecocq, A.; Crance, J.M.; Prins, M.W.; Garin, D.; Bouloy, M.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently shown that infection of ISE6 tick cells by a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) expressing a heterologous gene induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and silencing of the gene. To gain information on RNA interference (RNAi) in ticks, three known viral inhibitors that act in diff

  3. [The presence of non-integrated SV40 viral DNA in nonproductive cells transformed by this virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, L; Bénichou, D; Monier, R

    1975-09-08

    The hot phenol extraction of nuclic acids reveals the presence of small amounts of nonintegrated SV 40 DNA in transformed syrian hamster or mouse cells. The extractibility of the viral DNA is influenced by its conformation; SV 40 DNA, form I is preferentially extracted by contrast with form III DNA.

  4. Viral retasking of hBre1/RNF20 to recruit hPaf1 for transcriptional activation.

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    Gregory J Fonseca

    Full Text Available Upon infection, human adenovirus (HAdV must activate the expression of its early genes to reprogram the cellular environment to support virus replication. This activation is orchestrated in large part by the first HAdV gene expressed during infection, early region 1A (E1A. E1A binds and appropriates components of the cellular transcriptional machinery to modulate cellular gene transcription and activate viral early genes transcription. Previously, we identified hBre1/RNF20 as a target for E1A. The interaction between E1A and hBre1 antagonizes the innate antiviral response by blocking H2B monoubiquitination, a chromatin modification necessary for the interferon (IFN response. Here, we describe a second distinct role for the interaction of E1A with hBre1 in transcriptional activation of HAdV early genes. Furthermore, we show that E1A changes the function of hBre1 from a ubiquitin ligase involved in substrate selection to a scaffold which recruits hPaf1 as a means to stimulate transcription and transcription-coupled histone modifications. By using hBre1 to recruit hPaf1, E1A is able to optimally activate viral early transcription and begin the cycle of viral replication. The ability of E1A to target hBre1 to simultaneously repress cellular IFN dependent transcription while activating viral transcription, represents an elegant example of the incredible economy of action accomplished by a viral regulatory protein through a single protein interaction.

  5. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Melanie C., E-mail: melanie.mann@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Strobel, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.strobel@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Fleckenstein, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.fleckenstein@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Kress, Andrea K., E-mail: andrea.kress@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-09-15

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo.

  6. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  7. MKK7 confers different activities to viral infection of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and nervous necrosis virus (NNV) in grouper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minglan; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase 7 (MKK7) is one of the major stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)-activating kinases in response to environmental or physiological stimuli. Here a MKK7 named as Ec-MKK7 was identified from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA of Ec-MKK7 was 1853 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1272 bp encoding a putative protein of 423 amino acids. A characteristic S-K-A-K-T motif was contained in the domain of dual-specificity protein kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (PKc_MKK7). Intracellular localization showed that Ec-MKK7 was localized in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of grouper spleen (GS) and/or grouper brain (EAGB) cells. Moreover, Ec-MKK7 was universally expressed in all examined tissues and showed expression modulation to challenges of lipopolysacchride (LPS), Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) in vivo. A gene targeting strategy over-expressing Ec-MKK7 was performed to examine the activities of MKK7 to viral infection in vitro. Our data showed that Ec-MKK7 was involved in the evasion and replication of SGIV but played an antiviral role to the infection of nervous necrosis virus (NNV). All results demonstrated that Ec-MKK7 could play important roles in grouper innate immunity and show distinct functions on virus infection.

  8. Sulphated Polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus Seaweeds both Inhibit Viral Attachment/Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion, in NDV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Aguilar-Briseño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphated polysaccharides (SP extracted from seaweeds have antiviral properties and are much less cytotoxic than conventional drugs, but little is known about their mode of action. Combination antiviral chemotherapy may offer advantages over single agent therapy, increasing efficiency, potency and delaying the emergence of resistant virus. The paramyxoviridae family includes pathogens causing morbidity and mortality worldwide in humans and animals, such as the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV in poultry. This study aims at determining the antiviral activity and mechanism of action in vitro of an ulvan (SP from the green seaweed Ulva clathrata, and of its mixture with a fucoidan (SP from Cladosiphon okamuranus, against La Sota NDV strain. The ulvan antiviral activity was tested using syncytia formation, exhibiting an IC50 of 0.1 μg/mL; ulvan had a better anti cell-cell spread effect than that previously shown for fucoidan, and inhibited cell-cell fusion via a direct effect on the F0 protein, but did not show any virucidal effect. The mixture of ulvan and fucoidan showed a greater anti-spread effect than SPs alone, but ulvan antagonizes the effect of fucoidan on the viral attachment/entry. Both SPs may be promising antivirals against paramyxovirus infection but their mixture has no clear synergistic advantage.

  9. Viral replication rate regulates clinical outcome and CD8 T cell responses during highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

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    Yasuko Hatta

    Full Text Available Since the first recorded infection of humans with H5N1 viruses of avian origin in 1997, sporadic human infections continue to occur with a staggering mortality rate of >60%. Although sustained human-to-human transmission has not occurred yet, there is a growing concern that these H5N1 viruses might acquire this trait and raise the specter of a pandemic. Despite progress in deciphering viral determinants of pathogenicity, we still lack crucial information on virus/immune system interactions pertaining to severe disease and high mortality associated with human H5N1 influenza virus infections. Using two human isolates of H5N1 viruses that differ in their pathogenicity in mice, we have defined mechanistic links among the rate of viral replication, mortality, CD8 T cell responses, and immunopathology. The extreme pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses was directly linked to the ability of the virus to replicate rapidly, and swiftly attain high steady-state titers in the lungs within 48 hours after infection. The remarkably high replication rate of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus did not prevent the induction of IFN-β or activation of CD8 T cells, but the CD8 T cell response was ineffective in controlling viral replication in the lungs and CD8 T cell deficiency did not affect viral titers or mortality. Additionally, BIM deficiency ameliorated lung pathology and inhibited T cell apoptosis without affecting survival of mice. Therefore, rapidly replicating, highly lethal H5N1 viruses could simply outpace and overwhelm the adaptive immune responses, and kill the host by direct cytopathic effects. However, therapeutic suppression of early viral replication and the associated enhancement of CD8 T cell responses improved the survival of mice following a lethal H5N1 infection. These findings suggest that suppression of early H5N1 virus replication is key to the programming of an effective host response, which has implications in treatment of this infection in humans.

  10. Viral replication rate regulates clinical outcome and CD8 T cell responses during highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Yasuko; Hershberger, Karen; Shinya, Kyoko; Proll, Sean C; Dubielzig, Richard R; Hatta, Masato; Katze, Michael G; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Suresh, M

    2010-10-07

    Since the first recorded infection of humans with H5N1 viruses of avian origin in 1997, sporadic human infections continue to occur with a staggering mortality rate of >60%. Although sustained human-to-human transmission has not occurred yet, there is a growing concern that these H5N1 viruses might acquire this trait and raise the specter of a pandemic. Despite progress in deciphering viral determinants of pathogenicity, we still lack crucial information on virus/immune system interactions pertaining to severe disease and high mortality associated with human H5N1 influenza virus infections. Using two human isolates of H5N1 viruses that differ in their pathogenicity in mice, we have defined mechanistic links among the rate of viral replication, mortality, CD8 T cell responses, and immunopathology. The extreme pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses was directly linked to the ability of the virus to replicate rapidly, and swiftly attain high steady-state titers in the lungs within 48 hours after infection. The remarkably high replication rate of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus did not prevent the induction of IFN-β or activation of CD8 T cells, but the CD8 T cell response was ineffective in controlling viral replication in the lungs and CD8 T cell deficiency did not affect viral titers or mortality. Additionally, BIM deficiency ameliorated lung pathology and inhibited T cell apoptosis without affecting survival of mice. Therefore, rapidly replicating, highly lethal H5N1 viruses could simply outpace and overwhelm the adaptive immune responses, and kill the host by direct cytopathic effects. However, therapeutic suppression of early viral replication and the associated enhancement of CD8 T cell responses improved the survival of mice following a lethal H5N1 infection. These findings suggest that suppression of early H5N1 virus replication is key to the programming of an effective host response, which has implications in treatment of this infection in humans.

  11. Evaluation on Anti-hepatitis Viral Activity of Vitis vinifer L

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    Long Ma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Suosuo grape (Vitis vinifer L is traditionally used as a therapeutic agent for measles and hepatitis by the ethnic Uighurs. This work aimed to investigate the anti-HBV effect of total triterpene (VTT, total flavonoids (VTF and total polysaccharides (VTP from Suosuo grape, and their synergistic effects were also tested. The viral antigens of cellular secretion, HBsAg and HBeAg, were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.The quantity of HBV-DNA released in the supernatant was assayed by real-time PCR. It was found that it effectively suppressed the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg from HepG2.2.15 cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as the HBV DNA. The results of orthogonal design experiment showed that the combination of VTT 20 μg/mL, VTF 50 μg/mL and VTP 50 μg/mL had the best optimistic inhibitory effects on HBeAg secretion.

  12. Evaluation on anti-hepatitis viral activity of Vitis vinifer L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun; Li, Haibo; Ma, Long

    2010-10-22

    Suosuo grape (Vitis vinifer L) is traditionally used as a therapeutic agent for measles and hepatitis by the ethnic Uighurs. This work aimed to investigate the anti-HBV effect of total triterpene (VTT), total flavonoids (VTF) and total polysaccharides (VTP) from Suosuo grape, and their synergistic effects were also tested. The viral antigens of cellular secretion, HBsAg and HBeAg, were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The quantity of HBV-DNA released in the supernatant was assayed by real-time PCR. It was found that it effectively suppressed the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg from HepG2.2.15 cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as the HBV DNA. The results of orthogonal design experiment showed that the combination of VTT 20 μg/mL, VTF 50 μg/mL and VTP 50 μg/mL had the best optimistic inhibitory effects on HBeAg secretion.

  13. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

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    Sorensen Grith L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr/Thr 11 form of SP-D is associated with low serum levels and assembles predominantly as trimers as opposed to the more common multimeric forms of SP-D. Methods Preliminary experiments were done to establish the effects of different monoclonal antibodies against SP-D on ability of SP-D to bind to or neutralize the virus. We then purified natural human trimeric and multimeric forms of SP-D from amniotic fluid and tested ability of these preparations to bind to IAV, to inhibit infectivity and hemagglutination activity of IAV in vitro. Results In initial experiments mAbs directed against different areas on the CRD of SP-D were found to have differing effects on antiviral activity. Using an mAb that did not interfere with antiviral activity of SP-D, we confirm that natural SP-D trimers had reduced ability to bind to IAV. In addition, the trimers had reduced ability to neutralize IAV as compared to natural human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. Conclusion These studies indicate that a common human polymorphic form of SP-D may modulate host defense against IAV and give impetus to clinical studies correlating this genotype with risk for IAV infection in susceptible groups. We also show that mAbs directed against different areas on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein.

  14. Host Cell Protein C9orf9 Promotes Viral Proliferation via Interaction with HSV-1 UL25 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Yan-mei Li; Long-ding Liu; Li Jiang; Ma Ji; Rui-ju Jiang; Lei Guo; Yun Liao; Qi-han Li

    2011-01-01

    In light of the scarcity of reports on the interaction between HSV-1 nucleocapsid protein UL25 and its host cell proteins,the purpose of this study is to use yeast two-hybrid screening to search for cellular proteins that can interact with the UL25 protein.C9orf69,a protein of unknown function was identified.The interaction between the two proteins under physiological conditions was also confirmed by biological experiments including co-localization by fluorescence and immunoprecipitation.A preliminary study of the function of C9orf69 showed that it promotes viral proliferation.Further studies showed that C9orf69 did not influence viral multiplication efficiency by transcriptional regulation of viral genes,but indirectly promoted proliferation via interaction with UL25.

  15. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-11-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host's primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus.

  16. Effect of immunoglobulin on T cell subsets and inflammatory cytokines of patients with viral meningoencephalitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Cheng Bao; Xue-Long Xia; Ya-Ping Wu; Dan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of immunoglobulin in the adjuvant therapy of viral meningoencephalitis (VM).Methods: A total of 78 cases of VN in our hospital from September 2011 to April 2016 were chosen. According to the admission order, they were randomly divided into two groups, the control group and observation group, and 39 cases in each group. The control group was treated with acyclovir conventional therapy, and the observation group was supplemented by immunoglobulins. The differences of serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of T cell subsets and inflammatory cytokines between the two groups before and after treatment were compared.Results:The total effective rate of the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). The serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of T cell subsets CD3+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the CD8+ was lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). The serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of inflammatory cytokines PCT, INF-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α were all significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Immunoglobulin can effectively improve the level of CD3+, CD4+ and VM in CD8 patients, and adjust the CD4/CD8 balance, inhibit synthesis and secretion of Th1cytokines, so to play the assistant effects of acyclovir in the treatment of VM.

  17. Optogenetics-enabled assessment of viral gene and cell therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Boyle, Patrick M; Chen, Kay; Trayanova, Natalia A; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cardiac pathologies are accompanied by loss of tissue excitability, which leads to a range of heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). In addition to electronic device therapy (i.e. implantable pacemakers and cardioverter/defibrillators), biological approaches have recently been explored to restore pacemaking ability and to correct conduction slowing in the heart by delivering excitatory ion channels or ion channel agonists. Using optogenetics as a tool to selectively interrogate only cells transduced to produce an exogenous excitatory ion current, we experimentally and computationally quantify the efficiency of such biological approaches in rescuing cardiac excitability as a function of the mode of application (viral gene delivery or cell delivery) and the geometry of the transduced region (focal or spatially-distributed). We demonstrate that for each configuration (delivery mode and spatial pattern), the optical energy needed to excite can be used to predict therapeutic efficiency of excitability restoration. Taken directly, these results can help guide optogenetic interventions for light-based control of cardiac excitation. More generally, our findings can help optimize gene therapy for restoration of cardiac excitability.

  18. Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Keith, James; Fraser, Tresa; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Kolokoltsov, Andrey; Davey, Robert A; Higgs, Stephen; Mohammed, Ahmed; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Komalamisra, Narumon; Fraser, Malcolm J

    2009-06-04

    Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the refractory transgenic vector approach is the development of transgenes that effectively prohibit viral transmission. In this report we test the effectiveness of several hammerhead ribozymes for suppressing DENV in lentivirus-transduced mosquito cells in an attempt to mimic the transgenic use of these effector molecules in mosquitoes. A lentivirus vector that expresses these ribozymes as a fusion RNA molecule using an Ae. aegypti tRNA(val) promoter and terminating with a 60A tail insures optimal expression, localization, and activity of the hammerhead ribozyme against the DENV genome. Among the 14 hammerhead ribozymes we designed to attack the DENV-2 NGC genome, several appear to be relatively effective in reducing virus production from transduced cells by as much as 2 logs. Among the sequences targeted are 10 that are conserved among all DENV serotype 2 strains. Our results confirm that hammerhead ribozymes can be effective in suppressing DENV in a transgenic approach, and provide an alternative or supplementary approach to proposed siRNA strategies for DENV suppression in transgenic mosquitoes.

  19. Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ahmed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the refractory transgenic vector approach is the development of transgenes that effectively prohibit viral transmission. In this report we test the effectiveness of several hammerhead ribozymes for suppressing DENV in lentivirus-transduced mosquito cells in an attempt to mimic the transgenic use of these effector molecules in mosquitoes. A lentivirus vector that expresses these ribozymes as a fusion RNA molecule using an Ae. aegypti tRNAval promoter and terminating with a 60A tail insures optimal expression, localization, and activity of the hammerhead ribozyme against the DENV genome. Among the 14 hammerhead ribozymes we designed to attack the DENV-2 NGC genome, several appear to be relatively effective in reducing virus production from transduced cells by as much as 2 logs. Among the sequences targeted are 10 that are conserved among all DENV serotype 2 strains. Our results confirm that hammerhead ribozymes can be effective in suppressing DENV in a transgenic approach, and provide an alternative or supplementary approach to proposed siRNA strategies for DENV suppression in transgenic mosquitoes.

  20. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Sukun [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Du, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zheng, Chunfu [Soochow University, Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yalan [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hu, Qinxue, E-mail: qhu@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George' s University of London, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  1. Cytosolic 5'-triphosphate ended viral leader transcript of measles virus as activator of the RIG I-mediated interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Plumet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Double stranded RNA (dsRNA is widely accepted as an RNA motif recognized as a danger signal by the cellular sentries. However, the biology of non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses, or Mononegavirales, is hardly compatible with the production of such dsRNA. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During measles virus infection, the IFN-beta gene transcription was found to be paralleled by the virus transcription, but not by the virus replication. Since the expression of every individual viral mRNA failed to activate the IFN-beta gene, we postulated the involvement of the leader RNA, which is a small not capped and not polyadenylated RNA firstly transcribed by Mononegavirales. The measles virus leader RNA, synthesized both in vitro and in vivo, was efficient in inducing the IFN-beta expression, provided that it was delivered into the cytosol as a 5'-trisphosphate ended RNA. The use of a human cell line expressing a debilitated RIG-I molecule, together with overexpression studies of wild type RIG-I, showed that the IFN-beta induction by virus infection or by leader RNA required RIG-I to be functional. RIG-I binds to leader RNA independently from being 5-trisphosphate ended; while a point mutant, Q299A, predicted to establish contacts with the RNA, fails to bind to leader RNA. Since the 5'-triphosphate is required for optimal RIG-I activation but not for leader RNA binding, our data support that RIG-I is activated upon recognition of the 5'-triphosphate RNA end. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RIG-I is proposed to recognize Mononegavirales transcription, which occurs in the cytosol, while scanning cytosolic RNAs, and to trigger an IFN response when encountering a free 5'-triphosphate RNA resulting from a mislocated transcription activity, which is therefore considered as the hallmark of a foreign invader.

  2. [Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słodka, Aleksandra; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa

    2013-03-08

    Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI) on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation

  3. Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Słodka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation

  4. Inhibition viral RNP and anti-inflammatory activity of coumarins against influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YuTao; Yan, Wen; Chen, QiaoLian; Huang, WanYi; Yang, Zifeng; Li, Xiong; Wang, XinHua

    2017-03-01

    Influenza viruses pose a severe threat to human health and a significant increase in antiviral drug-resistant among influenza viruses worldwide has been observed. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop the new antiviral drugs, specifically from the natural products. In this study, the anti-viral and anti-inflammatory activities of coumarins against influenza A virus in vitro were investigated. One of the derivatives eleutheroside B1 showed a wide spectrum of anti- human influenza virus effect with the IC50 value of 64-125μg/ml in vitro, but it showed no effects against avian influenza virus. The time of addition was done and the results indicated that it had a potent antiviral effect when added at 0-6h, and also the virus yield was reduced by 60%. The influenza virus ribonucleoprotein was inhibited at 200μg/ml, and also the NP mRNA expression was inhibited at 50 and 200μg/ml. The expression level of cytokines and chemokines influenced by eleutheroside B1 was further demonstrated, the IL-6, CXCL-8, CCL-2 expression were all inhibited by the eleuthe roside B1 at concentration 200μg/ml. The findings of study suggest that eleutheroside B1 can be as potential agent to develop for the prevention and treatment of influenza A virus.

  5. Dynamic changes in myocardial matrix metalloproteinase activity in mice with viral myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiao-hui 孟晓慧; SONG Guo-jie 宋国杰; WANG Yi 汪翼; ZHUANG Jian-xin 庄建新; HAN Xiu-zhen 韩秀珍; CHEN Yao 陈瑶; JIN You-peng 靳有鹏; WANG Yu-lin 王玉林; YU Yong-hui 于永慧; James P. Spires

    2004-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the major regulators of collagen degradation involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases of the heart. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dynamic changes in myocardial MMP activity in mice with viral myocarditis (VM), the relationship between MMP activity and both cardiac function and the quantity of myocardial collagen, and the role MMPs playing in the pathological lesions of VM.Methods Sixty-five six-week-old male DBA/2 mice were divided into two groups. Mice in the infected group (n=50) were inoculated intraperitoneally with 0.14 ml of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, Nancy strain). Control mice (n=15) were inoculated intraperitoneally with 0.14 ml of Eagle's medium. Eight infected mice and three control mice were sacrificed on each of days 3, 7, 10, 21 and 30 after inoculation. MMP activity was measured on an SDS-PAGE substrate gel embedded with type Ⅰ gelatin (zymography). Echocardiographic studies were performed under anesthesia with 3% chloralhydrate administered intraperitoneally (0.01 ml/g-0.015 ml/g). Cardiac systolic function indices, such as peak velocity of the aorta (Vp), flow velocity integral of the aorta (Vi), ejection fraction (EF), and fractional shortening (FS) were determined by echocardiography. Histological cross sections of the hearts were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and myocardial histopathological scores were determined under an optical microscope. The amount of myocardial collagen was measured by means of hydroxyproline quantification. Results In virus-infected mice, both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were significantly higher than in control mice, reaching a peak on day 10 (P0.05). However, the amount of myocardial collagen in infected mice at the recovery stage (on days 21 and 30) was significantly greater than those of the control mice. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities positively correlated with myocardial histopathological scores (r=0.801,0.821, P<0.01) and negatively correlated

  6. Tim-3: An activation marker and activation limiter of innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencheng eHan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tim-3 was initially identified on activated Th1, Th17, and Tc1 cells and induces T cell death or exhaustion after binding to its ligand, Gal-9. The observed relationship between dysregulated Tim-3 expression on T cells and the progression of many clinical diseases has identified this molecule as an important target for intervention in adaptive immunity. Recent data have shown that it also plays critical roles in regulating the activities of macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and endothelial cells. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, dysregulation of Tim-3 expression on these innate immune cells leads to an excessive or inhibited inflammatory response and subsequent autoimmune damage or viral or tumor evasion. In this review, we focus on the expression and function of Tim-3 on innate immune cells and discuss 1 how Tim-3 is expressed and regulated on different innate immune cells; 2 how it affects the activity of different innate immune cells; and 3 how dysregulated Tim-3 expression on innate immune cells affects adaptive immunity and disease progression. Tim-3 is involved in the optimal activation of innate immune cells through its varied expression. A better understanding of the physiopathological role of the Tim-3 pathway in innate immunity will shed new light on the pathogenesis of clinical diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic viral infections, and cancer, and suggest new approaches to intervention.

  7. The role of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) NV gene in TNF-α- and VHSV infection-mediated NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2013-05-01

    The role of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) NV gene in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was investigated. Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells pre-treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α showed a strong resistance against VHSV infection, but cells treated with TNF-α after VHSV infection showed no resistance, suggesting that immediate early TNF-α-mediated responses inhibit VHSV replication. Activation of NF-κB is a key step in TNF-α-mediated immunomodulatory pathways. In this study, activation of NF-κB by TNF-α exposure was inhibited in EPC cells harboring NV gene expressing vectors, indicating that the NV gene of VHSV can suppress TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the NV gene knock-out recombinant VHSV (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP) induced significantly higher NF-κB activity in EPC cells than wild-type VHSV, suggesting that VHSV adopted a strategy to suppress early activation of NF-κB in host cells through and NV gene.

  8. Migration of activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes to sites of viral infection does not require endothelial selectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2000-01-01

    Using mice deficient of E-selectin and E/P-selectin, we have studied the requirement for endothelial selectins in extravasation of leukocytes at sites of viral infection, with major emphasis on the recruitment of virus-specific T(C)1 cells. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced mening......Using mice deficient of E-selectin and E/P-selectin, we have studied the requirement for endothelial selectins in extravasation of leukocytes at sites of viral infection, with major emphasis on the recruitment of virus-specific T(C)1 cells. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV...... or marginal reduction was found in E/P-sel -/- mice, compared with wild-type mice after local challenge with virus or immunodominant viral MHC class I restricted peptide, respectively. Similar results were obtained after adoptive transfer of wild-type effector cells into E/P-sel -/- recipients, whereas...... footpad swelling was markedly decreased in P-sel/ICAM-1 -/- and ICAM-1 -/- recipients. LCMV-induced footpad swelling was completely inhibited in ICAM-deficient mice transfused with donor cell preincubated with soluble VCAM-1-Ig chimeric protein. Taken together, the current findings strongly indicate...

  9. The membrane fusion step of vaccinia virus entry is cooperatively mediated by multiple viral proteins and host cell components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Laliberte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For many viruses, one or two proteins allow cell attachment and entry, which occurs through the plasma membrane or following endocytosis at low pH. In contrast, vaccinia virus (VACV enters cells by both neutral and low pH routes; four proteins mediate cell attachment and twelve that are associated in a membrane complex and conserved in all poxviruses are dedicated to entry. The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of cellular and viral proteins in initial stages of entry, specifically fusion of the membranes of the mature virion and cell. For analysis of the role of cellular components, we used well characterized inhibitors and measured binding of a recombinant VACV virion containing Gaussia luciferase fused to a core protein; viral and cellular membrane lipid mixing with a self-quenching fluorescent probe in the virion membrane; and core entry with a recombinant VACV expressing firefly luciferase and electron microscopy. We determined that inhibitors of tyrosine protein kinases, dynamin GTPase and actin dynamics had little effect on binding of virions to cells but impaired membrane fusion, whereas partial cholesterol depletion and inhibitors of endosomal acidification and membrane blebbing had a severe effect at the later stage of core entry. To determine the role of viral proteins, virions lacking individual membrane components were purified from cells infected with members of a panel of ten conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Each of the entry protein-deficient virions had severely reduced infectivity and except for A28, L1 and L5 greatly impaired membrane fusion. In addition, a potent neutralizing L1 monoclonal antibody blocked entry at a post-membrane lipid-mixing step. Taken together, these results suggested a 2-step entry model and implicated an unprecedented number of viral proteins and cellular components involved in signaling and actin rearrangement for initiation of virus-cell membrane fusion during poxvirus entry.

  10. Siglec-1 is a novel dendritic cell receptor that mediates HIV-1 trans-infection through recognition of viral membrane gangliosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Izquierdo-Useros

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are essential antigen-presenting cells for the induction of immunity against pathogens. However, HIV-1 spread is strongly enhanced in clusters of DCs and CD4(+ T cells. Uninfected DCs capture HIV-1 and mediate viral transfer to bystander CD4(+ T cells through a process termed trans-infection. Initial studies identified the C-type lectin DC-SIGN as the HIV-1 binding factor on DCs, which interacts with the viral envelope glycoproteins. Upon DC maturation, however, DC-SIGN is down-regulated, while HIV-1 capture and trans-infection is strongly enhanced via a glycoprotein-independent capture pathway that recognizes sialyllactose-containing membrane gangliosides. Here we show that the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin 1 (Siglec-1, CD169, which is highly expressed on mature DCs, specifically binds HIV-1 and vesicles carrying sialyllactose. Furthermore, Siglec-1 is essential for trans-infection by mature DCs. These findings identify Siglec-1 as a key factor for HIV-1 spread via infectious DC/T-cell synapses, highlighting a novel mechanism that mediates HIV-1 dissemination in activated tissues.

  11. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Král, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor's Thesis deals with effective promotional tools called viral marketing. The main contribution of the thesis is the definition and history of viral marketing, making analysis of process of viral marketing, progresses definition and rules for creating a viral campaign. And also aspects are necessary for a successful viral spread. There are analysis of the characteristics of social media which are dividing according to the orientation and marketing tactics. Thesis is especially about so...

  12. A note on the global properties of an age-structured viral dynamic model with multiple target cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Jianhong; Rong, Libin

    2017-06-01

    Some viruses can infect different classes of cells. The age of infection can affect the dynamics of infected cells and viral production. Here we develop a viral dynamic model with the age of infection and multiple target cell populations. Using the methods of semigroup and Lyapunov function, we study the global asymptotic property of the steady states of the model. The results show that when the basic reproductive number falls below 1, the infection is predicted to die out. When the basic reproductive number exceeds 1, there exists a unique infected steady state which is globally asymptotically stable. The model can be extended to study virus dynamics with multiple compartments or coinfection by multiple types of viruses. We also show that under some scenarios the age-structured model can be reduced to an ordinary differential equation system with or without time delays.

  13. High numbers of IL-2-producing CD8+ T cells during viral infection: correlation with stable memory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Using infections with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and vesicular stomatitis virus in mice as model systems, we have investigated the ability of antigen-primed CD8+ T cells generated in the context of viral infections to produce IL-2. Our results indicate that acute immunizing infection...... normally leads to generation of high numbers of IL-2-producing antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. By costaining for IL-2 and IFN-gamma intracellularly, we found that IL-2-producing cells predominantly constitute a subset of cells also producing IFN-gamma. Comparison of the kinetics of generation revealed...

  14. A novel peptide inhibits the influenza virus replication by preventing the viral attachment to the host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Rajik, Abdul Rahman Omar, Aini Ideris, Sharifah Syed Hassan, Khatijah Yusoff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses (AIV, the causative agent of avian flu or bird flu, cause widespread morbidity and mortality in poultry. The symptoms of the disease range from mild flu like symptoms to death. These viruses possess two important surface glycoproteins, namely hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA against which neutralizing antibodies are produced. Due to the highly mutative nature of the genes which encode these proteins, the viruses often confer resistance to the current anti-viral drugs making the prevention and treatment of infection challenging. In our laboratory, we have recently identified a novel anti-viral peptide (P1 against the AIV H9N2 from a phage displayed peptide library. This peptide inhibits the replication of the virus in ovo and in vitro by its binding to the HA glycoprotein. In the current study, we demonstrate that the peptide inhibits the virus replication by preventing the attachment to the host cell but it does not have any effect on the viral fusion. The reduction in the viral nucleoprotein (NP expression inside the host cell has also been observed during the peptide (P1 treatment. This novel peptide may have the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for the treatment and control of avian influenza virus H9N2 infections.

  15. Memory inflation during chronic viral infection is maintained by continuous production of short-lived, functional T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher M; Cho, Kathy S; Bonnett, Elizabeth L; van Dommelen, Serani; Shellam, Geoffrey R; Hill, Ann B

    2008-10-17

    During persistent murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, the T cell response is maintained at extremely high intensity for the life of the host. These cells closely resemble human CMV-specific cells, which compose a major component of the peripheral T cell compartment in most people. Despite a phenotype that suggests extensive antigen-driven differentiation, MCMV-specific T cells remain functional and respond vigorously to viral challenge. We hypothesized that a low rate of antigen-driven proliferation would account for the maintenance of this population. Instead, we found that most of these cells divided only sporadically in chronically infected hosts and had a short half-life in circulation. The overall population was supported, at least in part, by memory T cells primed early in infection, as well as by recruitment of naive T cells at late times. Thus, these data show that memory inflation is maintained by a continuous replacement of short-lived, functional cells during chronic MCMV infection.

  16. Early postnatal respiratory viral infection alters hippocampal neurogenesis, cell fate, and neuron morphology in the neonatal piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Matthew S; Harasim, Samantha; Rhodes, Justin S; Van Alstine, William G; Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viral infections are common during the neonatal period in humans, but little is known about how early-life infection impacts brain development. The current study used a neonatal piglet model as piglets have a gyrencephalic brain with growth and development similar to human infants. Piglets were inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to evaluate how chronic neuroinflammation affects hippocampal neurogenesis and neuron morphology. Piglets in the neurogenesis study received one bromodeoxyuridine injection on postnatal day (PD) 7 and then were inoculated with PRRSV. Piglets were sacrificed at PD 28 and the number of BrdU+ cells and cell fate were quantified in the dentate gyrus. PRRSV piglets showed a 24% reduction in the number of newly divided cells forming neurons. Approximately 15% of newly divided cells formed microglia, but this was not affected by sex or PRRSV. Additionally, there was a sexual dimorphism of new cell survival in the dentate gyrus where males had more cells than females, and PRRSV infection caused a decreased survival in males only. Golgi impregnation was used to characterize dentate granule cell morphology. Sholl analysis revealed that PRRSV caused a change in inner granule cell morphology where the first branch point was extended further from the cell body. Males had more complex dendritic arbors than females in the outer granule cell layer, but this was not affected by PRRSV. There were no changes to dendritic spine density or morphology distribution. These findings suggest that early-life viral infection can impact brain development.

  17. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  18. Retargeting of rat parvovirus H-1PV to cancer cells through genetic engineering of the viral capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaume, Xavier; El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Leuchs, Barbara; Bonifati, Serena; Kulkarni, Amit; Marttila, Tiina; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV is a promising anticancer agent given its oncosuppressive properties and the absence of known side effects in humans. H-1PV replicates preferentially in transformed cells, but the virus can enter both normal and cancer cells. Uptake by normal cells sequesters a significant portion of the administered viral dose away from the tumor target. Hence, targeting H-1PV entry specifically to tumor cells is important to increase the efficacy of parvovirus-based treatments. In this study, we first found that sialic acid plays a key role in H-1PV entry. We then genetically engineered the H-1PV capsid to improve its affinity for human tumor cells. By analogy with the resolved crystal structure of the closely related parvovirus minute virus of mice, we developed an in silico three-dimensional (3D) model of the H-1PV wild-type capsid. Based on this model, we identified putative amino acids involved in cell membrane recognition and virus entry at the level of the 2-fold axis of symmetry of the capsid, within the so-called dimple region. In situ mutagenesis of these residues significantly reduced the binding and entry of H-1PV into permissive cells. We then engineered an entry-deficient viral capsid and inserted a cyclic RGD-4C peptide at the level of its 3-fold axis spike. This peptide binds α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) integrins, which are overexpressed in cancer cells and growing blood vessels. The insertion of the peptide rescued viral infectivity toward cells overexpressing α(v)β(5) integrins, resulting in the efficient killing of these cells by the reengineered virus. This work demonstrates that H-1PV can be genetically retargeted through the modification of its capsid, showing great promise for a more efficient use of this virus in cancer therapy.

  19. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA.

  20. Residues in human respiratory syncytial virus P protein that are essential for its activity on RNA viral synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Ana; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-03-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) P protein, 241 amino acid long, is a structural homotetrameric phosphoprotein. Viral transcription and replication processes are dependent on functional P protein interactions inside viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). Binding capacity to RNPs proteins and transcription and replication complementation analyses, using inactive P protein variants, have identified residues essential for functional interactions with itself, L, N and M2-1 proteins. P protein may establish some of these interactions as monomer, but efficient viral transcription and replication requires P protein oligomerization through the central region of the molecule. A structurally stable three-dimensional model has been generated in silico for this region (residues 98-158). Our analysis has indicated that P protein residues L135, D139, E140 and L142 are involved in homotetramerization. Additionally, the residues D136, S156, T160 and E179 appear to be essential for P protein activity on viral RNA synthesis and very high turnover phosphorylation at S143, T160 and T210 could regulate it. Thus, compounds targeted to those of these residues, located in the modeled three-dimensional structure, could have specific anti-HRSV effect.

  1. Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Impact Chlorella variabilis Productivity and Host Quality for Viral Production and Cell Lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Labavitch, John; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae have been proposed as a potential feedstock for biofuel production; however, cell disruption is usually required for collection and utilization of cytoplasmic polysaccharides and lipids. Virus infection might be one approach to disrupt the cell wall. The concentration of yeast extract and presence of KNO3 in algae cultivation media were investigated to observe their effects on Chlorella variabilis NC64A physiology and composition and the subsequent effect on production of Chlorella virus and disruption of infected cells. Cytoplasmic starch accumulation increased from 5% to approximately 35% of the total dry weight when yeast extract decreased from 1 to 0.25 g L(-1). When cells were cultured with the lowest nitrogen levels, the total polysaccharide accounted for more than 50% of the cell wall, which was 1.7 times higher than the content in cells cultured with the highest nitrogen levels. The C/N ratio of the algal biomass decreased by a factor of approximately 2 when yeast extract increased from 0.25 to 1 g L(-1). After virus infection, cells with a low C/N ratio produced a 7.6 times higher burst size than cells with a high C/N ratio, suggesting that the nitrogen content in C. variabilis has a large influence on viral production and cell lysis. The results have implications on management of nitrogen for both the synthesis of products from algae and product recovery via viral lysis.

  2. C-Myc regulation by costimulatory signals modulates the generation of CD8+ memory T cells during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Wang, Youfei; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Norbury, Christopher; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    The signalling mechanisms of costimulation in the development of memory T cells remain to be clarified. Here, we show that the transcription factor c-Myc in CD8(+) T cells is controlled by costimulatory molecules, which modulates the development of memory CD8(+) T cells. C-Myc expression was dramatically reduced in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) memory CD8(+) T cells, and c-Myc over-expression substantially reversed the defects in the development of T-cell memory following viral infection. C-Myc regulated the expression of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, which promoted the generation of virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, over-expression of survivin with bcl-xL, a downstream molecule of NF-κB and intracellular target of costimulation that controls survival, in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) CD8(+) T cells, reversed the defects in the generation of memory T cells in response to viral infection. These results identify c-Myc as a key controller of memory CD8(+) T cells from costimulatory signals.

  3. The G1613A mutation in the HBV genome affects HBeAg expression and viral replication through altered core promoter activity.

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    Man-Shan Li

    Full Text Available Infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is closely associated with the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Previously, we demonstrated that the G1613A mutation in the HBV negative regulatory element (NRE is a hotspot mutation in HCC patients. In this study, we further investigated the functional consequences of this mutation in the context of the full length HBV genome and its replication. We showed that the G1613A mutation significantly suppresses the secretion of e antigen (HBeAg and enhances the synthesis of viral DNA, which is in consistence to our clinical result that the G1613A mutation associates with high viral load in chronic HBV carriers. To further investigate the molecular mechanism of the mutation, we performed the electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the recombinant RFX1 protein, a trans-activator that was shown to interact with the NRE of HBV. Intriguingly, RFX1 binds to the G1613A mutant with higher affinity than the wild-type sequence, indicating that the mutation possesses the trans-activating effect to the core promoter via NRE. The trans-activating effect was further validated by the enhancement of the core promoter activity after overexpression of RFX1 in liver cell line. In summary, our results suggest the functional consequences of the hotspot G1613A mutation found in HBV. We also provide a possible molecular mechanism of this hotspot mutation to the increased viral load of HBV carriers, which increases the risk to HCC.

  4. Experimental infection with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 in mice induces inflammatory cell infiltration in the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu-Jung; Kwon, Young-Je; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Previously, our study showed that oral inoculation of mice with cytopathic (cp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) led to lymphocyte depletion and increased numbers of megakaryocytes in the spleen as well as thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. In the present study, to investigate the possible differences in the detection of viral antigen, histopathological lesions, and hematologic changes between non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 and cp BVDV1, mice were orally administered low and high doses of ncp BVDV1 and were necropsied at days 0, 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). None of the ncp BVDV1-infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness, unlike those infected with cp BVDV1. Statistically significant thrombocytopenia was observed during ncp BVDV1 infection, and lymphopenia was found only in mice infected with a high dose at day 9 pi. Interestingly, ncp BVDV1 infection increased the numbers of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, and monocytes in some infected mice. Viral antigen was detected in the lymphocytes of the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and bone marrow by immunohistochemistry. Lymphoid depletion was evident in the mesenteric lymph nodes of mice infected with a high dose and also found in the Peyer's patches of some infected mice. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils and monocytes, and an increased number of megakaryocytes were seen in the spleen. These results suggest that the distribution of viral antigens is not associated with the presence of histopathological lesions. Inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the spleens as a result of viral replication and may be attributable to the host reaction to ncp BVDV1 infection. Together, these findings support the possibility that mice can be used as an animal model for BVDV infection.

  5. Expression of NKp46 Splice Variants in Nasal Lavage Following Respiratory Viral Infection: Domain 1-Negative Isoforms Predominate and Manifest Higher Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer-Avni, Yonat; Kundu, Kiran; Shemesh, Avishai; Brusilovsky, Michael; Yossef, Rami; Meshesha, Mesfin; Solomon-Alemayehu, Semaria; Levin, Shai; Gershoni-Yahalom, Orly; Campbell, Kerry S.; Porgador, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor NKp46/NCR1 plays a critical role in elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells. The NCR1 gene can be transcribed into five different splice variants, but the functional importance and physiological distribution of NKp46 isoforms are not yet fully understood. Here, we shed light on differential expression of NKp46 splice variants in viral respiratory tract infections and their functional difference at the cellular level. NKp46 was the most predominantly expressed natural cytotoxicity receptor in the nasal lavage of patients infected with four respiratory viruses: respiratory syncytia virus, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus, or influenza A. Expression of NKp30 was far lower and NKp44 was absent in all patients. Domain 1-negative NKp46 splice variants (i.e., NKp46 isoform d) were the predominantly expressed isoform in nasal lavage following viral infections. Using our unique anti-NKp46 mAb, D2-9A5, which recognizes the D2 extracellular domain, and a commercial anti-NKp46 mAb, 9E2, which recognizes D1 domain, allowed us to identify a small subset of NKp46 D1-negative splice variant-expressing cells within cultured human primary NK cells. This NKp46 D1-negative subset also showed higher degranulation efficiency in term of CD107a surface expression. NK-92 cell lines expressing NKp46 D1-negative and NKp46 D1-positive splice variants also showed functional differences when interacting with targets. A NKp46 D1-negative isoform-expressing NK-92 cell line showed enhanced degranulation activity. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence showing the physiological distribution and functional importance of human NKp46 splice variants under pathological conditions. PMID:28261217

  6. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

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    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  7. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Melanie C; Strobel, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Kress, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation.

  8. Effects of NV gene knock-out recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on Mx gene expression in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2012-03-01

    To determine whether the NV gene of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is related to the type I interferon response of hosts, expression of Mx gene in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in response to infection with either wild-type VHSV or recombinant VHSVs (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP and rVHSV-wild) was investigated. A reporter vector was constructed for measuring Mx gene expression using olive flounder Mx promoter, in which the reporter Metridia luciferase was designed to be excreted to culture medium to facilitate measurement. The highest increase of luciferase activity was detected from supernatant of cells infected with rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. In contrast cells infected with wild-type VHSV showed a slight increase of the luciferase activity. Interestingly, cells infected with rVHSV-wild that has artificially changed nucleotides just before and after the NV gene ORF, also showed highly increased luciferase activity, but the increased amplitude was lower than that by rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. These results strongly suggest that the NV protein of VHSV plays an important role in suppressing interferon response in host cells, which provides a condition for the viruses to efficiently proliferate in host cells. In an in vivo experiment, the Mx gene expression in olive flounder challenged with the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP was clearly higher than fish challenged with rVHSV-wild or wild-type VHSV, suggesting that lacking of the NV gene in the genome of rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP brought to strong interferon response that subsequently inhibit viral replication in fish.

  9. Viral encephalitis

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    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  10. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  11. Viral epidemics in a cell culture: novel high resolution data and their interpretation by a percolation theory based model

    CERN Document Server

    Gönci, Balázs; Balogh, Emeric; Szabó, Bálint; Dénes, Ádám; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    Because of its relevance to everyday life, the spreading of viral infections has been of central interest in a variety of scientific communities involved in fighting, preventing and theoretically interpreting epidemic processes. Recent large scale observations have resulted in major discoveries concerning the overall features of the spreading process in systems with highly mobile susceptible units, but virtually no data are available about observations of infection spreading for a very large number of immobile units. Here we present the first detailed quantitative documentation of percolation-type viral epidemics in a highly reproducible in vitro system consisting of tens of thousands of virtually motionless cells. We use a confluent astroglial monolayer in a Petri dish and induce productive infection in a limited number of cells with a genetically modified herpesvirus strain. This approach allows extreme high resolution tracking of the spatio-temporal development of the epidemic. We show that a simple model ...

  12. Immunologic and Virologic Progression in HIV Controllers: The Role of Viral "Blips" and Immune Activation in the ANRS CO21 CODEX Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Nicolas; Lerolle, Nathalie; Lécuroux, Camille; Goujard, Cécile; Venet, Alain; Saez-Cirion, Asier; Avettand-Fenoël, Veronique; Meyer, Laurence; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Some HIV controllers (HICs) experience CD4+T cell count loss and/or lose their ability to control HIV. In this study, we investigated the rate of immunologic and/or virologic progression (ImmP/VirP) and its determinants in the ANRS CO21/CODEX cohort. Immunologic progression was defined as a lasting fall in CD4+T cell count below 350/mm(3) or more than 200/mm(3) with a baseline count below 600/mm(3). Virologic progression was defined as a HIV viral load (VL) above 2000 copies/mL on two consecutive determinations. Clinical characteristics, immune activation, ultrasensitive HIV VL and total HIV DNA were analyzed. Disease progression was observed in 15 of the 217 patients followed up between 2009 and 2013 (ImmP, n = 10; VirP, n = 5). Progressors had higher ultrasensitive HIV RNA levels at inclusion (i.e. 1-2 years before progression) than non-progressors. ImmP had also lower CD4+T cell nadir and CD4+T cell count at inclusion, and VirP had higher HIV DNA levels in blood. T cell activation and IP10 levels at inclusion were significantly higher in ImmP than in non-progressors. In summary, the lasting loss of CD4+T cells, residual HIV replication and basal levels of immune activation appear to be major determinants of progression in HICs. These factors should be considered for adjusting their follow-up.

  13. Development of Viral Capsid DNA Aptamer Conjugates as Cell-Targeted Delivery Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Gary Jen-Wei

    The ability to generate semi-synthetic DNA-protein conjugates has become increasingly important in the fields of chemical biology and nanobiotechnology. As applications in these fields become more complex, there is also an increased need for methods of attaching synthetic DNA to protein substrates in a well-defined manner. This work outlines the development of new methods for site-specific DNA-protein bioconjugation, as well as the development of novel viral capsid DNA aptamer conjugates for cell-targeting purposes. In order to generate DNA-protein conjugates in a site-specific manner, chemistries orthogonal to native functional groups present on DNA and proteins were exploited. In one method, the attachment of DNA to proteins was achieved via oxime formation. This strategy involved the in situ deprotection of an allyloxycarbonyl-protected alkoxyamine-bearing DNA in the presence of a protein containing a single ketone group. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the synthesis of a DNA-GFP conjugate. In addition to the oxime formation route, two oxidative coupling methods were also developed for DNA-protein bioconjugation. The first reaction coupled phenylenediamine-containing DNA to anilines, which had been site-specifically incorporated into proteins, in the presence of NaIO4. These reaction conditions were demonstrated on the proteins bacteriophage MS2 and GFP, and were mild enough for the components to retain both protein structure and DNA base-pairing capabilities. The second oxidative coupling reaction conjugated aniline-containing proteins to DNA bearing an o-aminophenol moiety. This reaction occurred under similarly mild conditions; however, higher coupling yields were achieved on MS2 at shorter reaction times by using this strategy. In all three of these methods, the generation of a singly-modified product was achieved. Using one of our oxidative coupling strategies, MS2-DNA aptamer conjugates were synthesized for the development of multivalent

  14. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

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    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  15. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

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    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  16. Non-viral generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells by a six-factor-in-one-vector approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowski, Katharina; Warthemann, Rita; Lentes, Jana; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Dressel, Ralf; Langenstroth, Daniel; Gromoll, Jörg; Sasaki, Erika; Behr, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Groundbreaking studies showed that differentiated somatic cells of mouse and human origin could be reverted to a stable pluripotent state by the ectopic expression of only four proteins. The resulting pluripotent cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, could be an alternative to embryonic stem cells, which are under continuous ethical debate. Hence, iPS cell-derived functional cells such as neurons may become the key for an effective treatment of currently incurable degenerative diseases. However, besides the requirement of efficacy testing of the therapy also its long-term safety needs to be carefully evaluated in settings mirroring the clinical situation in an optimal way. In this context, we chose the long-lived common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) as a non-human primate species to generate iPS cells. The marmoset monkey is frequently used in biomedical research and is gaining more and more preclinical relevance due to the increasing number of disease models. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first-time generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells from postnatal skin fibroblasts by non-viral means. We used the transposon-based, fully reversible piggyback system. We cloned the marmoset monkey reprogramming factors and established robust and reproducible reprogramming protocols with a six-factor-in-one-construct approach. We generated six individual iPS cell lines and characterized them in comparison with marmoset monkey embryonic stem cells. The generated iPS cells are morphologically indistinguishable from marmoset ES cells. The iPS cells are fully reprogrammed as demonstrated by differentiation assays, pluripotency marker expression and transcriptome analysis. They are stable for numerous passages (more than 80) and exhibit euploidy. In summary, we have established efficient non-viral reprogramming protocols for the derivation of stable marmoset monkey iPS cells, which can be used to develop and test cell replacement therapies in

  17. Non-viral generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells by a six-factor-in-one-vector approach.

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    Katharina Debowski

    Full Text Available Groundbreaking studies showed that differentiated somatic cells of mouse and human origin could be reverted to a stable pluripotent state by the ectopic expression of only four proteins. The resulting pluripotent cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, could be an alternative to embryonic stem cells, which are under continuous ethical debate. Hence, iPS cell-derived functional cells such as neurons may become the key for an effective treatment of currently incurable degenerative diseases. However, besides the requirement of efficacy testing of the therapy also its long-term safety needs to be carefully evaluated in settings mirroring the clinical situation in an optimal way. In this context, we chose the long-lived common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus as a non-human primate species to generate iPS cells. The marmoset monkey is frequently used in biomedical research and is gaining more and more preclinical relevance due to the increasing number of disease models. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first-time generation of marmoset monkey iPS cells from postnatal skin fibroblasts by non-viral means. We used the transposon-based, fully reversible piggyback system. We cloned the marmoset monkey reprogramming factors and established robust and reproducible reprogramming protocols with a six-factor-in-one-construct approach. We generated six individual iPS cell lines and characterized them in comparison with marmoset monkey embryonic stem cells. The generated iPS cells are morphologically indistinguishable from marmoset ES cells. The iPS cells are fully reprogrammed as demonstrated by differentiation assays, pluripotency marker expression and transcriptome analysis. They are stable for numerous passages (more than 80 and exhibit euploidy. In summary, we have established efficient non-viral reprogramming protocols for the derivation of stable marmoset monkey iPS cells, which can be used to develop and test cell replacement

  18. Stable cytotoxic T cell escape mutation in hepatitis C virus is linked to maintenance of viral fitness.

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    Luke Uebelhoer

    Full Text Available Mechanisms by which hepatitis C virus (HCV evades cellular immunity to establish persistence in chronically infected individuals are not clear. Mutations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I-restricted epitopes targeted by CD8(+ T cells are associated with persistence, but the extent to which these mutations affect viral fitness is not fully understood. Previous work showed that the HCV quasispecies in a persistently infected chimpanzee accumulated multiple mutations in numerous class I epitopes over a period of 7 years. During the acute phase of infection, one representative epitope in the C-terminal region of the NS3/4A helicase, NS3(1629-1637, displayed multiple serial amino acid substitutions in major histocompatibility complex (MHC anchor and T cell receptor (TCR contact residues. Only one of these amino acid substitutions at position 9 (P9 of the epitope was stable in the quasispecies. We therefore assessed the effect of each mutation observed during in vivo infection on viral fitness and T cell responses using an HCV subgenomic replicon system and a recently developed in vitro infectious virus cell culture model. Mutation of a position 7 (P7 TCR-contact residue, I1635T, expectedly ablated the T cell response without affecting viral RNA replication or virion production. In contrast, two mutations at the P9 MHC-anchor residue abrogated antigen-specific T cell responses, but additionally decreased viral RNA replication and virion production. The first escape mutation, L1637P, detected in vivo only transiently at 3 mo after infection, decreased viral production, and reverted to the parental sequence in vitro. The second P9 variant, L1637S, which was stable in vivo through 7 years of follow-up, evaded the antigen-specific T cell response and did not revert in vitro despite being less optimal in virion production compared to the parental virus. These studies suggest that HCV escape mutants emerging early in infection are not necessarily

  19. Hepatitis B virus: pathogenesis, viral intermediates, and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Locarnini, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Although HBV has the potential to generate an almost limitless spectrum of quasispecies during chronic infection, the viability of the majority of these quasispecies is almost certainly impaired due to constraints imposed by the remarkably compact organization of the HBV genome. On the other hand, single mutations may affect more than one gene and result in complex and unpredictable effects on viral phenotype. Better understanding of the constraints imposed by gene overlap and of genotype-phenotype relationships should help in the development of improved antiviral strategies and management approaches. Although the probability of developing viral resistance is directly proportional to the intensity of selection pressure and the diversity of quasispecies, potent inhibition of HBV replication should be able to prevent development of drug resistance because mutagenesis is replication dependent. If viral replication can be suppressed for a sufficient length of time, viral load should decline to a point where the continued production of quasispecies with the potential to resist new drug treatments no longer occurs. Clinical application of this concept will require optimization of combination therapies analogous to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection. Total cure of hepatitis B will require elimination of the intranuclear pool of viral minichromosomes, which will probably only be achieved by normal cell turnover, reactivation of host immunity, or elucidation of the antiviral mechanisms operating during cytokine clearance in acute hepatitis B (see Fig. 1).

  20. Exosomes released by EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells convey the viral Latent Membrane Protein 1 and the immunomodulatory protein galectin 9

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    Hirashima Mitsuomi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC are consistently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Their malignant epithelial cells contain the viral genome and express several antigenic viral proteins. However, the mechanisms of immune escape in NPCs are still poorly understood. EBV-transformed B-cells have been reported to release exosomes carrying the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 which has T-cell inhibitory activity. Although this report suggested that NPC cells could also produce exosomes carrying immunosuppressive proteins, this hypothesis has remained so far untested. Methods Malignant epithelial cells derived from NPC xenografts – LMP1-positive (C15 or negative (C17 – were used to prepare conditioned culture medium. Various microparticles and vesicles released in the culture medium were collected and fractionated by differential centrifugation. Exosomes collected in the last centrifugation step were further purified by immunomagnetic capture on beads carrying antibody directed to HLA class II molecules. Purified exosomes were visualized by electron microscopy and analysed by western blotting. The T-cell inhibitory activities of recombinant LMP1 and galectin 9 were assessed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated by CD3/CD28 cross-linking. Results HLA-class II-positive exosomes purified from C15 and C17 cell supernatants were containing either LMP1 and galectin 9 (C15 or galectin 9 only (C17. Recombinant LMP1 induced a strong inhibition of T-cell proliferation (IC50 = 0.17 nM. In contrast recombinant galectin 9 had a weaker inhibitory effect (IC50 = 46 nM with no synergy with LMP1. Conclusion This study provides the proof of concept that NPC cells can release HLA class-II positive exosomes containing galectin 9 and/or LMP1. It confirms that the LMP1 molecule has intrinsic T-cell inhibitory activity. These findings will encourage investigations of tumor exosomes in the blood of NPC patients and

  1. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Mostafa K; Tabll, Ashraf A; El-Abd, Yasmine S; Bahgat, Mahmoud M; Shoeb, Hussein A; Youssef, Samar S; Din, Noha G Bader El; Redwan, El-Rashdy M; El-Demellawy, Maha; Omran, Moataza H; El-Garf, Wael T; Goueli, Said A

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with long-term replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naïve cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells. PMID:16937465

  2. HepG2 cells support viral replication and gene expression of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa K El-Awady; Moataza H Omran; Wael T El-Garf; Said A Goueli; Ashraf A Tabll; Yasmine S El-Abd; Mahmoud M Bahgat; Hussein A Shoeb; Samar S Youssef; Noha G Bader El Din; El-Rashdy M Redwan; Maha El-Demellawy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cell culture system with longterm replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and expression of viral antigens in vitro. METHODS: HepG2 cell line was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubation with a serum from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Cells and supernatant were harvested at various time points during the culture. Culture supernatant was tested for its ability to infect naive cells. The presence of minus (antisense) RNA strand, and the detection of core and E1 antigens in cells were examined by RT-PCR and immunological techniques (flow cytometry and Western blot) respectively. RESULTS: The intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on d 3 after infection and then could be consistently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least three months. The fresh cells could be infected with supernatant from cultured infected cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed surface and intracellular HCV antigen expression using in house made polyclonal antibodies (anti-core, and anti-E1). Western blot analysis showed the expression of a cluster of immunogenic peptides at molecular weights extended between 31 and 45 kDa in an one month old culture of infected cells whereas this cluster was undetectable in uninfected HepG2 cells. CONCLUSION: HepG2 cell line is not only susceptible to HCV infection but also supports its replication in vitro. Expression of HCV structural proteins can be detected in infected HepG2 cells. These cells are also capable of shedding viral particles into culture media which in turn become infectious to uninfected cells.

  3. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Cunningham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  4. RGD-conjugated rod-like viral nanoparticles on 2D scaffold improved bone differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eWang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Viral nanoparticles have uniform and well-defined nano-structures and can be produced in large quantities. Several plant viral nanoparticles have been tested in biomedical applications due to the lack of mammalian cell infectivity. We are particularly interested in using Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, which has been demonstrated to enhance bone tissue regeneration, as a tuneable nanoscale building block for biomaterials development. Unmodified TMV particles have been shown to accelerate osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells by synergistically upregulating BMP2 and IBSP expression with dexamethasone. However, the lack of affinity to mammalian cell surface resulted in low initial cell adhesion. In this study, to increase cell binding capacity of TMV based material the chemical functionalization of TMV with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD peptide was explored. An azide-derivatized RGD peptide was clicked to tyrosine residues on TMV outer surface via an efficient copper(I catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. The ligand spacing is calculated to be 2-4 nm, which could offer a polyvalent ligand clustering effect for enhanced cell receptor signalling, further promoting the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  5. RGD-conjugated rod-like viral nanoparticles on 2D scaffold improved bone differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Pongkwan, Sitasuwan; Lee, L.; Li, Kai; Nguyen, Huong

    2014-05-01

    Viral nanoparticles have uniform and well-defined nano-structures and can be produced in large quantities. Several plant viral nanoparticles have been tested in biomedical applications due to the lack of mammalian cell infectivity. We are particularly interested in using Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), which has been demonstrated to enhance bone tissue regeneration, as a tuneable nanoscale building block for biomaterials development. Unmodified TMV particles have been shown to accelerate osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells by synergistically upregulating BMP2 and IBSP expression with dexamethasone. However, the lack of affinity to mammalian cell surface resulted in low initial cell adhesion. In this study, to increase cell binding capacity of TMV based material the chemical functionalization of TMV with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide was explored. An azide-derivatized RGD peptide was “clicked” to tyrosine residues on TMV outer surface via an efficient copper(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. The ligand spacing is calculated to be 2-4 nm, which could offer a polyvalent ligand clustering effect for enhanced cell receptor signalling, further promoting the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  6. The Breadth of Expandable Memory CD8+ T Cells Inversely Correlates with Residual Viral Loads in HIV Elite Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Stampouloglou, Eleni; Cesa, Kevin; Mavrothalassitis, Orestes; Alvino, Donna Marie; Li, Jonathan Z.; Wilton, Shannon; Karel, Daniel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Chen, Huabiao; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that elite controllers with minimal effector T cell responses harbor a low-frequency, readily expandable, highly functional, and broadly directed memory population. Here, we interrogated the in vivo relevance of this cell population by investigating whether the breadth of expandable memory responses is associated with the magnitude of residual viremia in individuals achieving durable suppression of HIV infection. HIV-specific memory CD8+ T cells were expanded by using autologous epitopic and variant peptides. Viral load was measured by an ultrasensitive single-copy PCR assay. Following expansion, controllers showed a greater increase in the overall breadth of Gag responses than did untreated progressors (P = 0.01) as well as treated progressors (P = 0.0003). Nef- and Env-specific memory cells expanded poorly for all groups, and their expanded breadths were indistinguishable among groups (P = 0.9 for Nef as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.6 for Env as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test). More importantly, we show that the breadth of expandable, previously undetectable Gag-specific responses was inversely correlated with residual viral load (r = −0.6; P = 0.009). Together, these data reveal a direct link between the abundance of Gag-specific expandable memory responses and prolonged maintenance of low-level viremia. Our studies highlight a CD8+ T cell feature that would be desirable in a vaccine-induced T cell response. IMPORTANCE Many studies have shown that the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy appears to be heavily dependent upon special HIV-specific killer T lymphocytes that are able to inhibit viral replication. The identification of key features of these immune cells has the potential to inform rational HIV vaccine design. This study shows that a special subset of killer lymphocytes, known as central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes, is at least

  7. Epitope-Specific Vaccination Limits Clonal Expansion of Heterologous Naive T Cells during Viral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexus R. Johnson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite robust secondary T cell expansion primed by vaccination, the impact on primary immune responses to heterotypic antigens remains undefined. Here we show that secondary expansion of epitope-specific memory CD8+ T cells primed by prior infection with recombinant pathogens limits the primary expansion of naive CD8+ T cells with specificity to new heterologous antigens, dampening protective immunity against subsequent pathogen challenge. The degree of naive T cell repression directly paralleled the magnitude of the recall response. Suppressed primary T cell priming reflects competition for antigen accessibility, since clonal expansion was not inhibited if the primary and secondary epitopes were expressed on different dendritic cells. Interestingly, robust recall responses did not impact antigen-specific NK cells, suggesting that adaptive and innate lymphocyte responses possess different activation requirements or occur in distinct anatomical locations. These findings have important implications in pathogen vaccination strategies that depend on the targeting of multiple T cell epitopes.

  8. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    BLÁHOVÁ, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  9. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfil, Amanda R; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Howard, Cory M; Mates, Jessica M; Kwiek, Jesse J; Baiocchi, Robert A; Green, Patrick L

    2015-12-30

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2-3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i) in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  10. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL. This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  11. Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Glycoproteins B, H, and L Are Sufficient for, and Viral Glycoprotein Ov8 Can Enhance, Cell-Cell Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHajri, Salim M; Cunha, Cristina W; Nicola, Anthony V; Aguilar, Hector C; Li, Hong; Taus, Naomi S

    2017-03-15

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Macavirus that is carried asymptomatically by sheep. Infection of poorly adapted animals with OvHV-2 results in sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever, a fatal disease characterized by lymphoproliferation and vasculitis. There is no treatment or vaccine for the disease and no cell culture system to propagate the virus. The lack of cell culture has hindered studies of OvHV-2 biology, including its entry mechanism. As an alternative method to study OvHV-2 glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion as a part of the entry mechanism, we developed a virus-free cell-to-cell membrane fusion assay to identify the minimum required OvHV-2 glycoproteins to induce membrane fusion. OvHV-2 glycoproteins B, H, and L (gB, gH, and gL) were able to induce membrane fusion together but not when expressed individually. Additionally, open reading frame Ov8, unique to OvHV-2, was found to encode a transmembrane glycoprotein that can significantly enhance membrane fusion. Thus, OvHV-2 gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to induce membrane fusion, while glycoprotein Ov8 plays an enhancing role by an unknown mechanism.IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses enter cells via attachment of the virion to the cellular surface and fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes. Virus-cell membrane fusion is an important step for a successful viral infection. Elucidating the roles of viral glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion is critical toward understanding viral entry. Entry of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), the causative agent of sheep associated-malignant catarrhal fever, which is one of the leading causes of death in bison and other ungulates, has not been well studied due to the lack of a cell culture system to propagate the virus. The identification of OvHV-2 glycoproteins that mediate membrane fusion may help identify viral and/or cellular factors involved in OvHV-2 cell tropism and will advance investigation of cellular

  12. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wong, Victor C; Chavali, Arvind K; Gearhart, Larisa M; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical "activate-and-kill" strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV-GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime.

  13. Going viral: chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to CTL019, the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania. This is the first personalized cellular therapy for cancer to be so designated and occurred 25 years after the first publication describing genetic redirection of T cells to a surface antigen of choice. The peer-reviewed literature currently contains the outcomes of more than 100 patients treated on clinical trials of anti-CD19 redirected T cells, and preliminary results on many more patients have been presented. At last count almost 30 clinical trials targeting CD19 were actively recruiting patients in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients with high-risk B-cell malignancies therefore represent the first beneficiaries of an exciting and potent new treatment modality that harnesses the power of the immune system as never before. A handful of trials are targeting non-CD19 hematological and solid malignancies and represent the vanguard of enormous preclinical efforts to develop CAR T-cell therapy beyond B-cell malignancies. In this review, we explain the concept of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells, describe the extant results in hematologic malignancies, and share our outlook on where this modality is likely to head in the near future.

  14. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  15. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Alyssa Lundgren; Teoh, Jeffrey; Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I D(k) molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds D(k), are required to control viral spread. The extent of D(k)-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust D(k)-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen.

  16. Incorporation of Viral Glycoprotein VSV-G Improves the Delivery of DNA by Erythrocyte Ghost into Cells Refractory to Conventional Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Li, Yun-Pan; Zhong, Zhen-Min; Tan, Hui-Qi; Lin, Hao-Peng; Chen, Shao-Jun; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Wei, Chi-Ju

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate a novel gene delivery system based on the erythrocyte ghost (EG) integrated with fusogenic viral glycoprotein vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G). VSV-G proteins were harvested as condition medium of Ad293 cells carrying a VSV-G transgene and then incorporated into EG. Plasmid DNA was condensed by various transfection reagents. A luciferase expression construct (pGL3-control) and a DsRed expression cassette (pCMV-DsRed) were used to evaluate the delivery efficiency of DNA/EG/VSV-G complexes. VSV-G proteins could be incorporated into EG in static incubation under acidic conditions as evidenced by the Western blot analysis. Condensed plasmid DNA was bound mostly to the outer surface of EG, which could be detected by electromicroscopy and measured by electrophoresis. EG/VSV-G complexes stimulated the delivery of pGL3-control into Ad293 cells significantly with the luciferase activity increased about 4-fold as compared to that of the control. The delivery of pCMV-DsRed was also enhanced with the percentage of DsRed-positive Ad293 cells increased from 55 % to about 80 %. Moreover, the transfection efficiency in 3T3, HeLa, INS-1, and bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) cells increased about 2-3-fold. Finally, confocal microscopy analysis showed that incorporation of VSV-G significantly enhanced the endocytosis of EG into target cells. In the present study, a novel type of non-viral DNA delivery vehicle consisting of EG and fusogenic VSV-G proteins was formulated, which showed superior transfection efficiency even in cells resistant to classical transfection.

  17. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Kazlauskas, Arunas; Martikainen, Miika; Hinkkanen, Ari; Ahola, Tero; Saksela, Kalle

    2011-11-01

    Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV), Sindbis (SINV), and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  18. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Neuvonen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3 domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV, Sindbis (SINV, and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  19. Activation of blood T-cells in HIV/HCV co-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsiyeuskaya Natallia V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of HLA-DR which is immune response activation marker on T-cells and their subpopulations (CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and number of CD4 /CD25 cells with immune suppression properties in blood of HIV/HCV coinfected patients depending on HIV viral load, AIDS and receiving of antiretroviral therapy were studied. It was detected that HLA-DR expression on T-cells was significantly higher in patients with detectable HIV viral load, AIDS, and in patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Antiretroviral therapy leads to significant reduction of immune system activation markers expression, though it doesn’t allow to reach the level of healthy individuals. Number of CD4+/CD25+ cells had inverse correlation with activated CD3+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes and HIV viral load.

  20. Extra-cellular release and blood diffusion of BART viral micro-RNAs produced by EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baconnais Sonia; Amiel Corinne; Schneider Véronique; Témam Stéphane; Lang Philippe; Guigay Joël; Vérillaud Benjamin; Klibi Jihène; Bombik Izabela; Gelin Aurore; Gourzones Claire; Jimenez Anne-Sophie; Busson Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a human epithelial malignancy consistently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus. The viral genome is contained in the nuclei of all malignant cells with abundant transcription of a family of viral microRNAs called BART miRNAs. MicroRNAs are well known intra-cellular regulatory elements of gene expression. In addition, they are often exported in the extra-cellular space and sometimes transferred in recipient cells distinct from the produc...

  1. CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of AIDS, non-AIDS and deaths according to current antiretroviral use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Phillips, Andrew N; Gatell, Jose

    2013-01-01

    CD4 cell count and viral loads are used in clinical trials as surrogate endpoints for assessing efficacy of newly available antiretrovirals. If antiretrovirals act through other pathways or increase the risk of disease this would not be identified prior to licensing. The aim of this study was to ...... was to investigate the CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events according to current antiretrovirals....

  2. The in vitro anti-viral potential of Setarud (IMOD™, a commercial herbal medicine with protective activity against acquired immune deficiency syndrome in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Zabihollahi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Data from this study indicate that IMOD has significant anti-viral activity against HIV, HSV and MLV. Setarud could be subjected to further investigation after isolation of the constituents and determination of the toxic components.

  3. Electron tomography of the contact between T cells and SIV/HIV-1: implications for viral entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Sougrat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The envelope glycoproteins of primate lentiviruses, including human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, are heterodimers of a transmembrane glycoprotein (usually gp41, and a surface glycoprotein (gp120, which binds CD4 on target cells to initiate viral entry. We have used electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional architectures of purified SIV virions in isolation and in contact with CD4+ target cells. The trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein surface spikes are heterogeneous in appearance and typically approximately 120 A long and approximately 120 A wide at the distal end. Docking of SIV or HIV-1 on the T cell surface occurs via a neck-shaped contact region that is approximately 400 A wide and consistently consists of a closely spaced cluster of five to seven rod-shaped features, each approximately 100 A long and approximately 100 A wide. This distinctive structure is not observed when viruses are incubated with T lymphocytes in the presence of anti-CD4 antibodies, the CCR5 antagonist TAK779, or the peptide entry inhibitor SIVmac251 C34. For virions bound to cells, few trimers were observed away from this cluster at the virion-cell interface, even in cases where virus preparations showing as many as 70 envelope glycoprotein trimers per virus particle were used. This contact zone, which we term the "entry claw", provides a spatial context to understand the molecular mechanisms of viral entry. Determination of the molecular composition and structure of the entry claw may facilitate the identification of improved drugs for the inhibition of HIV-1 entry.

  4. Rate-equation modelling and ensemble approach to extraction of parameters for viral infection-induced cell apoptosis and necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Schilling, Joshua E.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav; Libert, Sergiy; Privman, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theoretical approach that uses physiochemical kinetics modelling to describe cell population dynamics upon progression of viral infection in cell culture, which results in cell apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis (direct cell death). Several model parameters necessary for computer simulation were determined by reviewing and analyzing available published experimental data. By comparing experimental data to computer modelling results, we identify the parameters that are the most sensitive to the measured system properties and allow for the best data fitting. Our model allows extraction of parameters from experimental data and also has predictive power. Using the model we describe interesting time-dependent quantities that were not directly measured in the experiment and identify correlations among the fitted parameter values. Numerical simulation of viral infection progression is done by a rate-equation approach resulting in a system of "stiff" equations, which are solved by using a novel variant of the stochastic ensemble modelling approach. The latter was originally developed for coupled chemical reactions.

  5. Identification of viral suppressors of RNAi by a reporter assay in Drosophila S2 cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleef, K.W. van; Mierlo, J.T. van; Beek, M. van den; Rij, R.P. van

    2011-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway plays an important role in antiviral immunity in insects. To -counteract the RNAi-mediated immune response of their hosts, several insect viruses, such as Flock house virus, Drosophila C virus, and Cricket paralysis virus, encode potent viral suppressors of RNAi (

  6. Cognitive change trajectories in virally suppressed HIV-infected individuals indicate high prevalence of disease activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Chloe; Gates, Thomas; Dermody, Nadene; Brew, Bruce J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The longitudinal rate and profile of cognitive decline in persons with stable, treated, and virally suppressed HIV infection is not established. To address this question, the current study quantifies the rate of cognitive decline in a cohort of virally suppressed HIV+ persons using clinically relevant definitions of decline, and determine cognitive trajectories taking into account historical and baseline HAND status. Methods Ninety-six HIV+ (clinically stable and virally undetectable) and 44 demographically comparable HIV- participants underwent standard neuropsychological testing at baseline and 18-months follow-up. We described clinically relevant cognitive trajectories based on standard definitions of historical and baseline HAND status and cognitive decline. Historical, moderate to severe HAND was formally diagnosed at the start of the cART era in 15/96 participants based on clinical neurological and neuropsychological assessment. The same standard of care has been applied to all participants at St. Vincent’s Hospital Infectious Disease Department for the duration of their HIV infection (median of 20 years). Results Relative to HIV- controls (4.5%), 14% of HIV+ participants declined (p = .11), they also scored significantly lower on the global change score (p = .03), processing speed (p = .02), and mental flexibility/inhibition (p = .02) domains. Having HAND at baseline significantly predicted cognitive decline at follow up (p = .005). We determined seven clinically relevant cognitive trajectories taking into account whether participant has a history of HAND prior to study entry (yes/no); their results on the baseline assessment (baseline impairment: yes/no) and their results on the 18-month follow up (decline or stable) which in order of prevalence were: 1) No HAND history, no baseline impairment, 18-month follow-up stable (39%), 2) No HAND history, baseline impairment, 18-month follow-up stable (35%), 3) History of HAND; baseline impairment, 18

  7. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection: Innate immunity to acute & chronic viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Brian A; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after ...

  8. Cell adhesion-dependent membrane trafficking of a binding partner for the ebolavirus glycoprotein is a determinant of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Derek; Schornberg, Kathryn L; Shoemaker, Charles J; Delos, Sue E; Stantchev, Tzanko S; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C; White, Judith M

    2010-09-21

    Ebolavirus is a hemorrhagic fever virus associated with high mortality. Although much has been learned about the viral lifecycle and pathogenesis, many questions remain about virus entry. We recently showed that binding of the receptor binding region (RBR) of the ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) and infection by GP pseudovirions increase on cell adhesion independently of mRNA or protein synthesis. One model to explain these observations is that, on cell adhesion, an RBR binding partner translocates from an intracellular vesicle to the cell surface. Here, we provide evidence for this model by showing that suspension 293F cells contain an RBR binding site within a membrane-bound compartment associated with the trans-Golgi network and microtubule-organizing center. Consistently, trafficking of the RBR binding partner to the cell surface depends on microtubules, and the RBR binding partner is internalized when adherent cells are placed in suspension. Based on these observations, we reexamined the claim that lymphocytes, which are critical for ebolavirus pathogenesis, are refractory to infection because they lack an RBR binding partner. We found that both cultured and primary human lymphocytes (in suspension) contain an intracellular pool of an RBR binding partner. Moreover, we identified two adherent primate lymphocytic cell lines that bind RBR at their surface and strikingly, support GP-mediated entry and infection. In summary, our results reveal a mode of determining viral entry by a membrane-trafficking event that translocates an RBR binding partner to the cell surface, and they suggest that this process may be operative in cells important for ebolavirus pathogenesis (e.g., lymphocytes and macrophages).

  9. Bioreactors for high cell density and continuous multi-stage cultivations: options for process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2016-03-01

    With an increasing demand for efficacious, safe, and affordable vaccines for human and animal use, process intensification in cell culture-based viral vaccine production demands advanced process strategies to overcome the limitations of conventional batch cultivations. However, the use of fed-batch, perfusion, or continuous modes to drive processes at high cell density (HCD) and overextended operating times has so far been little explored in large-scale viral vaccine manufacturing. Also, possible reductions in cell-specific virus yields for HCD cultivations have been reported frequently. Taking into account that vaccine production is one of the most heavily regulated industries in the pharmaceutical sector with tough margins to meet, it is understandable that process intensification is being considered by both academia and industry as a next step toward more efficient viral vaccine production processes only recently. Compared to conventional batch processes, fed-batch and perfusion strategies could result in ten to a hundred times higher product yields. Both cultivation strategies can be implemented to achieve cell concentrations exceeding 10(7) cells/mL or even 10(8) cells/mL, while keeping low levels of metabolites that potentially inhibit cell growth and virus replication. The trend towards HCD processes is supported by development of GMP-compliant cultivation platforms, i.e., acoustic settlers, hollow fiber bioreactors, and hollow fiber-based perfusion systems including tangential flow filtration (TFF) or alternating tangential flow (ATF) technologies. In this review, these process modes are discussed in detail and compared with conventional batch processes based on productivity indicators such as space-time yield, cell concentration, and product titers. In addition, options for the production of viral vaccines in continuous multi-stage bioreactors such as two- and three-stage systems are addressed. While such systems have shown similar virus titers compared to

  10. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from field cattle immune to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are permissive in vitro to BVDV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V; Mishra, N; Pateriya, A; Behera, S P; Rajukumar, K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro permissivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)-immune field cattle to homologous and heterologous BVDVs. PBMCs from seventeen BVDV-naïve and sixteen BVDV-immune animals were infected with noncytopathic BVDV-1 or BVDV-2. The immune status of cattle was indicated by the presence of virus neutralizing antibodies, while viral load of PBMCs was determined by real-time RT-PCR. The results revealed that the PBMCs from naïve or immune animals were permissive to either BVDV-1 or BVDV-2, but the viral load was significantly higher for the naïve than for the immune animals. Furthermore, the load of homologous virus in PBMCs from immune animals was lower than that of heterologous virus. Our results provide evidence that the PBMCs from BVDV-immune cattle in field are susceptible to reinfection with homologous or heterologous BVDV, albeit to a lower extent in the former case.

  11. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CCSR Building Room 3115A, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Wonjae [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie [Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Frank, Curtis W, E-mail: jeffrey.glenn@stanford.ed, E-mail: curt.frank@stanford.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from {approx}50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 +- 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  12. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe B; White, Malcolm F; Peng, Xu

    2015-06-19

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5' → 3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition to the previously demonstrated ssDNA endonuclease activity. Further, in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated interactions between gp17 and gp18 and between gp18 and gp19 with the former being mediated by the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of gp17. The strand-displacement replication mode proposed previously for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.

  13. Initial viral load determines the magnitude of the human CD8 T cell response to yellow fever vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondy, Rama S; Johnson, Philip L F; Nakaya, Helder I; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mulligan, Mark J; Lawson, Benton; Miller, Joseph D; Pulendran, Bali; Antia, Rustom; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-03-10

    CD8 T cells are a potent tool for eliminating intracellular pathogens and tumor cells. Thus, eliciting robust CD8 T-cell immunity is the basis for many vaccines under development. However, the relationship between antigen load and the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response is not well-described in a human immune response. Here we address this issue by quantifying viral load and the CD8 T-cell response in a cohort of 80 individuals immunized with the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YFV-17D) by sampling peripheral blood at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 30, and 90. When the virus load was below a threshold (peak virus load < 225 genomes per mL, or integrated virus load < 400 genome days per mL), the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response correlated strongly with the virus load (R(2) ∼ 0.63). As the virus load increased above this threshold, the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell responses saturated. Recent advances in CD8 T-cell-based vaccines have focused on replication-incompetent or single-cycle vectors. However, these approaches deliver relatively limited amounts of antigen after immunization. Our results highlight the requirement that T-cell-based vaccines should deliver sufficient antigen during the initial period of the immune response to elicit a large number of CD8 T cells that may be needed for protection.

  14. Small terminase couples viral DNA-binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C.; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here, we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ~23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essen...

  15. From Agrobacterium to viral vectors: genome modification of plant cells by rare cutting restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Ira; Honig, Arik; Omid, Ayelet; De Costa, Noam; Marhevka, Elena; Cohen, Barry; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and biotechnologists require methods to accurately modify the genome of higher eukaryotic cells. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, site-specific mutagenesis, site-specific insertion of foreign DNA, and replacement and deletion of native sequences. Accurate genome modifications in plant species have been rather limited, with only a handful of plant species and genes being modified through the use of early genome-editing techniques. The development of rare-cutting restriction enzymes as a tool for the induction of site-specific genomic double-strand breaks and their introduction as a reliable tool for genome modification in animals, animal cells and human cell lines have paved the way for the adaptation of rare-cutting restriction enzymes to genome editing in plant cells. Indeed, the number of plant species and genes which have been successfully edited using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and engineered homing endonucleases is on the rise. In our review, we discuss the basics of rare-cutting restriction enzyme-mediated genome-editing technology with an emphasis on its application in plant species.

  16. High-resolution labeling and functional manipulation of specific neuron types in mouse brain by Cre-activated viral gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Kuhlman

    Full Text Available We describe a method that combines Cre-recombinase knockin mice and viral-mediated gene transfer to genetically label and functionally manipulate specific neuron types in the mouse brain. We engineered adeno-associated viruses (AAVs that express GFP, dsRedExpress, or channelrhodopsin (ChR2 upon Cre/loxP recombination-mediated removal of a transcription-translation STOP cassette. Fluorescent labeling was sufficient to visualize neuronal structures with synaptic resolution in vivo, and ChR2 expression allowed light activation of neuronal spiking. The structural dynamics of a specific class of neocortical neuron, the parvalbumin-containing (Pv fast-spiking GABAergic interneuron, was monitored over the course of a week. We found that although the majority of Pv axonal boutons were stable in young adults, bouton additions and subtractions on axonal shafts were readily observed at a rate of 10.10% and 9.47%, respectively, over 7 days. Our results indicate that Pv inhibitory circuits maintain the potential for structural re-wiring in post-adolescent cortex. With the generation of an increasing number of Cre knockin mice and because viral transfection can be delivered to defined brain regions at defined developmental stages, this strategy represents a general method to systematically visualize the structure and manipulate the function of different cell types in the mouse brain.

  17. Differential effects of Sp cellular transcription factors on viral promoter activation by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE62 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Ruyechan, William T; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann

    2015-11-01

    The immediate early (IE) 62 protein is the major varicella-zoster virus (VZV) regulatory factor. Analysis of the VZV genome revealed 40 predicted GC-rich boxes within 36 promoters. We examined effects of ectopic expression of Sp1-Sp4 on IE62- mediated transactivation of three viral promoters. Ectopic expression of Sp3 and Sp4 enhanced IE62 activation of ORF3 and gI promoters while Sp3 reduced IE62 activation of ORF28/29 promoter and VZV DNA replication. Sp2 reduced IE62 transactivation of gI while Sp1 had no significant influence on IE62 activation with any of these viral promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) confirmed binding of Sp1 and Sp3 but not Sp2 and Sp4 to the gI promoter. Sp1-4 bound to IE62 and amino acids 238-258 of IE62 were important for the interaction with Sp3 and Sp4 as well as Sp1. This work shows that Sp family members have differential effects on IE62-mediated transactivation in a promoter-dependent manner.

  18. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  19. Dengue virus genomic variation associated with mosquito adaptation defines the pattern of viral non-coding RNAs and fitness in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Sebastian; Pallarés, Horacio M.; Blair, Carol D.; Fabri, Cintia; Morales, Maria A.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2017-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus includes a large number of medically relevant pathogens that cycle between humans and arthropods. This host alternation imposes a selective pressure on the viral population. Here, we found that dengue virus, the most important viral human pathogen transmitted by insects, evolved a mechanism to differentially regulate the production of viral non-coding RNAs in mosquitos and humans, with a significant impact on viral fitness in each host. Flavivirus infections accumulate non-coding RNAs derived from the viral 3’UTRs (known as sfRNAs), relevant in viral pathogenesis and immune evasion. We found that dengue virus host adaptation leads to the accumulation of different species of sfRNAs in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. This process does not depend on differences in the host machinery; but it was found to be dependent on the selection of specific mutations in the viral 3’UTR. Dissecting the viral population and studying phenotypes of cloned variants, the molecular determinants for the switch in the sfRNA pattern during host change were mapped to a single RNA structure. Point mutations selected in mosquito cells were sufficient to change the pattern of sfRNAs, induce higher type I interferon responses and reduce viral fitness in human cells, explaining the rapid clearance of certain viral variants after host change. In addition, using epidemic and pre-epidemic Zika viruses, similar patterns of sfRNAs were observed in mosquito and human infected cells, but they were different from those observed during dengue virus infections, indicating that distinct selective pressures act on the 3’UTR of these closely related viruses. In summary, we present a novel mechanism by which dengue virus evolved an RNA structure that is under strong selective pressure in the two hosts, as regulator of non-coding RNA accumulation and viral fitness. This work provides new ideas about the impact of host adaptation on the variability and evolution of flavivirus 3

  20. The glycoprotein and the matrix protein of rabies virus affect pathogenicity by regulating viral replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

  1. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  2. In-depth characterization of viral isolates from plasma and cells compared with plasma circulating quasispecies in early HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Dalmau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of in vitro models to unravel the phenotypic characteristics of circulating viral variants is key to understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis but limited by the availability of primary viral isolates from biological samples. However, overall in vivo genetic variability of HIV-1 within a subject may not be reflected in the viable viral population obtained after isolation. Although several studies have tried to determine whether viral populations expanded in vitro are representative of in vivo findings, the answer remains unclear due to the reduced number of clonal sequences analyzed or samples compared. In order to overcome previous experimental limitations, here we applied Deep Pyrosequencing (DPS technology in combination with phenotypic experiments to analyze and compare with unprecedented detail the composition of viral isolates and in vivo quasispecies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We amplified by DPS HIV-1 genomic regions covering gag, protease, integrase and env-V3 to characterize paired isolates from plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells and compare them with total plasma viral RNA in four recently HIV-1 infected subjects. Our study demonstrated the presence of unique haplotypes scattered between sample types with conservation of major variants. In addition, no differences in intra- and inter-population encoded protein variability were found between the different types of isolates or when these were compared to plasma viral RNA within subjects. Additionally, in vitro experiments demonstrated phenotypic similarities in terms of replicative capacity and co-receptor usage between viral isolates and plasma viral RNA. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in-depth comparison and characterization of viral isolates from different sources and plasma circulating quasispecies using DPS in recently HIV-1 infected subjects. Our data supports the use of primary isolates regardless of their plasma or cellular origin to define

  3. Downregulation of the stress-induced ligand ULBP1 following SV40 infection confers viral evasion from NK cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Yoav; Drayman, Nir; Ben-Nun-Shaul, Orly; Vitenstein, Alon; Yamin, Rachel; Ophir, Yael; Oppenheim, Ariella; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-03-29

    Polyomaviruses are a diverse family of viruses which are prevalent in the human population. However, the interactions of these viruses with the immune system are not well characterized. We have previously shown that two human polyomaviruses, JC and BK, use an identical microRNA to evade immune attack by Natural Killer (NK) cells. We showed that this viral microRNA suppresses ULBP3 expression, a stress induced ligand for the killer receptor NKG2D. Here we show that Simian Virus 40 (SV40) also evades NK cell attack through the down regulation of another stress-induced ligand of NKG2D, ULBP1. These findings indicate that NK cells play an essential role in fighting polyomavirus infections and further emphasize the importance of various members of the ULBP family in controlling polyomavirus infection.

  4. Viral Interleukin-10 Expressed by Human Cytomegalovirus during the Latent Phase of Infection Modulates Latently Infected Myeloid Cell Differentiation ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Avdic, Selmir; Cao, John Z.; Cheung, Allen K.L.; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene is expressed during latent and productive infections, and it codes for homologs of interleukin-10 (IL-10). We examined whether viral IL-10 expressed during latency altered differentiation of latently infected myeloid progenitors. In comparison to infection with parental virus or mock infection, latent infection with a virus in which the gene encoding viral IL-10 has been deleted upregulated cytokines associated with dendritic cell (DC) formation and incre...

  5. The study of antiviral activity of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with vitamin C» against influenza A/Victoria virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ганна Сергіївна Шумова

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of combined remedies, having in their composition herbal material, that shows anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, restorative, and immunotropic action, is one of promising directions in the search of effective agents for acute respiratory infections prevention and treatment.Aim. The purpose of our research was to determine antiviral activity of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with Vitamin C» in the form of hard capsules against influenza A/Victoria virus strains.Methods. Classic virological method of chick embryos contamination in the chorioallantoic membrane, immunofluorescence method for the obtained virus identification, and neutralization reaction in chick embryos has been used.Results. It has been determined that the dietary supplement components were non-toxic for chick embryos in dilution of 1:10 to 1:80; had antiviral activity against influenza A/Victoria prototype virus strain in dilution of 1:10 to 1:20; lethal toxic dose in dilution of 1:40. After administration of influenza A/Victoria prototype virus strain in chick embryos without incubation with the test remedy (passaging, the medicinal agent retained its initial properties, confirmed by infected embryo cells fluorescence and the further study of the subcultered strain in the inhibition hemagglutination test with chick erythrocytes.Conclusion. As a result of the carried out in experiment neutralization reaction in 9–11 days chick embryos by the method of contamination in the chorioallantoic membrane with further visualization and identification of material, containing the virus, by the immunofluorescence method of the infected cells specific fluorescence, antiviral properties of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with Vitamin C» components have been determined

  6. HPV positive neuroendocrine cervical cancer cells are dependent on Myc but not E6/E7 viral oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Blancato, Jan; Albanese, Christopher; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Naidong; Paul, Siddartha; Alkhilaiwi, Faris; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Dakic, Aleksandra; Fang, Shuang; Choudhary, Sujata; Hou, Tung-Wei; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Haddad, Bassem R.; Usuda, Yukari; Hartmann, Dan; Symer, David; Gillison, Maura; Agarwal, Seema; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Liu, Xuefeng; Schlegel, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Using conditional cell reprogramming, we generated a stable cell culture of an extremely rare and aggressive neuroendocrine cervical cancer. The cultured cells contained HPV-16, formed colonies in soft agar and rapidly produced tumors in immunodeficient mice. The HPV-16 genome was integrated adjacent to the Myc gene, both of which were amplified 40-fold. Analysis of RNA transcripts detected fusion of the HPV/Myc genes, arising from apparent microhomologous recombination. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) and fluorescent-in-situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated coordinate localization and translocation of the amplified Myc and HPV genes on chromosomes 8 and 21. Similar to the primary tumor, tumor cell cultures expressed very high levels of the Myc protein and, in contrast to all other HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines, they harbored a gain-of-function mutation in p53 (R273C). Unexpectedly, viral oncogene knockdown had no effect on the growth of the cells, but it did inhibit the proliferation of a conventional HPV-16 positive cervical cancer cell line. Knockdown of Myc, but not the mutant p53, significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the primary driver of transformation in this aggressive cervical cancer is not HPV oncogene expression but rather the overexpression of Myc. PMID:28378747

  7. Integration-free reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) without viral vectors, recombinant DNA, and genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are envisaged to be integral components of multicellular systems engineered for therapeutic applications. The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via recombinant expression of a limited number of transcription factors, which was first achieved by Yamanaka and colleagues in 2007, heralded a major breakthrough in the stem cell field. Since then, there has been rapid progress in the field of iPSC generation, including the identification of various small molecules that can enhance reprogramming efficiency and reduce the number of different transcription factors required for reprogramming. Nevertheless, the major obstacles facing clinical applications of iPSCs are safety concerns associated with the use of viral vectors and recombinant DNA for expressing the appropriate transcription factors during reprogramming. In particular, permanent genetic modifications to newly reprogrammed iPSCs have to be avoided in order to meet stringent safety requirements for clinical therapy. These safety challenges can be overcome by new technology platforms that enable cellular reprogramming to iPSCs without the need to utilize either recombinant DNA or viral vectors. The use of recombinant cell-penetrating peptides and direct transfection of synthetic mRNA encoding appropriate transcription factors have both been shown to successfully reprogram somatic cells to iPSCs. It has also been shown more recently that the direct transfection of certain miRNA species can reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency without the need for any of the transcription factors commonly utilized for iPSC generation. This chapter describes protocols for iPSC generation with these new techniques, which would obviate the use of recombinant DNA and viral vectors in cellular reprogramming, thus avoiding permanent genetic modification to the reprogrammed cells.

  8. Role of cell-to-cell variability in activating a positive feedback antiviral response in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI, which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop.

  9. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrig, Marylou V; Fan, Yijun; Hazelton, Paul

    2013-11-06

    Cannabinoids are promising therapies to support neurogenesis and decelerate disease progression in neuroinflammatory and degenerative disorders. Whether neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids are sustainable during persistent viral infection of the CNS is not known. Using a rodent model of chronic viral encephalitis based on Borna Disease (BD) virus, in which 1 week treatment with the general cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 has been shown to be neuroprotective (Solbrig et al., 2010), we examine longer term (2 week treatment) effects of a general (CB1 and CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1mg/kg ip twice per day) or a specific (CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-308 (5mg/kg ip once daily) on histopathology, measures of frontostriatal neurogenesis and gliogenesis, and viral load. We find that WIN and HU-308 differ in their ability to protect new BrdU(+) cells. The selective CB2 agonist HU increases BrdU(+) cells in prefrontal cortex (PFC), significantly increases BrdU(+) cells in striatum, differentially regulates polydendrocytes vs. microglia/macrophages, and reduces immune activation at a time WIN-treated rats appear tolerant to the anti-inflammatory effect of their cannabinoid treatment. WIN and HU had little direct viral effect in PFC and striatum, yet reduced viral signal in hippocampus. Thus, HU-308 action on CB2 receptors, receptors known to be renewed during microglia proliferation and action, is a nontolerizing mechanism of controlling CNS inflammation during viral encephalitis by reducing microglia activation, as well as partially limiting viral infection, and uses a nonpsychotropic cannabinoid agonist.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  11. Viral epidemics in a cell culture: novel high resolution data and their interpretation by a percolation theory based model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Gönci

    Full Text Available Because of its relevance to everyday life, the spreading of viral infections has been of central interest in a variety of scientific communities involved in fighting, preventing and theoretically interpreting epidemic processes. Recent large scale observations have resulted in major discoveries concerning the overall features of the spreading process in systems with highly mobile susceptible units, but virtually no data are available about observations of infection spreading for a very large number of immobile units. Here we present the first detailed quantitative documentation of percolation-type viral epidemics in a highly reproducible in vitro system consisting of tens of thousands of virtually motionless cells. We use a confluent astroglial monolayer in a Petri dish and induce productive infection in a limited number of cells with a genetically modified herpesvirus strain. This approach allows extreme high resolution tracking of the spatio-temporal development of the epidemic. We show that a simple model is capable of reproducing the basic features of our observations, i.e., the observed behaviour is likely to be applicable to many different kinds of systems. Statistical physics inspired approaches to our data, such as fractal dimension of the infected clusters as well as their size distribution, seem to fit into a percolation theory based interpretation. We suggest that our observations may be used to model epidemics in more complex systems, which are difficult to study in isolation.

  12. Immune functions in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas): Evaluation of natural killer cell activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Sylvain De; Ross, Peter; Osterhaus, Albert; Martineau, Daniel; Beland, P; Fournier, Michel

    1997-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer (NK) activity, an important non-specific defense mechanism against viral infections and tumors, was demonstrated in beluga whales using two different methods: 51Cr release and flow cytometry. Using the 51Cr release assay, NK activity in belugas was shown to be higher against K-562 than against YAC-1 cell lines. Moreover, it was enhanced by the addition of human recombinant interleukin-2 with both cell lines. NK activity evaluated by flow cytometry in the peripheral ...

  13. Differential neutrophil activation in viral infections: Enhanced TLR-7/8-mediated CXCL8 release in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca S.M.; Van Ly, David; Spann, Kirsten; Reading, Patrick C.; Burgess, Janette K.; Hartl, Dominik; Baines, Katherine J.; Oliver, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Respiratory viral infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations. Neutrophils accumulate in the airways and the mechanisms that link neutrophilic inflammation, viral infections and exacerbations are unclear. This study aims to investigate anti-viral responses in neutro

  14. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Shepelenko S; S, Salnikov A; V, Rak S; P, Goncharova E; B, Ryzhikov A, E-mail: shep@vector.nsc.r, E-mail: shep@ngs.r [Federal State Research Institution State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR of the Federal Service for Surveillance in Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being (FSRI SRC VB VECTOR) Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  15. H/KDEL receptors mediate host cell intoxication by a viral A/B toxin in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Björn; Blum, Andrea; Gießelmann, Esther; Dausend, Julia; Rammo, Domenik; Müller, Nina C.; Tschacksch, Emilia; Steimer, Miriam; Spindler, Jenny; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens; Breinig, Frank; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    A/B toxins such as cholera toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin and killer toxin K28 contain a KDEL-like amino acid motif at one of their subunits which ensures retrograde toxin transport through the secretory pathway of a target cell. As key step in host cell invasion, each toxin binds to distinct plasma membrane receptors that are utilized for cell entry. Despite intensive efforts, some of these receptors are still unknown. Here we identify the yeast H/KDEL receptor Erd2p as membrane receptor of K28, a viral A/B toxin carrying an HDEL motif at its cell binding β-subunit. While initial toxin binding to the yeast cell wall is unaffected in cells lacking Erd2p, binding to spheroplasts and in vivo toxicity strongly depend on the presence of Erd2p. Consistently, Erd2p is not restricted to membranes of the early secretory pathway but extends to the plasma membrane where it binds and internalizes HDEL-cargo such as K28 toxin, GFPHDEL and Kar2p. Since human KDEL receptors are fully functional in yeast and restore toxin sensitivity in the absence of endogenous Erd2p, toxin uptake by H/KDEL receptors at the cell surface might likewise contribute to the intoxication efficiency of A/B toxins carrying a KDEL-motif at their cytotoxic A-subunit(s). PMID:27493088

  16. HTLV-1 Tax mediated downregulation of miRNAs associated with chromatin remodeling factors in T cells with stably integrated viral promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifur Rahman

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a natural cellular mechanism to silence gene expression and is predominantly mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs that target messenger RNA. Viruses can manipulate the cellular processes necessary for their replication by targeting the host RNAi machinery. This study explores the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 transactivating protein Tax on the RNAi pathway in the context of a chromosomally integrated viral long terminal repeat (LTR using a CD4(+ T-cell line, Jurkat. Transcription factor profiling of the HTLV-1 LTR stably integrated T-cell clone transfected with Tax demonstrates increased activation of substrates and factors associated with chromatin remodeling complexes. Using a miRNA microarray and bioinformatics experimental approach, Tax was also shown to downregulate the expression of miRNAs associated with the translational regulation of factors required for chromatin remodeling. These observations were validated with selected miRNAs and an HTLV-1 infected T cells line, MT-2. miR-149 and miR-873 were found to be capable of directly targeting p300 and p/CAF, chromatin remodeling factors known to play critical role in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Overall, these results are first in line establishing HTLV-1/Tax-miRNA-chromatin concept and open new avenues toward understanding retroviral latency and/or replication in a given cell type.

  17. Utilization of replication-competent XMRV reporter-viruses reveals severe viral restriction in primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Martina Stürzel

    Full Text Available The gammaretrovirus termed xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was described to be isolated from prostate cancer tissue biopsies and from blood of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. However, many studies failed to detect XMRV and to verify these disease associations. Data suggesting the contamination of specimens in particular by PCR-based methods and recent reports demonstrating XMRV generation via recombination of two murine leukemia virus precursors raised serious doubts about XMRV being a genuine human pathogen. To elucidate cell tropism of XMRV, we generated replication competent XMRV reporter viruses encoding a green fluorescent protein or a secretable luciferase as tools to analyze virus infection of human cell lines or primary human cells. Transfection of proviral DNAs into LNCaP prostate cancer cells resulted in readily detectably reporter gene expression and production of progeny virus. Inoculation of known XMRV susceptible target cells revealed that these virions were infectious and expressed the reporter gene, allowing for a fast and highly sensitive quantification of XMRV infection. Both reporter viruses were capable of establishing a spreading infection in LNCaP and Raji B cells and could be easily passaged. However, after inoculation of primary human blood cells such as CD4 T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells, infection rates were very low, and a spreading infection was never established. In line with these results we found that supernatants derived from these XMRV infected primary cell types did not contain infectious virus. Thus, although XMRV efficiently replicated in some human cell lines, all tested primary cells were largely refractory to XMRV infection and did not support viral spread. Our results provide further evidence that XMRV is not a human pathogen.

  18. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ndjamen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG. gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB, a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  19. HCV Specific IL-21 Producing T Cells but Not IL-17A Producing T Cells Are Associated with HCV Viral Control in HIV/HCV Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacParland, Sonya A.; Fadel, Saleh M.; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Fawaz, Ali; Kim, Connie; Rahman, A. K. M. Nur-ur; Liu, Jun; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Grebely, Jason; Dore, Gregory J.; Wong, David K.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance, faster cirrhosis progression and higher HCV RNA levels are associated with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The CD4+ T helper cytokines interleukin (IL)-21 and IL-17A are associated with virus control and inflammation, respectively, both important in HCV and HIV disease progression. Here, we examined how antigen-specific production of these cytokines during HCV mono and HIV/HCV coinfection was associated with HCV virus control. Methods We measured HCV-specific IL-21 and IL-17A production by transwell cytokine secretion assay in PBMCs from monoinfected and coinfected individuals. Viral control was determined by plasma HCV RNA levels. Results In acutely infected individuals, those able to establish transient/complete HCV viral control tended to have stronger HCV-specific IL-21-production than non-controllers. HCV-specific IL-21 production also correlated with HCV viral decline in acute infection. Significantly stronger HCV-specific IL-21 production was detected in HAART-treated coinfected individuals. HCV-specific IL-17A production was not associated with lower plasma HCV RNA levels in acute or chronic HCV infection and responses were stronger in HIV coinfection. HCV-specific IL-21/ IL-17A responses did not correlate with microbial translocation or fibrosis. Exogenous IL-21 treatment of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells from monoinfected individuals enhanced their function although CD8+ T cells from coinfected individuals were somewhat refractory to the effects of IL-21. Conclusions These data show that HCV-specific IL-21 and IL-17A-producing T cells are induced in HIV/HCV coinfection. In early HIV/HCV coinfection, IL-21 may contribute to viral control, and may represent a novel tool to enhance acute HCV clearance in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals. PMID:27124305

  20. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  1. Viral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Forest; Barott, Katie

    2013-03-01

    Viruses are major drivers of global biogeochemistry and the etiological agents of many diseases. They are also the winners in the game of life: there are more viruses on the planet than cellular organisms and they encode most of the genetic diversity on the planet. In fact, it is reasonable to view life as a viral incubator. Nevertheless, most ecological and evolutionary theories were developed, and continue to be developed, without considering the virosphere. This means these theories need to be to reinterpreted in light of viral knowledge or we need to develop new theory from the viral point-of-view. Here we briefly introduce our viral planet and then address a major outstanding question in biology: why is most of life viral? A key insight is that during an infection cycle the original virus is completely broken down and only the associated information is passed on to the next generation. This is different for cellular organisms, which must pass on some physical part of themselves from generation to generation. Based on this premise, it is proposed that the thermodynamic consequences of physical information (e.g., Landauer's principle) are observed in natural viral populations. This link between physical and genetic information is then used to develop the Viral Information Hypothesis, which states that genetic information replicates itself to the detriment of system energy efficiency (i.e., is viral in nature). Finally, we show how viral information can be tested, and illustrate how this novel view can explain existing ecological and evolutionary theories from more fundamental principles.

  2. Viral Infection at High Magnification: 3D Electron Microscopy Methods to Analyze the Architecture of Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses need to hijack their cellular hosts and reprogram their machineries in order to replicate their genomes and produce new virions. For the direct visualization of the different steps of a viral life cycle (attachment, entry, replication, assembly and egress) electron microscopy (EM) methods are extremely helpful. While conventional EM has given important information about virus-host cell interactions, the development of three-dimensional EM (3D-EM) approaches provides unprecedented insights into how viruses remodel the intracellular architecture of the host cell. During the last years several 3D-EM methods have been developed. Here we will provide a description of the main approaches and examples of innovative applications.

  3. Purified JC virus T antigen derived from insect cells preferentially interacts with binding site II of the viral core origin under replication conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollag, B; Mackeen, P C; Frisque, R J

    1996-04-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) establishes persistent, asymptomatic infections in most individuals, but in severely immunocompromised hosts it may cause the fatal demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In cell culture JCV multiplies inefficiently and exhibits a narrow host range. This restricted behavior occurs, in part, at the level of DNA replication, which is regulated by JCV's multifunctional large tumor protein (TAg). To prepare purified JCV TAg (JCT) for biochemical analyses, the recombinant baculovirus B-JCT was generated by cotransfection of insect cells with wild-type baculovirus and the vector pVL-JCT(Int-) containing the JCT-coding sequence downstream of the efficient polyhedrin promoter. JCT expressed in infected cells was immunoaffinity purified using the anti-JCT monoclonal antibody PAb 2000. Characterization of the viral oncoprotein indicated that it exists in solution as a mixture of monomeric and oligomeric species. With the addition of ATP, the population of monomers decreased and that of hexamers and double hexamers increased. A DNA mobility shift assay indicated that origin binding occurred primarily with the double-hexamer form. A comparison of the specific DNA-binding activities of JCT and SV40 TAg (SVT) revealed that JCT generally exhibited greater affinity for binding site II relative to binding site I (B.S. I) of both viral origin regions, whereas SVT preferentially bound B.S. I. Furthermore, JCT bound nonviral DNA more efficiently than did SVT. These functional differences between the two TAgs may contribute to the reduced DNA replication potential of JCV in vitro, and to the virus' ability to establish persistent infections in vivo.

  4. Epigallocatechin gallate inhibits HBV DNA synthesis in a viral replication - inducible cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei He; Li-Xia Li; Qing-Jiao Liao; Chun-Lan Liu; Xu-Lin Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the antiviral mechanism of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. METHODS: In this research, the HBV-replicating cell line HepG2.117 was used to investigate the antiviral mechanism of EGCG. Cytotoxicity of EGCG was analyzed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) in the supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Precore mRNA and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) levels were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The effect of EGCG on HBV core promoter activity was measured by dual luciferase reporter assay. HBV covalently closed circular DNA and replicative intermediates of DNA were quantified by real-time PCR assay. RESULTS: When HepG2.117 cells were grown in the presence of EGCG, the expression of HBeAg was suppressed, however, the expression of HBsAg was not affected. HBV precore mRNA level was also downregulated by EGCG, while the transcription of precore mRNA was not impaired. The synthesis of both HBV covalently closed circular DNA and replicative intermediates of DNA were reduced by EGCG treatment to a similar extent, however, HBV pgRNA transcripted from chromosome-integrated HBV genome was not affected by EGCG treatment, indicating that EGCG targets only replicative intermediates of DNA synthesis. CONCLUSION: In HepG2.117 cells, EGCG inhibits HBV replication by impairing HBV replicative intermediates of DNA synthesis and such inhibition results in reduced production of HBV covalently closed circular DNA.

  5. VIRAL MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    OLENTSOVA Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This project seeks to investigate how the company Gitz can create awareness towards their brand by using viral marketing. To do this we analyze which elements of viral marketing the company can use, to reach their goal. In order to utilize the selected tools of viral marketing best possible, we need to figure out the company’s customer segment and figure out how to reach that segment. This has been done with the use of Henrik Dahl’s Minerva-model that divides the population into f...

  6. Innate Immune Responses in Viral Hepatitis: the role of Kupffer cells and liver-derived monocytes in shaping intrahepatic immunity in mice using the LCMV infection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Movita (Dowty)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This study was performed to elucidate the immunological role of the liver in viral hepatitis. The immune functions of the liver are shaped by the intrahepatic cells present during steady state condition, as well as the recruited immune cells during liver inflammation.

  7. Host competence and helicase activity differences exhibited by West Nile viral variants expressing NS3-249 amino acid polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley A Langevin

    Full Text Available A single helicase amino acid substitution, NS3-T249P, has been shown to increase viremia magnitude/mortality in American crows (AMCRs following West Nile virus (WNV infection. Lineage/intra-lineage geographic variants exhibit consistent amino acid polymorphisms at this locus; however, the majority of WNV isolates associated with recent outbreaks reported worldwide have a proline at the NS3-249 residue. In order to evaluate the impact of NS3-249 variants on avian and mammalian virulence, multiple amino acid substitutions were engineered into a WNV infectious cDNA (NY99; NS3-249P and the resulting viruses inoculated into AMCRs, house sparrows (HOSPs and mice. Differential viremia profiles were observed between mutant viruses in the two bird species; however, the NS3-249P virus produced the highest mean peak viral loads in both avian models. In contrast, this avian modulating virulence determinant had no effect on LD50 or the neurovirulence phenotype in the murine model. Recombinant helicase proteins demonstrated variable helicase and ATPase activities; however, differences did not correlate with avian or murine viremia phenotypes. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that avian-specific phenotypes are modulated by critical viral-host protein interactions involving the NS3-249 residue that directly influence transmission efficiency and therefore the magnitude of WNV epizootics in nature.

  8. Interleukin-10 determines viral clearance or persistence in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David G; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Edelmann, Kurt H.; Teyton, Luc; McGavern, Dorian B; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2008-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are a major health concern. One obstacle inhibiting the clearance of persistent infections is functional inactivation of antiviral T cells. Although such immunosuppression occurs rapidly after infection, the mechanisms that induce the loss of T-cell activity and promote viral persistence are unknown. Herein we document that persistent viral infection in mice results in a significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)-10 by antigen-presenting cells, leading to impaired T-cell responses. Genetic removal of Il10 resulted in the maintenance of robust effector T-cell responses, the rapid elimination of virus and the development of antiviral memory T-cell responses. Therapeutic administration of an antibody that blocks the IL-10 receptor restored T-cell function and eliminated viral infection. Thus, we identify a single molecule that directly induces immunosuppression leading to viral persistence and demonstrate that a therapy to neutralize IL-10 results in T-cell recovery and the prevention of viral persistence. PMID:17041596

  9. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  10. TLR3-induced activation of mast cells modulates CD8+ T-cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-08-01

    Mast cells play an important role in host defense against various pathogens, but their role in viral infection has not been clarified in detail. dsRNA, synthesized by various types of viruses and mimicked by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) is recognized by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). In this study, we demonstrate that poly(I:C) injection in vivo potently stimulates peritoneal mast cells to up-regulate a number of different costimulatory molecules. Therefore, we examined the expression and the functional significance of TLR3 activation in mast cells. Mast cells express TLR3 on the cell surface and intracellularly. After stimulation of mast cells with poly(I:C) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), TLR3 is phosphorylated and the expression of key antiviral response cytokines (interferon beta, ISG15) and chemokines (IP10, RANTES) is upregulated. Interestingly, mast cells activated via TLR3-poly(I:C) potently stimulate CD8+ T-cell recruitment. Indeed, mast-cell-deficient mice (KitW/KitW-v) given an intraperitoneal injection of poly(I:C) show a decreased CD8+ T-cell recruitment, whereas granulocytes normally migrate to the peritoneal cavity. Mast-cell reconstitution of KitW/KitW-v mice normalizes the CD8+ T-cell influx. Thus, mast cells stimulated through engagement of TLR3 are potent regulators of CD8+ T-cell activities in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Heba H; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus-specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential.

  12. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Heba H.; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus—specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential. PMID:27589232

  13. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  14. A viral microRNA down-regulates multiple cell cycle genes through mRNA 5'UTRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Grey

    Full Text Available Global gene expression data combined with bioinformatic analysis provides strong evidence that mammalian miRNAs mediate repression of gene expression primarily through binding sites within the 3' untranslated region (UTR. Using RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitation (RISC-IP techniques we have identified multiple cellular targets for a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV miRNA, miR-US25-1. Strikingly, this miRNA binds target sites primarily within 5'UTRs, mediating significant reduction in gene expression. Intriguingly, many of the genes targeted by miR-US25-1 are associated with cell cycle control, including cyclin E2, BRCC3, EID1, MAPRE2, and CD147, suggesting that miR-US25-1 is targeting genes within a related pathway. Deletion of miR-US25-1 from HCMV results in over expression of cyclin E2 in the context of viral infection. Our studies demonstrate that a viral miRNA mediates translational repression of multiple cellular genes by targeting mRNA 5'UTRs.

  15. The Frequency of Cytidine Editing of Viral DNA Is Differentially Influenced by Vpx and Nucleosides during HIV-1 or SIVMAC Infection of Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Nhi Nguyen

    Full Text Available Two cellular factors are currently known to modulate lentiviral infection specifically in myeloid cells: SAMHD1 and APOBEC3A (A3A. SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphohydrolase that interferes with viral infection mostly by limiting the intracellular concentrations of dNTPs, while A3A is a cytidine deaminase that has been described to edit incoming vDNA. The restrictive phenotype of myeloid cells can be alleviated through the direct degradation of SAMHD1 by the HIV-2/SIVSM Vpx protein or else, at least in the case of HIV-1, by the exogenous supplementation of nucleosides that artificially overcome the catabolic activity of SAMHD1 on dNTPs. Here, we have used Vpx and dNs to explore the relationship existing between vDNA cytidine deamination and SAMHD1 during HIV-1 or SIVMAC infection of primary dendritic cells. Our results reveal an interesting inverse correlation between conditions that promote efficient infection of DCs and the extent of vDNA editing that may reflect the different susceptibility of vDNA to cytoplasmic effectors during the infection of myeloid cells.

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K-Rta exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL like activity and is essential for viral reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Izumiya

    Full Text Available The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO is a protein that regulates a wide variety of cellular processes by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to a diverse array of target proteins. Sumoylation also plays an important role in the replication of many viruses. Previously, we showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV encodes a SUMO-ligase, K-bZIP, which catalyzes sumoylation of host and viral proteins. We report here that this virus also encodes a gene that functions as a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin-ligase (STUbL which preferentially targets sumoylated proteins for degradation. K-Rta, the major transcriptional factor which turns on the entire lytic cycle, was recently found to have ubiquitin ligase activity toward a selected set of substrates. We show in this study that K-Rta contains multiple SIMs (SUMO interacting motif and binds SUMOs with higher affinity toward SUMO-multimers. Like RNF4, the prototypic cellular STUbL, K-Rta degrades SUMO-2/3 and SUMO-2/3 modified proteins, including promyelocytic leukemia (PML and K-bZIP. PML-NBs (nuclear bodies or ND-10 are storage warehouses for sumoylated proteins, which negatively regulate herpesvirus infection, as part of the intrinsic immune response. Herpesviruses have evolved different ways to degrade or disperse PML bodies, and KSHV utilizes K-Rta to inhibit PML-NBs formation. This process depends on K-Rta's ability to bind SUMO, as a K-Rta SIM mutant does not effectively degrade PML. Mutations in the K-Rta Ring finger-like domain or SIM significantly inhibited K-Rta transactivation activity in reporter assays and in the course of viral reactivation. Finally, KSHV with a mutation in the Ring finger-like domain or SIM of K-Rta replicates poorly in culture, indicating that reducing SUMO-conjugates in host cells is important for viral replication. To our knowledge, this is the first virus which encodes both a SUMO ligase and a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase that together may generate

  17. Hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein over-expressed by baculovirus in hepatoma cells, efficiently encapsidates and transmits the viral RNA to naïve cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Suzanne U

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recombinant baculovirus(vBacORF2 that expressed the full-length ORF2 capsid protein of a genotype 1 strain of hepatitis E virus(HEV was constructed. Transduction of S10-3 human hepatoma cells with this baculovirus led to large amounts of ORF2 protein production in ~50% of the cells as determined by immune fluorescence microscopy. The majority of the ORF2 protein detected by Western blot was 72 kDa, the size expected for the full-length protein. To determine if the exogenously-supplied ORF2 protein could transencapsidate viral genomes, S10-3 cell cultures that had been transfected the previous day with an HEV replicon of genotype 1 that contained the gene for green fluorescent protein(GFP, in place of that for ORF2 protein, were transduced with the vBacORF2 virus. Cell lysates were prepared 5 days later and tested for the ability to deliver the GFP gene to HepG2/C3A cells, another human hepatoma cell line. FACS analysis indicated that lysates from cell cultures receiving only the GFP replicon were incapable of introducing the replicon into the HepG2/C3A cells whereas ~2% of the HepG2/C3A cells that received lysate from cultures that had received both the replicon and the baculovirus produced GFP. Therefore, the baculovirus-expressed ORF2 protein was able to trans-encapsidate the viral replicon and form a particle that could infect naïve HepG2/C3A cells. This ex vivo RNA packaging system should be useful for studying many aspects of HEV molecular biology.

  18. Nonviral and viral gene transfer into different subsets of human dendritic cells yield comparable efficiency of transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Andreas; Noffz, Gabriele; Pavlenko, Maxim; Saebøe-Larssen, Stein; Fong, Timothy; Maitland, Norman; Pisa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Among the many promising cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, dendritic cells (DC) have become of particular interest. This study aims to optimize a clinical grade protocol for culture and transfection of human DC. Monocytes and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from same donor were differentiated under serum-free conditions and analyzed for their susceptibility to several recently described nonviral transfection methods as compared with established virally mediated gene transfer. Nonviral gene transfer methods studied were square-wave electroporation, lipofection, and particle-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed mRNA. We conclude that DNA is not suitable for transduction of DC using nonviral methods. In contrast, mRNA and square-wave electroporation reproducibly yields 60% and 50% transfected monocyte- and CD34(+)-derived DC, respectively, measured at protein level, without affecting the cell viability. Thus, the transfection efficiency of this method is comparable with the 40-90% transgene expression obtained using retroviral (RV) or adenoviral (AdV) vectors in CD34(+)- and monocyte-derived DC, respectively. In monocyte-derived DC, however, the amount of protein expressed per-cell basis was higher after AdV (MOI = 1000) compared with mRNA electroporation-mediated transfer. This is the first study directly demonstrating side-by-side that mRNA electroporation into DC of different origin indeed results in a comparable number of transduced cells as when using virus-mediated gene transfer.

  19. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on viral safety evaluation of biotechnology products derived from cell lines of human or animal origin; availability--FDA. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing a guidance entitled "Q5A Viral Safety Evaluation of Biotechnology Products Derived From Cell Lines of Human or Animal Origin." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes the testing and evaluation of the viral safety of biotechnology products derived from characterized cell lines of human or animal origin, and outlines data that should be submitted in marketing applications.

  20. Do microRNAs induced by Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess anti-viral activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are small (18-22 nucleotides) endogenous RNAs that potently regulate the deadenylation, translation, and decay of a wide spectrum of target mRNAs. Their discovery adds a new layer to the mechanisms of control of gene expression, impacting a broad range of biological......RNAs were also up regulated in the liver and muscle (vaccination site) of fish vaccinated with a DNA vaccine expressing the VHSV glycoprotein gene. Recent studies further indicate that the expression of these miRNAs is induced by interferons. In order to analyze if miRNA-462 and miRNA-731 have any anti......-viral effects, we designed inhibitory synthetic oligonucleotides called antagomiRs or anti-miRNAs. These saline-formulated 2’-O-methylated Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-based antagomiRs were injected intraperitoneally into rainbow trout fingerlings followed by exposure of the fish to VHSV. Development of disease...

  1. The viral spike protein is not involved in the polarized sorting of coronaviruses in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; de Beer, R; Godeke, G J; Raamsman, M J; Horzinek, M C; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    1998-01-01

    Coronaviruses are assembled by budding into a pre-Golgi compartment from which they are transported along the secretory pathway to leave the cell. In cultured epithelial cells, they are released in a polarized fashion; depending on the virus and cell type, they are sorted preferentially either to th

  2. Method for Dual Viral Vector Mediated CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Disruption in Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haixia; Liu, Menglin; Klomp, Jeff; Merrill, Bradley J.; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2017-01-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) are widely used to study mechanisms of angiogenesis, inflammation, and endothelial permeability. Targeted gene disruption induced by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated Protein 9 (Cas9) nuclease gene editing is potentially an important tool for definitively establishing the functional roles of individual genes in ECs. We showed that co-delivery of adenovirus encoding EGFP-tagged Cas9 and lentivirus encoding a single guide RNA (sgRNA) in primary human lung microvascular ECs (HLMVECs) disrupted the expression of the Tie2 gene and protein. Tie2 disruption increased basal endothelial permeability and prevented permeability recovery following injury induced by the inflammatory stimulus thrombin. Thus, gene deletion via viral co-delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 in primary human ECs provides a novel platform to investigate signaling mechanisms of normal and perturbed EC function without the need for clonal expansion. PMID:28198371

  3. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition specialized for

  4. Antioxidant and Anti-Hepatitis C Viral Activities of Commercial Milk Thistle Food Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Anthony

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Milk thistle dietary supplements that contain silymarin are widely marketed and used in the USA and other countries for liver enhancement and recovery. More recently, silymarin has also been identified as a possible antiviral for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. To assess different brands of commercially sold silymarin, 45 products were collected from local stores and analyzed for their silymarin content, antioxidant activities, and antiviral activity against HCV. Antioxidant activity was measured as radical scavenging activity using DPPH and by estimating their antioxidant capacity as trolox equivalent. Anti-HCV activity was measured in an HCV genotype 1b replication inhibition assay. Samples were found to vary widely in their silymarin content, with some samples having none or very low concentrations while silymarin represented higher than 80% of other samples. Both antioxidant and anti-HCV activity correlated with the overall level of silymarin.

  5. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  6. Dengue virus NS1 protein interacts with the ribosomal protein RPL18: this interaction is required for viral translation and replication in Huh-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Salazar, Margot; Angel-Ambrocio, Antonio H; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Bautista-Carbajal, Patricia; Hurtado-Monzon, Arianna M; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Ludert, Juan E; Del Angel, Rosa M

    2015-10-01

    Given dengue virus (DENV) genome austerity, it uses cellular molecules and structures for virion entry, translation and replication of the genome. NS1 is a multifunctional protein key to viral replication and pathogenesis. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with NS1 may help in further understanding the functions of NS1. In this paper we isolated a total of 64 proteins from DENV infected human hepatic cells (Huh-7) that interact with NS1 by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation assays. The subcellular location and expression levels during infection of the ribosomal proteins RPS3a, RPL7, RPL18, RPL18a plus GAPDH were determined. None of these proteins changed their expression levels during infection; however, RPL-18 was redistributed to the perinuclear region after 48hpi. Silencing of the RPL-18 does not affect cell translation efficiency or viability, but it reduces significantly viral translation, replication and viral yield, suggesting that the RPL-18 is required during DENV replicative cycle.

  7. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  8. JC virus small T antigen binds phosphatase PP2A and Rb family proteins and is required for efficient viral DNA replication activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bollag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV produces five tumor proteins encoded by transcripts alternatively spliced from one precursor messenger RNA. Significant attention has been given to replication and transforming activities of JCV's large tumor antigen (TAg and three T' proteins, but little is known about small tumor antigen (tAg functions. Amino-terminal sequences of tAg overlap with those of the other tumor proteins, but the carboxy half of tAg is unique. These latter sequences are the least conserved among the early coding regions of primate polyomaviruses. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of wild type and mutant forms of JCV tAg to interact with cellular proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation and survival. The JCV P99A tAg is mutated at a conserved proline, which in the SV40 tAg is required for efficient interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the C157A mutant tAg is altered at one of two newly recognized LxCxE motifs. Relative to wild type and C157A tAgs, P99A tAg interacts inefficiently with PP2A in vivo. Unlike SV40 tAg, JCV tAg binds to the Rb family of tumor suppressor proteins. Viral DNAs expressing mutant t proteins replicated less efficiently than did the intact JCV genome. A JCV construct incapable of expressing tAg was replication-incompetent, a defect not complemented in trans using a tAg-expressing vector. CONCLUSIONS: JCV tAg possesses unique properties among the polyomavirus small t proteins. It contributes significantly to viral DNA replication in vivo; a tAg null mutant failed to display detectable DNA replication activity, and a tAg substitution mutant, reduced in PP2A binding, was replication-defective. Our observation that JCV tAg binds Rb proteins, indicates all five JCV tumor proteins have the potential to influence cell cycle progression in infected and transformed cells. It remains unclear how these proteins coordinate their unique and overlapping functions.

  9. Increased p16CDKN2A protein within feline cutaneous viral plaques, bowenoid in situ carcinomas, and a subset of invasive squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J S; French, A F; Peters-Kennedy, J; Orbell, G M B; Gwynne, K

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous viral plaques and bowenoid in situ carcinomas (BISCs) in cats are thought to be caused by papillomavirus (PV) infection. There is evidence that PVs may also cause some feline invasive squamous cell carcinomas (ISCCs). Human oncogenic PVs degrade retinoblastoma (RB) protein, impairing cell cycle control. Loss of RB function also increases p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16), and increased p16 immunoreactivity within a human oral ISCC indicates that the neoplasm was caused by PV infection. In the present study, p16 immunoreactivity was evaluated in 14 feline viral plaques, 14 BISCs, 7 non-solar-induced ISCCs, 11 solar-induced ISCCs, and 14 trichoblastomas. Increased p16 was present within all viral plaques, BISCs, and non-solar-induced ISCCs. In contrast, little p16 immunoreactivity was visible in the solar-induced ISCCs or trichoblastomas. PV DNA was consistently amplified from viral plaques, BISCs, and non-solar-induced ISCCs. However, just 5 solar-induced ISCCs and 1 trichoblastoma contained PV DNA. Given that both increased p16 immunoreactivity and PV DNA were present within viral plaques, BISCs, and non-solar-induced ISCCs, all 3 may be caused by PV infection. This suggests that feline non-solar-induced ISCCs may develop as a result of neoplastic progression from viral plaques and BISCs. Whether PVs promote this progression is unknown; however, evidence from this study suggests the PV that is associated with viral plaques and BISCs is able to disrupt the p16-RB pathway and therefore could have oncogenic potential. Immunohistochemical detection of p16 appears to be a useful technique to investigate the role of PVs in feline skin disease.

  10. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  11. West Nile virus infection does not induce PKR activation in rodent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbahesh, H; Scherbik, S V; Brinton, M A

    2011-12-05

    dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is activated by viral dsRNAs and phosphorylates eIF2a reducing translation of host and viral mRNA. Although infection with a chimeric West Nile virus (WNV) efficiently induced PKR and eIF2a phosphorylation, infections with natural lineage 1 or 2 strains did not. Investigation of the mechanism of suppression showed that among the cellular PKR inhibitor proteins tested, only Nck, known to interact with inactive PKR, colocalized and co-immunoprecipitated with PKR in WNV-infected cells and PKR phosphorylation did not increase in infected Nck1,2-/- cells. Several WNV stem-loop RNAs efficiently activated PKR in vitro but not in infected cells. WNV infection did not interfere with intracellular PKR activation by poly(I:C) and similar virus yields were produced by control and PKR-/- cells. The results indicate that PKR phosphorylation is not actively suppressed in WNV-infected cells but that PKR is not activated by the viral dsRNA in infected cells.

  12. HIV-1 proteins in infected cells determine the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I and class II molecules and the nature of the cellular and humoral antiviral immune responses--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-07-01

    The goals of molecular virology and immunology during the second half of the 20th century have been to provide the conceptual approaches and the tools for the development of safe and efficient virus vaccines for the human population. The success of the vaccination approach to prevent virus epidemics was attributed to the ability of inactivated and live virus vaccines to induce a humoral immune response and to produce antiviral neutralizing antibodies in the vaccinees. The successful development of antiviral vaccines and their application to most of the human population led to a marked decrease in virus epidemics around the globe. Despite this remarkable achievement, the developing epidemics of HIV-caused AIDS (accompanied by activation of latent herpesviruses in AIDS patients), epidemics of Dengue fever, and infections with respiratory syncytial virus may indicate that conventional approaches to the development of virus vaccines that induce antiviral humoral responses may not suffice. This may indicate that virus vaccines that induce a cellular immune response, leading to the destruction of virus-infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may be needed. Antiviral CD8+ CTLs are induced by viral peptides presented within the peptide binding grooves of HLA class I molecules present on the surface of infected cells. Studies in the last decade provided an insight into the presentation of viral peptides by HLA class I molecules to CD8+ T cells. These studies are here reviewed, together with a review of the molecular events of virus replication, to obtain an overview of how viral peptides associate with the HLA class I molecules. A similar review is provided on the molecular pathway by which viral proteins, used as subunit vaccines or inactivated virus particles, are taken up by endosomes in the endosome pathway and are processed by proteolytic enzymes into peptides that interact with HLA class II molecules during their transport to the plasma membrane of antigen

  13. Synthesis and anti-herpes simplex viral activity of monoglycosyl diglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwitayanuchit, Wicharn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Patarapanich, Chamnan; Pummangura, Sunibhond; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2003-12-01

    Based on the discovery of antiviral beta-galactosyl diglycerides from Clinacanthus nutans leaves, 19 monoglycosyl diglycerides were synthesized and examined for inhibitory effect on herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1, HSV-2). A study of the structure-activity relationships of the synthetic monoglycosyl diglycerides indicated that the fatty acyl moieties were critical for inhibitory action with higher activity displayed as the acyl groups became more olefinic in character. The sugar moiety was also important for anti-HSV action; however, the type of sugar (glucose or galactose) did not affect activity. The stereochemistry at C-2 of the glycerol backbone displayed no significant effect on anti-HSV activity. Among the compounds synthesized, 1,2-O-dilinolenoyl-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol showed the highest inhibitory activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 with IC50 values of 12.5+/-0.5 and 18.5+/-1.5 microg/ml, respectively.

  14. Viral fusogenic membrane glycoprotein induces HL-60 cell death via inhibiting NF-κB activity%病毒融合基因包膜糖蛋白通过抑制NF-κB活性诱导HL-60细胞死亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽; 谭获; 李小龙

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨猿猴白血病病毒融合基因包膜糖蛋白(GALV-FMG)诱导白血病HL-60细胞的死亡效应与NF-κB的关系.方法 将HL-60细胞分为pcDNA3.1(+)-GALV-FMG质粒转染(A)组、pcDNA3.1(+)空载体对照(B)组和空白对照(C)组.脂质体转染后,应用乳酸脱氢酶释放实验检测GALV-FMG引起HL-60细胞的死亡效应,免疫荧光和凝胶电迁移检验分析GALV-FMG在诱导HL-60细胞死亡中NF-κB的活性.结果 与B、C组相比,A组细胞中NF-κB的活性受到了明显的抑制,细胞死亡的发生显著增加(P<0.05).结论 GALV-FMG的表达可诱导HL-60细胞发生死亡;其机制可能与NF-κB的活性抑制有关.%Objective To investigate the relationship between HL-60 cell death induced by gibbon ape leukemia virus fusion gene envelope glycoprotein (GALV-FMG) and NF-kB activity. Methods HL-60 cells were divided into three groups of A[transfected with pcDNA3. l( + )-GALV-FMG],B[transfected with empty pcDNA3.1( + ) vector] and C(blank controls). After lipofectamine transfection, HL-60 cell death induced by GALV-FMG was detected by lactate dehydrogenase release test, and NF-kB activity was analyzed by immunofluorescence and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results Compared with groups of B and C, NF-kB activity was significantly inhibited and cell death was remarkably increased in group C(P<0. 05). Conclusion GALV-FMG expression can induce HL-60 cell death, which may be related with inhibition of NF-kB activity.

  15. Sphingolipids in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Viruses exploit membranes and their components such as sphingolipids in all steps of their life cycle including attachment and membrane fusion, intracellular transport, replication, protein sorting and budding. Examples for sphingolipid-dependent virus entry are found for: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which besides its protein receptors also interacts with glycosphingolipids (GSLs); rhinovirus, which promotes the formation of ceramide-enriched platforms and endocytosis; or measles virus (MV), which induces the surface expression of its own receptor CD150 via activation of sphingomyelinases (SMases). While SMase activation was implicated in Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment, the virus utilizes the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C protein 1 (NPC1) as 'intracellular' entry receptor after uptake into endosomes. Differential activities of SMases also affect the intracellular milieu required for virus replication. Sindbis virus (SINV), for example, replicates better in cells lacking acid SMase (ASMase). Defined lipid compositions of viral assembly and budding sites influence virus release and infectivity, as found for hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV. And finally, viruses manipulate cellular signaling and the sphingolipid metabolism to their advantage, as for example influenza A virus (IAV), which activates sphingosine kinase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB.

  16. High Programmed Death-1 levels on HCV specific T cells during acute infection are associated with viral persistence and require preservation of cognate antigen during chronic infection1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Ray, Stuart C.; Astemborski, Jacquie; Levine, Jordana; Liu, Lin; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Clute, Shalyn; Wang, Changyu; Korman, Alan; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Pardoll, Drew M.; Cox, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    HCV is an important human pathogen that represents a model for chronic infection since the majority of infected individuals fail to clear the infection despite generation of virus-specific T cell responses during the period of acute infection. While viral sequence evolution at targeted MHC class I restricted epitopes represents one mechanism for immune escape in HCV, many targeted epitopes remain intact under circumstances of viral persistence. In order to explore alternative mechanisms of HCV immune evasion, we analyzed patterns of expression of a major inhibitory receptor on T cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1), from the time of initial infection and correlated these with HCV RNA levels, outcome of infection, and sequence escape within the targeted epitope. We show that the level of PD-1 expression in early HCV infection is significantly higher on HCV-specific T cells from those who progress to chronic HCV infection compared to those who clear infection. This correlation is independent of HCV RNA levels, compatible with the notion that high PD-1 expression on HCV-specific CD8 T cells during acute infection inhibits viral clearance. Viral escape during persistent infection is associated with reduction in PD-1 levels on the surface of HCV specific T cells, supporting the necessity of ongoing antigenic stimulation of T cells for maintenance of PD-1 expression. These results support the idea that PD-1 expression on T cells specific for nonescaped epitopes contributes to viral persistence and suggest that PD-1 blockade may alter the outcome of HCV infection. PMID:19050238

  17. The anti-interferon activity of conserved viral dUTPase ORF54 is essential for an effective MHV-68 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronika Sitapara Leang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses such as KSHV and EBV establish lifelong persistent infections through latency in lymphocytes. These viruses have evolved several strategies to counteract the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. We conducted an unbiased screen using the genetically and biologically related virus, MHV-68, to find viral ORFs involved in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling and identified a conserved viral dUTPase, ORF54. Here we define the contribution of ORF54 in type I interferon inhibition by ectopic expression and through the use of genetically modified MHV-68. ORF54 and an ORF54 lacking dUTPase enzymatic activity efficiently inhibit type I interferon signaling by inducing the degradation of the type I interferon receptor protein IFNAR1. Subsequently, we show in vitro that the lack of ORF54 causes a reduction in lytic replication in the presence of type I interferon signaling. Investigation of the physiological consequence of IFNAR1 degradation and importance of ORF54 during MHV-68 in vivo infection demonstrates that ORF54 has an even greater impact on persistent infection than on lytic replication. MHV-68 lacking ORF54 expression is unable to efficiently establish latent infection in lymphocytes, although it replicates relatively normally in lung tissues. However, infection of IFNAR-/- mice alleviates this phenotype, emphasizing the specific role of ORF54 in type I interferon inhibition. Infection of mice and cells by a recombinant MHV-68 virus harboring a site specific mutation in ORF54 rendering the dUTPase inactive demonstrates that dUTPase enzymatic activity is not required for anti-interferon function of ORF54. Moreover, we find that dUTPase activity is dispensable at all stages of MHV-68 infection analyzed. Overall, our data suggest that ORF54 has evolved anti-interferon activity in addition to its dUTPase enzymatic activity, and that it is actually the anti-interferon role that renders ORF54 critical

  18. Evaluation of the matrix effect of thermophilic anaerobic digestion on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus using real-time PCR and viral cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tiejun; Bowlby, Evelyn; Tong, Yupin; Wu, John T Y; Wong, Lester; Tower, Robert J; Pang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaomei

    2012-04-01

    The matrix effect of the thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) process on inactivation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) was evaluated. Viral cell culture and real-time PCR were used for assessing removal of the viral infectivity and degradation of viral DNA, respectively. Results showed that the TAD-derived matrix alone can inactivate the virus and destroy the nucleic acid helix core of ILTV in a time-and- dose-dependent manner. No cytopathogenic effect (CPE) was observed in the cells exposed to ILTV pre-treated with TAD matrix for 1.5h in experiment 1 and for 16h in experiment 2. There was a significant statistical difference between TAD matrix treated and non-treated cultures (p<0.001, Chi-test). Amplifiable ILT viral DNA was reduced 2.27 log by 1.5h-treatment and was not present by 16h-treatment with TAD matrix, indicating complete viral DNA fragmentation. The TAD process is an environmentally friendly way for disposing of poultry biowaste and carcasses.

  19. New World hantaviruses activate IFNlambda production in type I IFN-deficient vero E6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Prescott

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses indigenous to the New World are the etiologic agents of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS. These viruses induce a strong interferon-stimulated gene (ISG response in human endothelial cells. African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells are used to propagate hantaviruses as well as many other viruses. The utility of the Vero E6 cell line for virus production is thought to owe to their lack of genes encoding type I interferons (IFN, rendering them unable to mount an efficient innate immune response to virus infection. Interferon lambda, a more recently characterized type III IFN, is transcriptionally controlled much like the type I IFNs, and activates the innate immune system in a similar manner.We show that Vero E6 cells respond to hantavirus infection by secreting abundant IFNlambda. Three New World hantaviruses were similarly able to induce IFNlambda expression in this cell line. The IFNlambda contained within virus preparations generated with Vero E6 cells independently activates ISGs when used to infect several non-endothelial cell lines, whereas innate immune responses by endothelial cells are specifically due to viral infection. We show further that Sin Nombre virus replicates to high titer in human hepatoma cells (Huh7 without inducing ISGs.Herein we report that Vero E6 cells respond to viral infection with a highly active antiviral response, including secretion of abundant IFNlambda. This cytokine is biologically active, and when contained within viral preparations and presented to human epithelioid cell lines, results in the robust activation of innate immune responses. We also show that both Huh7 and A549 cell lines do not respond to hantavirus infection, confirming that the cytoplasmic RNA helicase pathways possessed by these cells are not involved in hantavirus recognition. We demonstrate that Vero E6 actively respond to virus infection and inhibiting IFNlambda production in these cells might increase their utility

  20. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  1. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection.......-cell-mediated inflammation, no significant influence of VLA-1 was found either in the primary response or in the memory phase. However, alpha-VLA-4 antibody reduced the DTH-like reaction in VLA-1(-/-) mice to a higher degree than in wt mice, suggesting a synergistic effect of blocking both integrins. Taken together...

  2. pEPito: a significantly improved non-viral episomal expression vector for mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogris Manfred

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The episomal replication of the prototype vector pEPI-1 depends on a transcription unit starting from the constitutively expressed Cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMV-IEP and directed into a 2000 bp long matrix attachment region sequence (MARS derived from the human β-interferon gene. The original pEPI-1 vector contains two mammalian transcription units and a total of 305 CpG islands, which are located predominantly within the vector elements necessary for bacterial propagation and known to be counterproductive for persistent long-term transgene expression. Results Here, we report the development of a novel vector pEPito, which is derived from the pEPI-1 plasmid replicon but has considerably improved efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. The pEPito vector is significantly reduced in size, contains only one transcription unit and 60% less CpG motives in comparison to pEPI-1. It exhibits major advantages compared to the original pEPI-1 plasmid, including higher transgene expression levels and increased colony-forming efficiencies in vitro, as well as more persistent transgene expression profiles in vivo. The performance of pEPito-based vectors was further improved by replacing the CMV-IEP with the human CMV enhancer/human elongation factor 1 alpha promoter (hCMV/EF1P element that is known to be less affected by epigenetic silencing events. Conclusions The novel vector pEPito can be considered suitable as an improved vector for biotechnological applications in vitro and for non-viral gene delivery in vivo.

  3. Effects of Preinfection With Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus on Immune Cells From the Lungs of Calves Inoculated With Bovine Herpesvirus 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risalde, M A; Molina, V; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Palomo, F; Pedrera, M; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interstitial aggregates of immune cells observed in pulmonary parenchyma of calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus and challenged later with bovine herpesvirus 1. In addition, the intent of this research was to clarify the role of bovine viral diarrhea virus in local cell-mediated immunity and potentially in predisposing animals to bovine respiratory disease complex. Twelve Friesian calves, aged 8 to 9 months, were inoculated with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1. Ten were subsequently challenged with bovine herpesvirus 1 and euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 7, or 14 days postinoculation. The other 2 calves were euthanized prior to the second inoculation. Another cohort of 10 calves was inoculated only with bovine herpesvirus 1 and then were euthanized at the same time points. Two calves were not inoculated with any agent and were used as negative controls. Pulmonary lesions were evaluated in all animals, while quantitative and biosynthetic changes in immune cells were concurrently examined immunohistochemically to compare coinfected calves and calves challenged only with bovine herpesvirus 1. Calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus demonstrated moderate respiratory clinical signs and histopathologic evidence of interstitial pneumonia with aggregates of mononuclear cells, which predominated at 4 days postinoculation. Furthermore, this group of animals was noted to have a suppression of interleukin-10 and associated alterations in the Th1-driven cytokine response in the lungs, as well as inhibition of the response of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes against bovine herpesvirus 1. These findings suggest that bovine viral diarrhea virus preinfection could affect the regulation of the immune response as modulated by regulatory T cells, as well as impair local cell-mediated immunity to secondary respiratory pathogens.

  4. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Induces Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation via CD81 Binding for Viral Internalization and Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Diao, Jingyu; Pantua, Homer; Ngu, Hai; Komuves, Laszlo; Diehl, Lauri; Schaefer, Gabriele; Kapadia, Sharookh B.

    2012-01-01

    While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be important in the entry process for multiple viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), the molecular mechanisms by which EGFR facilitates HCV entry are not well understood. Using the infectious cell culture HCV model (HCVcc), we demonstrate that the binding of HCVcc particles to human hepatocyte cells induces EGFR activation that is dependent on interactions between HCV and CD81 but not claudin 1. EGFR activation can also be ...

  6. Outcomes from monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings with viral load, CD4 cell count, or clinical observation alone: a computer simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Miners, Alec H;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In lower-income countries, WHO recommends a population-based approach to antiretroviral treatment with standardised regimens and clinical decision making based on clinical status and, where available CD4 cell count, rather than viral load. Our aim was to study the potential consequenc...

  7. T20-insensitive HIV-1 from naive patients exhibits high viral fitness in a novel dual-color competition assay on primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas; Hagmann, Isabel; Lohrengel, Sabine; Heil, Marintha L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2005-03-15

    The relationship between sensitivity to antiviral drugs and viral fitness is of paramount importance in understanding the long-term implications of clinical resistance. Here we report the development of a novel recombinant virus assay to study entry inhibitor-resistant HIV variants using a biologically relevant cell type, primary CD4 T-cells. We have modified the replication-competent molecular clone HIV(NL4-3) to express a reporter protein (Renilla luciferase), Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), or Red Fluorescent Protein (DsRed2) upon infection, thus allowing quantification of replication. Luciferase-expressing virus was used to evaluate drug sensitivity, while co-infection with viruses carrying the green and red fluorescent proteins was employed in the competitive fitness assay. Using envelope proteins from three T20 insensitive variants, lower levels of resistance were observed in primary CD4 T-cells than had been previously reported for cell lines. Importantly, dual-color competition assays demonstrated comparable or higher fitness for these variants despite their reduced T20 sensitivity. We conclude that reduced sensitivity to T20 is compatible with high viral fitness in the absence of selection pressure. Thus, simultaneously measuring both resistance and viral fitness using this newly described dual-color competition assay will likely provide important information about resistant viral variants that emerge during therapy with entry inhibitors.

  8. Effect of BSA Antigen Sensitization during the Acute Phase of Influenza A Viral Infection on CD11c+ Pulmonary Antigen Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Sato

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: BSA antigen sensitization during the acute phase of influenza A viral infection enhanced IL-10 production from naive CD4+ T cell interaction with CD11c+ pulmonary APCs. The IL-10 secretion evoked Th2 responses in the lungs with downregulation of Th1 responses and was important for the eosinophil recruitment into the lungs after BSA antigen challenge.

  9. Understanding MHC class I presentation of viral antigens by human dendritic cells as a basis for rational design of therapeutic vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Montfoort (Nadine); E. van der Aa (Evelyn); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractEffective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Since dendritic cells (DC) have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some v

  10. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4(+) cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression. DESIGN: An observational cohort...

  11. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  12. Expression of late viral proteins is restricted in nasal mucosal leucocytes but not in epithelial cells during early-stage equine herpes virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeerdt, Annick C; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-08-01

    Equine herpes virus (EHV)-1 replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and reaches the lamina propria and bloodstream in infected mononuclear cells. This study evaluated expression of the late viral proteins gB, gC, gD and gM in respiratory epithelial and mononuclear cells using: (1) epithelial-like rabbit kidney cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with EHV-1 in vitro; (2) an equine ex vivo nasal explant system; and (3) nasal mucosa tissue of ponies infected in vivo. The viral proteins were expressed in all late-infected epithelial cells, whereas expression was not observed in infected leucocytes where proteins gB and gM were expressed in 60-90%, and proteins gC and gD in only 20% of infected cells, respectively. The results indicate that expression of these viral proteins during early-stage EHV-1 infection is highly dependent on the cell type infected.

  13. Single-step cloning-screening method: a new tool for developing and studying high-titer viral vector producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A F; Formas-Oliveira, A S; Guerreiro, M R; Tomás, H A; Alves, P M; Coroadinha, A S

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a novel method merging the cloning of viral vector producer cells with vector titer screening, allowing for screening 200-500 clones in 2 weeks. It makes use of a GFP separated into two fragments, S10 and S11 (Split GFP), fluorescing only upon transcomplementation. Producer cells carrying a S11 viral transgene are cloned in 96-well plates and co-cultured with target cells stably expressing S10. During the period of clone expansion, S11 viruses infect S10 target cells reconstituting the GFP signal. Transcomplemented fluorescence data provide direct estimation of the clone's productivity and can be analyzed in terms of density distribution, offering valuable information on the average productivity of the cell population and allowing the identification of high-producing clones. The method was validated by establishing a retrovirus producer from a nude cell line, in <3 months, inserting three vector constructs without clone selection or screening in between. Clones producing up to 10(8) infectious particles per ml were obtained, delivering optimal ratios of infectious-to-total particles (1 to 5). The method was additionally used to evaluate the production performance of HEK 293 and HEK 293T cell lines demonstrating that the latter sustains increased titers. Finally, it was used to study genetic manipulation of glutathione metabolism in retrovirus production showing that changing cell metabolism steers higher vector expression with titer increases of more than one order of magnitude.This method is a valuable tool not only for cell line development but also for genetic manipulation of viral vector and/or producer cells contributing to advancing the field of viral gene therapy.

  14. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation reduces Coxsackievirus B3 replication in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Wilsky, Steffi; Althof, Nadine; Wiesener, Nadine; Wutzler, Peter; Henke, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Interactions between viral replication machineries and host cell metabolism display interesting information how certain viruses capitalize cellular pathways to support progeny production. Among those pathogens, Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been identified to manipulate intracellular signaling very comprehensively. Next to others, this human pathogenic virus causes acute and chronic forms of myocarditis, pancreatitis, and meningitis. Here, activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling appears to be involved in successful infection. Viral replication is not restricted to solid organs but involves susceptible immune cells as well. In the present study, p65 phosphorylation as one aspect of NFκB activation and inhibition via BAY 11-7085 administration was analyzed in the context of CVB3 replication in lymphoid cells. During CVB3 infection, an up-regulation of p65 translation is detectable, which is accompanied by noticeable phosphorylation. Inhibition of NFκB signaling reduces viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that during CVB3 replication in human and murine lymphoid cells, NFκB signaling is activated and facilitates viral replication. Therefore, antiviral strategies to target such central cellular signaling pathways may represent potential possibilities for the development of new virostatica.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and safety of intravenous cidofovir for life-threatening viral infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso Brown, Amy E; Cohen, Mindy N; Tong, Suhong; Braverman, Rebecca S; Rooney, James F; Giller, Roger; Levin, Myron J

    2015-07-01

    Children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for life-threatening viral infections. Cidofovir is often used as a first-line agent for adenovirus infections, despite the absence of randomized controlled trials with HSCT patients, and as a second-line agent for resistant herpesvirus infections. The frequency and severity of adverse effects, particularly nephrotoxicity, in pediatric HSCT recipients are unclear, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of cidofovir in children have not previously been reported. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized, single-dose pilot study to determine the safety and PK of cidofovir in pediatric HSCT recipients with symptomatic adenovirus, nucleoside-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV), and/or human papovavirus infections. Subsequent dosing and frequency were determined by clinical response and side effects, as assessed by the treating physician. Blood and urine samples were obtained from patients for PK studies and assessment of toxicity and virologic response. Twelve patients were enrolled (median age, 9 years; 33.5 days posttransplantation). Four of seven patients with adenovirus infection were successfully treated and eventually cleared their infections. Four of twelve patients died of disseminated viral disease and multiorgan failure. Two of twelve patients had evidence of acute kidney injury after the first dose, and one of these patients developed chronic kidney disease; two other patients developed late nephrotoxicity. The mean drug half-life was 9.5 h. There was no correlation between nephrotoxicity and plasma maximum concentration, clearance, or half-life. PK were similar to those reported for adults, although the drug half-life was significantly longer than that for adults. Cidofovir was well tolerated in the majority of patients. However, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to support patients until immune reconstitution is achieved.

  16. Alternative purification method for recombinant measles viral nucleoprotein expressed in insect cells by ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, You-Jin; Yang, Jeongsun; Yoon, Hee Sook; Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Kisoon

    2014-03-01

    Recombinant measles virus nucleoproteins (rMeV N) and fusion (F) proteins were characterized as major antigenic proteins expressed in insect cells mediated by recombinant baculoviruses (rBVs). Band intensities were analyzed by Western blotting to recognize IgG and IgM antibodies against the rMeV N and F proteins in human sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) from patients with measles infections. Positive results from the blots using the rMeV N were consistent with the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in which whole viral proteins were used as antigens. Human sera and CSFs reacted more strongly with the rMeV N than with the rMeV F proteins prepared in an identical expression system. For efficient and reliable purification, ion-exchange chromatography using Source Q anion resin was applied, and high-purity rMeV N protein was harvested. To characterize the similarity with the native viral protein to purified N protein, structural mimicry of purified recombinant proteins with intact rMeV N was shown through transmission electron microscopy, and the truncation and the phosphorylation status of the expressed protein were analyzed. These results suggest that the rMeV N purified by ion-exchange chromatography has features similar to those of naïve N including a self-assembled structure, phosphorylation and antigenic function. Thus, these expression and purification methods can be applied to the large-scale production of the rMeV N, which is essential for the development of new diagnostic tools and vaccines for acute and chronic MeV infections.

  17. An emerging role for p21-activated kinases (Paks) in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Broeke, Celine; Radu, Maria; Chernoff, Jonathan;

    2010-01-01

    p21-activated protein kinases (Paks) are cytosolic serine/threonine protein kinases that act as effectors for small (p21) GTPases of the Cdc42 and Rac families. It has long been established that Paks play a major role in a host of vital cellular functions such as proliferation, survival and motil......p21-activated protein kinases (Paks) are cytosolic serine/threonine protein kinases that act as effectors for small (p21) GTPases of the Cdc42 and Rac families. It has long been established that Paks play a major role in a host of vital cellular functions such as proliferation, survival...

  18. Role of Cellular Components of Mosquito Cells in Viral Replication and Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-25

    serum ( Vig 5A) or of anti-mosquito cell serum ( Vig 5B) to intact BVA.albo. Polyacrylamide gels of aggregates formed after incubation either of BVBMK with...Preincubated with trypsinizede mosquito cell hemagglutinin 512 Preincubated with trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor 1024 aTwo ml of anti-mosquito cell...Reaction vas terminated by the addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor. dAll assays were performed at pH 6.5. .4 4 t- 45 Table 10 Survival of mice injected

  19. Selective depletion of non-specific T cells as an early event in T cell response to bacterial and viral infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jiu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Early T cell depletion occurs prior to the development of an effective immune response to infections.Both antigen-specific and non-specific T cells are induced to express early activation markers soon after microbial infections.This is followed by massive depletion of non-specific T cells and extensive proliferation of antigen-specific T cells.Proliferating antigen-specific cells exhibit a broad spectrum of late activation markers while non-specific cells exhibit no sign of further activation before succumbing to apoptosis.These results have crucial implications for the understanding of early events in the development of a robust T cell response.

  20. BCSH/BSBMT/UK clinical virology network guideline: diagnosis and management of common respiratory viral infections in patients undergoing treatment for haematological malignancies or stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignan, Fiona L; Clark, Andrew; Aitken, Celia; Gilleece, Maria; Jayakar, Vishal; Krishnamurthy, Pramila; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Michael N; Shaw, Bronwen; Skinner, Roderick; Turner, Andrew; Wynn, Robert F; Coyle, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology, the British Society for Bone Marrow Transplantation and the UK Clinical Virology Network has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory viral infections in patients with haematological malignancies or those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This guideline includes recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of respiratory viral infections in adults and children. The suggestions and recommendations are primarily intended for physicians practising in the United Kingdom.