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  1. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T; Lorenzo, Oscar; Revuelta, José L; McCabe, Paul F; Arellano, Juan B

    2014-07-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined.

  2. Requirement for HIV-1 TAR sequences for Tat activation in rodent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, J A; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-01-10

    HIV-1 gene expression is activated via an interaction between the virally encoded Tat protein and a target RNA, TAR. TAR is located at the immediate 5' end of all viral mRNAs and comprises a partially base-paired stem with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem and a hexanucleotide loop. In vitro, Tat binds specifically to the bulge and upper stem region with no requirement for the loop. In contrast, when Tat activation is analyzed in primate cells, mutations in the loop abolish activation, suggesting a critical role for loop binding cellular factors. However, in rodent cells the reverse is true. Messages with a mutation in the TAR loop are activated whereas messages harboring a wild-type TAR sequence are not activated. By testing the effect of mutations in the bulge and stem in the context of mutation in the loop we now show that this loop-independent activation by Tat in rodent cells requires the critical bulge-stem sequences needed for Tat binding in vitro. These data suggest that in rodent cells, as in vitro, Tat does not require a loop binding cofactor. In rodent cells containing human chromosome 12 (CHO12), however, Tat activation is both bulge and loop dependent. It appears that rodent cells, but not CHO12 cells, are refractory to the normal Tat/TAR activation pathway not by virtue of lacking a loop binding cofactor, but rather by the presence of a loop binding inhibitor of either Tat binding or the activation process. PMID:7530399

  3. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  4. Ethanolamine requirement of mammary epithelial cells is due to reduced activity of base exchange enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells and some of their transformed derivatives require ethanolamine (Etn) to proliferate normally in defined culture medium. The amount of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) is considerably reduced when these cells are cultured without Etn. Using Etn-responsive and -nonresponsive rat mammary carcinoma cell lines, the biochemical mechanism of Etn-responsiveness of investigated. The incorporation of [3H]serine into phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and PtdEtn in Etn-responsive cells was 60 and 37%, respectively, of those in Etn-nonresponsive cells. There was no significant difference between the two cell types in the activities of enzymes involved in PtdEtn synthesis via CDP-Etn. The activity of PtdSer decarboxylase was also very similar in these two cell types. When these cells were cultured in the presence of [32P]PtdEtn, the rate of accumulation of [32P]-labeled PtdSer from the radioactive PtdEtn was considerably reduced in Etn-responsive cells as compared to Etn-nonresponsive cells. Whereas there was no significant difference in the accumulation of the labeled PtdSer from [32P]phosphatidylcholine. These results demonstrate that the Etn-responsiveness is due to a limited ability to synthesize PtdSer resulting from a limited base exchange activity utilizing PtdEtn

  5. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, N.; Ase, K.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y. (Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a transient membrane association, which was maximal at 20 min. Delivery of multiple additions of 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin to the T cells resulted in progressively increased expression of the {alpha} subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and proliferation commensurate with the number of multiple additions delivered, suggesting that prolonged protein kinase C activity is required for T-cell activation.

  6. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Akinori, E-mail: morita@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiological Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8509 (Japan); Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Hosoi, Yoshio, E-mail: hosoi@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiation Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  7. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  8. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Induced Biliary Epithelial Cell NRas Activation Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy E Trussoni

    Full Text Available Cholangiocytes (biliary epithelial cells actively participate in microbe-induced proinflammatory responses in the liver and contribute to inflammatory and infectious cholangiopathies. We previously demonstrated that cholangiocyte TLR-dependent NRas activation contributes to proinflammatory/ proliferative responses. We test the hypothesis that LPS-induced activation of NRas requires the EGFR. SV40-transformed human cholangiocytes (H69 cells, or low passage normal human cholangiocytes (NHC, were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of EGFR or ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (TACE inhibitors. Ras activation assays, quantitative RT-PCR, and proliferation assays were performed in cells cultured with or without inhibitors or an siRNA to Grb2. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR was performed on LPS-treated mouse samples and specimens from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatitis C, and normal livers. LPS-treatment induced an association between the TLR/MyD88 and EGFR/Grb2 signaling apparatus, NRas activation, and EGFR phosphorylation. NRas activation was sensitive to EGFR and TACE inhibitors and correlated with EGFR phosphorylation. The TACE inhibitor and Grb2 depletion prevented LPS-induced IL6 expression (p<0.05 and proliferation (p<0.01. Additionally, cholangiocytes from LPS-treated mouse livers and human primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC livers exhibited increased phospho-EGFR (p<0.01. Moreover, LPS-induced mouse cholangiocyte proliferation was inhibited by concurrent treatment with the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib. Our results suggest that EGFR is essential for LPS-induced, TLR4/MyD88-mediated NRas activation and induction of a robust proinflammatory cholangiocyte response. These findings have implications not only for revealing the signaling potential of TLRs, but also implicate EGFR as an integral component of cholangiocyte TLR-induced proinflammatory processes.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Biliary Epithelial Cell NRas Activation Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussoni, Christy E; Tabibian, James H; Splinter, Patrick L; O'Hara, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocytes (biliary epithelial cells) actively participate in microbe-induced proinflammatory responses in the liver and contribute to inflammatory and infectious cholangiopathies. We previously demonstrated that cholangiocyte TLR-dependent NRas activation contributes to proinflammatory/ proliferative responses. We test the hypothesis that LPS-induced activation of NRas requires the EGFR. SV40-transformed human cholangiocytes (H69 cells), or low passage normal human cholangiocytes (NHC), were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of EGFR or ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (TACE) inhibitors. Ras activation assays, quantitative RT-PCR, and proliferation assays were performed in cells cultured with or without inhibitors or an siRNA to Grb2. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR was performed on LPS-treated mouse samples and specimens from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatitis C, and normal livers. LPS-treatment induced an association between the TLR/MyD88 and EGFR/Grb2 signaling apparatus, NRas activation, and EGFR phosphorylation. NRas activation was sensitive to EGFR and TACE inhibitors and correlated with EGFR phosphorylation. The TACE inhibitor and Grb2 depletion prevented LPS-induced IL6 expression (pphospho-EGFR (p<0.01). Moreover, LPS-induced mouse cholangiocyte proliferation was inhibited by concurrent treatment with the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib. Our results suggest that EGFR is essential for LPS-induced, TLR4/MyD88-mediated NRas activation and induction of a robust proinflammatory cholangiocyte response. These findings have implications not only for revealing the signaling potential of TLRs, but also implicate EGFR as an integral component of cholangiocyte TLR-induced proinflammatory processes.

  10. Human Cells Require Non-stop Ribosome Rescue Activity in Mitochondria.

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    Heather A Feaga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use trans-translation and the alternative rescue factors ArfA (P36675 and ArfB (Q9A8Y3 to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes that stall near the 3' end of an mRNA during protein synthesis. The eukaryotic protein ICT1 (Q14197 is homologous to ArfB. In vitro ribosome rescue assays of human ICT1 and Caulobacter crescentus ArfB showed that these proteins have the same activity and substrate specificity. Both ArfB and ICT1 hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on nonstop ribosomes or ribosomes stalled with ≤6 nucleotides extending past the A site, but are unable to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA when the mRNA extends ≥14 nucleotides past the A site. ICT1 provided sufficient ribosome rescue activity to support viability in C. crescentus cells that lacked both trans-translation and ArfB. Likewise, expression of ArfB protected human cells from death when ICT1 was silenced with siRNA. These data indicate that ArfB and ICT1 are functionally interchangeable, and demonstrate that ICT1 is a ribosome rescue factor. Because ICT1 is essential in human cells, these results suggest that ribosome rescue activity in mitochondria is required in humans.

  11. Glucose Uptake Is Limiting in T Cell Activation and Requires CD28-Mediated Akt-Dependent and Independent Pathways1

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Sarah R.; Herman, Catherine E.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Wofford, Jessica A.; Wieman, Heather L.; Hammen, Jeremy J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation potently stimulates cellular metabolism to support the elevated energetic and biosynthetic demands of growth, proliferation, and effector function. We show that glucose uptake is limiting in T cell activation and that CD28 costimulation is required to allow maximal glucose uptake following TCR stimulation by up-regulating expression and promoting the cell surface trafficking of the glucose transporter Glut1. Regulation of T cell glucose uptake and Glut1 was critical, as low ...

  12. Co-stimulation by anti-immunoglobulin is required for B cell activation by CD40Llow T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    strongly. Low buoyant density B cells also responded to CD40Llow Th cells. There was no B cell response to resting Th cells. mAb against CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II completely inhibited B cell responses to CD40Llow Th1 cells, equivalent...... cell Ag specificity by using anti-CD3/T cell receptor (TcR) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to activate T cells. To study the role of sIg engagement in the responsiveness of B cells to T help, we pre-treated small resting B cells with soluble anti-kappa mAb prior to contact with an activated Th1 clone....... By reducing the concentration of anti-TcR mAb we obtained low levels of CD40 ligand (CD40Llow) on Th cells, comparable to those expressed by lymph node T cells activated in vitro (ex vivo T cells). In contrast to untreated B cells, which did not respond to CD40Llow Th, anti-Ig-treated B cells responded...

  13. Rab5 is required in metastatic cancer cells for Caveolin-1-enhanced Rac1 activation, migration and invasion.

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    Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, Natalia; Leyton, Lisette; Stupack, Dwayne; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-06-01

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that regulates early endosome trafficking and other cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, Rab5 promotes Rac1 activation and cancer cell migration, but little is known about the upstream regulators of Rab5. We have previously shown that the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) promotes Rac1 activation and migration of cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that CAV1 stimulates Rab5 activation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Expression of CAV1 in B16-F10 mouse melanoma and HT-29(US) human colon adenocarcinoma cells increased the GTP loading of Rab5, whereas shRNA-mediated targeting of endogenous CAV1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased Rab5-GTP levels. Accordingly, shRNA-mediated downregulation of Rab5 decreased CAV1-mediated Rac1 activation, cell migration and invasion in B16-F10 and HT-29(US) cells. Expression of CAV1 was accompanied by increased recruitment of Tiam1, a Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), to Rab5-positive early endosomes. Using the inhibitor NSC23766, Tiam1 was shown to be required for Rac1 activation and cell migration induced by CAV1 and Rab5. Mechanistically, we provide evidence implicating p85α (also known as PIK3R1), a Rab5 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), in CAV1-dependent effects, by showing that CAV1 recruits p85α, precluding p85α-mediated Rab5 inactivation and increasing cell migration. In summary, these studies identify a novel CAV1-Rab5-Rac1 signaling axis, whereby CAV1 prevents Rab5 inactivation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion.

  14. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

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    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  15. Requirement for noncognate interaction with T cells for the activation of B cell immunoglobulin secretion by IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    23.1+ TH1 clone E9.D4 in F23.1 (anti-T cell receptor V-beta 8)-coated microwells. This induced polyclonal B cell activation to enter cell cycle (thymidine incorporation) at 2 days and to secrete immunoglobulin at 5 days. An anti-IL-2 mAb (S4B6) inhibited antibody production completely. Anti-IL-2 did...... not inhibit either LPS-induced B cell responses, or T cell activation (measured as IL-3 secretion). Anti-IL-2 receptor (anti-Tac) mAbs also inhibited T-dependent B cell responses, without affecting LPS responses. An anti-IFN-gamma mAb partially inhibited Ig secretion, without affecting entry into...

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase activity is required for the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in mammalian fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jocelyn H.; Munar, Erlynda; Jameson, Damon R; Andreassen, Paul R.; Margolis, Robert L.; Seger, Rony; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is required for mitogenesis in somatic mammalian cells and is activated by a wide variety of oncogenic stimuli. Specific roles for this signaling module in growth were dissected by inhibiting MAPK kinase 1 (MAPKK1) activity in highly synchronized NIH 3T3 cells. In addition to the known role of this kinase in cell-cycle entry from G0, the level of MAPKK activity was observed to affect the kinetics of progression through both the G1 and G2 pha...

  17. A virtual lymph node model to dissect the requirements for T-cell activation by synapses and kinapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bogle, Gib; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of T-cell responses in lymph nodes requires T cells to integrate signals delivered by dendritic cells (DCs) during long-lasting contacts (synapses) or more transient interactions (kinapses). However, it remains extremely challenging to understand how a specific sequence of contacts established by T cells ultimately dictates T-cell fate. Here, we have coupled a computational model of T-cell migration and interactions with DCs with a real-time, flow cytometry-like representation of T-cell activation. In this model, low-affinity peptides trigger T-cell proliferation through kinapses but we show that this process is only effective under conditions of high DC densities and prolonged antigen availability. By contrast, high-affinity peptides favor synapse formation and a vigorous proliferation under a wide range of antigen presentation conditions. In line with the predictions, decreasing the DC density in vivo selectively abolished proliferation induced by the low-affinity peptide. Finally, our results suggest that T cells possess a biochemical memory of previous stimulations of at least 1–2 days. We propose that the stability of T-cell–DC interactions, apart from their signaling potency, profoundly influences the robustness of T-cell activation. By offering the ability to control parameters that are difficult to manipulate experimentally, the virtual lymph node model provides new possibilities to tackle the fundamental mechanisms that regulate T-cell responses elicited by infections or vaccines. PMID:27089942

  18. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

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    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  19. Active Stat3 is required for survival of human squamous cell carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions

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    DiGiovanni John

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the skin is the most aggressive form of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, and is the single most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S., with over one million new cases reported each year. Recent studies have revealed an oncogenic role of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 in many human tumors, especially in those of epithelial origin, including skin SCC. Stat3 is a mediator of numerous growth factor and cytokine signaling pathways, all of which activate it through phosphorylation of tyrosine 705. Results To further address the role of Stat3 in skin SCC tumorigenesis, we have analyzed a panel of human skin-derived cell lines ranging from normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK, to non-tumorigenic transformed skin cells (HaCaT, to highly tumorigenic cells (SRB1-m7 and SRB12-p9 and observed a positive correlation between Stat3 phosphorylation and SCC malignancy. We next determined the role of Stat3 activity in cell proliferation and viability under serum-free culture conditions. This was accomplished by suppressing Stat3 activity in the SRB12-p9 cells through stable expression of a dominant negative acting form of Stat3β, which contains a tyrosine 705 to phenylalanine mutation (S3DN. The S3DN cells behaved similar to parental SRB12-p9 cells when cultured in optimal growth conditions, in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. However, unlike the SRB12-p9 cells, S3DN cells underwent apoptotic cell death when cultured in serum-free medium (SFM. This was evidenced by multiple criteria, including accumulation of sub-G1 particles, induced PARP cleavage, and acquisition of the characteristic morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence for a role for Stat3 in maintaining cell survival in the conditions of exogenous growth factor deprivation produced by culture in SFM. We also propose that delivery of the S3DN gene or

  20. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Dennis J Grab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  1. Discrete levels of Twist activity are required to direct distinct cell functions during gastrulation and somatic myogenesis.

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    Ming-Ching Wong

    Full Text Available Twist (Twi, a conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional regulator, directs the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and regulates changes in cell fate, cell polarity, cell division and cell migration in organisms from flies to humans. Analogous to its role in EMT, Twist has been implicated in metastasis in numerous cancer types, including breast, pancreatic and prostate. In the Drosophila embryo, Twist is essential for discrete events in gastrulation and mesodermal patterning. In this study, we derive a twi allelic series by examining the various cellular events required for gastrulation in Drosophila. By genetically manipulating the levels of Twi activity during gastrulation, we find that coordination of cell division is the most sensitive cellular event, whereas changes in cell shape are the least sensitive. Strikingly, we show that by increasing levels of Snail expression in a severe twi hypomorphic allelic background, but not a twi null background, we can reconstitute gastrulation and produce viable adult flies. Our results demonstrate that the level of Twi activity determines whether the cellular events of ventral furrow formation, EMT, cell division and mesodermal migration occur.

  2. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Blake R; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M; Eddy, Edward M; Wagner, Brad D; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L; Taylor, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation.

  3. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiulong, E-mail: songxiulong@hotmail.com; Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A., E-mail: zshaikh@uri.edu

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  4. Dual Requirement of Cytokine and Activation Receptor Triggering for Cytotoxic Control of Murine Cytomegalovirus by NK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak-Wittel, Melissa A.; Yang, Liping; Schreiber, Robert D.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in controlling murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and can mediate both cytokine production and direct cytotoxicity. The NK cell activation receptor, Ly49H, is responsible for genetic resistance to MCMV in C57BL/6 mice. Recognition of the viral m157 protein by Ly49H is sufficient for effective control of MCMV infection. Additionally, during the host response to infection, distinct immune and non-immune cells elaborate a variety of pleiotropic cytokines which have the potential to impact viral pathogenesis, NK cells, and other immune functions, both directly and indirectly. While the effects of various immune deficiencies have been examined for general antiviral phenotypes, their direct effects on Ly49H-dependent MCMV control are poorly understood. To specifically interrogate Ly49H-dependent functions, herein we employed an in vivo viral competition approach to show Ly49H-dependent MCMV control is specifically mediated through cytotoxicity but not IFNγ production. Whereas m157 induced Ly49H-dependent degranulation, efficient cytotoxicity also required either IL-12 or type I interferon (IFN-I) which acted directly on NK cells to produce granzyme B. These studies demonstrate that both of these distinct NK cell-intrinsic mechanisms are integrated for optimal viral control by NK cells. PMID:26720279

  5. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-12-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages. PMID:26624996

  6. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson, Anthony J.

    2013-03-25

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  7. FGFR2IIIb-MAPK Activity Is Required for Epithelial Cell Fate Decision in the Lower Müllerian Duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Jumpei; Rocchi, Altea; Serna, Vanida A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Graff, Jonathan M; Kurita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell fate of lower Müllerian duct epithelium (MDE), to become uterine or vaginal epithelium, is determined by the absence or presence of ΔNp63 expression, respectively. Previously, we showed that SMAD4 and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) were independently required for MDE to express ΔNp63. Here, we report that vaginal mesenchyme directs vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE through paracrine activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-MAPK pathway. In the developing reproductive tract, FGF7 and FGF10 were enriched in vaginal mesenchyme, whereas FGF receptor 2IIIb was expressed in epithelia of both the uterus and vagina. When Fgfr2 was inactivated, vaginal MDE underwent uterine cell fate, and this differentiation defect was corrected by activation of MEK-ERK pathway. In vitro, FGF10 in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A (ActA) was sufficient to induce ΔNp63 in MDE, and ActA was essential for induction of RUNX1 through SMAD-independent pathways. Accordingly, inhibition of type 1 receptors for activin in neonatal mice induced uterine differentiation in vaginal epithelium by down-regulating RUNX1, whereas conditional deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 had no effect on vaginal epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE is induced by FGF7/10-MAPK, bone morphogenetic protein 4-SMAD, and ActA-RUNX1 pathway activities, and the disruption in any one of these pathways results in conversion from vaginal to uterine epithelial cell fate. PMID:27164167

  8. Mitogen requirement for cell cycle progression in the absence of pocket protein activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, Floris; Wolthuis, Rob M F; Doodeman, Valerie; Medema, René H; te Riele, Hein

    2005-01-01

    Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking expression of all three retinoblastoma protein family members (TKO MEFs) have lost the G1 restriction point. However, in the absence of mitogens these cells become highly sensitive to apoptosis. Here, we show that TKO MEFs that survive serum depletion pass

  9. Epinephrine Activation of the β2-Adrenoceptor Is Required for IL-13-Induced Mucin Production in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Al-Sawalha

    Full Text Available Mucus hypersecretion by airway epithelium is a hallmark of inflammation in allergic asthma and results in airway narrowing and obstruction. Others have shown that administration a TH2 cytokine, IL-13 is sufficient to cause mucus hypersecretion in vivo and in vitro. Asthma therapy often utilizes β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR agonists, which are effective acutely as bronchodilators, however chronic use may lead to a worsening of asthma symptoms. In this study, we asked whether β2AR signaling in normal human airway epithelial (NHBE cells affected mucin production in response to IL-13. This cytokine markedly increased mucin production, but only in the presence of epinephrine. Mucin production was blocked by ICI-118,551, a preferential β2AR antagonist, but not by CGP-20712A, a preferential β1AR antagonist. Constitutive β2AR activity was not sufficient for IL-13 induced mucin production and β-agonist-induced signaling is required. A clinically important long-acting β-agonist, formoterol, was as effective as epinephrine in potentiating IL-13 induced MUC5AC transcription. IL-13 induced mucin production in the presence of epinephrine was significantly reduced by treatment with selective inhibitors of ERK1/2 (FR180204, p38 (SB203580 and JNK (SP600125. Replacement of epinephrine with forskolin + IBMX resulted in a marked increase in mucin production in NHBE cells in response to IL-13, and treatment with the inhibitory cAMP analogue Rp-cAMPS decreased mucin levels induced by epinephrine + IL-13. Our findings suggest that β2AR signaling is required for mucin production in response to IL-13, and that mitogen activated protein kinases and cAMP are necessary for this effect. These data lend support to the notion that β2AR-agonists may contribute to asthma exacerbations by increasing mucin production via activation of β2ARs on epithelial cells.

  10. Differential requirement of CD28 costimulation for activation of murine CD8+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte subsets and lymph node cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfanov, V; Lai, Y G; Gelfanova, V; Dong, J Y; Su, J P; Liao, N S

    1995-07-01

    The CD8+CD4- (CD8+) murine small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) contain two subpopulations, one expressing alpha alpha-CD8 homodimers and another alpha beta-CD8 heterodimers. In this study, plate-bound anti-TCR beta-chain (TCR-beta) mAb alone or combined with anti-CD28 mAb is used as a model system to study activation requirement of these two CD8+ IEL subsets. In contrast to CD8+ lymph node (LN) cells that require both TCR and CD28 triggering for activation, alpha beta-CD8+ IELs proliferate and produce IL-2 and IFN-gamma when stimulated with anti-TCR-beta mAb alone, and soluble CTLA-4 Ig has no effect on their responses. On the other hand, alpha alpha-CD8+ IELs neither make IL-2 or IFN-gamma nor proliferate even when both stimuli are provided. However, alpha alpha-CD8+ IELs are capable of proliferation in both CD8+ IEL subsets is lower than in CD8+ LN cells, which contributes to the weaker and delayed response of CD8+ IELs. PMID:7602124

  11. The N-terminal domain is a transcriptional activation domain required for Nanog to maintain ES cell self-renewal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO YunQian; ZHANG Juan; YE Li; CHEN Mo; YAO Dong; PAN GuangJin; ZHANG JieQiong; PEI DuanQing

    2009-01-01

    Nanog is a transcription factor identified by its ability to maintain the self-renewal of ES cells in the absence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Nanog protein contains an N-terminal domain (ND),a DNA-binding homeobox domain (HD) and a C-terminal domain (CD). We previously reported that the CD in Nanog is a transcriptional activation domain essential for the in vivo function of Nanog. Here we demonstrated that the ND in Nanog is also functionally important. Deletion of the ND reduces the transcriptional activity of Nanog on either artificial reporters or native Nanog promoters. This truncated Nanog is also less effective in regulating the endogenous Nanog target genes. Furthermore,the ND truncation disrupted the ability of Nanog to maintain ES cell self-renewal as well. We found that the ND Is not required for the nuclear localization of Nanog. These results suggest that the regulation of endogenous pluripotent genes such as oct3/4 and rex-1 is required for the in vivo function of Nanog.

  12. Activation of resting human T cells requires prolonged stimulation of protein kinase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, N; Ase, K; Kishimoto, A.; Nishizuka, Y

    1990-01-01

    Purified resting human T cells can be induced to express the alpha subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor and to proliferate by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin but not with 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin. Determination of the translocation of protein kinase C showed that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate plus ionomycin caused a prolonged membrane association of the enzyme for more than 4 hr, whereas 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol plus ionomycin induced a tr...

  13. Protection against HPV-16-Associated Tumors Requires the Activation of CD8+ Effector Memory T Cells and the Control of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Mariana O; Sales, Natiely S; Silva, Jamile R; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2016-08-01

    Active anticancer immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to induce cellular or humoral immune responses in patients, but, thus far, the observed outcomes did not ensure their recommendation for clinical use. The induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, although required for the clearance of most solid tumors, was shown to be insufficient for the development of a successful immunotherapeutic approach. The suppressive immune environment triggered by tumors, including the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), is detrimental to the development of antitumor immune responses and precludes the generation of more promising clinical outcomes. In this work, we characterized the CD8(+) T-cell population specifically involved in the control of tumor growth and the role of MDSCs after administration of an antitumor therapeutic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated tumors. Activation of cytotoxic high-avidity CD8(+) T cells with an effector memory phenotype was found in mice grafted with tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. In addition, MDSC antibody depletion further enhanced the immunotherapeutic effects of the vaccine, resulting in the complete eradication of tumor cells. Collectively, the current results indicate that the simultaneous control of MDSCs and activation of high-avidity tumor-specific effector memory CD8(+) T cells are key features for tumor protection by immunotherapeutic approaches and deserve further testing under clinical conditions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1920-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27222537

  14. IL-15 cis Presentation Is Required for Optimal NK Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Zanoni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have antitumor, antiviral, and antibacterial functions, and efforts are being made to manipulate them in immunotherapeutic approaches. However, their activation mechanisms remain poorly defined, particularly during bacterial infections. Here, we show that upon lipopolysaccharide or E. coli exposure, dendritic cells (DCs produce three cytokines—interleukin 2 (IL-2, IL-18, and interferon β (IFN-β—necessary and sufficient for NK cell activation. IFN-β enhances NK cell activation by inducing IL-15 and IL-15 receptor α not only in DCs but, surprisingly, also in NK cells. This process allows the transfer of IL-15 on NK cell surface and its cis presentation. cis-presented NK cell-derived and trans-presented DC-derived IL-15 contribute equally to optimal NK cell activation.

  15. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells

  16. Yeast spore germination: a requirement for Ras protein activity during re-entry into the cell cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, P K; Rine, J.

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae spore germination is a process in which quiescent, non-dividing spores become competent for mitotic cell division. Using a novel assay for spore uncoating, we found that spore germination was a multi-step process whose nutritional requirements differed from those for mitotic division. Although both processes were controlled by nutrient availability, efficient spore germination occurred in conditions that did not support cell division. In addition, germination did not ...

  17. Requirement of 8-mercaptoguanosine as a costimulus for IL-4-dependent μ to γ1 class switch recombination in CD38-activated B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mature B-2 cells expressing surface IgM and IgD proliferate upon stimulation by CD38, CD40 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and differentiate into IgG1-producing plasma cells in the presence of cytokines. The process of class switch recombination (CSR) from IgM to other isotypes is highly regulated by cytokines and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Blimp-1 and XBP-1 play an essential role in the terminal differentiation of switched B-2 cells to Ig-producing plasma cells. IL-5 induces AID and Blimp-1 expression in CD38- and CD40-activated B-2 cells, leading to μ to γ1 CSR at DNA level and IgG1 production. IL-4, a well-known IgG1-inducing factor, does not induce μ to γ1 CSR in CD38-activated B-2 cells or Blimp-1, while IL-4 induces μ to γ1 CSR, XBP-1 expression, and IgG1 production expression in CD40-activated B-2 cells. Interestingly, the addition of 8-mercaptoguanosine (8-SGuo) with IL-4 to the culture of CD38-activated B cells can induce μ to γ1 CSR, Blimp-1 expression, and IgG1 production. Intriguingly, 8-SGuo by itself induces AID expression in CD38-activated B cells. However, it does not induce μ to γ1 CSR. These results imply that the mode of B-cell activation for extracellular stimulation affects the outcome of cytokine stimulation with respect to the efficiency and direction of CSR, and the requirements of the transcriptional regulator and the generation of antibody-secreting cells. Furthermore, our data suggest the requirement of additional molecules in addition to AID for CSR

  18. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  19. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Scrimale, Thomas; DiDone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  20. Matriptase is required for the active form of hepatocyte growth factor induced Met, focal adhesion kinase and protein kinase B activation on neural stem/progenitor cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jung-Da; Lee, Sheau-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a chemoattractant and inducer for neural stem/progenitor (NS/P) cell migration. Although the type II transmembrane serine protease, matriptase (MTP) is an activator of the latent HGF, MTP is indispensable on NS/P cell motility induced by the active form of HGF. This suggests that MTP's action on NS/P cell motility involves mechanisms other than proteolytic activation of HGF. In the present study, we investigate the role of MTP in HGF-stimulated signaling events. Using specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK), we demonstrated that in NS/P cells HGF-activated c-Met induces PI3k-Akt signaling which then leads to FAK activation. This signaling pathway ultimately induces MMP2 expression and NS/P cell motility. Knocking down of MTP in NS/P cells with specific siRNA impaired HGF-stimulation of c-Met, Akt and FAK activation, blocked HGF-induced production of MMP2 and inhibited HGF-stimulated NS/P cell motility. MTP-knockdown NS/P cells cultured in the presence of recombinant protein of MTP protease domain or transfected with the full-length wild-type but not the protease-defected MTP restored HGF-responsive events in NS/P cells. In addition to functioning as HGF activator, our data revealed novel function of MTP on HGF-stimulated c-Met signaling activation.

  1. Matched sizes of activating and inhibitory receptor/ligand pairs are required for optimal signal integration by human natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Köhler

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that receptor-ligand complexes segregate or co-localise within immune synapses according to their size, and this is important for receptor signaling. Here, we set out to test the importance of receptor-ligand complex dimensions for immune surveillance of target cells by human Natural Killer (NK cells. NK cell activation is regulated by integrating signals from activating receptors, such as NKG2D, and inhibitory receptors, such as KIR2DL1. Elongating the NKG2D ligand MICA reduced its ability to trigger NK cell activation. Conversely, elongation of KIR2DL1 ligand HLA-C reduced its ability to inhibit NK cells. Whereas normal-sized HLA-C was most effective at inhibiting activation by normal-length MICA, only elongated HLA-C could inhibit activation by elongated MICA. Moreover, HLA-C and MICA that were matched in size co-localised, whereas HLA-C and MICA that were different in size were segregated. These results demonstrate that receptor-ligand dimensions are important in NK cell recognition, and suggest that optimal integration of activating and inhibitory receptor signals requires the receptor-ligand complexes to have similar dimensions.

  2. Human T cell leukemia virus-I (HTLV-I) Tax-mediated apoptosis in activated T cells requires an enhanced intracellular prooxidant state

    OpenAIRE

    Los, Marek Jan; Khazaie, K; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Baeuerle, P A; Schirrmacher, V.; Chlichlia, K.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that an estradiol-dependent activation of human T cell leukemia virus-I Tax leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and to the induction of apoptosis, The present study demonstrates that a hormone-dependent activation of Tax promotes an enhanced prooxidant state in stably transfected Jurkat cells as measured by changes in the intracellular levels of glutathione and H2O2; these changes are followed by apoptotic cell death. Additional stimulation of the CD3/TCR pathway enhan...

  3. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  4. Inducing P-selectin ligand formation in CD8 T cells: IL-2 and IL-12 are active in vitro but not required in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, Douglas A; Williams, Michael J; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2005-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that IL-2 and IL-12 can support formation of P-selectin ligands (P-SelL) in activated T cells, ligands that are variably required for efficient lymphocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation. To ascertain whether these cytokines were required for P-SelL formation in vivo, TCR transgenic CD8 T cells specific for male Ag (HY) were transferred into male mice under conditions in which either IL-2 and/or IL-15 or IL-12Rp40 were absent. P-SelL formation at day 2 was unperturbed in HY-TCR IL-2(null) CD8 T cells responding in doubly deficient IL-2(null)IL-12(null) or IL-2(null)IL-15(null) male recipients. HY-specific CD8 T cell proliferative responses detected in both spleen and peritoneum occurred vigorously, but only splenic CD8 T cells up-regulated P-SelL, demonstrating that in vivo induction of P-SelL is an active, nonprogrammed event following T cell activation and that despite the efficacy of IL-2 and IL-12 in supporting P-SelL formation in vitro, these cytokines appear to be dispensable for this purpose in vivo.

  5. Transiently Active Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Is Not Required but Must Be Silenced for Stem Cell Function during Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malea M. Murphy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult muscle’s exceptional capacity for regeneration is mediated by muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. As with many stem cells, Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been proposed to be critical in satellite cells during regeneration. Using new genetic reagents, we explicitly test in vivo whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary and sufficient within satellite cells and their derivatives for regeneration. We find that signaling is transiently active in transit-amplifying myoblasts, but is not required for regeneration or satellite cell self-renewal. Instead, downregulation of transiently activated β-catenin is important to limit the regenerative response, as continuous regeneration is deleterious. Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult satellite cells may simply be a vestige of their developmental lineage, in which β-catenin signaling is critical for fetal myogenesis. In the adult, surprisingly, we show that it is not activation but rather silencing of Wnt/β-catenin signaling that is important for muscle regeneration.

  6. Antiapoptotic effects of erythropoietin in differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells require activation of both the STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Moonkyoung; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-01

    The hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) prevents neuronal death during ischemic events in the brain and in neurodegenerative diseases, presumably through its antiapoptotic effects. To explore the role of different signaling pathways in Epo-mediated antiapoptotic effects in differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we employed a prolactin receptor (PrlR)/erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) chimera system, in which binding of prolactin (Prl) to the extracellular domain activates EpoR signaling in the cytosol. On induction of apoptosis by staurosporine, Prl supports survival of the SH-SY5Y cells expressing the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera. In these cells Prl treatment strongly activates the STAT5, AKT, and MAPK signaling pathways and induces weak activation of the p65 NF-kappaB factor. Selective mutation of the eight tyrosine residues of the EpoR cytoplasmic domain results in impaired or absent activation of either STAT5 (mutation of Tyr(343)) or AKT (mutation of Tyr(479)) or both (mutation of all eight tyrosine residues). Most interestingly, Prl treatment does not prevent apoptosis in cells expressing mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras in which either the STAT5 or the AKT signaling pathways are not activated. In contrast, ERK 1/2 is fully activated by all mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras, comparable with the level seen with the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera, implying that activation of the MAPK signaling pathway per se is not sufficient for antiapoptotic activity. Therefore, the antiapoptotic effects of Epo in neuronal cells require the combinatorial activation of multiple signaling pathways, including STAT5, AKT, and potentially MAPK as well, in a manner similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells.

  7. Activation of GSK3β by Sirt2 is required for early lineage commitment of mouse embryonic stem cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Si

    Full Text Available Sirt2, a member of the NAD(+-dependent protein deacetylase family, is increasingly recognized as a critical regulator of the cell cycle, cellular necrosis and cytoskeleton organization. However, its role in embryonic stem cells (ESCs remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Sirt2 is up-regulated during RA (retinoic acid-induced and embryoid body (EB differentiation of mouse ESCs. Using lentivirus-mediated shRNA methods, we found that knockdown of Sirt2 compromises the differentiation of mouse ESCs into ectoderm while promoting mesoderm and endoderm differentiation. Knockdown of Sirt2 expression also leads to the activation of GSK3β through decreased phosphorylation of the serine at position 9 (Ser9 but not tyrosine at position 216 (Tyr216. Moreover, the constitutive activation of GSK3β during EB differentiation mimics the effect of Sirt2 knockdown, while down-regulation of GSK3β rescues the effect of Sirt2 knockdown on differentiation. In contrast to the effect on lineage differentiation, Sirt2 knockdown and GSK3β up-regulation do not change the self-renewal state of mouse ESCs. Overall, our report reveals a new function for Sirt2 in regulating the proper lineage commitment of mouse ESCs.

  8. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Induction of Concurrent IL-1β and IL-23 Expression in THP-1 Cells Exhibits Differential Requirements for Caspase-1 and Cathepsin B Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynick, Christopher; Petes, Carlene; Tigert, Alexander; Gee, Katrina

    2016-08-01

    The inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex required for interleukin (IL)-1β production. Upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and subsequent ATP signaling, the NOD-like receptor containing-pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is activated to cleave pro-caspase-1 into caspase-1, allowing the secretion of IL-1β. IL-1β is known to function with IL-23 in the regulation of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells, Th17 cells, in adaptive immunity. Recently, studies have shown that IL-1β and IL-23 together activate IL-17-producing innate lymphoid cells, demonstrating that the pair may exhibit additional effects on cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of bacterial infection, LPS treatment of human monocytic cells, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. We found that IL-1β is partially required for optimal LPS-induced IL-23 production. We also found that IL-23 production was partially dependent on ATP signaling via the P2X7 receptor, whereas IL-1β production required this signaling. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for cathepsin B activity in IL-23 production. Taken together, this study identifies differential requirements for the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. Due to their similar roles in Th17 differentiation, characterization of the regulatory mechanisms for LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-23 may reveal novel information into the pathology of the inflammatory response particularly during bacterial infection. PMID:27096899

  10. Ethylene signaling is required for the acceleration of cell death induced by the activation of At ME K5 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxia Liu; Ying Wang; Juan Xu; Tongbing Su; Guoqin Liu; Dongtao Ren

    2008-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in the regulation of plant growth, development and responses to a wide variety of stimuli. In a conditional gain-of-function transgenic system, the activation of AtM£K5, a MAPK kinase, can in turn activate endogenous AtMAPK3 and AtMAPK6, and can lead to a striking increase in ethylene production and induce hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in Arabidopsis. However, the role of the increased ethylene production in regulating this HR-like cell death remains unknown. Using Arabidopsis transgenic plants that express AtMEK5DD , an active mutant of AtMEK5 that is under the control of a steroid-inducible promoter, we tested the contribution of ethylene to cell death. We found that ethylene biosynthesis occurs before cell death. Cell death was delayed by inhibiting AtMEK5-induced ethylene production using inhibitors of ACC-synthases, ACC-oxidases or ethylene receptors. In the mutants AtMEK5DDletrl-1 and AtMEK5DDlein2-l, both of which showed insen-sitivity to ethylene, the expression of AtMEKSDD protein, activity of AtMAPK3 and AtMAPK6, and ethylene production were the same as those seen in AtMEK.5 transgenic plants, but cell death was also delayed. These data suggest that ethylene signaling perception is required to accelerate cell death that is induced by AtMEK5 activation.

  11. Chemical genetics reveals a specific requirement for Cdk2 activity in the DNA damage response and identifies Nbs1 as a Cdk2 substrate in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Wohlbold

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs that promote cell-cycle progression are targets for negative regulation by signals from damaged or unreplicated DNA, but also play active roles in response to DNA lesions. The requirement for activity in the face of DNA damage implies that there are mechanisms to insulate certain CDKs from checkpoint inhibition. It remains difficult, however, to assign precise functions to specific CDKs in protecting genomic integrity. In mammals, Cdk2 is active throughout S and G2 phases, but Cdk2 protein is dispensable for survival, owing to compensation by other CDKs. That plasticity obscured a requirement for Cdk2 activity in proliferation of human cells, which we uncovered by replacement of wild-type Cdk2 with a mutant version sensitized to inhibition by bulky adenine analogs. Here we show that transient, selective inhibition of analog-sensitive (AS Cdk2 after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR enhances cell-killing. In extracts supplemented with an ATP analog used preferentially by AS kinases, Cdk2(as phosphorylated the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome gene product Nbs1-a component of the conserved Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex required for normal DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling-dependent on a consensus CDK recognition site at Ser432. In vivo, selective inhibition of Cdk2 delayed and diminished Nbs1-Ser432 phosphorylation during S phase, and mutation of Ser432 to Ala or Asp increased IR-sensitivity. Therefore, by chemical genetics, we uncovered both a non-redundant requirement for Cdk2 activity in response to DNA damage and a specific target of Cdk2 within the DNA repair machinery.

  12. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun, E-mail: hirayama.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp; Nishina, Hiroshi, E-mail: nishina.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  13. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation is required for phagocytosis of staphylococcus aureus by RAW 264.7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Fei, E-mail: zhufei@zju.edu.cn; Yue, Wanfu; Wang, Yongxia

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor which controls the expression of various genes involved in immune responses. However, it is not clear whether NF-κB activation is critical for phagocytosis when Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we investigated whether NF-κB cascade genes are altered in a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) when the cells were stimulated to activate a host innate immune response against live S. aureus or heat-inactivated S. aureus (HISA). NF-κB cascade genes such as Nfκb1, Nfκbiz, Nfκbie, Rel, Traf1 and Tnfaip3 were up-regulated by all treatments at one hour after incubation. NF-κB play an important role in activating phagocytosis in RAW 264.7 cells infected with S. aureus. Inhibition of NF-κB significantly blocked phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled S. aureus and decreased the expression of NFκB1, IL1α, IL1β and TLR2 in this cell line. Our results demonstrate that S. aureus may activate the NF-κB pathway and that NF-κB activation is required for phagocytosis of S. aureus by macrophages. - Highlights: • NF-κB cascade genes such as Nfκb1 and Traf1 were up-regulated by heat-inactivated S. aureus. • Inhibition of NF-κB significantly blocked phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled S. aureus. • NF-κB activation is required for phagocytosis of S. aureus by macrophages.

  14. The BPV-1 E2 DNA-contact helix cysteine is required for transcriptional activation but not replication in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossel, M J; Barsoum, J; Prakash, S S; Androphy, E J

    1996-03-01

    The papillomavirus E2 protein contains an amino-terminal region thought necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional activation and a carboxy-terminal region shown to direct sequence-specific DNA binding and dimerization. A cysteine residue in the center of the E2 DNA recognition helix is highly conserved among papillomavirus E2 proteins. Mutations of this cysteine in bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 to serine and glycine resulted in proteins which failed to activate E2-dependent promoters in mammalian cells. These E2 mutants were DNA-binding competent, dimeric, and nuclear. When fused to the VP16 transactivation domain, C-terminal regions of E2 containing the mutations at 340 supported transcriptional activation, indicating that the heterologous trans-activation domain did not require cysteine in the DNA-binding helix as did the full-length E2 transactivating protein. Although cysteine-340 was required for transcriptional activation it was not required for DNA replication in vivo. Together, these results suggest that the E2 DNA-binding domain may directly contribute to functions of transcriptional activation previously thought limited to the N-terminal domain. PMID:8599215

  15. Direct type I IFN but not MDA5/TLR3 activation of dendritic cells is required for maturation and metabolic shift to glycolysis after poly IC stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Pantel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs play an important role in direct antiviral defense as well as linking the innate and adaptive immune responses. On dendritic cells (DCs, IFNs facilitate their activation and contribute to CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell priming. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which IFNs regulate maturation and immunogenicity of DCs in vivo has not been studied in depth. Here we show that, after in vivo stimulation with the TLR ligand poly IC, IFNs dominate transcriptional changes in DCs. In contrast to direct TLR3/mda5 signaling, IFNs are required for upregulation of all pathways associated with DC immunogenicity. In addition, metabolic pathways, particularly the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, are also regulated by IFNs and required for DC maturation. These data provide evidence for a metabolic reprogramming concomitant with DC maturation and offer a novel mechanism by which IFNs modulate DC maturation.

  16. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne;

    2003-01-01

    in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal...

  17. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3. PMID:19633297

  18. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3.

  19. TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial alterations in human T cells requires FADD and caspase-8 activation but not RIP and caspase-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-09-15

    Although much is known about how TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-alpha in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12-24 h of TNF-alpha treatment. One of the earliest changes observed after TNF-alpha treatment was mitochondrial swelling at 10 min; followed by cytochrome c and Smac release at 10-30 min, and then heterochromatin clumping occurred at 60 min. While genetic deletion of receptor-interaction protein (RIP) had no effect on TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial damage, deletion of Fas-associated death domain (FADD) abolished the TNF-induced mitochondrial swelling. Since pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk abolished the TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes, z-DEVD-fmk, an inhibitor of caspase-3 had no effect, suggesting that TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes or cytochrome c and Smac release requires caspase-8 but not caspase-3 activation. Overall, our results indicated that mitochondrial changes are early events in TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that these mitochondrial changes require recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 activation, but not caspase-3 activation or RIP recruitment. PMID:20136500

  20. Substantial depletion of the intracellular Ca2+ stores is required for macroscopic activation of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current in rat basophilic leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, L; Parekh, A B

    2000-01-15

    1. Tight-seal whole-cell patch clamp experiments were performed to examine the ability of different intracellular Ca2+ mobilising agents to activate the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current (ICRAC) in rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-1) cells under conditions of weak cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering. 2. Dialysis with a maximal concentration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) routinely failed to activate macroscopic ICRAC in low buffer (0.mM EGTA, BAPTA or dimethyl BAPTA), whereas it activated the current to its maximal extent in high buffer (10 mM EGTA). Dialysis with a poorly metabolisable analogue of IP3, with ionomycin, or with IP3 and ionomycin all failed to generate macroscopic ICRAC in low Ca2+ buffering conditions. 3. Dialysis with the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump blocker thapsigargin was able to activate ICRAC even in the presence of low cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, albeit at a slow rate. Exposure to IP3 together with the SERCA blockers thapsigargin, thapsigargicin or cyclopiazonic acid rapidly activated ICRAC in low buffer. 4. Following activation of ICRAC by intracellular dialysis with IP3 and thapsigargin in low buffer, the current was very selective for Ca2+ (apparent KD of 1 mM) Sr2+ and Ba2+ were less effective charge carriers and Na+ was not conducted to any appreciable extent. The ionic selectivity of ICRAC was very similar in low or high intracellular Ca2+ buffer. 5. Fast Ca2+-dependent inactivation of ICRAC occurred at a similar rate and to a similar extent in low or high Ca2+ buffer. Ca2+-dependent inactivation is not the reason why macroscopic ICRAC cannot be seen under conditions of low cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering. 6. ICRAC could be activated by combining IP3 with thapsigargin, even in the presence of 100 microM Ca2+ and the absence of any exogenous Ca2+ chelator, where ATP and glutamate represented the only Ca2+ buffers in the pipette solution. 7. Our results suggest that a threshold exists within the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ store

  1. Antifungal Activity of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells against Cryptococcus neoformans In Vitro Requires Expression of Dectin-3 (CLEC4D) and Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Camaron R; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Mendiola, Andrew S; Wozniak, Karen L; Campuzano, Althea; Lin, Xin; Wormley, Floyd L

    2016-09-01

    Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) are critical for protection against pulmonary infection with the opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans; however, the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is unknown. We show for the first time that murine pDCs have direct activity against C. neoformans via reactive oxygen species (ROS), a mechanism different from that employed to control Aspergillus fumigatus infections. The anticryptococcal activity of murine pDCs is independent of opsonization but appears to require the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-3, a receptor not previously evaluated during cryptococcal infections. Human pDCs can also inhibit cryptococcal growth by a mechanism similar to that of murine pDCs. Experimental pulmonary infection of mice with a C. neoformans strain that induces protective immunity demonstrated that recruitment of pDCs to the lungs is CXCR3 dependent. Taken together, our results show that pDCs inhibit C. neoformans growth in vitro via the production of ROS and that Dectin-3 is required for optimal growth-inhibitory activity. PMID:27324480

  2. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiris Zanforlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP and polyclonal (anti-SAP antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs. Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP

  3. High levels of dRYBP induce apoptosis in Drosophila imaginal cells through the activation of reaper and the requirement of trithorax, dredd and dFADD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inma Gonzátlez; Ana Busturia

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila RYBP (dRYBP; Ringl and YY1 Binding Protein) is a Polycomb and trithorax interacting protein, whose homologous RYBP/DEDAF mammalian counterparts exhibit tumor cell-specific killing activity. Here we show that although endogenous dRYBP is not involved in developmental apoptosis, high levels of exogenous dRYBP induce apoptosis in all the imaginal discs of the fly, indicating that dRYBP apoptotic activity is not specific to tumor cells. We also show that dRYBP-induced apoptosis is inhibited by high levels of either p35 or DIAPI (Drosophila Inhibi-tor of Apoptosis Protein 1), and requires the function of the pro-apoptotic REAPER, HID and GRIM proteins, the apical caspase DREDD, the adaptor dFADD protein as well as TRITHORAX (TRX), an epigenetic transcriptional regulator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of TRX also induces apoptosis in the imaginal discs. Fi-nally, we show that the expression of reaper-lacZ is upregulated both upon dRYBP-induced apoptosis and upon TRX-induced apoptosis in imaginal discs and that the reaper gene is a direct target of dRYBP in Drosophila embryos. Our results indicate that dRYBP triggers in a receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway that also includes TRX-dependent epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  4. Synthesis of fusogenic lipids through activation of phospholipase D1 by GTPases and the kinase RSK2 is required for calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Exocytosis of hormones occurs through the fusion of large dense-core secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. This highly regulated process involves key proteins such as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) and also specific lipids at the site of membrane fusion. Among the different lipids required for exocytosis, our recent observations have highlighted the crucial role of PA (phosphatidic acid) in the late stages of membrane fusion in various exocytotic events. An RNAi (RNA interference) strategy coupled with the detection of PA in living cells has pointed to plasma membrane-associated PLD1 (phospholipase D(1)) as the main producer of PA in response to secretagogue stimulation. We have identified several GTPases which regulate the activation level of PLD(1) in neuroendocrine cells. Finally, RSK2 (ribosomal S6 kinase 2) appears to phosphorylate and regulate the activity of PLD(1) in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether our results have unravelled a complex set of regulatory pathways controlling the synthesis of fusogenic lipids at the secretory granule fusion site by PLD(1). PMID:20074053

  5. CtBP and associated LSD1 are required for transcriptional activation by NeuroD1 in gastrointestinal endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Subir K; Li, H Joyce; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Leiter, Andrew B

    2014-06-01

    Gene expression programs required for differentiation depend on both DNA-bound transcription factors and surrounding histone modifications. Expression of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein NeuroD1 is restricted to endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where it is important for endocrine differentiation. RREB1 (RAS-responsive element binding protein 1), identified as a component of the CtBP corepressor complex, binds to nearby DNA elements to associate with NeuroD and potentiate transcription of a NeuroD1 target gene. Transcriptional activation by RREB1 depends on recruitment of CtBP with its associated proteins, including LSD1, through its PXDLS motifs. The mechanism of transcriptional activation by CtBP has not been previously characterized. Here we found that activation was dependent on the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylase activity of LSD1, which removes repressive methyl marks from dimethylated H3K9 (H3K9Me2), to facilitate subsequent H3K9 acetylation by the NeuroD1-associated histone acetyltransferase, P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF). The secretin, β-glucokinase, insulin I, and insulin II genes, four known direct targets of NeuroD1 in intestinal and pancreatic endocrine cells, all show similar promoter occupancy by CtBP-associated proteins and PCAF, with acetylation of H3K9. This work may indicate a mechanism for selective regulation of transcription by CtBP and LSD1 involving their association with specific transcription factors and cofactors to drive tissue-specific transcription.

  6. Estradiol promotes functional responses in inflammatory and steady-state dendritic cells through differential requirement for activation function-1 of estrogen receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillet, Cyril; Rouquié, Nelly; Foulon, Eliane; Douin-Echinard, Victorine; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-François; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Laffont, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been shown to regulate GM-CSF- or Flt3 ligand-driven dendritic cell (DC) development through estrogen receptor (ER) α signaling in myeloid progenitors. ERα regulates transcription of target genes through two distinct activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2, whose respective involvement varies in a cell type- or tissue-specific manner. In this study, we investigated the role of ERα AFs in the development and effector functions of inflammatory DCs, steady-state conventional DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC), using mouse lacking either AF-1 or AF-2. In agreement with previous works, we showed that E2 fostered the differentiation and effector functions of inflammatory DCs through ERα-dependent upregulation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 in GM-CSF-stimulated myeloid progenitors. Interestingly, whereas AF-1 was required for early IRF-4 upregulation in DC precursors, it was dispensable to enhance IRF-4 expression in differentiated DCs to a level compatible with the development of the more functional Ly6C(-) CD11b(+) DC subset. Presence of E2 had no effect on progenitors from either knock-in mice with 7-aa deletion in helix 12 of ERα, lacking AF-2, or ERα(-/-) mice. By contrast, in Flt3 ligand-driven DC differentiation, activation of AF-1 domain was required to promote the development of more functionally competent conventional DCs and pDCs. Moreover, lack of ERα AF-1 blunted the TLR7-mediated IFN-α response of female pDCs in vivo. Thus, our study demonstrates that ERα uses AF-1 differently in steady-state and inflammatory DC lineages to regulate their innate functions, suggesting that selective ER modulators could be used to target specific DC subsets. PMID:23626011

  7. Induction of Proinflammatory Responses in Macrophages by the Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) of Plasmodium falciparum: CELL SIGNALING RECEPTORS, GPI STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENT, AND REGULATION OF GPI ACTIVITY*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnegowda, Gowdahalli; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Zhu, Jianzhong; Douglass, Erika J.; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Woods, Amina S.; Gowda, D. Channe

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The proinflammatory cytokines produced by the innate immune system in response to pathogenic infection protect the host by controlling microbial growth. However, excessive proinflammatory responses could disrupt the host’s vital physiological functions, causing severe pathological conditions. In the case of Plasmodium falciparum, the protozoan parasite that causes fatal malaria in man, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors are thought to be the major factors that contribute to malaria pathogenesis through their ability to induce proinflammatory responses. In this study, we identified the receptors for P. falciparum GPI-induced cell signaling that leads to proinflammatory responses, and studied the GPI structure-activity relationship. The data show that GPI-signaling is mediated mainly through recognition by TLR2 and to a lesser extent by TLR4. The activity of sn-2 lyso GPIs is comparable to that of the intact GPIs, whereas the activity of Man3-GPIs is about 80% that of the intact GPIs. The GPIs with three (intact GPIs and Man3-GPIs) and two fatty acids (sn-2 lyso GPIs) appear to differ considerably in the requirement of the auxiliary receptor, TLR1 or TLR6, for recognition by TLR2. The former are preferentially recognized by TLR2/TLR1, whereas the latter are favored by TLR2/TLR6. However, the signaling pathways initiated by all three GPI types are similar, involving the MyD88-dependent activation of ERK, JNK and p38, and NF-κB signaling pathways. The signaling molecules of these pathways differentially contribute to the production of various cytokines and nitric oxide (Zhu, J., et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem., accompanying manuscript). Our data also show that GPIs are degraded by the macrophage surface phospholipases, predominantly into inactive species, indicating that the host can regulate GPI activity, at least in part, by this mechanism. These results imply that macrophage surface phospholipases play important roles in the GPI-induced innate

  8. Arthropathic group A streptococcal cell walls require specific antibody for activation of human complement by both the classical and alternative pathways.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, R A; Schwab, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of acute arthritis in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of group A streptococcal cell wall is associated with the activation of complement. We have therefore investigated the interaction of arthropathic peptidoglycan-polysaccharide complex of streptococcal cell walls and human complement. The incubation of cell wall in normal human serum results in the formation of complexes of cell wall and the C3 and C4 components of complement. Using agammaglobulinemic serum, we have...

  9. Grp/DChk1 is required for G(2)-M checkpoint activation in Drosophila S2 cells, whereas Dmnk/DChk2 is dispensable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, HI; Uyetake, L; Lemstra, W; Brunsting, JF; Su, TT; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints are signal-transduction pathways required to maintain genomic stability in dividing cells. Previously, it was reported that two kinases essential for checkpoint signalling, Chk1 and Chk2 are structurally conserved. In contrast to yeast, Xenopus and mammals, the Chk1- and Chk2-

  10. Vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, are required for activation-induced degranulation of mature human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Leif E; Frank, Simon P C; Bolat, Seza; Blank, Ulrich; Galli, Thierry; Bigalke, Hans; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2008-03-01

    Mediator release from mast cells (MC) is a crucial step in allergic and non-allergic inflammatory disorders. However, the final events in response to activation leading to membrane fusion and thereby facilitating degranulation have hitherto not been analyzed in human MC. Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) represent a highly conserved family of proteins that have been shown to mediate intracellular membrane fusion events. Here, we show that mature MC isolated from human intestinal tissue express soluble N-ethylmaleide sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)-23, Syntaxin (STX)-1B, STX-2, STX-3, STX-4, and STX-6 but not SNAP-25. Furthermore, we found that primary human MC express substantial amounts of vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-3, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 and, in contrast to previous reports about rodent MC, only low levels of VAMP-2. Furthermore, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 were found to translocate to the plasma membrane and interact with SNAP-23 and STX-4 upon activation. Inhibition of SNAP-23, STX-4, VAMP-7 or VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, resulted in a markedly reduced high-affinity IgE receptor-mediated histamine release. In summary, our data show that mature human MC express a specific pattern of SNARE and that VAMP-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2, are required for rapid degranulation.

  11. ERK-dependent activation of Sp1 is required for low-power laser irradiation-induced vascular endothelial cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    Here, we report that low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) activates ERK/Sp1 pathway to upregulate VEGF expression and promote vascular endothelial cell proliferation. We demonstrate for the first time that LPLI enhances DNA-binding activity and transactivation activity of Sp1 on VEGF promoter. Additionally, ERK translocates from cytoplasm to nucleus following LPLI. Moreover, activated ERK phosphorylates Sp1 and results in increased EKR-Sp1 interaction. Selective inhibition of Sp1 or ERK suppresses the effect of LPLI on the promotion of cell cycle progression and proliferation. These findings provide a novel link between LPLI and angiogenesis, supplying potential therapy strategies for angiogenesis with LPLI.

  12. Tim-4 inhibition of T-cell activation and T helper type 17 differentiation requires both the immunoglobulin V and mucin domains and occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cao, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Emerging experimental data suggest an important role for the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 1 (Tim-1):Tim-4 pathway in autoimmune and alloimmune responses in vivo. Using a Tim-4 ectodomain human IgG Fc fusion protein we studied the role of Tim-4 in T-cell activation, signalling and differentiation responses in vitro. We demonstrate that Tim-4Fc can inhibit naive and pre-activated T-cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion via a Tim-1-independent pathway. Tim-4 contains immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and mucin domains; to identify which domain accounts for the inhibitory effect novel Tim-4 fusion proteins containing either the IgV or mucin domain were generated. We demonstrate that both IgV and mucin domains are required for the inhibitory effects and that they are mediated at least in part by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity. Given the emerging interest in the role of the Tim family in T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, which play an important role in autoimmune disease and transplantation tolerance, our data show that Tim-4Fc can prevent polarization of CD4(+) T cells to the Th17 phenotype. Collectively, our results highlight an inhibitory role for Tim-4Fc in vitro, which we propose is mediated by a receptor other than Tim-1. In addition, this study provides new insights into the role of Tim-4Fc in regulating Th17 immune responses and may open a new avenue for autoimmune therapy.

  13. TNF-α-Induced Mitochondrial Alterations in Human T Cells Requires FADD and Caspase-8 Activation but Not RIP and Caspase-3 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2010-01-01

    Although much is known about how TNF-α induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-α in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12–24 h ...

  14. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  15. Activation of MAPK Is Required for ROS Generation and Exocytosis in HMC-1 Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Derived Secretory Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narantsogt, Giimaa; Min, Arim; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Agvaandaram, Gurbadam; Dorjsuren, Temuulen; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis and cervicitis in women and asymptomatic urethritis and prostatitis in men. Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in vaginal smears and vaginal walls of patients infected with T. vaginalis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activated by various stimuli, have been shown to regulate the transcriptional activity of various cytokine genes in mast cells. In this study, we investigated whether MAPK is involved in ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 cells induced by T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP). We found that TvSP induces the activation of MAPK and NADPH oxidase in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP induced phosphorylation of MAPK and p47(phox) in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP also induced up-regulation of CD63, a marker for exocytosis, along the surfaces of human mast cells. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors strongly inhibited TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation. Finally, our results suggest that TvSP induces intracellular ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 via MAPK signaling.

  16. Aplysia cell adhesion molecule and a novel protein kinase C activity in the postsynaptic neuron are required for presynaptic growth and initial formation of specific synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiang-Yuan; Chen, Yang; Bougie, Joanna K; Sossin, Wayne S.; Schacher, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    To explore the role of both Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (ApCAM) and activity of specific protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in the initial formation of sensory neuron synapses with specific postsynaptic targets (L7 but not L11), we examined presynaptic growth, initial synapse formation, and the expression of the presynaptic neuropeptide sensorin following cell-specific reduction of ApCAM or of a novel PKC activity. Synapse formation between sensory neurons and L7 begins by 3 h after plating a...

  17. Nucleolin and YB-1 are required for JNK-mediated interleukin-2 mRNA stabilization during T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, C Y; Gherzi, R; Andersen, Jens S.;

    2000-01-01

    Regulated mRNA turnover is a highly important process, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Using interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA as a model, we described a role for the JNK-signaling pathway in stabilization of IL-2 mRNA during T-cell activation, acting via a JNK response element (JRE) in the 5...

  18. Adhesion-related kinase induction of migration requires phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ras stimulation of rac activity in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Allen, Melissa P; Xu, Mei; Linseman, Daniel A; Pawlowski, John E; Bouchard, R J; Varnum, Brian C; Heidenreich, Kim A; Wierman, Margaret E

    2007-06-01

    GnRH neurons migrate into the hypothalamus during development. Although migratory defects may result in disordered activation of the reproductive axis and lead to delayed or absent sexual maturation, specific factors regulating GnRH neuronal migration remain largely unknown. The receptor tyrosine kinase, adhesion-related kinase (Ark) (also known as Axl, UFO, and Tyro7), has been implicated in the migration of GnRH neuronal cells. Binding of its ligand, growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and migration of NLT GnRH neuronal cells via Rac and p38 MAPK. Here, we examined the Axl effectors proximal to Rac in the signaling pathway. Gas6/Axl-induced lamellipodia formation and migration were blocked after phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells. The p85 subunit of PI3K coimmunoprecipitated with Axl and was phosphorylated in a Gas6-sensitive manner. In addition, PI3K inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells diminished Gas6-induced Rac activation. Exogenous expression of a dominant-negative form of Ras also decreased GnRH neuronal lamellipodia formation, migration, and Rac activation. PI3K inhibition blocked Ras in addition to Rac activation and migration. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the phospholipase C gamma effectors, protein kinase C or calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II, had no effect on Gas6/Axl signaling to promote Rac activation or stimulate cytoskeletal reorganization and migration. Together, these data show that the PI3K-Ras pathway is a major mediator of Axl actions upstream of Rac to induce GnRH neuronal cell migration. PMID:17332061

  19. Late repression of NF-κB activity by invasive but not non-invasive meningococcal isolates is required to display apoptosis of epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala-Eddine Deghmane

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal invasive isolates of the ST-11 clonal complex are most frequently associated with disease and rarely found in carriers. Unlike carriage isolates, invasive isolates induce apoptosis in epithelial cells through the TNF-α signaling pathway. While invasive and non-invasive isolates are both able to trigger the TLR4/MyD88 pathway in lipooligosaccharide (LOS-dependant manner, we show that only non-invasive isolates were able to induce sustained NF-κB activity in infected epithelial cells. ST-11 invasive isolates initially triggered a strong NF-κB activity in infected epithelial cells that was abolished after 9 h of infection and was associated with sustained activation of JNK, increased levels of membrane TNFR1, and induction of apoptosis. In contrast, infection with carriage isolates lead to prolonged activation of NF-κB that was associated with a transient activation of JNK increased TACE/ADAM17-mediated shedding of TNFR1 and protection against apoptosis. Our data provide insights to understand the meningococcal duality between invasiveness and asymptomatic carriage.

  20. Potentiation of Growth Factor Signaling by Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 in Breast Epithelial Cells Requires Sphingosine Kinase Activity*

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Janet L; Mike Z. Lin; Eileen M. McGowan; Baxter, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1...

  1. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  2. Secreted phospholipase A2-IIA-induced a phenotype of activated microglia in BV-2 cells requires epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation and proHB-EGF shedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Rubén

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of microglia, the primary component of the innate immune response in the brain, is a hallmark of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other pathological conditions such as stroke or CNS infection. In response to a variety of insults, microglial cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines that are often involved in neuronal injury, and play an important role in the recognition, engulfment, and clearance of apoptotic cells and/or invading microbes. Secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA, an enzyme that interacts with cells involved in the systemic immune/inflammatory response, has been found up-regulated in the cerebrospinal fluid and brain of AD patients. However, despite several approaches, its functions in mediating CNS inflammation remain unknown. In the present study, the role of sPLA2-IIA was examined by investigating its direct effects on microglial cells. Methods Primary and immortalized microglial cells were stimulated by sPLA2-IIA in order to characterize the cytokine-like actions of the phospholipase. The hallmarks of activated microglia analyzed include: mitogenic response, phagocytic capabilities and induction of inflammatory mediators. In addition, we studied several of the potential molecular mechanisms involved in those events. Results The direct exposure of microglial cells to sPLA2-IIA stimulated, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, their phagocytic and proliferative capabilities. sPLA2-IIA also triggered the synthesis of the inflammatory proteins COX-2 and TNFα. In addition, EGFR phosphorylation and shedding of the membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (pro-HB-EGF ectodomain, as well as a rapid activation/phosphorylation of the classical survival proteins ERK, P70S6K and rS6 were induced upon sPLA2-IIA treatment. We further demonstrated that the presence of an EGFR inhibitor (AG1478, a matrix metalloproteinase

  3. FAK activation is required for IGF1R-mediated regulation of EMT, migration, and invasion in mesenchymal triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro-Smith, LaTonia; Oberlick, Elaine; Liu, Tongrui; McGlothen, Tanisha; Alcaide, Tiffanie; Tobin, Rachel; Donnelly, Siobhan; Commander, Rachel; Kline, Erik; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Havel, Lauren; Marcus, Adam; Nahta, Rita; O'Regan, Ruth

    2015-03-10

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly metastatic disease that currently lacks effective prevention and treatment strategies. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways function in numerous developmental processes, and alterations in both are linked with a number of common pathological diseases. Overexpression of IGF1R and FAK are closely associated with metastatic breast tumors. The present study investigated the interrelationship between IGF1R and FAK signaling in regulating the malignant properties of TNBC cells. Using small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated IGF1R silencing methods, we showed that IGF1R is essential for sustaining mesenchymal morphologies of TNBC cells and modulates the expression of EMT-related markers. We further showed that IGF1R overexpression promotes migratory and invasive behaviors of TNBC cell lines. Most importantly, IGF1R-driven migration and invasion is predominantly mediated by FAK activation and can be suppressed using pharmacological inhibitors of FAK. Our findings in TNBC cells demonstrate a novel role of the IGF1R/FAK signaling pathway in regulating critical processes involved in the metastatic cascade. These results may improve the current understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of TNBC metastasis and provide a strong rationale for co-targeting of IGF1R and FAK as therapy for mesenchymal TNBCs. PMID:25749031

  4. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  5. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. → Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. → Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  6. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  7. p70 S6 kinase activation is not required for insulin-like growth factor-induced differentiation of rat, mouse, or human skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canicio, J; Gallardo, E; Illa, I; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A; Kaliman, P

    1998-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are potent stimulators of muscle differentiation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is an essential second messenger in this process. Little is known about the downstream effectors of the IGF/PI 3-kinase myogenic cascade, and contradictory observations have been reported concerning the involvement of p70 S6 kinase. In an attempt to clarify the role of p70 S6 kinase in myogenesis, here we have studied the effect of rapamycin on rat, mouse, and human skeletal muscle cell differentiation. Both insulin and IGF-II activated p70 S6 kinase in rat L6E9 and mouse Sol8 myoblasts, which was markedly inhibited at 1 ng/ml rapamycin concentrations. Consistent with previous observations in a variety of cell lines, rapamycin exerted a potent inhibitory effect on L6E9 and Sol8 serum-induced myoblast proliferation. In contrast, even at high concentrations (20 ng/ml), rapamycin had no effect on IGF-II-induced proliferation or differentiation. Indeed, neither the morphological differentiation, as assessed by myotube formation, nor the expression of muscle-specific markers such as myogenin, myosin heavy chain, or GLUT4 (glucose transporter-4) glucose carriers was altered by rapamycin. Moreover, here we extended our studies on IGF-II-induced myogenesis to human myoblasts derived from skeletal muscle biopsies. We show that, as observed for rat and mouse muscle cells, human myoblasts can be induced to form multinucleated myotubes in the presence of exogenous IGF-II. Moreover, IGF-II-induced human myotube formation was totally blocked by LY294002, a specific PI 3-kinase inhibitor, but remained unaffected in the presence of rapamycin. PMID:9832443

  8. Requirements for Peptide-induced T Cell Receptor Downregulation on Naive CD8+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Zeling; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Brunmark, Anders; Jackson, Michael R.; Peterson, Per A.; Sprent, Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for inducing downregulation of α/β T cell receptor (TCR) molecules on naive major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted T cells was investigated with 2C TCR transgenic mice and defined peptides as antigen. Confirming previous results, activation of 2C T cells in response to specific peptides required CD8 expression on the responder cells and was heavily dependent upon costimulation provided by either B7-1 or ICAM-1 on antigen-presenting cells (APC). These stringent re...

  9. Cyclophilin B interacts with sodium-potassium ATPase and is required for pump activity in proximal tubule cells of the kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Suñé

    Full Text Available Cyclophilins (Cyps, the intracellular receptors for Cyclosporine A (CsA, are responsible for peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerisation and for chaperoning several membrane proteins. Those functions are inhibited upon CsA binding. Albeit its great benefits as immunosuppressant, the use of CsA has been limited by undesirable nephrotoxic effects, including sodium retention, hypertension, hyperkalemia, interstial fibrosis and progressive renal failure in transplant recipients. In this report, we focused on the identification of novel CypB-interacting proteins to understand the role of CypB in kidney function and, in turn, to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of CsA-induced toxicity. By means of yeast two-hybrid screens with human kidney cDNA, we discovered a novel interaction between CypB and the membrane Na/K-ATPase β1 subunit protein (Na/K-β1 that was confirmed by pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, in proximal tubule-derived HK-2 cells. The Na/K-ATPase pump, a key plasma membrane transporter, is responsible for maintenance of electrical Na+ and K+ gradients across the membrane. We showed that CypB silencing produced similar effects on Na/K-ATPase activity than CsA treatment in HK-2 cells. It was also observed an enrichment of both alpha and beta subunits in the ER, what suggested a possible failure on the maturation and routing of the pump from this compartment towards the plasma membrane. These data indicate that CypB through its interaction with Na/K-β1 might regulate maturation and trafficking of the pump through the secretory pathway, offering new insights into the relationship between cyclophilins and the nephrotoxic effects of CsA.

  10. CXCR3-dependent CD4⁺ T cells are required to activate inflammatory monocytes for defense against intestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Cohen

    Full Text Available Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in orchestrating immunity to microbial pathogens, including the orally acquired Th1-inducing protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 is associated with Th1 responses, and here we use bicistronic CXCR3-eGFP knock-in reporter mice to demonstrate upregulation of this chemokine receptor on CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes during Toxoplasma infection. We show a critical role for CXCR3 in resistance to the parasite in the intestinal mucosa. Absence of the receptor in Cxcr3⁻/⁻ mice resulted in selective loss of ability to control T. gondii specifically in the lamina propria compartment. CD4⁺ T cells were impaired both in their recruitment to the intestinal lamina propria and in their ability to secrete IFN-γ upon stimulation. Local recruitment of CD11b⁺Ly6C/G⁺ inflammatory monocytes, recently reported to be major anti-Toxoplasma effectors in the intestine, was not impacted by loss of CXCR3. However, inflammatory monocyte activation status, as measured by dual production of TNF-α and IL-12, was severely impaired in Cxcr3⁻/⁻ mice. Strikingly, adoptive transfer of wild-type but not Ifnγ⁻/⁻ CD4⁺ T lymphocytes into Cxcr3⁻/⁻ animals prior to infection corrected the defect in inflammatory macrophage activation, simultaneously reversing the susceptibility phenotype of the knockout animals. Our results establish a central role for CXCR3 in coordinating innate and adaptive immunity, ensuring generation of Th1 effectors and their trafficking to the frontline of infection to program microbial killing by inflammatory monocytes.

  11. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  12. Activation of c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) Is Required for Gemcitabine’s Cytotoxic Effect in Human Lung Cancer H1299 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Teraishi, Fuminori; Zhang, Lidong; Wei GUO; Dong, Fengqin; John J. Davis; Lin, Anning; Fang, Bingliang

    2005-01-01

    Although gemcitabine is a potent therapeutic agent in the treatment of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), resistance to gemcitabine is common. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired gemcitabine resistance against NSCLC cells. Gemcitabine-resistant NSCLC H1299 cells (H1299/GR) were selected by long-term exposure of parental H1299 cells to gemcitabine. The median inhibitory concentrations of gemcitabine in H1299 and H1299/GR cells were 19.4 nM and 23...

  13. Immobilization of cells via activated cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markt, M.; Kas, J.; Valentova, O.; Demnerova, K.; Vodrazka, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum were activated by periodate oxidation of vicinal diol groups in cell wall polysaccharides. The aldehyde groups thus generated allow the yeast cells to be covalently bound to modified bead cellulose or macroporous glycidyl methacrylate supports, or to enzymes such as glucose oxidase and catalase. 6 references.

  14. IgA production requires B cell interaction with subepithelial dendritic cells in Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboldi, Andrea; Arnon, Tal I; Rodda, Lauren B; Atakilit, Amha; Sheppard, Dean; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-13

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) induction primarily occurs in intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs). However, the cellular interactions necessary for IgA class switching are poorly defined. Here we show that in mice, activated B cells use the chemokine receptor CCR6 to access the subepithelial dome (SED) of PPs. There, B cells undergo prolonged interactions with SED dendritic cells (DCs). PP IgA class switching requires innate lymphoid cells, which promote lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR)-dependent maintenance of DCs. PP DCs augment IgA production by integrin αvβ8-mediated activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). In mice where B cells cannot access the SED, IgA responses against oral antigen and gut commensals are impaired. These studies establish the PP SED as a niche supporting DC-B cell interactions needed for TGFβ activation and induction of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:27174992

  15. Activation of H2O2-induced VSOR Cl- currents in HTC cells require phospholipase Cgamma1 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe; Olivero, Pablo;

    2007-01-01

    Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channels participate in several physiological processes such as regulatory volume decrease, cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Recent evidence points to a significant role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in VSOR Cl(-) channel act...

  16. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S;

    1999-01-01

    was required for a complete morphological transition towards the spindle-shaped fibroblast-like phenotype. The expression of an interleukin-2 receptor (IL2R)-beta1A chimera and its incorporation into focal adhesions also induced the disruption of cadherin-based adhesions and the reorganization of ECM......Adhesion receptors, which connect cells to each other and to the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), play a crucial role in the control of tissue structure and of morphogenesis. In this work, we have studied how intercellular adhesion molecules and beta1 integrins influence each other using two......-catenin protein levels accompanied by their redistribution from the cytoskeleton-associated fraction to the detergent-soluble fraction. Regulation of alpha-catenin protein levels by beta1 integrins is likely to play a role in the morphological transition, since overexpression of alpha-catenin in GE11 cells before...

  17. Retinoic acid activates two pathways required for meiosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Koubova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In all sexually reproducing organisms, cells of the germ line must transition from mitosis to meiosis. In mice, retinoic acid (RA, the extrinsic signal for meiotic initiation, activates transcription of Stra8, which is required for meiotic DNA replication and the subsequent processes of meiotic prophase. Here we report that RA also activates transcription of Rec8, which encodes a component of the cohesin complex that accumulates during meiotic S phase, and which is essential for chromosome synapsis and segregation. This RA induction of Rec8 occurs in parallel with the induction of Stra8, and independently of Stra8 function, and it is conserved between the sexes. Further, RA induction of Rec8, like that of Stra8, requires the germ-cell-intrinsic competence factor Dazl. Our findings strengthen the importance of RA and Dazl in the meiotic transition, provide important details about the Stra8 pathway, and open avenues to investigate early meiosis through analysis of Rec8 induction and function.

  18. Activation of oligodendroglial Stat3 is required for efficient remyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Andrew J.; Zhou, Yun; Koit, Hisami; Kim, SunJa; Payne, H. Ross; Lu, Q. Richard; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most prevalent demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is histologically characterized by perivascular demyelination as well as neurodegeneration. While the degree of axonal damage is correlated with clinical disability, it is believed that remyelination can protect axons from degeneration and slow disease progression. Therefore, understanding the intricacies associated with myelination and remyelination may lead to therapeutics that can enhance the remyelination process and slow axon degeneration and loss of function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) family cytokines such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and interleukin11(IL-11) are known to promote oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination in experimental models of demyelination. Because CNTF family member binding to the gp 130 receptor results in activation of the JAK2/Stat3 pathway we investigated the necessity of oligodendroglial Stat3 in transducing the signal required for myelination and remyelination. We found that Stat3 activation in the CNS coincides with myelination during development. Stimulation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) with CNTF or LIF promoted OPC survival and final differentiation, which was completely abolished by pharmacologic blockade of Stat3 activation with JAK2 inhibitor. Similarly, genetic ablation of Stat3 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells prevented CNTF-induced OPC differentiation in culture. In vivo, while oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling appears to be dispensable for developmental CNS myelination, it is required for oligodendrocyte regeneration and efficient remyelination after toxin-induced focal demyelination in the adult brain. Our data suggest a critical function for oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling in myelin repair. PMID:27060559

  19. Motor skill learning requires active central myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ian A; Ohayon, David; Li, Huiliang; de Faria, Joana Paes; Emery, Ben; Tohyama, Koujiro; Richardson, William D

    2014-10-17

    Myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) are formed continuously in the healthy adult brain. In this work, we study the function of these late-forming cells and the myelin they produce. Learning a new motor skill (such as juggling) alters the structure of the brain's white matter, which contains many OLs, suggesting that late-born OLs might contribute to motor learning. Consistent with this idea, we show that production of newly formed OLs is briefly accelerated in mice that learn a new skill (running on a "complex wheel" with irregularly spaced rungs). By genetically manipulating the transcription factor myelin regulatory factor in OL precursors, we blocked production of new OLs during adulthood without affecting preexisting OLs or myelin. This prevented the mice from mastering the complex wheel. Thus, generation of new OLs and myelin is important for learning motor skills. PMID:25324381

  20. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Rode, Anna Kathrine Obelitz;

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys...

  1. Requirements for anthrax toxin entry into cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Patricia Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis secretes a harmful exotoxin called anthrax toxin. Anthrax toxin has deleterious effects on several host cell types and is a significant contributor to anthrax pathogenesis. Toxin-deleted strains of B. anthracis are highly attenuated and many of the symptoms of anthrax can be replicated with anthrax toxin alone. Anthrax toxin is an AB-type toxin with two catalytic A moieties. PA, the B moiety, is responsible for receptor binding, pore formation and translocation of the catal...

  2. 27 CFR 40.526 - Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. 40.526 Section 40.526 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Manufacturers of Processed Tobacco § 40.526 Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. A permit...

  3. 27 CFR 40.256 - Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum manufacturing and... Provisions Relating to Operations § 40.256 Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. The minimum manufacturing and activity requirement prescribed in § 40.61(b) of this part is a continuing condition of...

  4. Design requirements for high-efficiency high concentration ratio space solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H.; Patterson, R.

    1980-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator system concept was developed for low cost, multikilowatt space solar arrays. The system imposes some requirements on solar cells which are new and different from those imposed for conventional applications. The solar cells require a circular active area of approximately 4 mm in diameter. High reliability contacts are required on both front and back surfaces. The back area must be metallurgically bonded to a heat sink. The cell should be designed to achieve the highest practical efficiency at 100 AMO suns and at 80 C. The cell design must minimize losses due to nonuniform illumination intensity and nonnormal light incidence. The primary radiation concern is the omnidirectional proton environment.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Activity is Required for Appropriate Cardiomyocyte Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Peymani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ is a member of the PPAR nuclear receptor superfamily. Although PPARγ acts as a master transcription factor in adipocyte differentiation, it is also associated with a variety of cell functions including carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This study aimed to assess the expression level of PPARγ in order to address its role in cardiac cell differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs. Materials and Methods In this an intervening study, mESCs were subjected to cardiac differentiation. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was carried out to estimate level of gene expression. Furthermore, the requirement of PPARγ in cardiac differentiation of mESCs, during cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs formation, was examined by applying the respective agonist and antagonist. Results The obtained data revealed an elevation in the expression level of PPARγ during spontaneous formation of CPCs and cardiomyocytes. Our results indicated that during CPC formation, PPARγ inactivation via treatment with GW9662 (GW reduced expression of CPC and cardiac markers. Conclusion We conclude that PPARγ modulation has an effective role on cardiac differentiation of mESCs at the early stage of cardiomyogenesis.

  6. The p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathway is required for BMP-2-induced cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gamell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs have been shown to participate in the patterning and specification of several tissues and organs during development and to regulate cell growth, differentiation and migration in different cell types. BMP-mediated cell migration requires activation of the small GTPase Cdc42 and LIMK1 activities. In our earlier report we showed that activation of LIMK1 also requires the activation of PAKs through Cdc42 and PI3K. However, the requirement of additional signaling is not clearly known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Activation of p38 MAPK has been shown to be relevant for a number of BMP-2's physiological effects. We report here that BMP-2 regulation of cell migration and actin cytoskeleton remodelling are dependent on p38 activity. BMP-2 treatment of mesenchymal cells results in activation of the p38/MK2/Hsp25 signaling pathway downstream from the BMP receptors. Moreover, chemical inhibition of p38 signaling or genetic ablation of either p38α or MK2 blocks the ability to activate the downstream effectors of the pathway and abolishes BMP-2-induction of cell migration. These signaling effects on p38/MK2/Hsp25 do not require the activity of either Cdc42 or PAK, whereas p38/MK2 activities do not significantly modify the BMP-2-dependent activation of LIMK1, measured by either kinase activity or with an antibody raised against phospho-threonine 508 at its activation loop. Finally, phosphorylated Hsp25 colocalizes with the BMP receptor complexes in lamellipodia and overexpression of a phosphorylation mutant form of Hsp25 is able to abolish the migration of cells in response to BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Cdc42/PAK/LIMK1 and p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathways, acting in parallel and modulating specific actin regulatory proteins, play a critical role in integrating responses during BMP-induced actin reorganization and cell migration.

  7. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma

  8. 12 CFR 980.3 - New business activity notice requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... undertaking a new business activity, except as provided in § 980.4(b), a Bank shall submit to the Finance... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New business activity notice requirement. 980.3 Section 980.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES...

  9. Auxin requirements of sycamore cells in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, M M; Hall, J F; Robinson, G M; Elliott, M C

    1983-04-01

    Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cell suspension cultures (strain OS) require 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in their culture medium for normal growth. If the 2,4-D is omitted, rates of cell division are dramatically reduced and cell lysis may occur. Despite this ;auxin requirement,' it has been shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that the cells synthesize indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA). Changes in free 2,4-D and IAA in the cells during a culture passage have been monitored.There is a rapid uptake of 2,4-D by the cells during the lag phase leading to a maximum concentration per cell (125 nanograms per 10(6) cells) on day 2 followed by a decline to 45 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 (middle of linear phase). The initial concentration of IAA (0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells) rises slowly to a peak of 1.4 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 then decreases rapidly to 0.2 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 15 (early declining phase) and 0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 23 (early stationary phase).

  10. The polycomb group protein Suz12 is required for embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Hansen, Jacob Bo Højberg;

    2007-01-01

    results in early lethality of mouse embryos. Here, we demonstrate that Suz12(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be established and expanded in tissue culture. The Suz12(-/-) ES cells are characterized by global loss of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and higher expression levels of differentiation......-specific genes. Moreover, Suz12(-/-) ES cells are impaired in proper differentiation, resulting in a lack of repression of ES cell markers as well as activation of differentiation-specific genes. Finally, we demonstrate that the PcGs are actively recruited to several genes during ES cell differentiation, which...... despite an increase in H3K27me3 levels is not always sufficient to prevent transcriptional activation. In summary, we demonstrate that Suz12 is required for the establishment of specific expression programs required for ES cell differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that PcGs have different...

  11. Desmosome dynamics in migrating epithelial cells requires the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brett J.; Pashaj, Anjeza; Johnson, Keith R.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Re-modeling of epithelial tissues requires that the cells in the tissue rearrange their adhesive contacts in order to allow cells to migrate relative to neighboring cells. Desmosomes are prominent adhesive structures found in a variety of epithelial tissues that are believed to inhibit cell migration and invasion. Mechanisms regulating desmosome assembly and stability in migrating cells are largely unknown. In this study we established a cell culture model to examine the fate of desmosomal components during scratch wound migration. Desmosomes are rapidly assembled between epithelial cells at the lateral edges of migrating cells and structures are transported in a retrograde fashion while the structures become larger and mature. Desmosome assembly and dynamics in this system are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton prior to being associated with the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton. These studies extend our understanding of desmosome assembly and provide a system to examine desmosome assembly and dynamics during epithelial cell migration. PMID:21945137

  12. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  13. Validation of Power Requirement Model for Active Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Madsen, Anders Normann; Bjerregaard, Ruben;

    2015-01-01

    The actual power requirement of an active loudspeaker during playback of music has not received much attention in the literature. This is probably because no single and simple solution exists and because a complete system knowledge from input voltage to output sound pressure level is required....... There are however many advantages that could be harvested from such knowledge like size, cost and efficiency improvements. In this paper a recently proposed power requirement model for active loudspeakers is experimentally validated and the model is expanded to include the closed and vented type enclosures...

  14. LSD1 is Required for Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Cai, Chengfu; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) plays an important role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. It has recently been demonstrated that during development, downregulation of LSD1 inhibits cell proliferation, modulates the expression of cell cycle regulators, and reduces hair cell formation in the zebrafish lateral line, which suggests that LSD1-mediated epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the development of hair cells. However, the role of LSD1 in hair cell regeneration after hair cell loss remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the effect of LSD1 on hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced hair cell loss. We show that the LSD1 inhibitor trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (2-PCPA) significantly decreases the regeneration of hair cells in zebrafish after neomycin damage. In addition, immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that 2-PCPA administration suppresses supporting cell proliferation and alters cell cycle progression. Finally, in situ hybridization shows that 2-PCPA significantly downregulates the expression of genes related to Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf activation. Altogether, our data suggest that downregulation of LSD1 significantly decreases hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced hair cell loss through inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf signaling pathways. Thus, LSD1 plays a critical role in hair cell regeneration and might represent a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:26008620

  15. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  16. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  17. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  18. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  19. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 Is Required to Trigger Pyroptotic Death of Lymphoid-Tissue-Derived CD4 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L.K. Galloway

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The progressive depletion of CD4 T cells underlies clinical progression to AIDS in untreated HIV-infected subjects. Most dying CD4 T cells correspond to resting nonpermissive cells residing in lymphoid tissues. Death is due to an innate immune response against the incomplete cytosolic viral DNA intermediates accumulating in these cells. The viral DNA is detected by the IFI16 sensor, leading to inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and the induction of pyroptosis, a highly inflammatory form of programmed cell death. We now show that cell-to-cell transmission of HIV is obligatorily required for activation of this death pathway. Cell-free HIV-1 virions, even when added in large quantities, fail to activate pyroptosis. These findings underscore the infected CD4 T cells as the major killing units promoting progression to AIDS and highlight a previously unappreciated role for the virological synapse in HIV pathogenesis.

  20. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 Is Required to Trigger Pyroptotic Death of Lymphoid-Tissue-Derived CD4 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Nicole L K; Doitsh, Gilad; Monroe, Kathryn M; Yang, Zhiyuan; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Levy, David N; Greene, Warner C

    2015-09-01

    The progressive depletion of CD4 T cells underlies clinical progression to AIDS in untreated HIV-infected subjects. Most dying CD4 T cells correspond to resting nonpermissive cells residing in lymphoid tissues. Death is due to an innate immune response against the incomplete cytosolic viral DNA intermediates accumulating in these cells. The viral DNA is detected by the IFI16 sensor, leading to inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and the induction of pyroptosis, a highly inflammatory form of programmed cell death. We now show that cell-to-cell transmission of HIV is obligatorily required for activation of this death pathway. Cell-free HIV-1 virions, even when added in large quantities, fail to activate pyroptosis. These findings underscore the infected CD4 T cells as the major killing units promoting progression to AIDS and highlight a previously unappreciated role for the virological synapse in HIV pathogenesis.

  1. Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities. General Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication describes the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessments for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The requirements provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessments, facilitating the transfer of good practices between organizations. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  2. Mechanisms of cell propulsion by active stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, A E, E-mail: aec@wustl.edu [Department of Physics, Washington University, Campus Box 1105, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored by using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that (i) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, (ii) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, (iii) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell and (iv) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed.

  3. CRTC2 is required for β-cell function and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Chandra E; Fu, Accalia; Reeks, Courtney; Screaton, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Previous work in insulinoma cell lines has established that calcineurin plays a critical role in the activation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (Creb), a key transcription factor required for β-cell function and survival, by dephosphorylating the Creb coactivator Creb-regulated transcription coactivator (Crtc)2 at 2 regulatory sites, Ser171 and Ser275. Here, we report that Crtc2 is essential both for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and cell survival in the β-cell. Endogenous Crtc2 activation is achieved via increasing glucose levels to the physiological feeding range, indicating that Crtc2 is a sensor that couples ambient glucose concentrations to Creb activity in the β-cell. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporin A and tacrolimus that target the protein phosphatase calcineurin are commonly administered after organ transplantation. Chronic use is associated with reduced insulin secretion and new onset diabetes, suggestive of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Importantly, we show that overexpression of a Crtc2 mutant rendered constitutively active by introduction of nonphosphorylatable alanine residues at Ser171 and Ser275 permits Creb target gene activation under conditions when calcineurin is inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that promoting Crtc2-Creb activity is required for β-cell function and proliferation and promoting this pathway could ameliorate symptoms of new onset diabetes after transplantation.

  4. Verifying cell loss requirements in high-speed communication networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry W. Fendick

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In high-speed communication networks it is common to have requirements of very small cell loss probabilities due to buffer overflow. Losses are measured to verify that the cell loss requirements are being met, but it is not clear how to interpret such measurements. We propose methods for determining whether or not cell loss requirements are being met. A key idea is to look at the stream of losses as successive clusters of losses. Often clusters of losses, rather than individual losses, should be regarded as the important “loss events”. Thus we propose modeling the cell loss process by a batch Poisson stochastic process. Successive clusters of losses are assumed to arrive according to a Poisson process. Within each cluster, cell losses do not occur at a single time, but the distance between losses within a cluster should be negligible compared to the distance between clusters. Thus, for the purpose of estimating the cell loss probability, we ignore the spaces between successive cell losses in a cluster of losses. Asymptotic theory suggests that the counting process of losses initiating clusters often should be approximately a Poisson process even though the cell arrival process is not nearly Poisson. The batch Poisson model is relatively easy to test statistically and fit; e.g., the batch-size distribution and the batch arrival rate can readily be estimated from cell loss data. Since batch (cluster sizes may be highly variable, it may be useful to focus on the number of batches instead of the number of cells in a measurement interval. We also propose a method for approximately determining the parameters of a special batch Poisson cell loss with geometric batch-size distribution from a queueing model of the buffer content. For this step, we use a reflected Brownian motion (RBM approximation of a G/D/1/C queueing model. We also use the RBM model to estimate the input burstiness given the cell loss rate. In addition, we use the RBM model to

  5. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  6. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Leguminous plants engage into symbiotic relationships with soil bacteria, rhizobia, and develop root nodules. This process initiates with recognition of bacteria derived signalling molecules called nod factors. The subsequent events lead to symbiotic infection and, occurring in parallel, de novo...... was shown to require auxin signalling. Cytokinin, in contrast, exert a negative regulation of bacterial entry into the root. During organogenesis, auxin and cytokinin maxima are known to accompany nodule primordia development and together regulate progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, application...... observations of the DR5 reporter showed activity maxima situated in pericycle and endodermis cells specifically below infection sites. Using gravitropic bending auxin responses in the pericycle could be induced, specifically on the outer side of the gravitropic bend in uninoculated plants. When conducted...

  7. Sonic hedgehog-induced histone deacetylase activation is required for cerebellar granule precursor hyperplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease.

  8. CK1epsilon is required for breast cancers dependent on beta-catenin activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Aberrant beta-catenin signaling plays a key role in several cancer types, notably colon, liver and breast cancer. However approaches to modulate beta-catenin activity for therapeutic purposes have proven elusive to date.To uncover genetic dependencies in breast cancer cells that harbor active beta-catenin signaling, we performed RNAi-based loss-of-function screens in breast cancer cell lines in which we had characterized beta-catenin activity. Here we identify CSNK1E, the gene encoding casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon as required specifically for the proliferation of breast cancer cells with activated beta-catenin and confirm its role as a positive regulator of beta-catenin-driven transcription. Furthermore, we demonstrate that breast cancer cells that harbor activated beta-catenin activity exhibit enhanced sensitivity to pharmacological blockade of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. We also find that expression of CK1epsilon is able to promote oncogenic transformation of human cells in a beta-catenin-dependent manner.These studies identify CK1epsilon as a critical contributor to activated beta-catenin signaling in cancer and suggest it may provide a potential therapeutic target for cancers that harbor active beta-catenin. More generally, these observations delineate an approach that can be used to identify druggable synthetic lethal interactions with signaling pathways that are frequently activated in cancer but are difficult to target with the currently available small molecule inhibitors.

  9. Differentiation of immortal cells inhibits telomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, H W; Sokoloski, J A; Perez, J.R.; Maltese, J Y; Sartorelli, A C; Stein, C A; Nichols, G; Khaled, Z.; Telang, N T; Narayanan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleic acid-protein complex, adds hexameric repeats of 5'-TTAGGG-3' to the ends of mammalian chromosomal DNA (telomeres) to compensate for the progressive loss that occurs with successive rounds of DNA replication. Although somatic cells do not express telomerase, germ cells and immortalized cells, including neoplastic cells, express this activity. To determine whether the phenotypic differentiation of immortalized cells is linked to the regulation of telomerase activity, t...

  10. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L;

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells ...

  11. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  12. Telomerase activity in plasma cell dyscrasias

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, D; Zheng, C.; Bergenbrant, S; Holm, G; Björkholm, M.; Yi, Q; Gruber, A

    2001-01-01

    Activation of telomerase is essential for in vitro cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated telomerase activation and its implications in plasma cell dyscrasias including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukaemia (PCL). All 5 patients with MGUS exhibited normal levels of telomerase activity in their plasma cells. Elevated telomerase activity was found in the samples from 21/27 patients wi...

  13. The phosphatase domains of CD45 are required for ligand induced T-cell receptor downregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C;

    2000-01-01

    Down-regulation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) plays an important role in modulating T-cell responses, both during T-cell development and in mature T cells. At least two distinct pathways exist for TCR down-regulation: down-regulation following TCR ligation; and down-regulation following activation...... of protein kinase C (PKC). Ligand-induced TCR down-regulation is dependent on protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity and seems to be closely related to T-cell activation. In addition, previous studies have indicated that ligand-induced TCR down-regulation is dependent on the expression of CD45, a...... transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase. The role of the different domains of CD45 in TCR down-regulation was investigated in this study. We found that the phosphatase domains of CD45 are required for efficient ligand-induced TCR down-regulation. In contrast, the extracellular domain of CD45 is dispensable...

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type and SAP Domain Mutant Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Porcine Cells Identifies the Ubiquitin-Activating Enzyme UBE1 Required for Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zixiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Keshan; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Wang, Guoqing; Mao, Ruoqing; Li, Dan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-01

    Leader protein (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manipulates the activities of several host proteins to promote viral replication and pathogenicity. L(pro) has a conserved protein domain SAP that is suggested to subvert interferon (IFN) production to block antiviral responses. However, apart from blocking IFN production, the roles of the SAP domain during FMDV infection in host cells remain unknown. Therefore, we identified host proteins associated with the SAP domain of L(pro) by a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in conjunction with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry]. Comparison of the differentially regulated proteins in rA/FMDVΔmSAP- versus rA/FMDV-infected SK6 cells revealed 45 down-regulated and 32 up-regulated proteins that were mostly associated with metabolic, ribosome, spliceosome, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. The results also imply that the SAP domain has a function similar to SAF-A/B besides its potential protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (PIAS) function. One of the identified proteins UBE1 was further analyzed and displayed a novel role for the SAP domain of L(pro). Overexpression of UBE1 enhanced the replication of FMDV, and knockdown of UBE1 decreased FMDV replication. This shows that FMDV manipulates UBE1 for increased viral replication, and the SAP domain was involved in this process.

  15. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Hacker, Neville F; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  16. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  17. Assembly of a Notch transcriptional activation complex requires multimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Kaplan, Fred M; Weaver, Kelly L; VanWye, Jeffrey D; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2011-04-01

    Notch transmembrane receptors direct essential cellular processes, such as proliferation and differentiation, through direct cell-to-cell interactions. Inappropriate release of the intracellular domain of Notch (N(ICD)) from the plasma membrane results in the accumulation of deregulated nuclear N(ICD) that has been linked to human cancers, notably T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Nuclear N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex by interacting with the coactivator protein Mastermind-like 1 and the DNA binding protein CSL (for CBF-1/Suppressor of Hairless/Lag-1) to regulate target gene expression. Although it is well understood that N(ICD) forms a transcriptional activation complex, little is known about how the complex is assembled. In this study, we demonstrate that N(ICD) multimerizes and that these multimers function as precursors for the stepwise assembly of the Notch activation complex. Importantly, we demonstrate that the assembly is mediated by N(ICD) multimers interacting with Skip and Mastermind. These interactions form a preactivation complex that is then resolved by CSL to form the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA.

  18. Time required for motor activity in lucid dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between the time required for specific tasks (counting and performing squats) in lucid dreams and in the waking state. Five proficient lucid dreamers (26-34 yr. old, M=29.8, SD=3.0; one woman and four men) participated. Analysis showed that the time needed for counting in a lucid dream is comparable to the time needed for counting in wakefulness, but motor activities required more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state.

  19. Time required for motor activity in lucid dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between the time required for specific tasks (counting and performing squats) in lucid dreams and in the waking state. Five proficient lucid dreamers (26-34 yr. old, M=29.8, SD=3.0; one woman and four men) participated. Analysis showed that the time needed for counting in a lucid dream is comparable to the time needed for counting in wakefulness, but motor activities required more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. PMID:15739850

  20. Mind bomb-1 in dendritic cells is specifically required for Notch-mediated T helper type 2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Jeong

    Full Text Available In dendritic cell (DC-CD4(+ T cell interaction, Notch signaling has been implicated in the CD4(+ T cell activation, proliferation, and subset differentiation. However, there has been a lot of debate on the exact role of Notch signaling. Here, we observed that expression of Mind bomb-1 (Mib1, a critical regulator of Notch ligands for the activation of Notch signaling, increases gradually as precursor cells differentiate into DCs in mice. To clarify the role of Mib1 in DC-CD4(+ T cell interactions, we generated Mib1-null bone marrow-derived DCs. These cells readily expressed Notch ligands but failed to initiate Notch activation in the adjacent cells. Nevertheless, Mib1-null DCs were able to prime the activation and proliferation of CD4(+ T cells, suggesting that Notch activation in CD4(+ T cells is not required for these processes. Intriguingly, stimulation of CD4(+ T cells with Mib1-null DCs resulted in dramatically diminished Th2 cell populations, while preserving Th1 cell populations, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that Mib1 in DCs is critical for the activation of Notch signaling in CD4(+ T cells, and Notch signaling reinforces Th2 differentiation, but is not required for the activation or proliferation of the CD4(+ T cells.

  1. Structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gansler

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects.

  2. Establishment of human papillomavirus infection requires cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohun Pyeon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these

  3. The lipid moiety of brincidofovir is required for in vitro antiviral activity against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Laura K; Flint, Mike; Dyall, Julie; Albariño, César; Olinger, Gene G; Foster, Scott; Sethna, Phiroze; Hensley, Lisa E; Nichol, Stuart T; Lanier, E Randall; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    Brincidofovir (BCV) is the 3-hexadecyloxy-1-propanol (HDP) lipid conjugate of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate cidofovir (CDV). BCV has established broad-spectrum activity against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses; however, its activity against RNA viruses has been less thoroughly evaluated. Here, we report that BCV inhibited infection of Ebola virus in multiple human cell lines. Unlike the mechanism of action for BCV against cytomegalovirus and other dsDNA viruses, phosphorylation of CDV to the diphosphate form appeared unnecessary. Instead, antiviral activity required the lipid moiety and in vitro activity against EBOV was observed for several HDP-nucleotide conjugates.

  4. Change in Cell Shape Is Required for Matrix Metalloproteinase-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2010-01-01

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a “cuboidal” epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-β-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents. PMID:18506791

  5. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  6. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  7. Recruitment of epidermal growth factor receptors into coated pits requires their activated tyrosine kinase

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    EGF-receptor (EGF-R) tyrosine kinase is required for the down- regulation of activated EGF-R. However, controversy exists as to whether ligand-induced activation of the EGF-R tyrosine kinase is required for internalization or for lysosomal targeting. We have addressed this issue using a cell-free assay that selectively measures the recruitment of EGF-R into coated pits. Here we show that EGF bound to wild-type receptors is efficiently sequestered in coated pits. In contrast, sequestration of ...

  8. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) tunes T regulatory cell development and is required for suppressive function1

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Weishan; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Kannan, Arun K.; Huang, Lu; August, Avery

    2014-01-01

    ITK is a key signaling mediator downstream of TcR, mediating T cell positive selection, innate T cell and CD4+ Th2/Th17 differentiation. Here we show that ITK also negatively tunes IL-2-induced expansion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). In vivo, Treg abundance is inversely correlated with ITK expression, and iTreg development is inversely dependent on ITK kinase activity. While Treg development normally requires both hematopoietic and thymic MHC class 2 (MHC2) expression, the absence of I...

  9. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  10. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the growth of the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...

  11. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  12. Computational identification of a p38SAPK regulated transcription factor network required for tumor cell quiescence

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Alejandro P.; George, Ajish; Schewe, Denis; Bragado, Paloma; Iglesias, Bibiana V.; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Kourtidis, Antonis; Conklin, Douglas S.; Julio A Aguirre-Ghiso

    2009-01-01

    The stress activated kinase p38 plays key roles in tumor suppression and induction of tumor cell dormancy. However, the mechanisms behind these functions remain poorly understood. Using computational tools we identified a transcription factor (TF) network regulated by p38α/β and required for human squamous carcinoma cell quiescence in vivo. We found that p38 transcriptionally regulates a core network of 46 genes that includes 16 TFs. Activation of p38 induced the expression of the TFs p53 and...

  13. Utx Is Required for Proper Induction of Ectoderm and Mesoderm during Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Torres, Cristina; Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    for the activation of lineage choice genes in response to developmental signals. To further understand the function of Utx in pluripotency and differentiation we generated Utx knockout embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we show that Utx is not required for the proliferation of ESCs, however, Utx contributes......Embryonic development requires chromatin remodeling for dynamic regulation of gene expression patterns to ensure silencing of pluripotent transcription factors and activation of developmental regulators. Demethylation of H3K27me3 by the histone demethylases Utx and Jmjd3 is important...

  14. The Histone H2B Monoubiquitination Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Differentiation of Multipotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpiuk, Oleksandra; Najafova, Zeynab; Kramer, Frank;

    2012-01-01

    Extensive changes in posttranslational histone modifications accompany the rewiring of the transcriptional program during stem cell differentiation. However, the mechanisms controlling the changes in specific chromatin modifications and their function during differentiation remain only poorly...... understood. We show that histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) significantly increases during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and various lineage-committed precursor cells and in diverse organisms. Furthermore, the H2B ubiquitin ligase RNF40 is required for the induction of...... during the transition from an inactive to an active chromatin conformation. Thus, these data indicate that H2Bub1 is required for maintaining multipotency of hMSCs and plays a central role in controlling stem cell differentiation....

  15. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Almuedo-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  16. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  17. Cysteine 904 is required for maximal insulin degrading enzyme activity and polyanion activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available Cysteine residues in insulin degrading enzyme have been reported as non-critical for its activity. We found that converting the twelve cysteine residues in rat insulin degrading enzyme (IDE to serines resulted in a cysteine-free form of the enzyme with reduced activity and decreased activation by polyanions. Mutation of each cysteine residue individually revealed cysteine 904 as the key residue required for maximal activity and polyanion activation, although other cysteines affect polyanion binding to a lesser extent. Based on the structure of IDE, Asn 575 was identified as a potential hydrogen bond partner for Cys904 and mutation of this residue also reduced activity and decreased polyanion activation. The oligomerization state of IDE did not correlate with its activity, with the dimer being the predominant form in all the samples examined. These data suggest that there are several conformational states of the dimer that affect activity and polyanion activation.

  18. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  19. Materials requirements for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M.

    1985-01-01

    To achieve higher Si solar cell efficiencies (greater than 20%), better single-crystal Si must be produced. It is believed possible to bring Cz (Czochralski) Si up to the same low recombination level as FZ (Float Zone) Si. It is also desirable that solar cell Si meet the following requirements: long minority carrier lifetime (0.2 ohm-cm p-type with tau less than 500 microsec); repeatedly uniform lifetime (not spread from 50 to 1000 microsec); a lifetime that does not decrease during normal device processing; a silicon wafer sheet that is flat and stays throughout normal device processing; uniform and reasonable mechanical strength; and, manufacture at low cost (less than $50/sq m).

  20. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  1. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  2. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  3. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  4. Tbx16 and Msgn1 are required to establish directional cell migration of zebrafish mesodermal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alyssa J; Kimelman, David

    2015-10-15

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process that occurs repeatedly during embryogenesis whereby stably adherent cells convert to an actively migrating state. While much is known about the factors and events that initiate the EMT, the steps that cells undergo to become directionally migratory are far less well understood. Zebrafish embryos lacking the transcription factors Tbx16/Spadetail and Mesogenin1 (Msgn1) are a valuable system for investigating the EMT. Mesodermal cells in these embryos are unable to perform the EMT necessary to leave the most posterior end of the body (the tailbud) and join the pre-somitic mesoderm, a process that is conserved in all vertebrates. It has previously been very difficult to study this EMT in vertebrates because of the multiple cell types in the tailbud and the morphogenetic changes the whole embryo undergoes. Here, we describe a novel tissue explant system for imaging the mesodermal cell EMT in vivo that allows us to investigate the requirements for cells to acquire migratory properties during the EMT with high spatio-temporal resolution. This method revealed that, despite the inability of tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells to leave the tailbud, actin-based protrusions form surprisingly normally in these cells and they become highly motile. However, tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells have specific cell-autonomous defects in the persistence and anterior direction of migration because the lamellipodia they form are not productive in driving anteriorward migration. Additionally, we show that mesoderm morphogenesis and differentiation are separable and that there is a migratory cue that directs mesodermal cell migration that is independent of Tbx16 and Msgn1. This work defines changes that cells undergo as they complete the EMT and provides new insight into the mechanisms required in vivo for cells to become mesenchymal.

  5. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. KEY FINDINGS: Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. CONCLUSIONS: Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  6. Autophagy is Required for the Maintenance of Liver Progenitor Cell Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiji Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver progenitor cells (LPCs are bipotent stem cells existing in the adult liver, which could be activated upon massive liver injury and contribute to liver regeneration. However, mechanisms of maintenance of LPC functionality remain poorly understood. Previous studies found that autophagy was required for the self-renewal and differentiation of several tissue stem cells. Methods: The study compared the level of autophagic activity in LPCs and differentiated hepatocytes. Then, autophagic activity was inhibited in LPCs by lentivirus-mediated autophagy-related gene 5 or Beclin 1 knockdown. Clonogenic assay, cell viability assays, hepatic differentiation assay, and senescence analysis were conducted to assess the role of autophagy in regulating self-renewal, hepatic differentiation and senescence of LPCs. Results: We observed high autophagic activity in LPCs compared with differentiated hepatocytes. We found that inhibition of autophagy impaired the self-renewal, proliferation, and hepatic differentiation capability of LPCs under normal cultural condition, but had little impact on cell viability. Interestingly, while wild-type LPCs remained rarely affected by the toxin, etoposide, inhibition of autophagy induced the senescent phenotype of LPCs. Overexpression of Beclin 1 in Beclin 1-knockdown LPCs restored the functionality of stem cells. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that autophagy may function as a critical regulator of LPC functionality under both physiological and pathological condition.

  7. PKCθ is required for the activation of human T lymphocytes induced by CD43 engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The turnover of phosphoinositides leading to PKC activation constitutes one of the principal axes of intracellular signaling. In T lymphocytes, the enhanced and prolonged PKC activation resulting from the engagement of the TcR and co-receptor molecules ensures a productive T cell response. The CD43 co-receptor promotes activation and proliferation, by inducing IL-2 secretion and CD69 expression. CD43 engagement has been shown to promote phosphoinositide turnover and DAG production. Moreover, PKC activation was found to be required for the activation of the MAP kinase pathway in response to CD43 ligation. Here we show that CD43 engagement led to the membrane translocation and enzymatic activity of specific PKC isoenzymes: cPKC (α/β), nPKC (ε and θ), aPKC (ζ) and PKCμ. We also show that activation of PKCθ resulting from CD43 ligation induced CD69 expression through an ERK-dependent pathway leading to AP-1, NF-κB activation and an ERK independent pathway promoting NFAT activation. Together, these data suggest that PKCθ plays a critical role in the co-stimulatory functions of CD43 in human T cells

  8. Activity driven fluctuations in living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, É; Gov, N S; Visco, P; Weitz, D A; van Wijland, F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  9. NK-cell activity in immunotoxicity drug evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NK-cell activity as a tool for detection of immunotoxic effects of new human drugs has gained further attention when the recent European note for guidance CPMP/SWP/1042/99 was adopted. The inclusion of NK-cell activity plus distribution of lymphocyte subsets were suggested as an alternative to the primary antibody response to a T-cell dependent antigen. Either of the two test alternatives should be included as a routine parameter in at least one repeated dose-toxicity study, rats or mice being the species of choice. The standard procedure for measuring NK-cell activity is the 51Cr-release assay. However, a new flow-cytometric assay, adapted for rat peripheral blood, does not require dedicated groups of animals, offers the possibility of repeated testing, and shows at least as sensitive as the conventional 51Cr-release assay

  10. Measuring enzyme activity in single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovarik, Michelle L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Seemingly identical cells can differ in their biochemical state, function and fate, and this variability plays an increasingly recognized role in organism-level outcomes. Cellular heterogeneity arises in part from variation in enzyme activity, which results from interplay between biological noise and multiple cellular processes. As a result, single-cell assays of enzyme activity, particularly those that measure product formation directly, are crucial. Recent innovations have yielded a range o...

  11. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  12. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (Nampt is required for de novo lipogenesis in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Bowlby

    Full Text Available Tumor cells have increased metabolic requirements to maintain rapid growth. In particular, a highly lipogenic phenotype is a hallmark of many tumor types, including prostate. Cancer cells also have increased turnover of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+, a coenzyme involved in multiple metabolic pathways. However, a specific role for NAD(+ in tumor cell lipogenesis has yet to be described. Our studies demonstrate a novel role for the NAD(+-biosynthetic enzyme Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt in maintaining de novo lipogenesis in prostate cancer (PCa cells. Inhibition of Nampt reduces fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis. In particular, short chain saturated fatty acids and the phosphatidylcholine (PC lipids into which these fatty acids are incorporated were specifically reduced by Nampt inhibition. Nampt blockade resulted in reduced ATP levels and concomitant activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC. In spite of this, pharmacological inhibition of AMPK was not sufficient to fully restore fatty acid synthesis. Rather, Nampt blockade also induced protein hyperacetylation in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, which correlated with the observed decreases in lipid synthesis. Moreover, the sirtuin inhibitor Sirtinol, and the simultaneous knockdown of SIRT1 and SIRT3, phenocopied the effects of Nampt inhibition on fatty acid synthesis. Altogether, these data reveal a novel role for Nampt in the regulation of de novo lipogenesis through the modulation of sirtuin activity in PCa cells.

  13. AKT induces erythroid-cell maturation of JAK2-deficient fetal liver progenitor cells and is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Saghi; Kitidis, Claire; Zhao, Wei; Marinkovic, Dragan; Fleming, Mark D; Luo, Biao; Marszalek, Joseph; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-01

    AKT serine threonine kinase of the protein kinase B (PKB) family plays essential roles in cell survival, growth, metabolism, and differentiation. In the erythroid system, AKT is known to be rapidly phosphorylated and activated in response to erythropoietin (Epo) engagement of Epo receptor (EpoR) and to sustain survival signals in cultured erythroid cells. Here we demonstrate that activated AKT complements EpoR signaling and supports erythroid-cell differentiation in wild-type and JAK2-deficient fetal liver cells. We show that erythroid maturation of AKT-transduced cells is not solely dependent on AKT-induced cell survival or proliferation signals, suggesting that AKT transduces also a differentiation-specific signal downstream of EpoR in erythroid cells. Down-regulation of expression of AKT kinase by RNA interference, or AKT activity by expression of dominant negative forms, inhibits significantly fetal liver-derived erythroid-cell colony formation and gene expression, demonstrating that AKT is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell maturation.

  14. Lipolytic activity in adipocyte cell fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschry, Y; Shapiro, B

    1980-05-28

    Adipocytes release only negligible amounts of free fatty acids unless stimulated, but reveal considerable lipolytic activity when homogenized. Epinephrine treatment of the cells caused only a 20-40% increase in the activity of infranatants of homogenates while raising the activity associated with the fat layer up to 10-fold. Full activity (i.e. that of intact-activated cells) could be revealed by epinephrine treatment of the homogenate as well as by sonication of the fat layer in buffer. The combination of both treatments did not yield higher activities. The fat cake contains the bulk of the potential activities which are only realized when dispersed in the aqueous phase by sonication, or upon hormone activation of the whole homogenate. Increase in activity could also be obtained by removal of most of the lipid from the fat layer by extraction with petroleum ether. Re-introduction of extracted lipid inhibited lipolysis. The active enzyme could be separated by flotation at 1.12 specific gravity. The data suggest that the lack of activity in the intact non-stimulated cell may be due to the lack of availability of the aqueous phase to the enzyme. PMID:7378439

  15. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  16. ATM Kinase Is Required for Telomere Elongation in Mouse and Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Suyong Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence, and apoptosis, thus maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase-specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease.

  17. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  18. Asymmetric Receptor Contact is Required for Tyrosine Autophosphorylation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor in Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, J.; Boggon, T; Tomé, F; Mandiyan, V; Lax, I; Schlessinge, J

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in regulation of kinase activity and in recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Autophosphorylation is mediated by a sequential and precisely ordered intermolecular (trans) reaction. In this report we present structural and biochemical experiments demonstrating that formation of an asymmetric dimer between activated FGFR1 kinase domains is required for transphosphorylation of FGFR1 in FGF-stimulated cells. Transphosphorylation is mediated by specific asymmetric contacts between the N-lobe of one kinase molecule, which serves as an active enzyme, and specific docking sites on the C-lobe of a second kinase molecule, which serves a substrate. Pathological loss-of-function mutations or oncogenic activating mutations in this interface may hinder or facilitate asymmetric dimer formation and transphosphorylation, respectively. The experiments presented in this report provide the molecular basis underlying the control of transphosphorylation of FGF receptors and other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  19. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    Segah Altuntaş; Muhammed Ali Kara; Deniz Selin Aksoy; Zehra Dilşad Çoban; Şefik Güran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications hav...

  20. Transparent electrode requirements for thin film solar cell modules

    KAUST Repository

    Rowell, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The transparent conductor (TC) layer in thin film solar cell modules has a significant impact on the power conversion efficiency. Reflection, absorption, resistive losses and lost active area either from the scribed interconnect region in monolithically integrated modules or from the shadow losses of a metal grid in standard modules typically reduce the efficiency by 10-25%. Here, we perform calculations to show that a competitive TC must have a transparency of at least 90% at a sheet resistance of less than 10 Ω/sq (conductivity/absorptivity ≥ 1 Ω -1) for monolithically integrated modules. For standard modules, losses are much lower and the performance of alternative lower cost TC materials may already be sufficient to replace conducting oxides in this geometry. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Haemolysis induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus requires P2X receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne Gerberg; Leipziger, Jens Georg; Prætorius, Helle

    2011-01-01

    -forming bacterial toxins. In this context, it is essential to know whether this is specific to HlyA-induced cell damage or if other bacterial pore-forming toxins involve purinergic signals to orchestrate haemolysis. Here, we investigate if the haemolysis produced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus involves P2...... receptor activation. We observed that α-toxin-induced haemolysis is completely blocked by the unselective P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Moreover, several selective blockers of P2X1 and P2X7 ionotropic receptors abolished haemolysis in murine and equine...... erythrocytes. Inhibitors of pannexin channels partially reduced the α-toxin induced lysis. Thus, we conclude that α-toxin, similar to HlyA from E. coli produces cell damage by specific activation of a purinergic signalling cascade. These data indicate that pore-forming toxins in general require purinergic...

  2. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle;

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle......-dependent changes in the capacity for conductive Cl- transport. It is suggested that in ELA cells, entrance into the S phase requires an increase in VRAC activity and/or an increased potential for regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and at the same time a decrease in CaCC magnitude....

  3. The invisible addiction: Cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, James A; PETNJI YAYA, LUC HONORE; MANOLIS, CHRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The primary objective of the present study was to investigate which cell-phone activities are associated with cell-phone addiction. No research to date has studied the full-range of cell-phone activities, and their relationship to cell-phone addiction, across male and female cell-phone users. Methods: College undergraduates (N = 164) participated in an online survey. Participants completed the questionnaire as part of their class requirements. The questionnaire took 10 an...

  4. The Protrusive Phase and Full Development of Integrin-Dependent Adhesions in Colon Epithelial Cells Require FAK- and ERKMediated Actin Spike Formation: Deregulation in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie G. Brunton

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins play an important role in tumour progression by influencing cellular responses and matrix-dependent adhesion. However, the regulation of matrix-dependent adhesion assembly in epithelial cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the integrin and signalling requirements of cell-matrix adhesion assembly in colon carcinoma cells after plating on fibronectin. Adhesion assembly in these, and in the adenoma cells from which they were derived, was largely dependent on αvβ6 integrin and required phosphorylation of FAK on tyrosine-397. The rate of fibronectin-induced adhesion assembly and the expression of both αvβ6 integrin and FAK were increased during the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition. The matrix-dependent adhesion assembly process, particularly the final stages of complex protrusion that is required for optimal cell spreading, required the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. Furthermore, phosphorylated ERK was targeted to newly forming cell-matrix adhesions in the carcinoma cells but not the adenoma cells, and inhibition of FAK-tyrosine-397 phosphorylation or MEK suppressed the appearance of phosphorylated ERK at peripheral sites. In addition, inhibition of MEK-ERK activation blocked the formation of peripheral actin microspikes that were necessary for the protrusive phase of cell-matrix adhesion assembly. Thus, MEK-ERK-dependent peripheral actin re-organization is required for the full development of integrin-induced adhesions and this pathway is stimulated in an in vitro model of colon cancer progression.

  5. 20 CFR 655.1302 - Required pre-filing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Temporary Employment Certification must maintain documentation of its advertising and recruitment efforts as... satisfy all the requirements for newspaper advertisements contained in § 655.103 and comply with the requirements for agricultural clearance orders in 20 CFR part 653 Subpart F and the requirements set forth...

  6. ROS-Induced JNK and p38 Signaling Is Required for Unpaired Cytokine Activation during Drosophila Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Santabárbara-Ruiz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Upon apoptotic stimuli, epithelial cells compensate the gaps left by dead cells by activating proliferation. This has led to the proposal that dying cells signal to surrounding living cells to maintain homeostasis. Although the nature of these signals is not clear, reactive oxygen species (ROS could act as a signaling mechanism as they can trigger pro-inflammatory responses to protect epithelia from environmental insults. Whether ROS emerge from dead cells and what is the genetic response triggered by ROS is pivotal to understand regeneration of Drosophila imaginal discs. We genetically induced cell death in wing imaginal discs, monitored the production of ROS and analyzed the signals required for repair. We found that cell death generates a burst of ROS that propagate to the nearby surviving cells. Propagated ROS activate p38 and induce tolerable levels of JNK. The activation of JNK and p38 results in the expression of the cytokines Unpaired (Upd, which triggers the JAK/STAT signaling pathway required for regeneration. Our findings demonstrate that this ROS/JNK/p38/Upd stress responsive module restores tissue homeostasis. This module is not only activated after cell death induction but also after physical damage and reveals one of the earliest responses for imaginal disc regeneration.

  7. ROS-Induced JNK and p38 Signaling Is Required for Unpaired Cytokine Activation during Drosophila Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabárbara-Ruiz, Paula; López-Santillán, Mireya; Martínez-Rodríguez, Irene; Binagui-Casas, Anahí; Pérez, Lídia; Milán, Marco; Corominas, Montserrat; Serras, Florenci

    2015-10-01

    Upon apoptotic stimuli, epithelial cells compensate the gaps left by dead cells by activating proliferation. This has led to the proposal that dying cells signal to surrounding living cells to maintain homeostasis. Although the nature of these signals is not clear, reactive oxygen species (ROS) could act as a signaling mechanism as they can trigger pro-inflammatory responses to protect epithelia from environmental insults. Whether ROS emerge from dead cells and what is the genetic response triggered by ROS is pivotal to understand regeneration of Drosophila imaginal discs. We genetically induced cell death in wing imaginal discs, monitored the production of ROS and analyzed the signals required for repair. We found that cell death generates a burst of ROS that propagate to the nearby surviving cells. Propagated ROS activate p38 and induce tolerable levels of JNK. The activation of JNK and p38 results in the expression of the cytokines Unpaired (Upd), which triggers the JAK/STAT signaling pathway required for regeneration. Our findings demonstrate that this ROS/JNK/p38/Upd stress responsive module restores tissue homeostasis. This module is not only activated after cell death induction but also after physical damage and reveals one of the earliest responses for imaginal disc regeneration.

  8. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  9. The CXXC finger 5 protein is required for DNA damage-induced p53 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical component of the DNA damage response pathway that induces a set of genes responsible for cell cycle arrest,senescence,apoptosis,and DNA repair.The ataxia te-langiectasia mutated protein kinase(ATM) responds to DNA-damage stimuli and signals p53 stabiliza-tion and activation,thereby facilitating transactivation of p53 inducible genes and maintainence of genome integrity.In this study,we identified a CXXC zinc finger domain containing protein termed CF5 as a critical component in the DNA damage signaling pathway.CF5 induces p53 transcriptional activity and apoptosis in cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53-deficient cells.Knockdown of CF5 in-hibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation as well as cell cycle arrest.Furthermore,CF5 physically interacts with ATM and is required for DNA damage-induced ATM phosphorylation but not its recruitment to chromatin.These findings suggest that CF5 plays a crucial role in ATM-p53 signaling in response to DNA damage.

  10. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.

  11. Fcγ receptor IIb strongly regulates Fcγ receptor-facilitated T cell activation by dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Montfoort (Nadine); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); S.M. Mangsbo (Sara); M. Camps (Marcel); P. Boross (Peter); C.J.M. Melief (Cornelis); F. Ossendorp (Ferry); J.S. Verbeek (Sjef)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFcγR ligation by Ag-Ab immune complexes (IC) not only mediates effective Ag uptake, but also strongly initiates dendritic cell (DC) maturation, a requirement for effective T cell activation. Besides the activating FcγRI, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV, the inhibitory FcγRIIb is expressed on DCs. It

  12. Requirement of cell nucleus for Sindbis virus replication in cultured Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, C; Brown, D T

    1983-02-01

    The ability of Sindbis virus to grow in enucleated BHK-21 (vertebrate) and Aedes albopictus (invertebrate) cells was tested to determine the dependence of this virus upon nuclear function in these two phylogenetically unrelated hosts. Although both cell types could be demonstrated to produce viable cytoplasts (enucleated cells) which produced virus-specific antigen subsequent to infection. BHK cytoplasts produced a significant number of progeny virions, whereas mosquito cytoplasts did not. The production of vesicular stomatitis virus in mosquito cells was not significantly reduced by enucleation. That such a host function was not essential for vesicular stomatitis virus growth in insect cells is supported by the observation that the production of this virus by mosquito cells is not actinomycin D sensitive. This result agrees with a previously published report in which it was shown that Sindbis virus maturation in invertebrate cells is inhibited by actinomycin D, indicating a possible requirement for host cell nuclear function (Scheefers-Borchel et al., Virology, 110:292-301, 1981).

  13. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Previous studies done in Havana showed values of physical activity level (PAL) which are lower than the reported for elderly subjects. Elderly people living in rural areas use to have physical activity levels which differ from the observed in urban areas. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 40 apparently healthy people older than 60 years of age living in a rural mountain community will be submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary, anthropometric and insulin resistance study. Physical activity will be determined by questionnaire and by the calculation of the PAL from the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) measured with the doubly-labelled water method (DLW). Associations with the prevalence of insulin resistance and obesity will be assessed. (author)

  14. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1. 77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11% and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW-method The value of 1.51 x BMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated. (author)

  15. ACE2 is required for daughter cell-specific G1 delay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Laabs, Tracy L.; Markwardt, David D.; Slattery, Matthew G.; Newcomb, Laura L.; Stillman, David J.; Heideman, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reproduce by budding to yield a mother cell and a smaller daughter cell. Although both mother and daughter begin G1 simultaneously, the mother cell progresses through G1 more rapidly. Daughter cell G1 delay has long been thought to be due to a requirement for attaining a certain critical cell size before passing the commitment point in the cell cycle known as START. We present an alternative model in which the daughter cell-specific Ace2 ...

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation mediates Ginseng Rg3-induced anti-gallbladder cancer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keren; Li, Ning; Sun, Huaqin; Xu, Tao; Jin, Fa; Nie, Jifeng

    2015-10-23

    In the current study, we examined the potential effect of Ginsenoside Rg3 against gallbladder cancer cells, the underlying signaling mechanisms were also studied. We demonstrated that Rg3 exerted potent cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activity against established and primary human gallbladder cancer cells. Yet it was safe to non-cancerous gallbladder epithelial cells. At the molecular level, we showed that Rg3 induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activation, the latter was evidenced by C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) upregulation, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1)/PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylations, and caspase-12 activation in gallbladder cancer cells. Reversely, the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal, the caspase-12 inhibitor z-ATAD-fmk as well as CHOP shRNA knockdown significantly attenuated Rg3-induced cytotoxicity against gallbladder cancer cells. In vivo, we showed that Rg3 oral administration significantly inhibited GBC-SD gallbladder cancer xenograft growth in nude mice, its activity was, however, compromised with co-administration of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal. Thus, we suggest that ER stress activation mediates Ginseng Rg3-induced anti-gallbladder cancer cell activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26361144

  17. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  18. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  19. Entangled active matter: From cells to ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D. L.; Phonekeo, S.; Altshuler, E.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2016-07-01

    Both cells and ants belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. However cells and ants differ from fish and birds in that they can support static loads. This is because cells and ants can be entangled, so that individual units are bound by transient links. Entanglement gives cells and ants a set of remarkable properties usually not found together, such as the ability to flow like a fluid, spring back like an elastic solid, and self-heal. In this review, we present the biology, mechanics and dynamics of both entangled cells and ants. We apply concepts from soft matter physics and wetting to characterize these systems as well as to point out their differences, which arise from their differences in size. We hope that our viewpoints will spur further investigations into cells and ants as active materials, and inspire the fabrication of synthetic active matter.

  20. Long-term T cell memory requires the surface expression of self-peptide/major histocompatibility complex molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Markiewicz, Mary A.; Girao, Cristina; Opferman, Joseph T.; Sun, Jiling; Hu, Qinghui; Agulnik, Alexander A.; Bishop, Colin E.; Thompson, Craig B.; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    How memory T cells are maintained in vivo is poorly understood. To address this problem, a male-specific peptide (H-Y) was identified and used to activate female anti-H-Y T cells in vitro. Anti-H-Y T cells survived in vivo for at least 70 days in the absence of antigen. This persistence was not because of the intrinsic ability of memory T cells to survive in vivo. Instead, the survival and function of adoptively transferred memory cells was found to require transporter of antigen protein 1-de...

  1. Memory CD8(+) T Cells Require Increased Concentrations of Acetate Induced by Stress for Optimal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Maria L; Ma, Eric H; Bantug, Glenn R; Grählert, Jasmin; Pfister, Simona; Glatter, Timo; Jauch, Annaïse; Dimeloe, Sarah; Slack, Emma; Dehio, Philippe; Krzyzaniak, Magdalena A; King, Carolyn G; Burgener, Anne-Valérie; Fischer, Marco; Develioglu, Leyla; Belle, Réka; Recher, Mike; Bonilla, Weldy V; Macpherson, Andrew J; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Jones, Russell G; Hess, Christoph

    2016-06-21

    How systemic metabolic alterations during acute infections impact immune cell function remains poorly understood. We found that acetate accumulates in the serum within hours of systemic bacterial infections and that these increased acetate concentrations are required for optimal memory CD8(+) T cell function in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, upon uptake by memory CD8(+) T cells, stress levels of acetate expanded the cellular acetyl-coenzyme A pool via ATP citrate lyase and promoted acetylation of the enzyme GAPDH. This context-dependent post-translational modification enhanced GAPDH activity, catalyzing glycolysis and thus boosting rapid memory CD8(+) T cell responses. Accordingly, in a murine Listeria monocytogenes model, transfer of acetate-augmented memory CD8(+) T cells exerted superior immune control compared to control cells. Our results demonstrate that increased systemic acetate concentrations are functionally integrated by CD8(+) T cells and translate into increased glycolytic and functional capacity. The immune system thus directly relates systemic metabolism with immune alertness. PMID:27212436

  2. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  3. GlnB is specifically required for Azospirillum brasilense NifA activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Luiza M; Monteiro, Rose A; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Rigo, Liu U; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2004-01-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense transcription regulator NifA and the nitrogen-status signaling proteins GlnB, GlnZ and GlnK were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed for their ability to activate nif gene expression. When expressed separately, none of the proteins were able to activate nifH promoter expression in any tested conditions; in contrast, nifH expression was observed in cells grown in the absence of ammonium and oxygen and when expressing simultaneously NifA and GlnB proteins, but not when expressing NifA and GlnZ or GlnK. Our results show that the GlnB protein is required for transcription activation by Azospirillum brasilense NifA and it cannot be replaced by GlnZ or GlnK.

  4. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  5. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  6. Identification of Two Tyrosine Residues Required for the Intramolecular Mechanism Implicated in GIT1 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Totaro; Veronica Astro; Diletta Tonoli; Ivan de Curtis

    2014-01-01

    GIT1 is an ArfGAP and scaffolding protein regulating cell adhesion and migration. The multidomain structure of GIT1 allows the interaction with several partners. Binding of GIT1 to some of its partners requires activation of the GIT1 polypeptide. Our previous studies indicated that binding of paxillin to GIT1 is enhanced by release of an intramolecular interaction between the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal portions that keeps the protein in a binding-incompetent state. Here we have addre...

  7. Transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase-2 by tumor suppressor p53 requires nuclear factor-kappaB

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit, Valérie; Moraes, E.; Dar, N A; Taranchon, E.; Bours, Vincent; Hautefeuille, A.; Taniere, P; Chariot, Alain; Scoazec, J Y; Gallo, C. V. D.; Merville, Marie-Paule; Hainaut, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-dama...

  8. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  9. Large stationary fuel cell systems: Status and dynamic requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    Molten carbonate fuel cell demonstrations to-date, have been able to show the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies (>50%) of any stand-alone fuel cell type. The primary developer of this type of fuel cell in United States is Fuel Cell Energy Corporation (FCE), the developer and manufacturer of the Direct FuelCell ™ concept. FCE and MTU CFC Solutions in Germany, a licensee of FCE have demonstrated carbonate fuel cells from 10 kW to 2 MW of electrical output on a variety of fuels. IHI in Japan are also developing carbonate fuel cells for stationary power and have recently successfully demonstrated the technology in Kawagoe, Japan. In Italy, Ansaldo fuel cell have demonstrated a 100 kW carbonate fuel cell in Milan. In Korea, the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy has committed to install 300 fuel cell units, sized 250 kW to 1 MW, for distributed power generation by 2012. Carbonate fuel cell technology is more fuel flexible than lower temperature fuel cell technologies and is well suited for on-site stationary CHP applications as well as to marine, military, and traction applications. The present paper gives an overview about the commercialisation efforts for the molten carbonate fuel cell technology.

  10. Transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase-2 by tumor suppressor p53 requires nuclear factor-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, V; de Moraes, E; Dar, N A; Taranchon, E; Bours, V; Hautefeuille, A; Tanière, P; Chariot, A; Scoazec, J-Y; de Moura Gallo, C V; Merville, M-P; Hainaut, P

    2006-09-21

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-damaging agent. Pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 enhanced apoptosis in response to daunomycin, in particular in cells containing active p53. In esophageal cancer, there was a correlation between Cox-2 expression and wild-type TP53 in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and in adenocarcinoma, but not in squamous cell carcinoma (P<0.01). These results suggest that p53 and NF-kappaB cooperate in upregulating Cox-2 expression, promoting cell survival in inflammatory precursor lesions such as BE. PMID:16682957

  11. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology.

  12. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  13. A single tyrosine of the interleukin-9 (IL-9) receptor is required for STAT activation, antiapoptotic activity, and growth regulation by IL-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, J B; Uyttenhove, C; Van Roost, E; DeLestré, B; Donckers, D; Van Snick, J; Renauld, J C

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9), a T-cell-derived cytokine, interacts with a specific receptor associated with the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. In this report, we analyze the functional domains of the human IL-9 receptor transfected into mouse lymphoid cell lines. Three different functions were examined: growth stimulation in factor-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells, protection against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, and Ly-6A2 induction in BW5147 lymphoma cells. The results indicated that a single tyrosine, at position 116 in the cytoplasmic domain, was required for all three activities. In addition, we observed that human IL-9 reduced the proliferation rate of transfected BW5147 cells, an effect also dependent on the same tyrosine. This amino acid was necessary for IL-9-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and for STAT activation but not for IRS-2/4PS activation or for JAK1 phosphorylation, which depended on a domain closer to the plasma membrane. We also showed that JAK1 was constitutively associated with the IL-9 receptor. Activated STAT complexes induced by IL-9 were found to contain STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 transcription factors. Moreover, sequence homologies between human IL-9 receptor tyrosine 116 and tyrosines (of other receptors activating STAT3 and STAT5 were observed. Taken together, these data indicate that a single tyrosine of the IL-9 receptor, required for activation of three different STAT proteins, is necessary for distinct activities of this cytokine, including proliferative responses.

  14. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  15. Initial activation of EpCAM cleavage via cell-to-cell contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently over-expressed in simple epithelia, progenitors, embryonic and tissue stem cells, carcinoma and cancer-initiating cells. Besides functioning as a homophilic adhesion protein, EpCAM is an oncogenic receptor that requires regulated intramembrane proteolysis for activation of its signal transduction capacity. Upon cleavage, the extracellular domain EpEX is released as a soluble ligand while the intracellular domain EpICD translocates into the cytoplasm and eventually into the nucleus in combination with four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 2 (FHL2) and β-catenin, and drives cell proliferation. EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were investigated under varying density conditions using confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, cell counting, and conditional cell systems. EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were dependent on adequate cell-to-cell contact. If cell-to-cell contact was prohibited EpCAM did not provide growth advantages. If cells were allowed to undergo contact to each other, EpCAM transmitted proliferation signals based on signal transduction-related cleavage processes. Accordingly, the pre-cleaved version EpICD was not dependent on cell-to-cell contact in order to induce c-myc and cell proliferation, but necessitated nuclear translocation. For the case of contact-inhibited cells, although cleavage of EpCAM occurred, nuclear translocation of EpICD was reduced, as were EpCAM effects. Activation of EpCAM's cleavage and oncogenic capacity is dependent on cellular interaction (juxtacrine) to provide for initial signals of regulated intramembrane proteolysis, which then support signalling via soluble EpEX (paracrine)

  16. Appressorium formation in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis requires a G2 cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Sónia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2015-01-01

    Many of the most important plant diseases are caused by fungal pathogens that form specialized cell structures to breach the leaf surface as well as to proliferate inside the plant. To initiate pathogenic development, the fungus responds to a set of inductive cues. Some of them are of extracellular nature (environmental signals) while others respond to intracellular conditions (developmental signals). These signals have to be integrated into a single response that has as a major outcome changes in the morphogenesis of the fungus. The cell cycle regulation is pivotal during these cellular differentiations, and we hypothesized that cell cycle regulation would be likely to provide control points for infection development by fungal pathogens. Although efforts have been done in various fungal systems, there is still limited information available regarding the relationship of these processes with the induction of the virulence programs. Hence, the role of fungal cell cycle regulators -which are wide conserved elements- as true virulence factors, has yet to be defined. Here we discuss the recent finding that the formation of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis seems to be incompatible with an active cell cycle and, therefore genetic circuits evolved in this fungus to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on plant surface, before the appressorium-mediated penetration into the plant tissue.

  17. Intracellular disassembly and activity of pertussis toxin require interaction with ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Roger D; Scanlon, Karen M; Taylor, Michael; Teter, Ken; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    The active subunit (S1) of pertussis toxin (PT), a major virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis, ADP-ribosylates Gi proteins in the mammalian cell cytosol to inhibit GPCR signaling. The intracellular pathway of PT includes endocytosis and retrograde transport to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Subsequent translocation of S1 to the cytosol is presumably preceded by dissociation from the holotoxin. In vitro, such dissociation is stimulated by interaction of PT with ATP. To investigate the role of this interaction in cellular events, we engineered a form of PT (PTDM) with changes to two amino acids involved in the interaction with ATP. PTDM was reduced in (1) binding to ATP, (2) dissociability by interaction with ATP, (3) in vitro enzymatic activity and (4) cellular ADP-ribosylation activity. In cells treated with PTDM carrying target sequences for organelle-specific modifications, normal transport to the TGN and ER occurred, but N-glycosylation patterns of the S1 and S4 subunits were consistent with an inability of PTDM to dissociate in the ER. These results indicate a requirement for interaction with ATP for PT dissociation in the ER and cellular activity. They also indicate that the retrograde transport route is the cellular intoxication pathway for PT.

  18. Efficient expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PGK gene depends on an upstream activation sequence but does not require TATA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogden, J E; Stanway, C; Kim, S.; Mellor, J; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1986-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PGK (phosphoglycerate kinase) gene encodes one of the most abundant mRNA and protein species in the cell. To identify the promoter sequences required for the efficient expression of PGK, we undertook a detailed internal deletion analysis of the 5' noncoding region of the gene. Our analysis revealed that PGK has an upstream activation sequence (UASPGK) located between 402 and 479 nucleotides upstream from the initiating ATG sequence which is required for full trans...

  19. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection. PMID:26105052

  20. C. elegans nucleostemin is required for larval growth and germline stem cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Kudron

    Full Text Available The nucleolus has shown to be integral for many processes related to cell growth and proliferation. Stem cells in particular are likely to depend upon nucleolus-based processes to remain in a proliferative state. A highly conserved nucleolar factor named nucleostemin is proposed to be a critical link between nucleolar function and stem-cell-specific processes. Currently, it is unclear whether nucleostemin modulates proliferation by affecting ribosome biogenesis or by another nucleolus-based activity that is specific to stem cells and/or highly proliferating cells. Here, we investigate nucleostemin (nst-1 in the nematode C. elegans, which enables us to examine nst-1 function during both proliferation and differentiation in vivo. Like mammalian nucleostemin, the NST-1 protein is localized to the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm; however, its expression is found in both differentiated and proliferating cells. Global loss of C. elegans nucleostemin (nst-1 leads to a larval arrest phenotype due to a growth defect in the soma, while loss of nst-1 specifically in the germ line causes germline stem cells to undergo a cell cycle arrest. nst-1 mutants exhibit reduced levels of rRNAs, suggesting defects in ribosome biogenesis. However, NST-1 is generally not present in regions of the nucleolus where rRNA transcription and processing occurs, so this reduction is likely secondary to a different defect in ribosome biogenesis. Transgenic studies indicate that NST-1 requires its N-terminal domain for stable expression and both its G1 GTPase and intermediate domains for proper germ line function. Our data support a role for C. elegans nucleostemin in cell growth and proliferation by promoting ribosome biogenesis.

  1. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear fusion requires prior activation by alpha factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, M D; Price, B R; Fink, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for efficient fusion of spheroplasts of the same mating type. Nuclear fusion in this whole-cell system is also efficient and closely parallels nuclear fusion in heterosexual mating of intact cells. In the spheroplast fusion system, nuclear fusion is dependent on both the KAR1 gene and prior exposure to alpha factor. The major products of nuclear fusion in the spheroplast fusion assay were true diploids that were homozygous at the mating-type locus. An additional 1...

  3. Cell-intrinsic in vivo requirement for the E47-p21 pathway in long-term hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Patricia M; Ding, Ying; Borghesi, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Major regulators of long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) self-renewal and proliferation have been identified, but knowledge of their in vivo interaction in a linear pathway is lacking. In this study, we show a direct genetic link between the transcription factor E47 and the major cell cycle regulator p21 in controlling LT-HSC integrity in vivo under repopulation stress. Numerous studies have shown that E47 activates p21 transcription in hematopoietic subsets in vitro, and we now reveal the in vivo relevance of the E47-p21 pathway by reducing the gene dose of each factor individually (E47(het) or p21(het)) versus in tandem (E47(het)p21(het)). E47(het)p21(het) LT-HSCs and downstream short-term hematopoietic stem cells exhibit hyperproliferation and preferential susceptibility to mitotoxin compared to wild-type or single haploinsufficient controls. In serial adoptive transfers that rigorously challenge self-renewal, E47(het)p21(het) LT-HSCs dramatically and progressively decline, indicating the importance of cell-intrinsic E47-p21 in preserving LT-HSCs under stress. Transient numeric recovery of downstream short-term hematopoietic stem cells enabled the production of functionally competent myeloid but not lymphoid cells, as common lymphoid progenitors were decreased, and peripheral lymphocytes were virtually ablated. Thus, we demonstrate a developmental compartment-specific and lineage-specific requirement for the E47-p21 pathway in maintaining LT-HSCs, B cells, and T cells under hematopoietic repopulation stress in vivo.

  4. The Wnt receptor, Lrp5, is expressed by mouse mammary stem cells and is required to maintain the basal lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha M Badders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ectopic Wnt signaling induces increased stem/progenitor cell activity in the mouse mammary gland, followed by tumor development. The Wnt signaling receptors, Lrp5/6, are uniquely required for canonical Wnt activity. Previous data has shown that the absence of Lrp5 confers resistance to Wnt1-induced tumor development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that all basal mammary cells express Lrp5, and co-express Lrp6 in a similar fashion. Though Wnt dependent transcription of key target genes is relatively unchanged in mammary epithelial cell cultures, the absence of Lrp5 specifically depletes adult regenerative stem cell activity (to less than 1%. Stem cell activity can be enriched by >200 fold (over 80% of activity, based on high Lrp5 expression alone. Though Lrp5 null glands have apparent normal function, the basal lineage is relatively reduced (from 42% basal/total epithelial cells to 22% and Lrp5-/- mammary epithelial cells show enhanced expression of senescence-associated markers in vitro, as measured by expression of p16(Ink4a and TA-p63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first single biomarker that has been demonstrated to be functionally involved in stem cell maintenance. Together, these results demonstrate that Wnt signaling through Lrp5 is an important component of normal mammary stem cell function.

  5. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-09-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration.

  6. Understanding the structural requirements for activators of the Kef bacterial potassium efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Jessica; Ekkerman, Silvia; Pliotas, Christos; Richard, Morgiane; Bartlett, Wendy; Grayer, Samuel C; Morris, Garrett M; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Conway, Stuart J; Rasmussen, Tim

    2014-04-01

    The potassium efflux system, Kef, protects bacteria against the detrimental effects of electrophilic compounds via acidification of the cytoplasm. Kef is inhibited by glutathione (GSH) but activated by glutathione-S-conjugates (GS-X) formed in the presence of electrophiles. GSH and GS-X bind to overlapping sites on Kef, which are located in a cytosolic regulatory domain. The central paradox of this activation mechanism is that GSH is abundant in cells (at concentrations of ∼10-20 mM), and thus, activating ligands must possess a high differential over GSH in their affinity for Kef. To investigate the structural requirements for binding of a ligand to Kef, a novel fluorescent reporter ligand, S-{[5-(dimethylamino)naphthalen-1-yl]sulfonylaminopropyl} glutathione (DNGSH), was synthesized. By competition assays using DNGSH, complemented by direct binding assays and thermal shift measurements, we show that the well-characterized Kef activator, N-ethylsuccinimido-S-glutathione, has a 10-20-fold higher affinity for Kef than GSH. In contrast, another native ligand that is a poor activator, S-lactoylglutathione, exhibits a similar Kef affinity to GSH. Synthetic ligands were synthesized to contain either rigid or flexible structures and investigated as ligands for Kef. Compounds with rigid structures and high affinity activated Kef. In contrast, flexible ligands with similar binding affinities did not activate Kef. These data provide insight into the structural requirements for Kef gating, paving the way for the development of a screen for potential therapeutic lead compounds targeting the Kef system. PMID:24601535

  7. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  8. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  9. Temporal and Spatial Requirement of EMF1 Activity for Arabidopsis Vegetative and Reproductive Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosario Sánchez; Minjung Y.Kim; Myriam Calonje; Yong-Hwan Moon; Z.Renee Sung

    2009-01-01

    EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF) genes are required to maintain vegetative development via repression of flower homeotic genes in Arabidopsis.Removal of EMF gene function caused plants to flower upon germination,producing abnormal and sterile flowers.The pleiotropic effect of emf1 mutation suggests its requirement for gene programs involved in diverse developmental processes.Transgenic plants harboring EMF1 promoter::glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were generated to investigate the temporal and spatial expression pattern of EMF1.These plants displayed differential GUS activity in vegetative and flower tissues,consistent with the role of EMF1 in regulating multiple gene programs.EMF1::GUS expression pattern in emf mutants suggests organ-specific auto-regulation.Sense- and antisense (as) EMF1 cDNA were expressed under the control of stage- and tissue-specific promoters in transgenic plants.Characterization of these transgenic plants showed that EMF1 activity is required in meristematic as well as differentiating tissues to rescue emf mutant phenotype.Temporal removal or reduction of EMF1 activity in the embryo or shoot apex of wild-type seedlings was sufficient to cause early flowering and terminal flower formation in adult plants.Such reproductive cell memory is reflected in the flower MADS-box gene activity expressed prior to flowering in these early flowering plants.However,temporal removal of EMF1 activity in flower meristem did not affect flower development.Our results are consistent with EMF1's primary role in repressing flowering in order to allow for vegetative growth.

  10. 10 CFR 490.507 - Credit activity reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 490.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM... person or fleet applying for allocation of alternative fueled vehicle credits must submit a credit... acquired in model years before the first model year the fleet or covered person is required to...

  11. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Xuemei Xu; Yong Liu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  12. Rab24 is required for normal cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Rodrigo D; Munafó, Daniela B; Berón, Walter; López, Luis A; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Colombo, María I

    2013-05-01

    Rab24 is an atypical member of the Rab GTPase family whose distribution in interphase cells has been characterized; however, its function remains largely unknown. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution of Rab24 throughout cell division. We have observed that Rab24 was located at the mitotic spindle in metaphase, at the midbody during telophase and in the furrow during cytokinesis. We have also observed partial co-localization of Rab24 and tubulin and demonstrated its association to microtubules. Interestingly, more than 90% of transiently transfected HeLa cells with Rab24 presented abnormal nuclear connections (i.e., chromatin bridges). Furthermore, in CHO cells stably transfected with GFP-Rab24wt, we observed a large percentage of binucleated and multinucleated cells. In addition, these cells presented an extremely large size and multiple failures in mitosis, as aberrant spindle formation (metaphase), delayed chromosomes (telophase) and multiple cytokinesis. A marked increase in binucleated, multinucleated and multilobulated nucleus formation was observed in HeLa cells depleted of Rab24. We also present evidence that a fraction of Rab24 associates with microtubules. In addition, Rab24 knock down resulted in misalignment of chromosomes and abnormal spindle formation in metaphase leading to the appearance of delayed chromosomes during late telophase and failures in cytokinesis. Our findings suggest that an adequate level of Rab24 is necessary for normal cell division. In summary, Rab24 modulates several mitotic events, including chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, perhaps through the interaction with microtubules. PMID:23387408

  13. Renin secretion from permeabilized juxtaglomerular cells requires a permeant cation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Ellekvist, Peter; Skøtt, O

    1999-01-01

    The cytosolic concentration of chloride correlates directly with renin secretion from renal juxtaglomerular granular (JG) cells. In the present study, the mechanism by which chloride stimulates renin release was investigated in a preparation of permeabilized rat glomeruli with attached JG cells. ...

  14. Stearoyl CoA Desaturase Is Required to Produce Active, Lipid-Modified Wnt Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rios-Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation.

  15. Deletion of antigen-specific immature thymocytes by dendritic cells requires LFA-1/ICAM interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, D A; van Oers, N S; Teh, S J; Teh, H S

    1992-03-15

    An in vitro assay was used for assessing the participation of various cell surface molecules and the efficacy of various cell types in the deletion of Ag-specific immature thymocytes. Thymocytes from mice expressing a transgenic TCR specific for the male Ag presented by the H-2Db class I MHC molecule were used as a target for deletion. In H-2d transgenic mice, cells bearing the transgenic TCR are not subjected to thymic selection as a consequence of the absence of the restricting H-2Db molecule but, nevertheless, express this TCR on the vast majority of immature CD4+8+ thymocytes. In this report we show that CD4+8+ thymocytes from H-2d TCR-transgenic mice are preferentially killed upon in vitro culture with male APC; DC were particularly effective in mediating in vitro deletion when compared with either B cells or T cells. Deletion of CD4+8+ thymocytes by DC was H-2b restricted and could be inhibited by mAb to either LFA-1 alpha or CD8. Partial inhibition was observed with mAb to ICAM-1, whereas mAb to CD4 and LFA-1 beta were without effect. These results are the first direct evidence of LFA-1 involvement in negative selection and provide further direct support for the participation of CD8/class I MHC interactions in this process. Like the requirements for deletion, activation of mature male-specific CD4-8+ T cells from female H-2b TCR-transgenic mice was also largely dependent on Ag presentation by DC and required both LFA-1/ICAM and CD8/class I MHC interactions; these results support the view that activation and deletion may represent maturation stage-dependent consequences of T cells encountering the same APC. Finally, our results also support the hypothesis that negative selection (deletion) does not require previous positive selection because deletion was observed under conditions where positive selection had not occurred.

  16. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

  17. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Teng, E-mail: tengyu33@yahoo.com [Department of Dermatology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital Affiliated of Soochow University, SuZhou, Jiangsu Province 215000 (China); Guo, Yong-li [Department of Oncology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  18. Decidual cell polyploidization necessitates mitochondrial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Ma

    Full Text Available Cellular polyploidy has been widely reported in nature, yet its developmental mechanism and function remain poorly understood. In the present study, to better define the aspects of decidual cell polyploidy, we isolated pure polyploid and non-polyploid decidual cell populations from the in vivo decidual bed. Three independent RNA pools prepared for each population were then subjected to the Affymetrix gene chip analysis for the whole mouse genome transcripts. Our data revealed up-regulation of 1015 genes and down-regulation of 1207 genes in the polyploid populations, as compared to the non-polyploid group. Comparative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results indeed confirmed differential expressional regulation of several genes between the two populations. Based on functional enrichment analyses, up-regulated polyploidy genes appeared to implicate several functions, which primarily include cell/nuclear division, ATP binding, metabolic process, and mitochondrial activity, whereas that of down-regulated genes primarily included apoptosis and immune processes. Further analyses of genes that are related to mitochondria and bi-nucleation showed differential and regional expression within the decidual bed, consistent with the pattern of polyploidy. Consistently, studies revealed a marked induction of mitochondrial mass and ATP production in polyploid cells. The inhibition of mitochondrial activity by various pharmacological inhibitors, as well as by gene-specific targeting using siRNA-mediated technology showed a dramatic attenuation of polyploidy and bi-nucleation development during in vitro stromal cell decidualization, suggesting mitochondria play a major role in positive regulation of decidual cell polyploidization. Collectively, analyses of unique polyploidy markers and molecular signaling networks may be useful to further characterize functional aspects of decidual cell polyploidy at the site of implantation.

  19. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  20. Electrodynamic activity of healthy and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microtubules in the cell form a structure capable of generating electrodynamic field and mitochondria form their supporting system for physical processes including energy supply. Mitochondria transfer protons from their matrix space into cytosol, create strong static field around them that causes ordering of water and altering it into quasi-elastic medium with reduced viscous damping. Microtubules are composed of heterodimers that are electric dipoles. Microtubule oscillations generate an electrodynamic field. The greatest energy supply may be provided by liberation of non-utilized energy from mitochondria. Microtubules and mitochondria form a unique cooperating system in the cell. Mitochondria form a boundary element whose function depends on chemical-genetic control but their output is essential for physical processes in the cell. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells results in diminished intensity of the static electric field, disturbed water ordering, increased damping of microtubule oscillations and their shift towards linear region, and decreased energy supply. Power and coherence of oscillations and generated electrodynamic field is weakened. Malignant properties of cancer cell, in particular local invasion and metastasis, may depend on disturbed electrodynamic field. Nanotechnology is promising for investigation of electrodynamic activity in living cells.

  1. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  2. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  3. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-02-18

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  4. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-28

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  5. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  6. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (P0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  7. Feeding cells induced by phytoparasitic nematodes require γ-tubulin ring complex for microtubule reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Youssef Banora

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reorganization of the microtubule network is important for the fast isodiametric expansion of giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes. The efficiency of microtubule reorganization depends on the nucleation of new microtubules, their elongation rate and activity of microtubule severing factors. New microtubules in plants are nucleated by cytoplasmic or microtubule-bound γ-tubulin ring complexes. Here we investigate the requirement of γ-tubulin complexes for giant feeding cells development using the interaction between Arabidopsis and Meloidogyne spp. as a model system. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrate that γ-tubulin localizes to both cortical cytoplasm and mitotic microtubule arrays of the giant cells where it can associate with microtubules. The transcripts of two Arabidopsis γ-tubulin (TUBG1 and TUBG2 and two γ-tubulin complex proteins genes (GCP3 and GCP4 are upregulated in galls. Electron microscopy demonstrates association of GCP3 and γ-tubulin as part of a complex in the cytoplasm of giant cells. Knockout of either or both γ-tubulin genes results in the gene dose-dependent alteration of the morphology of feeding site and failure of nematode life cycle completion. We conclude that the γ-tubulin complex is essential for the control of microtubular network remodelling in the course of initiation and development of giant-feeding cells, and for the successful reproduction of nematodes in their plant hosts.

  8. Prediction of paclitaxel sensitivity by CDK1 and CDK2 activity in human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Satoshi; Torikoshi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Tomokazu; Sudo, Tamotsu; Matsushima, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Katayama, Aya; Gohda, Keigo; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Ishihara, Hideki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Paclitaxel is used widely in the treatment of breast cancer. Not all tumors respond to this drug, however, and the characteristics that distinguish resistant tumors from sensitive tumors are not well defined. Activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint is required for paclitaxel-induced cell death. We hypothesized that cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1 activity and CDK2 activity in cancer cells, which reflect the activation state of the spindle assembly checkpoint and the growth ...

  9. Autocatalytic activation of the furin zymogen requires removal of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Gawlik

    Full Text Available Before furin can act on protein substrates, it must go through an ordered process of activation. Similar to many other proteinases, furin is synthesized as a zymogen (profurin which becomes active only after the autocatalytic removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. We hypothesized that to activate profurin its prodomain had to be removed and, in addition, the emerging enzyme's N-terminus had to be ejected from the catalytic cleft.We constructed and analyzed the profurin mutants in which the egress of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the catalytic cleft was restricted. Mutants were autocatalytically processed at only the primary cleavage site Arg-Thr-Lys-Arg(107 downward arrowAsp(108, but not at both the primary and the secondary (Arg-Gly-Val-Thr-Lys-Arg(75 downward arrowSer(76 cleavage sites, yielding, as a result, the full-length prodomain and mature furins commencing from the N-terminal Asp108. These correctly processed furin mutants, however, remained self-inhibited by the constrained N-terminal sequence which continuously occupied the S' sub-sites of the catalytic cleft and interfered with the functional activity. Further, using the in vitro cleavage of the purified prodomain and the analyses of colon carcinoma LoVo cells with the reconstituted expression of the wild-type and mutant furins, we demonstrated that a three-step autocatalytic processing including the cleavage of the prodomain at the previously unidentified Arg-Leu-Gln-Arg(89 downward arrowGlu(90 site, is required for the efficient activation of furin.Collectively, our results show the restrictive role of the enzyme's N-terminal region in the autocatalytic activation mechanisms. In a conceptual form, our data apply not only to profurin alone but also to a range of self-activated proteinases.

  10. Carboxyl terminal of rhodopsin kinase is required for the phosphorylation of photo—activated rhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUQINGMING; LANMA; 等

    1998-01-01

    Human rhodopsin kinase (RK) and a carboxyl terminus-truncated mutant RK lacking the last 59 amino acids (RKC) were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of RK in recognition and phosphorylation of rhodopsin.RKC,like the wild-type RK,was detected in both plasma membranes and cytosolic fractions.The Cterminal truncated rhodopsin kinase was unable to phosphorylate photo-activated rhodopsin,but possesses kinase activity similar to the wild-type RK in phosphorylation of small peptide substrate.It suggests that the truncation did not disturb the gross structures of RK catalytic domain.Our results also show that RKC failed to translocate to photo-activated rod out segments.Taken together,our study demonstrate the carboxyl terminus of RK is required for phosphorylation of photo-activated rhodopsin and strongly indicate that carboxyl-terminus of RK may be involved in interaction with photo-activated rhodopsin.

  11. Activation of resting T cells: distinct roles of intact accessory cells, phorbol myristate acetate and interleukin 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-03-05

    The accessory cell (AC) signals involved in the activation of resting guinea pig T lymphocytes stimulated with mitogen (PHA), or the calcium ionophore, ionomycin (Ion) were examined. Activation of T cells was assessed by cell cycle analysis after acridine orange staining and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. PHA-stimulated T cells depleted of all AC were unable to respond in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and/or interleukin 1 (IL 1). With suboptimal numbers of AC, PMA greatly augmented the number of T cells activated by PHA to enter and progress through the cell cycle, but only when present during the first few hours of culture. By contrast, IL 1 had little effect on the number of cells entering the cell cycle, although it enhanced S phase entry of the activated cells. IL 1 augmented DNA synthesis when added initially or later in culture. In contrast to the effects noted with PHA, PMA promoted activation and DNA synthesis of the majority of Ion stimulated cells in the complete absence of AC. IL 1 alone could not support Ion induced T cell activation although it enhanced T cell DNA synthesis in cultures stimulated by PMA and Ion. These studies indicate that intact AC, IL 1 and PMA-like signals play distinct roles in the progression of T cells through the initial cell cycle. Stimulation by Ion requires only PMA whereas PHA responses require intact AC and can be amplified by PMA. The major effect of IL 1 is to promote S phase entry of activated T cells.

  12. CD8+ T cell priming by dendritic cell vaccines requires antigen transfer to endogenous antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice W Yewdall

    Full Text Available Immunotherapeutic strategies to stimulate anti-tumor immunity are promising approaches for cancer treatment. A major barrier to their success is the immunosuppressive microenvironment of tumors, which inhibits the functions of endogenous dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary for the generation of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells. To overcome this problem, autologous DCs are generated ex vivo, loaded with tumor antigens, and activated in this non-suppressive environment before administration to patients. However, DC-based vaccines rarely induce tumor regression.We examined the fate and function of these DCs following their injection using murine models, in order to better understand their interaction with the host immune system. Contrary to previous assumptions, we show that DC vaccines have an insignificant role in directly priming CD8+ T cells, but instead function primarily as vehicles for transferring antigens to endogenous antigen presenting cells, which are responsible for the subsequent activation of T cells.This reliance on endogenous immune cells may explain the limited success of current DC vaccines to treat cancer and offers new insight into how these therapies can be improved. Future approaches should focus on creating DC vaccines that are more effective at directly priming T cells, or abrogating the tumor induced suppression of endogenous DCs.

  13. Folliculostellate Cells Are Required for Laminin Release from Gonadotrophs in Rat Anterior Pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anterior pituitary gland is organized tissue comprising hormone-producing cells and folliculostellate (FS) cells. FS cells interconnect to form a meshwork, and their cytoplasmic processes are anchored by a basement membrane containing laminin. Recently, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture that reproduces this FS cell architecture. In this study of the novel function of FS cells, we used transgenic rats that express green fluorescent protein in FS cells for the 3D culture. Anterior pituitary cells were cultured with different proportions of FS cells (0%, 5%, 10%, and 20%). Anterior pituitary cells containing 5–20% FS cells formed round/oval cell aggregates, whereas amorphous cell aggregates were formed in the absence of FS cells. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry showed laminin-immunopositive cells instead of extracellular laminin deposition in FS cell-deficient cell aggregates. Double-immunostaining revealed that these laminin-immunopositive cells were gonadotrophs. Laminin mRNA expression did not differ in relation to the presence or absence of FS cells. When anterior pituitary cells with no FS cells were cultured with FS cell-conditioned medium, the proportion of laminin-immunopositive cells was lower than in control. These results suggest that a humoral factor from FS cells is required for laminin release from gonadotrophs

  14. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martínez-Bonet

    Full Text Available To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  15. Stem-loop binding protein is required for retinal cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and intraretinal axon pathfinding in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Yoshizawa, Asuka; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Oguri, Eri; Araragi, Masato; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Masai, Ichiro

    2014-10-01

    In the developing retina, neurogenesis and cell differentiation are coupled with cell proliferation. However, molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell proliferation and differentiation are not fully understood. In this study, we found that retinal neurogenesis is severely delayed in the zebrafish stem-loop binding protein (slbp) mutant. SLBP binds to a stem-loop structure at the 3'-end of histone mRNAs, and regulates a replication-dependent synthesis and degradation of histone proteins. Retinal cell proliferation becomes slower in the slbp1 mutant, resulting in cessation of retinal stem cell proliferation. Although retinal stem cells cease proliferation by 2 days postfertilization (dpf) in the slbp mutant, retinal progenitor cells in the central retina continue to proliferate and generate neurons until at least 5dpf. We found that this progenitor proliferation depends on Notch signaling, suggesting that Notch signaling maintains retinal progenitor proliferation when faced with reduced SLBP activity. Thus, SLBP is required for retinal stem cell maintenance. SLBP and Notch signaling are required for retinal progenitor cell proliferation and subsequent neurogenesis. We also show that SLBP1 is required for intraretinal axon pathfinding, probably through morphogenesis of the optic stalk, which expresses attractant cues. Taken together, these data indicate important roles of SLBP in retinal development.

  16. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  17. The α isoform of topoisomerase II is required for hypercompaction of mitotic chromosomes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Christine J; Antoniou-Kourounioti, Melissa; Mimmack, Michael L; Volkov, Arsen; Porter, Andrew C G

    2014-04-01

    As proliferating cells transit from interphase into M-phase, chromatin undergoes extensive reorganization, and topoisomerase (topo) IIα, the major isoform of this enzyme present in cycling vertebrate cells, plays a key role in this process. In this study, a human cell line conditional null mutant for topo IIα and a derivative expressing an auxin-inducible degron (AID)-tagged version of the protein have been used to distinguish real mitotic chromosome functions of topo IIα from its more general role in DNA metabolism and to investigate whether topo IIβ makes any contribution to mitotic chromosome formation. We show that topo IIβ does contribute, with endogenous levels being sufficient for the initial stages of axial shortening. However, a significant effect of topo IIα depletion, seen with or without the co-depletion of topo IIβ, is the failure of chromosomes to hypercompact when delayed in M-phase. This requires much higher levels of topo II protein and is impaired by drugs or mutations that affect enzyme activity. A prolonged delay at the G2/M border results in hyperefficient axial shortening, a process that is topo IIα-dependent. Rapid depletion of topo IIα has allowed us to show that its function during late G2 and M-phase is truly required for shaping mitotic chromosomes.

  18. NK cell survival mediated through the regulatory synapse with human DCs requires IL-15Rα

    OpenAIRE

    Brilot, Fabienne; Strowig, Till; Roberts, Susanne M.; Arrey, Frida; Münz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    DCs activate NK cells during innate immune responses to viral infections. However, the composition and kinetics of the immunological synapse mediating this interaction are largely unknown. Here, we report the rapid formation of an immunological synapse between human resting NK cells and mature DCs. Although inhibitory NK cell receptors were polarized to this synapse, where they are known to protect mature DCs from NK cell lysis, the NK cell also received activation signals that induced mobili...

  19. P-glycoprotein ATPase activity requires lipids to activate a switch at the first transmission interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) drug pump. A common feature of ABC proteins is that they are organized into two wings. Each wing contains a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Drug substrates and ATP bind at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Drug transport involves ATP-dependent conformational changes between inward- (open, NBDs far apart) and outward-facing (closed, NBDs close together) conformations. P-gps crystallized in the presence of detergent show an open structure. Human P-gp is inactive in detergent but basal ATPase activity is restored upon addition of lipids. The lipids might cause closure of the wings to bring the NBDs close together to allow ATP hydrolysis. We show however, that cross-linking the wings together did not activate ATPase activity when lipids were absent suggesting that lipids may induce other structural changes required for ATPase activity. We then tested the effect of lipids on disulfide cross-linking of mutants at the first transmission interface between intracellular loop 4 (TMD2) and NBD1. Mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C but not G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C were cross-linked with oxidant when in membranes. The mutants were then purified and cross-linked with or without lipids. Mutants G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C cross-linked only in the absence of lipids whereas mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C were cross-linked only in the presence of lipids. The results suggest that lipids activate a switch at the first transmission interface and that the structure of P-gp is different in detergents and lipids. PMID:26944019

  20. P-glycoprotein ATPase activity requires lipids to activate a switch at the first transmission interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) drug pump. A common feature of ABC proteins is that they are organized into two wings. Each wing contains a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Drug substrates and ATP bind at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Drug transport involves ATP-dependent conformational changes between inward- (open, NBDs far apart) and outward-facing (closed, NBDs close together) conformations. P-gps crystallized in the presence of detergent show an open structure. Human P-gp is inactive in detergent but basal ATPase activity is restored upon addition of lipids. The lipids might cause closure of the wings to bring the NBDs close together to allow ATP hydrolysis. We show however, that cross-linking the wings together did not activate ATPase activity when lipids were absent suggesting that lipids may induce other structural changes required for ATPase activity. We then tested the effect of lipids on disulfide cross-linking of mutants at the first transmission interface between intracellular loop 4 (TMD2) and NBD1. Mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C but not G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C were cross-linked with oxidant when in membranes. The mutants were then purified and cross-linked with or without lipids. Mutants G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C cross-linked only in the absence of lipids whereas mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C were cross-linked only in the presence of lipids. The results suggest that lipids activate a switch at the first transmission interface and that the structure of P-gp is different in detergents and lipids.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 is required for lung cancer stem cell maintenance, tumor initiation and metastatic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verline Justilien

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2 in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC. Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. Interestingly, clonal expansion of Mmp10 deficient oncospheres can be restored by addition of exogenous Mmp10 protein to the culture medium, demonstrating a direct role for Mmp10 in the proliferation of these cells. Oncospheres exhibit enhanced tumor-initiating and metastatic activity when injected orthotopically into syngeneic mice, whereas Mmp10-deficient cultures show a severe defect in tumor initiation. Conversely, oncospheres implanted into syngeneic non-transgenic or Mmp10(-/- mice show no significant difference in tumor initiation, growth or metastasis, demonstrating the importance of Mmp10 produced by cancer cells rather than the tumor microenvironment in lung tumor initiation and maintenance. Analysis of gene expression data from human cancers reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor Mmp10 expression and metastatic behavior in many human tumor types. Thus, Mmp10 is required for maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, metastatic stem-like cell population in lung cancer. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Mmp10 is a critical lung cancer stem cell gene and novel therapeutic target for lung cancer stem cells.

  2. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  3. Glucagon and adenylate cyclase: binding studies and requirements for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, G S; Fletcher, M A; Klein, I

    1975-01-01

    Solubilization of myocardial adenylate cyclase abolished responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, two of the hormones which activate the membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase freed of detergent by DEAE-cellulose chromatography continues to remain unresponsive to hormone stimulation. However, adding purified bovine brain phospholipids--phosphotidylserine and monophosphatidylinositol--restored responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, respectively. 125-i-glucagon binding appeared to be independent of phospholipid, since equal binding was observed in the presence or absence of detergent and in the presence or absence of phospholipids. Chromatography of the solubilized preparation on Sephadex G-100 WAS CHARACTERIZED BY 125-I-glucagon binding and fluoride-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity appearing in the fractions consistent with the void volume, suggesting a molecular weight greater than 100,000 for the receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. Prior incubation of the binding peak with 125-I-glucagon and rechromatography of the bound glucagon on Sephadex G-100 shifted its elution to a later fraction consistent with a smaller-molecular-weight peak. The molecular weight of this material was 24,000 to 28,000, as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The latter findings are consistent with a dissociable receptor site for glucagon on myocardial adenylate cyclase. PMID:165684

  4. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  5. Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Is a Consequence of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixia Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is similar to other Cdks but is activated during cell differentiation and cell death rather than cell division. Since activation of Cdk5 has been reported in many situations leading to cell death, we attempted to determine if it was required for any form of cell death. We found that Cdk5 is activated during apoptotic deaths and that the activation can be detected even when the cells continue to secondary necrosis. This activation can occur in the absence of Bim, calpain, or neutral cathepsins. The kinase is typically activated by p25, derived from p35 by calpain-mediated cleavage, but inhibition of calpain does not affect cell death or the activation of Cdk5. Likewise, RNAi-forced suppression of the synthesis of Cdk5 does not affect the incidence or kinetics of cell death. We conclude that Cdk5 is activated as a consequence of metabolic changes that are common to many forms of cell death. Thus its activation suggests processes during cell death that will be interesting or important to understand, but activation of Cdk5 is not necessary for cells to die.

  6. echinus, required for interommatidial cell sorting and cell death in the Drosophila pupal retina, encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorski Sharon M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death is used to remove excess cells between ommatidia in the Drosophila pupal retina. This death is required to establish the crystalline, hexagonal packing of ommatidia that characterizes the adult fly eye. In previously described echinus mutants, interommatidial cell sorting, which precedes cell death, occurred relatively normally. Interommatidial cell death was partially suppressed, resulting in adult eyes that contained excess pigment cells, and in which ommatidia were mildly disordered. These results have suggested that echinus functions in the pupal retina primarily to promote interommatidial cell death. Results We generated a number of new echinus alleles, some likely null mutants. Analysis of these alleles provides evidence that echinus has roles in cell sorting as well as cell death. echinus encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases. These proteins cleave ubiquitin-conjugated proteins at the ubiquitin C-terminus. The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms, including two proteins that lack residues thought to be critical for deubiquitination activity. Surprisingly, ubiquitous expression in the eye of versions of Echinus that lack residues critical for ubiquitin specific protease activity, as well as a version predicted to be functional, rescue the echinus loss-of-function phenotype. Finally, genetic interactions were not detected between echinus loss and gain-of-function and a number of known apoptotic regulators. These include Notch, EGFR, the caspases Dronc, Drice, Dcp-1, Dream, the caspase activators, Rpr, Hid, and Grim, the caspase inhibitor DIAP1, and Lozenge or Klumpfuss. Conclusion The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms of a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases, but protease activity is unlikely to be required for echinus function, at least when echinus is overexpressed. Characterization of likely echinus null alleles and genetic interactions

  7. Bam32: a novel mediator of Erk activation in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Connie L; Gurson, Jordan M; Surana, Rishi; Barda-Saad, Mira; Lee, Jan; Kishor, Aparna; Li, Wenmei; Gasser, Adam J; Barr, Valarie A; Miyaji, Michihiko; Love, Paul E; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2008-07-01

    Bam32 (B lymphocyte adapter molecule of 32 kDa) is an adapter protein expressed in some hematopoietic cells including B and T lymphocytes. It was previously shown that Bam32-deficient mice have defects in various aspects of B cell activation including B cell receptor (BCR)-induced Erk activation, BCR-induced proliferation and T-independent antibody responses. In this study, we have examined the role of Bam32 in T cell activation using Bam32-deficient mice. By comparing CD4(+) T cells from lymph nodes of wild-type and Bam32-deficient mice, we found that Bam32 was required for optimal TCR-induced Erk activation, cytokine production, proliferation and actin-mediated spreading of CD4(+) T cells. These results indicate a novel pathway to Erk activation in T cells involving the adapter protein Bam32.

  8. Cell-autonomous requirement for TCF1 and LEF1 in the development of Natural Killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Zhu, Wandi S; Steinke, Farrah C; Xue, Hai-Hui; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells develop from common CD4(+) CD8(+) thymocyte precursors. Transcriptional programs that regulate the development of NKT cells in the thymus development remain to be fully delineated. Here, we demonstrate a cell-intrinsic requirement for transcription factors TCF1 and LEF1 for the development of all subsets of NKT cells. Conditional deletion of TCF1 alone results in a substantial reduction in NKT cells. The remaining NKT cells are eliminated when TCF1 and LEF1 are both deleted. These data reveal an essential role for TCF1 and LEF1 in development of NKT cells.

  9. Oligosaccharide composition of the neurotoxin responsive Na+ channel and the requirement of sialic acid for activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neurotoxin responsive Na+ channel was purified to homogeneity in an 18% yield from a clonal cell line of mouse neuroblastoma, N-18, metabolically labeled with L-[3H]fucose. The Na+ channel, a glycoprotein, M/sub r/=200,000 (gradient 7-14% PAGE) was digested with Pronase and the glycopeptides were characterized by serial lectin affinity chromatography. greater than 90% of the oligosaccharides contained sialic acid and 18% were biantennary, 39% were triantennary and 30% tetraantennary. The glycoprotein was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles and 86Rb flux was stimulated (65%) by 200 μM veratridine and 1.2 μg of scorpion venom and was inhibited (95%) by 5 μM tetrodotoxin. The requirement of sialic acid for Na+ channel activity was demonstrated since neuraminidase (0.01 U) treatment of the reconstituted glycoprotein eliminated the response of 86Rb flux to the stimulating neurotoxins. In other experiments, treatment of N-18 cells with 10 μM swainsonine, an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing, altered the oligosaccharide composition of the Na+ channel. When the abnormally glycosylated Na+ channel was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles, 86Rb flux in response to neurotoxins was impaired. Thus, glycosylation of the polypeptide with oligosaccharides of specific composition and structure is essential for expression of the biological activity of the neurotoxin responsive Na+ channel

  10. Variants of the cell recognition site of fibronectin that retain attachment-promoting activity

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A tetrapeptide sequence, Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, is the minimal structure recognized by cells in the large, adhesive glycoprotein fibronectin. We now have defined the structural requirements for this cell recognition site by testing several synthetic variants of the active tetrapeptide sequence. The conservative substitutions of lysine for arginine, alanine for glycine, or glutamic acid for aspartic acid each resulted in abrogation of the cell attachment-promoting activity characteristic of the natu...

  11. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S;

    2001-01-01

    (SEC3) with up to a 150-fold increase in TCR affinity. By stimulating T cells with SEC3 molecules immobilized onto plastic surfaces, we demonstrate that increasing the affinity of the SEC3/TCR interaction caused a proportional increase in the ability of SEC3 to activate T cells. Thus, the potency......Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...... correlation between ligand affinity and ligand potency indicating that it is the density of receptor-ligand complexes in the T cell contact area that determines TCR signaling strength....

  12. Promotion of haematopoietic activity in embryonic stem cells by the aorta-gonad-mesonephros microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated whether the in vitro differentiation of ES cells into haematopoietic progenitors could be enhanced by exposure to the aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) microenvironment that is involved in the generation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during embryonic development. We established a co-culture system that combines the requirements for primary organ culture and differentiating ES cells and showed that exposure of differentiating ES cells to the primary AGM region results in a significant increase in the number of ES-derived haematopoietic progenitors. Co-culture of ES cells on the AM20-1B4 stromal cell line derived from the AGM region also increases haematopoietic activity. We conclude that factors promoting the haematopoietic activity of differentiating ES cells present in primary AGM explants are partially retained in the AM20.1B4 stromal cell line and that these factors are likely to be different to those required for adult HSC maintenance

  13. Intrinsic HER4/4ICD transcriptional activation domains are required for STAT5A activated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen; Sfondouris, Mary E; Semmes, Eleanor C; Meyer, Alicia M; Jones, Frank E

    2016-10-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor family member HER4 undergoes proteolytic processing at the cell surface to release the HER4 intracellular domain (4ICD) nuclear protein. Interestingly, 4ICD directly interacts with STAT5 and functions as an obligate STAT5 nuclear chaperone. Once in the nucleus 4ICD binds with STAT5 at STAT5 target genes, dramatically potentiating STAT5 transcriptional activation. These observations raise the possibility that 4ICD directly coactivates STAT5 gene expression. Using both yeast and mammalian transactivation reporter assays, we performed truncations of 4ICD fused to a GAL4 DNA binding domain and identified two independent 4ICD transactivation domains located between residues 1022 and 1090 (TAD1) and 1192 and 1225 (TAD2). The ability of the 4ICD DNA binding domain fusions to transactivate reporter gene expression required deletion of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain. In addition, we identified the 4ICD carboxyl terminal TVV residues, a PDZ domain binding motif (PDZ-DBM), as a potent transcriptional repressor. The transactivation activity of the HER4 carboxyl terminal domain lacking the tyrosine kinase (CTD) was significantly lower than similar EGFR or HER2 CTD. However, deletion of the HER4 CTD PDZ-DBM enhanced HER4 CTD transactivation to levels equivalent to the EGFR and HER2 CTDs. To determine if 4ICD TAD1 and TAD2 have a physiologically relevant role in STAT5 transactivation, we coexpressed 4ICD or 4ICD lacking TAD2 or both TAD1 and TAD2 with STAT5 in a luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrate that each 4ICD TAD contributes additively to STAT5A transactivation and the ability of STAT5A to transactivate the β-casein promoter requires the 4ICD TADs. Taken together, published data and our current results demonstrate that both 4ICD nuclear chaperone and intrinsic coactivation activities are essential for STAT5 regulated gene expression. PMID:27502417

  14. PDGF is required for remyelination-promoting IgM stimulation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens O Watzlawik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Promotion of remyelination is a major goal in treating demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. The recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22, targets myelin and oligodendrocytes (OLs and promotes remyelination in animal models of MS. It is unclear whether rHIgM22-mediated stimulation of lesion repair is due to promotion of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC proliferation and survival, OPC differentiation into myelinating OLs or protection of mature OLs. It is also unknown whether astrocytes or microglia play a functional role in IgM-mediated lesion repair. METHODS: We assessed the effect of rHIgM22 on cell proliferation in mixed CNS glial and OPC cultures by tritiated-thymidine uptake and by double-label immunocytochemistry using the proliferation marker, Ki-67. Antibody-mediated signaling events, OPC differentiation and OPC survival were investigated and quantified by Western blots. RESULTS: rHIgM22 stimulates OPC proliferation in mixed glial cultures but not in purified OPCs. There is no proliferative response in astrocytes or microglia. rHIgM22 activates PDGFαR in OPCs in mixed glial cultures. Blocking PDGFR-kinase inhibits rHIgM22-mediated OPC proliferation in mixed glia. We confirm in isolated OPCs that rHIgM22-mediated anti-apoptotic signaling and inhibition of OPC differentiation requires PDGF and FGF-2. We observed no IgM-mediated effect in mature OLs in the absence of PDGF and FGF-2. CONCLUSION: Stimulation of OPC proliferation by rHIgM22 depends on co-stimulatory astrocytic and/or microglial factors. We demonstrate that rHIgM22-mediated activation of PDGFαR is required for stimulation of OPC proliferation. We propose that rHIgM22 lowers the PDGF threshold required for OPC proliferation and protection, which can result in remyelination of CNS lesions.

  15. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  16. Switching on electrocatalytic activity in solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jae-Ha; Neagu, Dragos; Miller, David N.; Irvine, John T. S.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOCs) can operate with high efficiency in two ways—as fuel cells, oxidizing a fuel to produce electricity, and as electrolysis cells, electrolysing water to produce hydrogen and oxygen gases. Ideally, SOCs should perform well, be durable and be inexpensive, but there are often competitive tensions, meaning that, for example, performance is achieved at the expense of durability. SOCs consist of porous electrodes—the fuel and air electrodes—separated by a dense electrolyte. In terms of the electrodes, the greatest challenge is to deliver high, long-lasting electrocatalytic activity while ensuring cost- and time-efficient manufacture. This has typically been achieved through lengthy and intricate ex situ procedures. These often require dedicated precursors and equipment; moreover, although the degradation of such electrodes associated with their reversible operation can be mitigated, they are susceptible to many other forms of degradation. An alternative is to grow appropriate electrode nanoarchitectures under operationally relevant conditions, for example, via redox exsolution. Here we describe the growth of a finely dispersed array of anchored metal nanoparticles on an oxide electrode through electrochemical poling of a SOC at 2 volts for a few seconds. These electrode structures perform well as both fuel cells and electrolysis cells (for example, at 900 °C they deliver 2 watts per square centimetre of power in humidified hydrogen gas, and a current of 2.75 amps per square centimetre at 1.3 volts in 50% water/nitrogen gas). The nanostructures and corresponding electrochemical activity do not degrade in 150 hours of testing. These results not only prove that in operando methods can yield emergent nanomaterials, which in turn deliver exceptional performance, but also offer proof of concept that electrolysis and fuel cells can be unified in a single, high-performance, versatile and easily manufactured device. This opens up the possibility of

  17. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Goo Lee

    Full Text Available Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  18. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Megason, Sean G.; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  19. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  20. Tubule-guided cell-to-cell movement of a plant virus requires class XI myosin motors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell movement of plant viruses occurs via plasmodesmata (PD, organelles that evolved to facilitate intercellular communications. Viral movement proteins (MP modify PD to allow passage of the virus particles or nucleoproteins. This passage occurs via several distinct mechanisms one of which is MP-dependent formation of the tubules that traverse PD and provide a conduit for virion translocation. The MP of tubule-forming viruses including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV recruit the plant PD receptors called Plasmodesmata Located Proteins (PDLP to mediate tubule assembly and virus movement. Here we show that PDLP1 is transported to PD through a specific route within the secretory pathway in a myosin-dependent manner. This transport relies primarily on the class XI myosins XI-K and XI-2. Inactivation of these myosins using dominant negative inhibition results in mislocalization of PDLP and MP and suppression of GFLV movement. We also found that the proper targeting of specific markers of the Golgi apparatus, the plasma membrane, PD, lipid raft subdomains within the plasma membrane, and the tonoplast was not affected by myosin XI-K inhibition. However, the normal tonoplast dynamics required myosin XI-K activity. These results reveal a new pathway of the myosin-dependent protein trafficking to PD that is hijacked by GFLV to promote tubule-guided transport of this virus between plant cells.

  1. Mind bomb 1 is required for pancreatic ß-cell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Signe; Kobberup, Sune; Jørgensen, Mette C;

    2012-01-01

    the insulin producing ß-cells. However, signals that regulate proximodistal (P-D) patterning and thus formation of ß-cell progenitors are unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) is required for correct P-D patterning of the developing pancreas and ß-cell formation. We found that endoderm...

  2. Mechanism for macrophage activation against Corynebacterium parvum--participation of T cells and its lymphokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Mihara, M; Uesugi, Y; Nagai, H; Koda, A

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that Corynebacterium parvum activates macrophages to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It is suspected that the activation of macrophages by C. parvum requires T-cell participation. The purpose of this study was to confirm that T cells participate in the activation of macrophages by C. parvum. TNF production in vitro from the spleen cells of BALB/c(-)+/+ mice was abrogated completely by the pre-treatment of spleen cells with anti-Ia antiserum and complement, indicating that Ia+ cells are the source of TNF. TNF production was not elicited at all in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. However, there was an increase in the number of Ia+ cells as well as an increase in the weight of spleen and liver. Supernatant from a culture of spleen cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (a PHA-induced lymphokine) made it possible for BALB/c-nu/nu mice to produce TNF, associated with an induction of Lyt-1+ cells and Lyt-2+ cells. However, treatment with the lymphokine did not augment the increases of Ia+ cells or liver and spleen weights. These results suggest that increasing the number of Ia+ cells is not sufficient to bring about TNF production; Ia+ cells must also be stimulated by T cells or T-cell lymphokines in order to produce TNF. These results suggest that T cells play an essential role in the activation of Ia+ cells against C. parvum. PMID:7723692

  3. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  4. Human B cells have an active phagocytic capability and undergo immune activation upon phagocytosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Zhang, Min; Shi, Ming; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Wenjing; Zhang, Guangyun; Yang, Longxiu; Zhi, Jin; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Gengyao; Chen, Pin; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Feng, Guodong; Zhao, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm that B cells are nonphagocytic was taken for granted for a long time until phagocytic B cells were found in early vertebrate animals. Thereafter, limited evidence has shown that human B cells may also internalize bacteria. However, whether human B cells can actively phagocytose bacteria has been less extensively investigated; in particular, the mechanisms and significance of the phagocytosis require clarification. Here, we show that the human Raji B cell line can phagocytose both live and dead Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the phagocytosed Mtb in turn affects the immune functions of the B cells. After incubation of Raji cells with Mtb, our confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and flow cytometry data showed that Raji cells effectively engulfed Mtb as well as latex beads. The phagocytic rate was proportional to the incubation time and the amount of Mtb or beads added. Additionally, we found that normal human serum could enhance the ability of Raji cells to phagocytose Mtb, while heat-inactivated serum reversed this promoting effect. The phagocytic process of B cells could partially be inhibited by cytochalasin B, an actin inhibitor. Importantly, the phagocytosed Mtb could regulate B cell immune functions, such as stimulating IgM production and upregulating the expression of the antigen-presenting costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Therefore, our results provide the first evidence that human B cells can phagocytose Mtb in an active manner that is independent of bacterial viability, and phagocytosed Mtb can in turn regulate the immune activation of B cells.

  5. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  6. 30 CFR 280.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 280.30 What activities will not require environmental... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities will not require environmental... environmental impact and will normally be categorically excluded from additional environmental analysis....

  7. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  8. Design requirements document for project W-520, immobilized low-activity waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-08-06

    This design requirements document (DRD) identifies the functions that must be performed to accept, handle, and dispose of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) private treatment contractors and close the facility. It identifies the requirements that are associated with those functions and that must be met. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized Low-Activity Waste disposal facility project (W-520) and provides traceability from the program-level requirements to the project design activity.

  9. 77 FR 6815 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Country of Origin Marking Requirements for Containers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Country of Origin... requirement concerning Country of Origin Marking Requirements for Containers or Holders. This request for...: Title: Country of Origin Marking Requirements for Containers or Holders. OMB Number: 1651-0057....

  10. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58......) in addition to use of TCR negative T cell lines. The expression of IL2R-alpha -beta and -gamma chains of activated T cells was analysed by flow cytometry after incubation of T cells alone or with RPE cells. Human RPE cells were found to inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a cell contact...

  11. Opposing Activities of Notch and Wnt Signaling Regulate Intestinal Stem Cells and Gut Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper organ homeostasis requires tight control of adult stem cells and differentiation through the integration of multiple inputs. In the mouse small intestine, Notch and Wnt signaling are required both for stem cell maintenance and for a proper balance of differentiation between secretory and absorptive cell lineages. In the absence of Notch signaling, stem cells preferentially generate secretory cells at the expense of absorptive cells. Here, we use function-blocking antibodies against Notch receptors to demonstrate that Notch blockade perturbs intestinal stem cell function by causing a derepression of the Wnt signaling pathway, leading to misexpression of prosecretory genes. Importantly, attenuation of the Wnt pathway rescued the phenotype associated with Notch blockade. These studies bring to light a negative regulatory mechanism that maintains stem cell activity and balanced differentiation, and we propose that the interaction between Wnt and Notch signaling described here represents a common theme in adult stem cell biology.

  12. Glucose-dependent anaplerosis in cancer cells is required for cellular redox balance in the absence of glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbas, Naniye Mallı; Sudderth, Jessica; Harris, Robert C.; Cebeci, Aysun; Negri, Gian L.; Yılmaz, Ömer H.; Deberardinis, Ralph J.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells have altered metabolism compared to normal cells, including dependence on glutamine (GLN) for survival, known as GLN addiction. However, some cancer cell lines do not require GLN for survival and the basis for this discrepancy is not well understood. GLN is a precursor for antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and NADPH, and GLN deprivation is therefore predicted to deplete antioxidants and increase reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using diverse human cancer cell lines we show that this occurs only in cells that rely on GLN for survival. Thus, the preference for GLN as a dominant antioxidant source defines GLN addiction. We show that despite increased glucose uptake, GLN addicted cells do not metabolize glucose via the TCA cycle when GLN is depleted, as revealed by 13C-glucose labeling. In contrast, GLN independent cells can compensate by diverting glucose-derived pyruvate into the TCA cycle. GLN addicted cells exhibit reduced PDH activity, increased PDK1 expression, and PDK inhibition partially rescues GLN starvation-induced ROS and cell death. Finally, we show that combining GLN starvation with pro-oxidants selectively kills GLN addicted cells. These data highlight a major role for GLN in maintaining redox balance in cancer cells that lack glucose-dependent anaplerosis.

  13. Jun is required in Isl1-expressing progenitor cells for cardiovascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available Jun is a highly conserved member of the multimeric activator protein 1 transcription factor complex and plays an important role in human cancer where it is known to be critical for proliferation, cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and cell death. All of these biological functions are also crucial for embryonic development. Although all Jun null mouse embryos die at mid-gestation with persistent truncus arteriosus, a severe cardiac outflow tract defect also seen in human congenital heart disease, the developmental mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that murine Jun is expressed in a restricted pattern in several cell populations important for cardiovascular development, including the second heart field, pharyngeal endoderm, outflow tract and atrioventricular endocardial cushions and post-migratory neural crest derivatives. Several genes, including Isl1, molecularly mark the second heart field. Isl1 lineages include myocardium, smooth muscle, neural crest, endocardium, and endothelium. We demonstrate that conditional knockout mouse embryos lacking Jun in Isl1-expressing progenitors display ventricular septal defects, double outlet right ventricle, semilunar valve hyperplasia and aortic arch artery patterning defects. In contrast, we show that conditional deletion of Jun in Tie2-expressing endothelial and endocardial precursors does not result in aortic arch artery patterning defects or embryonic death, but does result in ventricular septal defects and a low incidence of semilunar valve defects, atrioventricular valve defects and double outlet right ventricle. Our results demonstrate that Jun is required in Isl1-expressing progenitors and, to a lesser extent, in endothelial cells and endothelial-derived endocardium for cardiovascular development but is dispensable in both cell types for embryonic survival. These data provide a cellular framework for understanding the role of Jun in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease.

  14. Continuous requirement for the T cell receptor for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Andrew G; Arvey, Aaron; Jin, Wei; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) maintain immunological tolerance and their deficiency results in fatal multi-organ autoimmunity. Although heightened T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is critical for the differentiation of Treg cells, the role of TCR signaling in Treg cell function remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate inducible ablation of the TCR results in Treg cell dysfunction which cannot be attributed to impaired Foxp3 expression, decreased expression of Treg cell signature g...

  15. Cathepsin L is required for endothelial progenitor cell-induced neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbich, Carmen; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Bruhl, Thomas; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin D.; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2004-01-15

    Infusion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not of mature endothelial cells (ECs), promotes neovascularization after ischemia. We performed a gene expression profiling of EPCs and ECs to identify genes, which might be important for the neovascularization capacity of EPCs. Intriguingly, the protease cathepsin L (CathL) was highly expressed in EPCs as opposed to ECs and is essential for matrix degradation and invasion by EPCs in vitro. CathL deficient mice showed impaired functional recovery after hind limb ischemia supporting the concept for an important role of CathL in postnatal neovascularization. Infused CathL deficient progenitor cells failed to home to sites of ischemia and to augment neovascularization. In contrast, over expression of CathL in mature ECs significantly enhanced their invasive activity and induced their neovascularization capacity in vivo. Taken together, CathL plays a crucial role for the integration of circulating EPCs into the ischemic tissue and is required for neovascularization mediated by EPCs.

  16. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene.

  17. Fuel cell systems for passenger cars - opportunities and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachtler, J. [BMW, Munich (Germany); Bourne, C. [Rover Group, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    From the point of view of energy density, handling and economy, present-day motor fuels are superior to all known alternatives. The internal combustion engine powered by them satisfies the requirements of customers to an excellent degree. The search for alternatives can therefore only be justified if emissions can be avoided totally and non-fossil primary energy sources can be used or at least partially our dependence on mineral oil can be reduced. What was long suspected has been increasingly confirmed, not least by developments at BMW: electricity (stored in batteries) and hydrogen offer the best prerequisites for achieving these goals in the long term. These forms of energy can be produced in sufficient quantities and with relatively little effect on the environment. They promise to produce an absolute minimum of pollutants when used in vehicles. Natural gas, which is very similar to hydrogen, and hybrid systems, that would compensate for battery risks, could perform a valuable function in the transitional phase.

  18. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Susan R Ross

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was indepe...

  19. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  20. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-01

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  1. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...... and in established cell lines was reduced to about the same basic level after treatment with heparin, a highly specific inhibitor of CKII activity. The activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase was virtually the same in fibroblasts and various human tumour cell lines investigated....

  2. Steroids are required for epidermal cell fate establishment in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Kavitha T; Chen, Andrew Y; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2009-05-12

    The simple structure of Arabidopsis roots provides an excellent model system to study epidermal cell fate specification. Epidermal cells in contact with 2 underlying cortical cells differentiate into hair cells (H cells; trichoblasts), whereas cells that contact only a single cortical cell differentiate into mature hairless cells (N cells; atrichoblasts). This position-dependent patterning, in combination with the constrained orientation of cell divisions, results in hair and nonhair cell files running longitudinally along the root epidermis. Here, we present strong evidence that steroid hormones called brassinosteroids (BRs) are required to maintain position-dependent fate specification in roots. We show that BRs are required for normal expression levels and patterns of WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), master regulators of epidermal patterning. Loss of BR signaling results in loss of hair cells in H positions, likely as a consequence of reduced expression of CAPRICE (CPC), a direct downstream target of WER. Our observations demonstrate that in addition to their well-known role in cell expansion, BRs play an essential role in directing cell fate.

  3. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-BETA MEDIATED SUPPRESSION OF ANTI-TUMOR T CELLS REQUIRES FOXP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Tom L.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Tesone, Amelia J.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Sarmin, Fahmida; Borowsky, Mark E.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor-reactive T cells become unresponsive in advanced tumors. Here we have characterized a common mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer driven by the up-regulation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (Foxp1), which prevents CD8+ T cells from proliferating and up-regulating Granzyme-B and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to tumor antigens. Accordingly, Foxp1-deficient lymphocytes induced rejection of incurable tumors, and promoted protection against tumor re-challenge. Mechanistically, Foxp1 interacted with the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3 in pre-activated CD8+ T cells in response to microenvironmental transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and was essential for its suppressive activity. Therefore, Smad2 and Smad3-mediated c-Myc repression requires Foxp1 expression in T cells. Furthermore, Foxp1 directly mediated TGF-β-induced c-Jun transcriptional repression, which abrogated T cell activity. Our results unveil a fundamental mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness different from anergy or exhaustion, driven by TGF-β signaling on tumor-associated lymphocytes undergoing Foxp1-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:25238097

  4. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...... activity was observed after premedication with diazepam per os. The activity increased further during a combined anaesthesia (thiopentone + N2O + O2 + buprenorphene + pancuronium) and remained increased during surgery. Postoperatively, NK cell activity fell and remained depressed for a period of at least 5...

  5. Transcriptional activation function is not required for stimulation of DNA replication by bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2.

    OpenAIRE

    Grossel, M J; Sverdrup, F; Breiding, D E; Androphy, E J

    1996-01-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 1 replication was previously shown to require both the E1 initiator protein and the E2 transactivator protein. We show here that E1, in the absence of E2, is sufficient for low-level bovine papillomavirus type 1 DNA replication in C-33A cells. In addition, studies of genetically isolated E2 point mutants demonstrate that enhancement of replication by E2 does not require its transcriptional activation function. The uncoupling of the E2 functions suggests that stimula...

  6. Pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells activation during experimental acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inmaculada; Lopez-Font; Sabrina; Gea-Sorlí; Enrique; de-Madaria; Luis; M; Gutiérrez; Miguel; Pérez-Mateo; Daniel; Closa

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the activation of pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells and the effect of mast cell inhibition on the activation of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of 5% sodium taurodeoxycholate in rats.The mast cell inhibitor cromolyn was administered intraperitoneally(i.p.) 30 min before pancreatitis induction.The pancreatic and pulmonary tissue damage was evaluated histologically and mast cells and their state of activation...

  7. A balanced pyrimidine pool is required for optimal Chk1 activation to prevent ultrafine anaphase bridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemble, Simon; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Biard, Denis; Lambert, Sarah; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2016-08-15

    Cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency induces an excess of cellular dCTP, which reduces basal PARP-1 activity, thereby compromising complete DNA replication, leading to ultrafine anaphase bridge (UFB) formation. CDA dysfunction has pathological implications, notably in cancer and in Bloom syndrome. It remains unknown how reduced levels of PARP-1 activity and pyrimidine pool imbalance lead to the accumulation of unreplicated DNA during mitosis. We report that a decrease in PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells impairs DNA-damage-induced Chk1 activation, and, thus, the downstream checkpoints. Chemical inhibition of the ATR-Chk1 pathway leads to UFB accumulation, and we found that this pathway was compromised in CDA-deficient cells. Our data demonstrate that ATR-Chk1 acts downstream from PARP-1, preventing the accumulation of unreplicated DNA in mitosis, and, thus, UFB formation. Finally, delaying entry into mitosis is sufficient to prevent UFB formation in both CDA-deficient and CDA-proficient cells, suggesting that both physiological and pathological UFBs are derived from unreplicated DNA. Our findings demonstrate an unsuspected requirement for a balanced nucleotide pool for optimal Chk1 activation both in unchallenged cells and in response to genotoxic stress.

  8. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development.

  9. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  10. Cited2 is required for the maintenance of glycolytic metabolism in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinwei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fangqiang; Puchowitz, Michelle A; Fujioka, Hisashi; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Danielpour, David; Yang, Yu-Chung

    2014-01-15

    Mammalian adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and display a distinct metabolic phenotype compared with their progenitors. It has been proposed that HSCs generate energy mainly through anaerobic glycolysis in a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-dependent manner. Cited2 is an essential regulator for HSC quiescence, apoptosis, and function. Herein, we show that conditional deletion of Cited2 in murine HSCs results in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, decreased cellular glutathione content, increased mitochondrial activity, and decreased glycolysis. At the molecular level, Cited2 deficiency significantly reduced the expression of genes involved in metabolism, such as Pdk2, Pdk4, and lactate dehydrogenases B and D (LDHB and LDHD). Cited2-deficient HSCs also exhibited increased Akt signaling, concomitant with elevated mTORC1 activity and phosphorylation of FoxOs. Further, inhibition of PI3/Akt, but not mTORC1, partially rescued the repression of Pdk4 caused by deletion of Cited2. Altogether, our results suggest that Cited2 is required for the maintenance of adult HSC glycolytic metabolism likely through regulating Pdk2, Pdk4, LDHB, LDHD, and Akt activity. PMID:24083546

  11. HIV-1 Vpr-induced apoptosis is cell cycle dependent and requires Bax but not ANT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L Andersen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr causes G2 arrest and apoptosis in infected cells. We previously identified the DNA damage-signaling protein ATR as the cellular factor that mediates Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis. Here, we examine the mechanism of induction of apoptosis by Vpr and how it relates to induction of G2 arrest. We find that entry into G2 is a requirement for Vpr to induce apoptosis. We investigated the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by knockdown of its essential component, the adenine nucleotide translocator. We found that Vpr-induced apoptosis was unaffected by knockdown of ANT. Instead, apoptosis is triggered through a different mitochondrial pore protein, Bax. In support of the idea that checkpoint activation and apoptosis induction are functionally linked, we show that Bax activation by Vpr was ablated when ATR or GADD45alpha was knocked down. Certain mutants of Vpr, such as R77Q and I74A, identified in long-term nonprogressors, have been proposed to inefficiently induce apoptosis while activating the G2 checkpoint in a normal manner. We tested the in vitro phenotypes of these mutants and found that their abilities to induce apoptosis and G2 arrest are indistinguishable from those of HIV-1NL4-3 vpr, providing additional support to the idea that G2 arrest and apoptosis induction are mechanistically linked.

  12. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition

  13. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biological Cancer Therapy, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou 221002 (China); Yang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: wuchuanfangsichuan@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  14. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  15. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segah Altuntaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications have stressed the importance of the expression of pluripotentiality associated markers: the transcription factors Nanog, Sox2, Oct3/4, SSEA4, CD13, Stro1 are indispensable for the stem cells to divide indefinitely without affecting their differentiation potential (self renewal capacity. Progesterone is a steroid hormone leading to menstrual cycle and gestation. There is a widespread rumor among people that pregnancy causes toothy loss. Method: So, progesterone was applied in different concentrations on human dental pulp cells in cell culture. Cell viability assay was applied 24th hour later with trypan blue. RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis and Real Time PCR analysis were applied on selected transcription factors (Nanog and Oct4 (POU5F1 genes which have role on steamness of stem cells. Gene expression analyses results were correlated with the cell viability assay results. Results: Cell viability assay results were 80% viable in control, 82% viable in 7 ml progesterone application, 81% viable in 14 ml progesterone application, 83% viable in 21 ml progesterone application. Due to our findings, progesterone in different concentrations did not chance the cell viability in dental pulpa cells. On gene expression analyses, preliminary results supported that high concentrations of progesterone enhance the gene expressions of steamness genes (Nanog, and Oct4 in dental pulp cells. Conclusions: So, progesterone did not change cell viability in high concentrations. We

  16. Integration of light and metabolic signals for stem cell activation at the shoot apical meristem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Janocha, Denis; Dong, Yihan; Medzihradszky, Anna; Schöne, Stefanie; Daum, Gabor; Suzaki, Takuya; Forner, Joachim; Langenecker, Tobias; Rempel, Eugen; Schmid, Markus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of embryogenesis is the specification of stem cell systems, but in contrast to the situation in most animals, plant stem cells remain quiescent until the postembryonic phase of development. Here, we dissect how light and metabolic signals are integrated to overcome stem cell dormancy at the shoot apical meristem. We show on the one hand that light is able to activate expression of the stem cell inducer WUSCHEL independently of photosynthesis and that this likely involves inter-regional cytokinin signaling. Metabolic signals, on the other hand, are transduced to the meristem through activation of the TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN (TOR) kinase. Surprisingly, TOR is also required for light signal dependent stem cell activation. Thus, the TOR kinase acts as a central integrator of light and metabolic signals and a key regulator of stem cell activation at the shoot apex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17023.001 PMID:27400267

  17. Induction of aversive learning through thermogenetic activation of Kenyon cell ensembles in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eVasmer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila represents a model organism to analyze neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Kenyon cells of the Drosophila mushroom body are required for associative odor learning and memory retrieval. But is the mushroom body sufficient to acquire and retrieve an associative memory? To answer this question we have conceived an experimental approach to bypass olfactory sensory input and to thermogenetically activate sparse and random ensembles of Kenyon cells directly. We found that if the artifical activation of Kenyon cell ensembles coincides with a salient, aversive stimulus learning was induced The animals adjusted their behavior in a subsequent test situation and actively avoided reactivation of these Kenyon cells. Our results show that Kenyon cell activity in coincidence with a salient aversive stimulus can suffice to form an associative memory. Memory retrieval is characterized by a closed feedback loop between a behavioral action and the reactivation of sparse ensembles of Kenyon cells.

  18. Langerhans cells are not required for epidermal V gamma 3 T cell homeostasis and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taveirne, Sylvie; De Colvenaer, Veerle; Van Den Broeck, Tina; Van Ammel, Els; Bennett, Clare L.; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Plum, Jean; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Leclercq, Georges

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that V gamma 3 TCR-bearing T cells are influenced by LCs. V gamma 3 T cells and LCs are located in the epidermis of mice. V gamma 3 T cells represent the main T cell population in the skin epithelium and play a crucial role in maintaining the skin integrity, whereas

  19. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells. PMID:26882972

  20. Inhibition of protein kinase B activity induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis during early G₁ phase in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, José; van Donselaar, Elly; Humbel, Bruno M; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of PKB (protein kinase B) activity using a highly selective PKB inhibitor resulted in inhibition of cell cycle progression only if cells were in early G1 phase at the time of addition of the inhibitor, as demonstrated by time-lapse cinematography. Addition of the inhibitor during mitosis up to 2 h after mitosis resulted in arrest of the cells in early G1 phase, as deduced from the expression of cyclins D and A and incorporation of thymidine. After 24 h of cell cycle arrest, cells expressed the cleaved caspase-3, a central mediator of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that PKB activity in early G1 phase is required to prevent the induction of apoptosis. Using antibodies, it was demonstrated that active PKB translocates to the nucleus during early G1 phase, while an even distribution of PKB was observed through cytoplasm and nucleus during the end of G1 phase. PMID:22251027

  1. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Kimberly C; Pearson, Bret J.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell de...

  2. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shweta; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Agrewala, Javed N

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB) cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID), signifying class switch recombination (CSR). Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response. PMID:21674065

  3. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolletschek Alexandra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. Results In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells activates transcription of the target genes mdm2, p21, puma and noxa. We observed bi-phasic kinetics for nuclear accumulation of p53 after ionizing radiation. During the first wave of nuclear accumulation, p53 levels were increased and the p53 target genes mdm2, p21 and puma were transcribed. Transcription of noxa correlated with the second wave of nuclear accumulation. Transcriptional activation of p53 target genes resulted in an increased amount of proteins with the exception of p21. While p21 transcripts were efficiently translated in 3T3 cells, we failed to see an increase in p21 protein levels after IR in embryonal stem cells. Conclusion In embryonic stem cells where (anti-proliferative p53 activity is not necessary, or even unfavorable, p53 is retained in the cytoplasm and prevented from activating its target genes. However, if its activity is beneficial or required, p53 is allowed to accumulate in the nucleus and activates its target genes, even in embryonic stem cells.

  4. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID, signifying class switch recombination (CSR. Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  5. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo, E-mail: jbyue@me.com

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ●Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ●Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ●B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ●All Raf members are

  6. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G;

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  7. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  8. Repression of the integrated papillomavirus E6/E7 promoter is required for growth suppression of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, D A; Schmid, S I; Howley, P M

    2000-03-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is an important regulator of viral E6 and E7 gene expression. E2 can repress the viral promoter for E6 and E7 expression as well as block progression of the cell cycle in cancer cells harboring the DNA of "high-risk" HPV types. Although the phenomenon of E2-mediated growth arrest of HeLa cells and other HPV-positive cancer cells has been well documented, the specific mechanism by which E2 affects cellular proliferation has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2-induced growth arrest of HeLa cells requires the repression of the E6 and E7 promoter. This repression is specific for E2TA and not E2TR, a BPV E2 variant that lacks the N-terminal transactivation domain. We demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E6 and E7 from a heterologous promoter that is not regulated by E2 rescues HeLa cells from E2-mediated growth arrest. Our data indicate that the pathway of E2-mediated growth arrest of HeLa cells requires repression of E6 and E7 expression through an activity specified by the transactivation domain of E2TA. PMID:10684283

  9. The invisible addiction: Cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETNJI YAYA, LUC HONORE; MANOLIS, CHRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The primary objective of the present study was to investigate which cell-phone activities are associated with cell-phone addiction. No research to date has studied the full-range of cell-phone activities, and their relationship to cell-phone addiction, across male and female cell-phone users. Methods: College undergraduates (N = 164) participated in an online survey. Participants completed the questionnaire as part of their class requirements. The questionnaire took 10 and 15 minutes to complete and contained a measure of cell-phone addiction and questions that asked how much time participants spent daily on 24 cell-phone activities. Results: Findings revealed cell-phone activities that are associated significantly with cell-phone addiction (e.g., Instagram, Pinterest), as well as activities that one might logically assume would be associated with this form of addiction but are not (e.g., Internet use and Gaming). Cell-phone activities that drive cell-phone addiction (CPA) were found to vary considerably across male and female cell-phone users. Although a strong social component drove CPA for both males and females, the specific activities associated with CPA differed markedly. Conclusions: CPA amongst the total sample is largely driven by a desire to connect socially. The activities found to be associated with CPA, however, differed across the sexes. As the functionality of cell-phones continues to expand, addiction to this seemingly indispensable piece of technology becomes an increasingly realistic possibility. Future research must identify the activities that push cell-phone use beyond its “;tipping point” where it crosses the line from a helpful tool to one that undermines our personal well-being and that of others. PMID:25595966

  10. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization. PMID:27312576

  11. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  12. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  13. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  14. Sperm surface protein PH-20 is bifunctional: one activity is a hyaluronidase and a second, distinct activity is required in secondary sperm-zona binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, G R; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1996-07-01

    In previous studies, we have found that the sperm membrane protein PH-20 acts during two different stages of fertilization. On acrosome-intact sperm, PH-20 has a hyaluronidase activity that is required for sperm penetration through the cumulus cell layer that surrounds the oocyte. On acrosome-reacted sperm, PH-20 has a required function in sperm-zona binding (secondary binding). Because hyaluronic acid (HA) has been detected in the zona pellucida, secondary sperm-zona adhesion could depend on repetitive binding and hydrolysis of HA by PH-20 acting as a hyaluronidase. Alternatively, PH-20 may be bifunctional and have a second, different activity required for secondary binding. To distinguish between these two possibilities, in this study we used reagents that inhibit either PH-20's function in sperm-zona binding or its hyaluronidase activity. We found that an anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 90%) had no effect on hyaluronidase activity. Conversely, apigenin, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, blocked PH-20 hyaluronidase activity 93% without inhibiting sperm-zona binding. Similarly, another anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited hyaluronidase activity 95% only partially inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 45%). We also extensively pretreated oocytes with hyaluronidase to remove all accessible HA on or in the zona pellucida and found little or no effect on secondary sperm-zona binding. Our results suggest that PH-20 is bifunctional and has two activities: a hyaluronidase activity and a second, separate activity required for secondary sperm-zona binding. PMID:8793062

  15. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  16. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  17. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: An analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, E; Böcker, L; Helbich, M

    2015-01-01

    Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through ev

  18. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanan eGreenman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non cell-autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX as a non cell-autonomous regulator of neural stem cell proliferation. ATX (also known as ENPP2 is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA.

  19. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...

  20. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Richard K Assoian; Rader, Daniel J; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD4...

  1. N-Cadherin Induction by ECM Stiffness and FAK Overrides the Spreading Requirement for Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley L. Mui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the accepted pro-proliferative effect of cell-matrix adhesion, the proliferative effect of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion remains unresolved. Here, we studied the effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation in the vasculature. We show that N-cadherin is induced in smooth muscle cells (SMCs in response to vascular injury, an in vivo model of tissue stiffening and proliferation. Complementary experiments performed with deformable substrata demonstrated that stiffness-mediated activation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK-p130Cas-Rac signaling pathway induces N-cadherin. Additionally, by culturing paired and unpaired SMCs on microfabricated adhesive islands of different areas, we found that N-cadherin relaxes the spreading requirement for SMC proliferation. In vivo SMC deletion of N-cadherin strongly reduced injury-induced cycling. Finally, SMC-specific deletion of FAK inhibited proliferation after vascular injury, and this was accompanied by reduced induction of N-cadherin. Thus, a stiffness- and FAK-dependent induction of N-cadherin connects cell-matrix to cell-cell adhesion and regulates the degree of cell spreading needed for cycling.

  2. Herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein requires a mammalian factor for efficient in vitro endoribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Jones, F E; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-02-01

    The virion host shutoff protein (vhs) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated mRNA turnover during virus infection and induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of exogenous RNA substrates when it is produced in a rabbit reticulocyte (RRL) in vitro translation system. Although vhs induces RNA turnover in the absence of other HSV gene products, it is not yet known whether cellular factors are required for its activity. As one approach to addressing this question, we expressed vhs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of vhs inhibited colony formation, and the severity of this effect varied with the carbon source. The biological relevance of this effect was assessed by examining the activity of five mutant forms of vhs bearing previously characterized in-frame linker insertions. The results indicated a complete concordance between the growth inhibition phenotype in yeast and mammalian host cell shutoff. Despite these results, expression of vhs did not trigger global mRNA turnover in vivo, and cell extracts of yeast expressing vhs displayed little if any vhs-dependent endoribonuclease activity. However, activity was readily detected when such extracts were mixed with RRL. These data suggest that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease requires one or more mammalian macromolecular factors for efficient activity.

  3. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jong W.; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M.; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A.; Hughes, Anna C.; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D.; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B.; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo. PMID:25965667

  4. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong W Yu

    Full Text Available CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  5. Mapping of ESE-1 subdomains required to initiate mammary epithelial cell transformation via a cytoplasmic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tentler John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ETS family transcription factor ESE-1 is often overexpressed in human breast cancer. ESE-1 initiates transformation of MCF-12A cells via a non-transcriptional, cytoplasmic process that is mediated by a unique 40-amino acid serine and aspartic acid rich (SAR subdomain, whereas, ESE-1's nuclear transcriptional property is required to maintain the transformed phenotype of MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D breast cancer cells. Results To map the minimal functional nuclear localization (NLS and nuclear export (NES signals, we fused in-frame putative NLS and NES motifs between GFP and the SAR domain. Using these GFP constructs as reporters of subcellular localization, we mapped a single NLS to six basic amino acids (242HGKRRR247 in the AT-hook and two CRM1-dependent NES motifs, one to the pointed domain (NES1: 102LCNCALEELRL112 and another to the DNA binding domain (DBD, (NES2: 275LWEFIRDILI284. Moreover, analysis of a putative NLS located in the DBD (316GQKKKNSN323 by a similar GFP-SAR reporter or by internal deletion of the DBD, revealed this sequence to lack NLS activity. To assess the role of NES2 in regulating ESE-1 subcellular localization and subsequent transformation potency, we site-specifically mutagenized NES2, within full-length GFP-ESE-1 and GFP-NES2-SAR reporter constructs. These studies show that site-specific mutation of NES2 completely abrogates ESE-1 transforming activity. Furthermore, we show that exclusive cytoplasmic targeting of the SAR domain is sufficient to initiate transformation, and we report that an intact SAR domain is required, since block mutagenesis reveals that an intact SAR domain is necessary to maintain its full transforming potency. Finally, using a monoclonal antibody targeting the SAR domain, we demonstrate that the SAR domain contains a region accessible for protein - protein interactions. Conclusions These data highlight that ESE-1 contains NLS and NES signals that play a critical role in

  6. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  7. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms.

  8. Zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis requires Scribble-dependent oriented cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Trinh, Le A; Fraser, Scott E; Moens, Cecilia B

    2011-01-11

    How control of subcellular events in single cells determines morphogenesis on the scale of the tissue is largely unresolved. The stereotyped cross-midline mitoses of progenitors in the zebrafish neural keel provide a unique experimental paradigm for defining the role and control of single-cell orientation for tissue-level morphogenesis in vivo. We show here that the coordinated orientation of individual progenitor cell division in the neural keel is the cellular determinant required for morphogenesis into a neural tube epithelium with a single straight lumen. We find that Scribble is required for oriented cell division and that its function in this process is independent of canonical apicobasal and planar polarity pathways. We identify a role for Scribble in controlling clustering of α-catenin foci in dividing progenitors. Loss of either Scrib or N-cadherin results in abnormally oriented mitoses, reduced cross-midline cell divisions, and similar neural tube defects. We propose that Scribble-dependent nascent cell-cell adhesion clusters between neuroepithelial progenitors contribute to define orientation of their cell division. Finally, our data demonstrate that while oriented mitoses of individual cells determine neural tube architecture, the tissue can in turn feed back on its constituent cells to define their polarization and cell division orientation to ensure robust tissue morphogenesis.

  9. The Chromatin-Modifying Enzyme Ezh2 Is Critical for the Maintenance of Regulatory T Cell Identity after Activation

    OpenAIRE

    DuPage, Michel; Chopra, Gaurav; Quiros, Jason; Rosenthal, Wendy L.; Morar, Malika M.; Holohan, Dan; Zhang, Ruan; Turka, Laurence; Marson, Alexander; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are required for immune homeostasis. Chromatin remodeling is essential for establishing diverse cellular identities, but how the epigenetic program in Treg cells is maintained throughout the dynamic activation process remains unclear. Here we have shown that CD28 co-stimulation, an extracellular cue intrinsically required for Treg cell maintenance, induced the chromatin-modifying enzyme, Ezh2. Treg-specific ablation of Ezh2 resulted in spontaneous autoimmunity ...

  10. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen;

    2015-01-01

    densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  11. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion. PMID:27583450

  12. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  13. 75 FR 48553 - Supplement to Commission Procedures During Periods of Emergency Operations Requiring Activation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... operation are met, thereby providing continuity in the conduct of the Commission's business and certainty to... Emergency Operations Requiring Activation of Continuity of Operations Plan Issued August 5, 2010. AGENCY... Commission is required to implement its Continuity of Operations Plan in response to an emergency...

  14. Interleukin 4 (B cell stimulatory factor 1) can mediate the induction of lymphokine-activated killer cell activity directed against fresh tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) expresses multiple biologic activities, including B cell, mast cell, and T cell stimulation. We showed that the incubation of resting splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice solely in purified native or recombinant mouse IL-4 results in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity directed against fresh, syngeneic sarcoma cells. The precursor activated by IL-4 expresses surface asialo-GM1. In addition, IL-4 is capable of amplifying the splenic LAK activity induced b...

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic 75selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by 51Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances

  16. NOTCH3 expression is induced in mural cells through an autoregulatory loop that requires endothelial-expressed JAGGED1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Kennard, Simone; Lilly, Brenda

    2009-02-27

    Endothelial cells and mural cells (smooth muscle cells, pericytes, or fibroblasts) are known to communicate with one another. Their interactions not only serve to support fully functional blood vessels but also can regulate vessel assembly and differentiation or maturation. In an effort to better understand the molecular components of this heterotypic interaction, we used a 3D model of angiogenesis and screened for genes, which were modulated by coculturing of these 2 different cell types. In doing so, we discovered that NOTCH3 is one gene whose expression is robustly induced in mural cells by coculturing with endothelial cells. Knockdown by small interfering RNA revealed that NOTCH3 is necessary for endothelial-dependent mural cell differentiation, whereas overexpression of NOTCH3 is sufficient to promote smooth muscle gene expression. Moreover, NOTCH3 contributes to the proangiogenic abilities of mural cells cocultured with endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that the expression of NOTCH3 is dependent on Notch signaling, because the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT blocked its upregulation. Furthermore, in mural cells, a dominant-negative Mastermind-like1 construct inhibited NOTCH3 expression, and endothelial-expressed JAGGED1 was required for its induction. Additionally, we demonstrated that NOTCH3 could promote its own expression and that of JAGGED1 in mural cells. Taken together, these data provide a mechanism by which endothelial cells induce the differentiation of mural cells through activation and induction of NOTCH3. These findings also suggest that NOTCH3 has the capacity to maintain a differentiated phenotype through a positive-feedback loop that includes both autoregulation and JAGGED1 expression.

  17. Tolerogenicity of resting and activated B cells

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Antigen presentation by resting splenic B cells has been shown previously to induce T helper 1 cell (Th1) anergy. In contrast to expectations, it was found here that B cells treated with F(ab')2 goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgM) for 24 or 48 h also presented antigen (Ag) to Th1 cells in a manner that induced dramatic Ag-specific proliferative inactivation. The tolerogenicity of the anti-Ig-treated B cells was consistent with the observation that these B cells were only slightly more effici...

  18. A rapid and sensitive method for measuring N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mauri

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method to quantitatively assess N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG activity in cultured cells is highly desirable for both basic research and clinical studies. NAG activity is deficient in cells from patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB due to mutations in NAGLU, the gene that encodes NAG. Currently available techniques for measuring NAG activity in patient-derived cell lines include chromogenic and fluorogenic assays and provide a biochemical method for the diagnosis of MPS IIIB. However, standard protocols require large amounts of cells, cell disruption by sonication or freeze-thawing, and normalization to the cellular protein content, resulting in an error-prone procedure that is material- and time-consuming and that produces highly variable results. Here we report a new procedure for measuring NAG activity in cultured cells. This procedure is based on the use of the fluorogenic NAG substrate, 4-Methylumbelliferyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MUG, in a one-step cell assay that does not require cell disruption or post-assay normalization and that employs a low number of cells in 96-well plate format. We show that the NAG one-step cell assay greatly discriminates between wild-type and MPS IIIB patient-derived fibroblasts, thus providing a rapid method for the detection of deficiencies in NAG activity. We also show that the assay is sensitive to changes in NAG activity due to increases in NAGLU expression achieved by either overexpressing the transcription factor EB (TFEB, a master regulator of lysosomal function, or by inducing TFEB activation chemically. Because of its small format, rapidity, sensitivity and reproducibility, the NAG one-step cell assay is suitable for multiple procedures, including the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries to identify modulators of NAG expression, folding and activity, and the investigation of candidate molecules and constructs for applications in

  19. The insulator protein BEAF-32 is required for Hippo pathway activity in the terminal differentiation of neuronal subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukam, David; Viets, Kayla; Anderson, Caitlin; Zhou, Cyrus; DeFord, Peter; Yan, Jenny; Cao, Jinshuai; Johnston, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The Hippo pathway is crucial for not only normal growth and apoptosis but also cell fate specification during development. What controls Hippo pathway activity during cell fate specification is incompletely understood. In this article, we identify the insulator protein BEAF-32 as a regulator of Hippo pathway activity in Drosophila photoreceptor differentiation. Though morphologically uniform, the fly eye is composed of two subtypes of R8 photoreceptor neurons defined by expression of light-detecting Rhodopsin proteins. In one R8 subtype, active Hippo signaling induces Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6) and represses Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5), whereas in the other subtype, inactive Hippo signaling induces Rh5 and represses Rh6. The activity state of the Hippo pathway in R8 cells is determined by the expression of warts, a core pathway kinase, which interacts with the growth regulator melted in a double-negative feedback loop. We show that BEAF-32 is required for expression of warts and repression of melted Furthermore, BEAF-32 plays a second role downstream of Warts to induce Rh6 and prevent Rh5 fate. BEAF-32 is dispensable for Warts feedback, indicating that BEAF-32 differentially regulates warts and Rhodopsins. Loss of BEAF-32 does not noticeably impair the functions of the Hippo pathway in eye growth regulation. Our study identifies a context-specific regulator of Hippo pathway activity in post-mitotic neuronal fate, and reveals a developmentally specific role for a broadly expressed insulator protein. PMID:27226322

  20. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  1. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: An analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot Fishman; Lars Böcker; Marco Helbich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Methods Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 – 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling ...

  2. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: an analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Fishman

    Full Text Available Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling.Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 - 2012, this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics.The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel.The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of environments and cultures that

  3. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhu Xiong

    Full Text Available The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL, encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone.

  4. β-catenin is selectively required for the expansion and regeneration of mature pancreatic acinar cells in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Keefe

    2012-07-01

    The size of the pancreas is determined by intrinsic factors, such as the number of progenitor cells, and by extrinsic signals that control the fate and proliferation of those progenitors. Both the exocrine and endocrine compartments of the pancreas undergo dramatic expansion after birth and are capable of at least partial regeneration following injury. Whether the expansion of these lineages relies on similar mechanisms is unknown. Although we have shown that the Wnt signaling component β-catenin is selectively required in mouse embryos for the generation of exocrine acinar cells, this protein has been ascribed various functions in the postnatal pancreas, including proliferation and regeneration of islet as well as acinar cells. To address whether β-catenin remains important for the maintenance and expansion of mature acinar cells, we have established a system to follow the behavior and fate of β-catenin-deficient cells during postnatal growth and regeneration in mice. We find that β-catenin is continuously required for the establishment and maintenance of acinar cell mass, extending from embryonic specification through juvenile and adult self-renewal and regeneration. This requirement is not shared with islet cells, which proliferate and function normally in the absence of β-catenin. These results make distinct predictions for the relative role of Wnt–β-catenin signaling in the etiology of human endocrine and exocrine disease. We suggest that loss of Wnt–β-catenin activity is unlikely to drive islet dysfunction, as occurs in type 2 diabetes, but that β-catenin is likely to promote human acinar cell proliferation following injury, and might therefore contribute to the resolution of acute or chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Ki-67 is required for maintenance of cancer stem cells but not cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidado, Justin; Wong, Hong Yuen; Rosen, D. Marc; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Garay, Joseph P.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Hicks, Jessica; Cochran, Rory L.; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Mohseni, Morassa; Beaver, Julia A.; Chu, David; Cravero, Karen; Christenson, Eric S.; Medford, Arielle; Mattox, Austin; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Argani, Pedram; Chawla, Ajay; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 expression is correlated with cell proliferation and is a prognostic marker for various cancers; however, its function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that genetic disruption of Ki-67 in human epithelial breast and colon cancer cells depletes the cancer stem cell niche. Ki-67 null cells had a proliferative disadvantage compared to wildtype controls in colony formation assays and displayed increased sensitivity to various chemotherapies. Ki-67 null cancer cells showed decreased and delayed tumor formation in xenograft assays, which was associated with a reduction in cancer stem cell markers. Immunohistochemical analyses of human breast cancers revealed that Ki-67 expression is maintained at equivalent or greater levels in metastatic sites of disease compared to matched primary tumors, suggesting that maintenance of Ki-67 expression is associated with metastatic/clonogenic potential. These results elucidate Ki-67's role in maintaining the cancer stem cell niche, which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for human malignancies. PMID:26823390

  6. Requirement for CD40 ligand, CD4(+) T cells, and B cells in an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, J W; Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, J P;

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68) results in productive infection of the lung, the establishment of latency in B lymphocytes and other cell types, transient splenomegaly, and prolonged clonal expansion of activated CD8(+) CD62L(lo) T cells, particularly a Vbet...

  7. Automatic counting of microglial cell activation and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beatriz I Gallego Collado; Pablo de Gracia

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by the damage and death of the retinal gan-glion cells. This disease results in vision loss and blindness. Any vision loss resulting from the disease cannot be restored and nowadays there is no available cure for glaucoma;however an early detection and treatment, could offer neuronal protection and avoid later serious damages to the visual function. A full understanding of the etiology of the disease will still require the contribution of many scientiifc efforts. Glial activation has been observed in glaucoma, being microglial proliferation a hallmark in this neuro-degenerative disease. A typical project studying these cellular changes involved in glaucoma often needs thousands of images-from several animals-covering different layers and regions of the retina. The gold standard to evaluate them is the manual count. This method requires a large amount of time from special-ized personnel. It is a tedious process and prone to human error. We present here a new method to count microglial cells by using a computer algorithm. It counts in one hour the same number of images that a researcher counts in four weeks, with no loss of reliability.

  8. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  9. Microdomains of High Calcium Are Not Required for Exocytosis in Rbl-2h3 Mucosal Mast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Sahar F.; Fewtrell, Clare

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that store-associated microdomains of high Ca2+ are not essential for exocytosis in RBL-2H3 mucosal mast cells. We have now examined whether Ca2+ microdomains near the plasma membrane are required, by comparing the secretory responses seen when Ca2+ influx was elicited by two very different mechanisms. In the first, antigen was used to activate the Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ (CRAC) current (ICRAC) through CRAC channels. In the second, a Ca2+ ionophore was used to tra...

  10. Autocrine IL-10 activation of the STAT3 pathway is required for pathological macrophage differentiation in polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peda, Jacqueline D.; Salah, Sally M.; Wallace, Darren P.; Fields, Patrick E.; Grantham, Connor J.; Fields, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is characterized by slow expansion of fluid-filled cysts derived from tubules within the kidney. Cystic expansion results in injury to surrounding parenchyma and leads to inflammation, scarring and ultimately loss of renal function. Macrophages are a key element in this process, promoting cyst epithelial cell proliferation, cyst expansion and disease progression. Previously, we have shown that the microenvironment established by cystic epithelial cells can ‘program’ macrophages, inducing M2-like macrophage polarization that is characterized by expression of markers that include Arg1 and Il10. Here, we functionally characterize these macrophages, demonstrating that their differentiation enhances their ability to promote cyst cell proliferation. This observation indicates a model of reciprocal pathological interactions between cysts and the innate immune system: cyst epithelial cells promote macrophage polarization to a phenotype that, in turn, is especially efficient in promoting cyst cell proliferation and cyst growth. To better understand the genesis of this macrophage phenotype, we examined the role of IL-10, a regulatory cytokine shown to be important for macrophage-stimulated tissue repair in other settings. Herein, we show that the acquisition of the pathological macrophage phenotype requires IL-10 secretion by the macrophages. Further, we demonstrate a requirement for IL-10-dependent autocrine activation of the STAT3 pathway. These data suggest that the IL-10 pathway in macrophages plays an essential role in the pathological relationship between cysts and the innate immune system in PKD, and thus could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27491076

  11. Platelet-derived stromal cell-derived factor-1 is required for the transformation of circulating monocytes into multipotential cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Seta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14(+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs, which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s derived from circulating CD14(- cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. METHODS: We cultured CD14(+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14(- peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. RESULTS: The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1's critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14(+CXCR4(high cell population. CONCLUSION: The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs.

  12. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinases with distinct requirements for Ste5 scaffolding influence signaling specificity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatauer, Laura J; Zadeh, Sheena F; Bardwell, Lee

    2005-03-01

    Scaffold proteins are believed to enhance specificity in cell signaling when different pathways share common components. The prototype scaffold Ste5 binds to multiple components of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromone response pathway, thereby conducting the mating signal to the Fus3 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Some of the kinases that Ste5 binds to, however, are also shared with other pathways. Thus, it has been presumed that Ste5 prevents its bound kinases from transgressing into other pathways and protects them from intrusions from those pathways. Here we found that Fus3MAPK required Ste5 scaffolding to receive legitimate signals from the mating pathway as well as misdirected signals leaking from other pathways. Furthermore, increasing the cellular concentration of active Ste5 enhanced the channeling of inappropriate stimuli to Fus3. This aberrant signal crossover resulted in the erroneous induction of cell cycle arrest and mating. In contrast to Fus3, the Kss1 MAPK did not require Ste5 scaffolding to receive either authentic or leaking signals. Furthermore, the Ste11 kinase, once activated via Ste5, was able to signal to Kss1 independently of Ste5 scaffolding. These results argue that Ste5 does not act as a barrier that actively prevents signal crossover to Fus3 and that Ste5 may not effectively sequester its activated kinases away from other pathways. Rather, we suggest that specificity in this network is promoted by the selective activation of Ste5 and the distinct requirements of the MAPKs for Ste5 scaffolding. PMID:15713635

  14. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  15. Ovulation requires the activation on proestrus of M₁ muscarinic receptors in the left ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M E; Flores, A; Alvarado, B E; Hernández, C G; Zárate, A; Chavira, R; Cárdenas, M; Arrieta-Cruz, I; Gutiérrez-Juárez, R

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the effects of chemically blocking type 1 muscarinic receptors (M1R) on either the left or right ovary on ovulation rate, number of ova shed and steroid hormones levels. M1R were unilaterally blocked in ovary with the M1R selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZP). PZP was delivered into the bursa ovarica of the left or right ovary of adult rats at 13:00 h on proestrus day. PZP treatment in the left but not in the right ovary blocked ovulation. PZP did not modify the number of ova shed, nor progesterone or 17β-estradiol serum levels. The surge of luteinizing hormone levels was diminished while that of follicle-stimulating hormone did not change in animals treated with PZP in the left ovary. Interestingly, treatment with either synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone or human chorionic gonadotropin 1 h after PZP administration in the left ovary restored ovulation in both ovaries. The presence of M1R protein in the theca cells of the ovarian follicles as well as in cells of the corpus luteum was detected on proestrus day. These results suggest that M1R activation in the left ovary is required for pre-ovulatory gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and ovulation. Furthermore, these results also suggest that M1R in the left ovary might be regulating ovulation asymmetrically through a stimulatory neural signal relayed to the hypothalamus via the vagus nerve to induce the GnRH secretion which then triggers ovulation.

  16. Mol- mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae requiring high levels of molybdate for nitrogenase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Imperial, J; Ugalde, R A; Shah, V K; Brill, W J

    1985-01-01

    Mol- mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae requiring high levels of molybdate for nitrogenase and nitrate reductase activity were characterized. The effects of mol mutations on nitrogenase activity were very similar to those caused by nifQ mutations. Mol- mutants of K. pneumoniae appear to be equivalent to ChlD- mutants of Escherichia coli.

  17. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  18. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Giansanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr and funnel cakes (fun encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression.

  19. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E; Jewett, Cayla E; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C; Brill, Julie A; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-11-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression. PMID:26528720

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster Apaf-1 homologue ARK is required for most, but not all, programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathryn; Daish, Tasman; Harvey, Kieran F; Pfleger, Cathie M; Hariharan, Iswar K; Kumar, Sharad

    2006-03-13

    The Apaf-1 protein is essential for cytochrome c-mediated caspase-9 activation in the intrinsic mammalian pathway of apoptosis. Although Apaf-1 is the only known mammalian homologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans CED-4 protein, the deficiency of apaf-1 in cells or in mice results in a limited cell survival phenotype, suggesting that alternative mechanisms of caspase activation and apoptosis exist in mammals. In Drosophila melanogaster, the only Apaf-1/CED-4 homologue, ARK, is required for the activation of the caspase-9/CED-3-like caspase DRONC. Using specific mutants that are deficient for ark function, we demonstrate that ARK is essential for most programmed cell death (PCD) during D. melanogaster development, as well as for radiation-induced apoptosis. ark mutant embryos have extra cells, and tissues such as brain lobes and wing discs are enlarged. These tissues from ark mutant larvae lack detectable PCD. During metamorphosis, larval salivary gland removal was severely delayed in ark mutants. However, PCD occurred normally in the larval midgut, suggesting that ARK-independent cell death pathways also exist in D. melanogaster.

  1. Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project

  2. Magnesium excretion in C. elegans requires the activity of the GTL-2 TRPM channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Teramoto

    Full Text Available Systemic magnesium homeostasis in mammals is primarily governed by the activities of the TRPM6 and TRPM7 cation channels, which mediate both uptake by the intestinal epithelial cells and reabsorption by the distal convoluted tubule cells in the kidney. In the nematode, C. elegans, intestinal magnesium uptake is dependent on the activities of the TRPM channel proteins, GON-2 and GTL-1. In this paper we provide evidence that another member of the TRPM protein family, GTL-2, acts within the C. elegans excretory cell to mediate the excretion of excess magnesium. Thus, the activity of GTL-2 balances the activities of the paralogous TRPM channel proteins, GON-2 and GTL-1.

  3. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Duwaerts

    Full Text Available Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry, mRNA expression (qtPCR, nitric oxide (NO (. production (Griess reaction, and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs were determined. To address the potential role of NO (. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (. , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury.

  4. Pancreatic β-cell response to increased metabolic demand and to pharmacologic secretagogues requires EPAC2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jin; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Lee, Suh Eun; Hussain, Mehboob A

    2013-08-01

    Incretin hormone action on β-cells stimulates in parallel two different intracellular cyclic AMP-dependent signaling branches mediated by protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP islet/brain isoform 2A (EPAC2A). Both pathways contribute toward potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the overall functional role of EPAC2A in β-cells as it relates to in vivo glucose homeostasis remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we have examined in vivo GSIS in global EPAC2A knockout mice. Additionally, we have conducted in vitro studies of GSIS and calcium dynamics in isolated EPAC2A-deficient islets. EPAC2A deficiency does not impact GSIS in mice under basal conditions. However, when mice are exposed to diet-induced insulin resistance, pharmacologic secretagogue stimulation of β-cells with an incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 analog or with a fatty acid receptor 1/G protein-coupled receptor 40 selective activator, EPAC2A is required for the increased β-cell response to secretory demand. Under these circumstances, EPAC2A is required for potentiating the early dynamic increase in islet calcium levels after glucose stimulation, which is reflected in potentiated first-phase insulin secretion. These studies broaden our understanding of EPAC2A function and highlight its significance during increased secretory demand or drive on β-cells. Our findings advance the rationale for developing EPAC2A-selective pharmacologic activators for β-cell-targeted pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Histone demethylase JMJD2B is required for tumor cell proliferation and survival and is overexpressed in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhao, Li; Zang, Wen; Liu, Zhifang; Chen, Long; Liu, Tiantian [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Xu, Dawei, E-mail: Dawei.Xu@ki.se [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Jia, Jihui, E-mail: jiajihui@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is required for cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion induces apoptosis and/or cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion activates DNA damage response and enhances p53 stabilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is overexpressed in human primary gastric cancer. -- Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Jumonji domain containing 2B (JMJD2B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of JMJD2B. We explored the functional role of JMJD2B in cancer cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis, and determined its expression profile in gastric cancer. Knocking down JMJD2B expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in gastric and other cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and/or induced apoptosis and elevated the expression of p53 and p21{sup CIP1} proteins. The enhanced p53 expression resulted from activation of the DNA damage response pathway. JMJD2B knockdown markedly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in mice. Moreover, JMJD2B expression was increased in primary gastric-cancer tissues of humans. Thus, JMJD2B is required for sustained proliferation and survival of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, and its aberrant expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  6. Pancreatic cancer cells require an EGF receptor-mediated autocrine pathway for proliferation in serum-free conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, L O; Cluck, M W; Lovas, S; Ötvös, F; Murphy, R F; Schally, A V; Permert, J; Larsson, J; Knezetic, J A; Adrian, T E

    2001-01-01

    In-vitro and in-vivo studies have shown that autocrine growth factors and receptors are frequently expressed in human malignancies. Few of these studies, however, provide evidence that the identified autocrine pathway is functional. In this study, a functional autocrine growth pathway in pancreatic cancer has been identified using an in-vitro cell culture system. When pancreatic cancer cells were grown without change of medium, proliferation was greater than when either medium was replaced frequently (HPAF, CAPAN-2, PANC-1 or SW1990) or cells were grown in the presence of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 or the MEK inhibitor PD098059 (HPAF or CAPAN-2). Activity of extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 and c- jun and c- fos mRNA levels were significantly elevated in CAPAN-2 cells cultured continuously in serum-free medium. Collectively, the observations indicate that the EGF receptor and the ERK MAP kinase pathway mediate autocrine signals. In contrast to previous reports, the GRP and IGF-I receptors were shown not to be required for autocrine effects on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Autocrine stimulation of the EGF receptor can contribute to sustained mitogenic activity and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286473

  7. Modification of T cell responses by stem cell mobilization requires direct signaling of the T cell by G-CSF and IL-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Le Texier, Laetitia; Zhang, Ping;

    2014-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic stem cell transplants are currently undertaken using G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. G-CSF has diverse biological effects on a broad range of cells and IL-10 is a key regulator of many of these effects. Using mixed radiation chimeras in which......, stem cell mobilization with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 did not alter the donor T cell's ability to induce acute GVHD. These studies provide an explanation for the effects of G-CSF on T cell function and demonstrate that IL-10 is required to license regulatory function but T cell production of IL-10...... is not itself required for the attenuation GVHD. Although administration of CXCR4 antagonists is an efficient means of stem cell mobilization, this fails to evoke the immunomodulatory effects seen during G-CSF mobilization. These data provide a compelling rationale for considering the immunological benefits...

  8. Oct4 is required for lineage priming in the developing inner cell mass of the mouse blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bin, Gloryn Chia; Muñoz-Descalzo, Silvia; Kurowski, Agata; Leitch, Harry; Lou, Xinghua; Mansfield, William; Etienne-Dumeau, Charles; Grabole, Nils; Mulas, Carla; Niwa, Hitoshi; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Nichols, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    The transcription factor Oct4 is required in vitro for establishment and maintenance of embryonic stem cells and for reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotency. In vivo, it prevents the ectopic differentiation of early embryos into trophoblast. Here, we further explore the role of Oct4 in blastocyst formation and specification of epiblast versus primitive endoderm lineages using conditional genetic deletion. Experiments involving mouse embryos deficient for both maternal and zygotic Oct4 suggest that it is dispensable for zygote formation, early cleavage and activation of Nanog expression. Nanog protein is significantly elevated in the presumptive inner cell mass of Oct4 null embryos, suggesting an unexpected role for Oct4 in attenuating the level of Nanog, which might be significant for priming differentiation during epiblast maturation. Induced deletion of Oct4 during the morula to blastocyst transition disrupts the ability of inner cell mass cells to adopt lineage-specific identity and acquire the molecular profile characteristic of either epiblast or primitive endoderm. Sox17, a marker of primitive endoderm, is not detected following prolonged culture of such embryos, but can be rescued by provision of exogenous FGF4. Interestingly, functional primitive endoderm can be rescued in Oct4-deficient embryos in embryonic stem cell complementation assays, but only if the host embryos are at the pre-blastocyst stage. We conclude that cell fate decisions within the inner cell mass are dependent upon Oct4 and that Oct4 is not cell-autonomously required for the differentiation of primitive endoderm derivatives, as long as an appropriate developmental environment is established. PMID:24504341

  9. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  10. Cortisol patterns are associated with T cell activation in HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Patterson

    Full Text Available The level of T cell activation in untreated HIV disease is strongly and independently associated with risk of immunologic and clinical progression. The factors that influence the level of activation, however, are not fully defined. Since endogenous glucocorticoids are important in regulating inflammation, we sought to determine whether less optimal diurnal cortisol patterns are associated with greater T cell activation.We studied 128 HIV-infected adults who were not on treatment and had a CD4(+ T cell count above 250 cells/µl. We assessed T cell activation by CD38 expression using flow cytometry, and diurnal cortisol was assessed with salivary measurements.Lower waking cortisol levels correlated with greater T cell immune activation, measured by CD38 mean fluorescent intensity, on CD4(+ T cells (r = -0.26, p = 0.006. Participants with lower waking cortisol also showed a trend toward greater activation on CD8(+ T cells (r = -0.17, p = 0.08. A greater diurnal decline in cortisol, usually considered a healthy pattern, correlated with less CD4(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.018 and CD8(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.017 activation.These data suggest that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis contributes to the regulation of T cell activation in HIV. This may represent an important pathway through which psychological states and the HPA axis influence progression of HIV.

  11. Constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase predisposes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines to CD40-mediated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, C Annette; Owens, Trevor; Nalbantoglu, Josephine;

    2006-01-01

    CD40 promotes survival, proliferation, and differentiation of normal B cells but can cause activation-induced cell death in malignant B lymphocytes. CD40 ligand and anti-CD40 antibodies have been used successfully to induce apoptosis in lymphoma lines both in vitro and in xenograft tumor models...... a specific cell line or tumor will undergo apoptosis when stimulated with CD40 and to identify targets downstream of CD40 that affect only the apoptotic arm of CD40 signaling. We have analyzed gene expression patterns in CD40-sensitive and CD40-resistant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines...... and no increase in ERK activity in response to CD40 stimulation. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of ERK may be required for death signaling by CD40....

  12. Identification of two tyrosine residues required for the intramolecular mechanism implicated in GIT1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Totaro

    Full Text Available GIT1 is an ArfGAP and scaffolding protein regulating cell adhesion and migration. The multidomain structure of GIT1 allows the interaction with several partners. Binding of GIT1 to some of its partners requires activation of the GIT1 polypeptide. Our previous studies indicated that binding of paxillin to GIT1 is enhanced by release of an intramolecular interaction between the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal portions that keeps the protein in a binding-incompetent state. Here we have addressed the mechanism mediating this intramolecular inhibitory mechanism by testing the effects of the mutation of several formerly identified GIT1 phosphorylation sites on the binding to paxillin. We have identified two tyrosines at positions 246 and 293 of the human GIT1 polypeptide that are needed to keep the protein in the inactive conformation. Interestingly, mutation of these residues to phenylalanine did not affect binding to paxillin, while mutation to either alanine or glutamic acid enhanced binding to paxillin, without affecting the constitutive binding to the Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor βPIX. The involvement of the two tyrosine residues in the intramolecular interaction was supported by reconstitution experiments showing that these residues are important for the binding between the amino-terminal fragment and carboxy-terminal portions of GIT1. Either GIT1 or GIT1-N tyrosine phosphorylation by Src and pervanadate treatment to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatases did not affect the intramolecular binding between the amino- and carboxy-terminal fragments, nor the binding of GIT1 to paxillin. Mutations increasing the binding of GIT1 to paxillin positively affected cell motility, measured both by transwell migration and wound healing assays. Altogether these results show that tyrosines 246 and 293 of GIT1 are required for the intramolecular inhibitory mechanism that prevents the binding of GIT1 to paxillin. The data also suggest that tyrosine

  13. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Babu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  14. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoting Zhao, Yinan Guo, Wentao Yue, Lina Zhang, Meng Gu, Yue Wang Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Beijing TB and Thoracic Tumor Research Institute/Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4, is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods: ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion: ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. Keywords: ABCC4, cell proliferation, lung cancer, cell cycle

  15. Heteronomous rhythmic activity of neurosecretory cells in the silkmoth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Toshio; Kamimoto, Satoshi

    2003-08-21

    Electrical action potentials of neurosecretory cells producing pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and electrocardiograms were recorded from female pupae of Bombyx mori and the correlation between firing activity of the cells and cardiac activity was analyzed. PBAN producing cells localized in the suboesophageal ganglion (SOG) generated clusters of action potentials at an interval of 30-60 min. The firing activity rhythm at a middle pupal period was closely related to heartbeat reversal rhythm: an active phase of the cells was usually apparent during anterograde pulse phases. Electrocardiograms at a late pupal period often revealed brief oscillatory potentials (15-25 Hz in frequency) of unknown origin. The firing activity rhythm of PBAN cells closely correlated with the rhythmic appearance of clustered oscillatory potentials. Transection of connectives between the brain and SOG abolished rhythmic activity of the cells. These results suggest that a rhythmic firing activity of the PBAN cell system is heteronomously generated by a cerebral neuronal mechanism and the cerebral mechanism relates the cell system to other neuronal mechanisms controlling cardiac activity and oscillatory potential rhythms. PMID:12873731

  16. Activated Notch Causes Deafness by Promoting a Supporting Cell Phenotype in Developing Auditory Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Savoy-Burke; Felicia A Gilels; Wei Pan; Diana Pratt; Jianwen Que; Lin Gan; White, Patricia M.; Kiernan, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether activated Notch can promote a supporting cell fate during sensory cell differentiation in the inner ear. Methods An activated form of the Notch1 receptor (NICD) was expressed in early differentiating hair cells using a Gfi1-Cre mouse allele. To determine the effects of activated Notch on developing hair cells, Gfi1-NICD animals and their littermate controls were assessed at 5 weeks for hearing by measuring auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and distortion product...

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 β activity is required for hBora/Aurora A-mediated mitotic entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Po-Chi; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Hsiao, Michael; Huang, Chi-Ying; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2013-03-15

    The synthesis and degradation of hBora is important for the regulation of mitotic entry and exist. In G 2 phase, hBora can complex with Aurora A to activate Plk1 and control mitotic entry. However, whether the post-translational modification of hBora is relevant to the mitotic entry still unclear. Here, we used the LC-MS/MS phosphopeptide mapping assay to identify 13 in vivo hBora phosphorylation sites and characterized that GSK3β can interact with hBora and phosphorylate hBora at Ser274 and Ser278. Pharmacological inhibitors of GSK3β reduced the retarded migrating band of hBora in cells and diminished the phosphorylation of hBora by in vitro kinase assay. Moreover, as well as in GSK3β activity-inhibited cells, specific knockdown of GSK3β by shRNA and S274A/S278 hBora mutant-expressing cells also exhibited the reduced Plk1 activation and a delay in mitotic entry. It suggests that GSK3β activity is required for hBora-mediated mitotic entry through Ser274 and Ser278 phosphorylation.

  18. A minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Franck; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    How the cells break symmetry and organize their edge activity to move directionally is a fun- damental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly rely on gradients of regulatory factors and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe polarization of edge activity. Theses approaches, however, fail to explain cell behavior prior to the onset of polarization. Our analysis using the model system of polarizing and moving fish epidermal keratocytes suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organization of cell activity in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell center, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviors. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion, and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell center.

  19. Impaired telomerase activity hinders proliferation and in vitro transformation of Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayesh, P; Vrinda, S; Priyaja, P; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2016-08-01

    Retaining terminal transferase activity of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein enzyme which add telomeric repeats on chromosome end is thought to be required to prevent cellular ageing. Additionally, telomerase considered as a marker for cell proliferation and immortalization in eukaryotes. We examined telomerase activity in tissues and lymphoid cell culture of Penaeus monodon. Along with telomerase activity, telomere repeats and an attempt on identification of telomerase reverse transcriptase (PmTERT) were made. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol revealed that telomerase-dependent telomeric lengthening has been taking place in P. monodon and the adult tissues were retaining this capacity throughout their lifespan with the highest activity in ovary, testis and lymphoid organ. However, telomerase activity could not be detected in lymphoid cells in culture. The canonical telomeric repeats added by telomerase of lymphoid tissue extract were identified as TTAGG, but pentameric repeats GGTTA and AGGTT were also added by the telomerase. PmTERT protein sequence (partial) shared 100 % identity with the TERT sequence of Daphnia pulex, 27 % sequence identity with Purple sea urchin and 24-25 % with Zebra fish. Undetectable telomerase activity in lymphoid cell culture supports the hypothesis that the inadequate telomerase activity or gene expression may be a reason that prevents neoplastic transformation and spontaneous immortalization of the cells in vitro. Thus, it is envisaged that telomerase activation in lymphoid cells may surmount cellular ageing for in vitro transformation and cell line establishment. PMID:26084784

  20. Impaired telomerase activity hinders proliferation and in vitro transformation of Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayesh, P; Vrinda, S; Priyaja, P; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2016-08-01

    Retaining terminal transferase activity of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein enzyme which add telomeric repeats on chromosome end is thought to be required to prevent cellular ageing. Additionally, telomerase considered as a marker for cell proliferation and immortalization in eukaryotes. We examined telomerase activity in tissues and lymphoid cell culture of Penaeus monodon. Along with telomerase activity, telomere repeats and an attempt on identification of telomerase reverse transcriptase (PmTERT) were made. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol revealed that telomerase-dependent telomeric lengthening has been taking place in P. monodon and the adult tissues were retaining this capacity throughout their lifespan with the highest activity in ovary, testis and lymphoid organ. However, telomerase activity could not be detected in lymphoid cells in culture. The canonical telomeric repeats added by telomerase of lymphoid tissue extract were identified as TTAGG, but pentameric repeats GGTTA and AGGTT were also added by the telomerase. PmTERT protein sequence (partial) shared 100 % identity with the TERT sequence of Daphnia pulex, 27 % sequence identity with Purple sea urchin and 24-25 % with Zebra fish. Undetectable telomerase activity in lymphoid cell culture supports the hypothesis that the inadequate telomerase activity or gene expression may be a reason that prevents neoplastic transformation and spontaneous immortalization of the cells in vitro. Thus, it is envisaged that telomerase activation in lymphoid cells may surmount cellular ageing for in vitro transformation and cell line establishment.

  1. p73 is required for ependymal cell maturation and neurogenic SVZ cytoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cano, L; Fuertes-Alvarez, S; Robledinos-Anton, N; Bizy, A; Villena-Cortes, A; Fariñas, I; Marques, M M; Marin, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is a highly organized microenvironment established during the first postnatal days when radial glia cells begin to transform into type B-cells and ependymal cells, all of which will form regenerative units, pinwheels, along the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Here, we identify p73, a p53 homologue, as a critical factor controlling both cell-type specification and structural organization of the developing mouse SVZ. We describe that p73 deficiency halts the transition of the radial glia into ependymal cells, leading to the emergence of immature cells with abnormal identities in the ventricle and resulting in loss of the ventricular integrity. p73-deficient ependymal cells have noticeably impaired ciliogenesis and they fail to organize into pinwheels, disrupting SVZ niche structure and function. Therefore, p73 is essential for appropriate ependymal cell maturation and the establishment of the neurogenic niche architecture. Accordingly, lack of p73 results in impaired neurogenesis. Moreover, p73 is required for translational planar cell polarity establishment, since p73 deficiency results in profound defects in cilia organization in individual cells and in intercellular patch orientation. Thus, our data reveal a completely new function of p73, independent of p53, in the neurogenic architecture of the SVZ of rodent brain and in the establishment of ependymal planar cell polarity with important implications in neurogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 730-747, 2016. PMID:26482843

  2. Exosomes released from Mycoplasma infected tumor cells activate inhibitory B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas cause numerous human diseases and are common opportunistic pathogens in cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. Mycoplasma infection elicits various host immune responses. Here we demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes (myco+ exosomes that specifically activate splenic B cells and induce splenocytes cytokine production. Induction of cytokines, including the proinflammatory IFN-γ and the anti-inflammatory IL-10, was largely dependent on the presence of B cells. B cells were the major IL-10 producers. In splenocytes from B cell deficient μMT mice, induction of IFN-γ+ T cells by myco+ exosomes was greatly increased compared with wild type splenocytes. In addition, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in the presence of myco+ exosome-treated B cells. Also, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell signaling was impaired by myco+ exosome treatment. Proteomic analysis identified mycoplasma proteins in exosomes that potentially contribute to the effects. Our results demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes carrying mycoplasma components that preferentially activate B cells, which in turn, are able to inhibit T cell activity. These results suggest that mycoplasmas infecting tumor cells can exploit the exosome pathway to disseminate their own components and modulate the activity of immune cells, in particular, activate B cells with inhibitory activity.

  3. Slow cluster formation of purified human or rhesus T cells requires protein kinase C and LFA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylar, E H; Molina, C; Báez, I; Kessler, M

    1996-03-01

    Homotropic T cell adhesion, as generally studied, consists of a rapid, transient binding process that is measured over a 15-120 min. period. Here we report a slow type of adhesion process occurring with human or rhesus T cells, purified from peripheral blood, that manifests itself by the formation of rounded, multi-layer clusters which may contain hundreds of cells. The maximal number and size of the clusters peak 1-2 days after the addition of phorbol ester, an absolute requirement. The number of clusters formed is proportional to phorbol ester concentration up to 1.25 ng/mL. Phorbol esters such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), phorbol dibutyrate (PDB), and 7-octylindolactam (OIL) induced optimal cluster formation at 1-13 ng/mL, levels slightly higher than that required to induce mitogenesis of purified T cells. Phorbol itself and the alpha-form of the ester were inactive. Both cluster formation and mitogenesis (stimulated by Con A or anti-CD3) are completely inhibited by staurosporin at 12.5 ng/mL. Even at 2.5 ng/mL, 74% of cluster formation was inhibited, which strongly implies a crucial role for protein kinase C. In the presence of accessory cells, T cell clusters were suppressed. Monoclonal Ab such as anti-CD3, mouse anti-CD3 followed by anti-mouse IgG, anti-CD4, anti-CD4A, anti-CD2, anti-CD8, and anti-CD45 did not induce cluster formation. None were inhibitory or stimulatory in the presence of PMA, except for anti-CD3 which enhanced cluster formation by 26%. However, anti-LFA-1 beta-chain (mouse monoclonal) completely blocked cluster formation over the range studied (63-1000 ng/mL) for both human and rhesus cells; rat anti-LFA-1 only blocked human cell adhesion. Anti LFA-1 only partially inhibited T cell mitogenesis. These results show that slow cluster formation shares the LFA-1 and phorbol ester requirements of the rapid adhesion of T cells requiring LFA-1 and ICAM-1. However, cluster occurs at a very low phorbol ester concentration, appears more

  4. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  5. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  6. Requirements Evolution and Reuse Using the Systems Engineering Process Activities (SEPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suzanne Barber

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available As more organizations attempt to reuse previous development efforts and incorporate legacy systems, typical software development activities have transitioned from unique ground-up coding efforts to the integration of new code, legacy code, and COTS implementations. This transition has brought on a whole new set of development issues, including resolving mismatches between integrated components and tracing legacy and COTS components to requirements. This paper presents the Systems Engineering Process Activities (SEPA methodology, developed to address these and other issues in current software development practices. SEPA aids the reuse and integration process by focusing on requirements integration and evolution, while maintaining traceability to requirements gathered from domain experts and end users. The SEPA methodology supports the development process by promoting requirements analysis prior to design, separation of domain-based and application-based (i.e. implementation-specific requirements, and evaluating system component suitability in terms of domain and application requirements. The paper also presents an example illustrating the application of SEPA in the emergency incident response domain to facilitate requirements management and foster requirements reuse.

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is introduced into human hosts via tick bites. Among the cell types present in the skin which may initially contact spirochetes are mast cells. Since spirochetes are known to activate a variety of cell types in vitro, we tested whether B. burgdorferi spirochetes could activate mast cells. We report here that freshly isolated rat peritoneal mast cells or mouse MC/9 mast cells cultured in vitro with live or freeze-thawed B. burgdorferi spirochetes undergo low but detectable degranulation, as measured by [5-3H] hydroxytryptamine release, and they synthesize and secrete the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast to findings in previous studies, where B. burgdorferi-associated activity was shown to be dependent upon protein lipidation, mast cell TNF-α release was not induced by either lipidated or unlipidated recombinant OspA. This activity was additionally shown to be protease sensitive and surface expressed. Finally, comparisons of TNF-α-inducing activity in known low-, intermediate-, and high-passage B. burgdorferi B31 isolates demonstrated passage-dependent loss of activity, indicating that the activity is probably plasmid encoded. These findings document the presence in low-passage B. burgdorferi spirochetes of a novel lipidation-independent activity capable of inducing cytokine release from host cells. PMID:10024550

  8. Nutritional requirements for methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells and growing cells of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phisit Seesuriyachan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 possesses cytoplasmic azoreductase and can breakdown azo bonds under microaerophilic condition. It was found previously that a growing culture is more tolerant to a high initial dye concentration than freely suspended cells supplied only with sucrose. The present study is aimed at investigating the nutritive requirements for decolourisation by the growing cells and the freely suspended cells using Plackett-Burmann experimental design. In this study, the composition of the medium was found to play an important role in methyl orange decolourisation and biomass production. Sucrose, meat extract and peptone increased methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells, whereas sodium acetate exerted a negative effect on decolourisation. In addition, it was observed that the yeast and meat extracts enhanced the degradation of the dye by the growing cells. Sucrose was an important factor in biomass production by freely suspended cells and growing cells. On the other hand, dipotassium hydrogen phosphate and sodium acetate decreased the biomass production. These findings promote the understanding and knowledge about the requirements of azo dye decolourisation by Lactobacillus casei.

  9. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  10. Phosphorylation of both nucleoplasmin domains is required for activation of its chromatin decondensation activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Omaetxebarria, Miren J; Ramos, Isbaal;

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) is a histone chaperone involved in nucleosome assembly, chromatin decondensation at fertilization, and apoptosis. To carry out these activities NP has to interact with different types of histones, an interaction that is regulated by phosphorylation. Here we have identified...

  11. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  12. Activation of C3a receptor is required in cigarette smoke-mediated emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiaoyi; Shan, Ming; You, Ran; Frazier, Michael V.; Hong, Monica Jeongsoo; Wetsel, Rick A.; Drouin, Scott; SERYSHEV, ALEXANDER; MD, Li-zhen Song; Cornwell, Lorraine; Rossen, Roger D.; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke can initiate sterile inflammatory responses in the lung and activate myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) that induce differentiation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the emphysematous lungs. Consumption of complement proteins increases in acute inflammation, but the contribution of complement protein 3 (C3) to chronic cigarette smoke-induced immune responses in the lung is not clear. Here we show that following chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, C3 deficient...

  13. Innate lymphoid cell development requires TOX-dependent generation of a common ILC progenitor

    OpenAIRE

    Seehus, Corey R.; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D.; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined, based on effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways leading to ILC lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional regulator TOX is required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors to ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrates that TOX deficiency result...

  14. Transparent conducting oxide electrodes requirements for high efficiency micromorph solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Boccard, Mathieu; Cuony, Peter; SöDerströM, Karin; Bugnon, Grégory; Despeisse, Matthieu; Battaglia, Corsin; Ding, Laura; NICOLAY, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The requirements for a micromorph tandem cell front transparent conductive oxide (TCO) are multiple. This essential layer needs a high transparency, excellent conduction, strong light scattering into silicon and good surface morphology for the subsequent growth of silicon cells. These parameters are all linked and trade-offs have to be found for optimal layer. The optimum combination, taking into account current achievable materials properties, is still unclear. Concerning transparency, we st...

  15. Cystatin F regulates proteinase activity in IL-2-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Katarina; Konjar, Spela; Watts, Colin; Turk, Boris; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Cystatin F is a unique member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, which is synthesized as an inactive dimer and it is activated by N-terminal cleavage in the endolysosomes. It is expressed in the cells of the immune system: myeloid cells and the cells involved in target cell killing: natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Upon activation of the NK cells with interleukin 2 (IL-2), cystatin F was found upregulated and co-localized in cytotoxic granules with cathepsin C (CatC) and CatV. However, cystatin F inhibits the CatC in cells only when its N-terminal part is processed. Although cystatin F could inhibit both CatV and CatC, the IL-2 stimulation of the YT cells resulted in an increased CatV activity, while the CatC activity was unchanged. The incubation of IL-2 activated NK cells with a cysteine proteinase inhibitor E-64d increased the cystatin F dimer formation. Our results suggest that cystatin F not only inhibits CatV, but it is processed by the CatV in order to inhibit the CatC activity in cytotoxic granules. The regulation of the CatC activity in the cytotoxic granules of the NK cells by the cystatin F could be important for the processing and activation of granule-associated serine proteases - granzymes.

  16. Preparation of cell lines for single-cell analysis of transcriptional activation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Imaging molecularly defined regions of chromatin in single living cells during transcriptional activation has the potential to provide new insight into gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a method for isolating cell lines with multi-copy arrays of reporter transgenes, which can be used for real-time high-resolution imaging of transcriptional activation dynamics in single cells.

  17. Neural progenitor cells regulate microglia functions and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Kira I; Andres, Robert H; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Bieri, Gregor; Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; He, Yingbo; Guzman, Raphael; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2012-11-01

    We found mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to have a secretory protein profile distinct from other brain cells and to modulate microglial activation, proliferation and phagocytosis. NPC-derived vascular endothelial growth factor was necessary and sufficient to exert at least some of these effects in mice. Thus, neural precursor cells may not only be shaped by microglia, but also regulate microglia functions and activity.

  18. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  19. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  20. Telomere elongation in immortal human cells without detectable telomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, T M; Englezou, A; J Gupta; Bacchetti, S; Reddel, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    Immortalization of human cells is often associated with reactivation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening. We examined whether telomerase activation is necessary for immortalization. All normal human fibroblasts tested were negative for telomerase activity. Thirteen out of 13 DNA tumor virus-transformed cell cultures were also negative in the pre-crisis (i.e. non-immortalized) stage. Of 35 immortalized cell line...

  1. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, N. A. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Fedotov, I. V. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V. [M.M. Shemyakin and Yu.A. Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Zheltikov, A. M. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 143025 (Russian Federation); Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  2. Homocysteine activates T cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling and increasing mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Lü, Silin; Ding, Yanhong; Zheng, Ming; Wang, Xian

    2016-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accelerates atherosclerosis by increasing proliferation and stimulating cytokine secretion in T cells. However, whether homocysteine (Hcy)-mediated T cell activation is associated with metabolic reprogramming is unclear. Here, our in vivo and in vitro studies showed that Hcy-stimulated splenic T-cell activation in mice was accompanied by increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium, mitochondrial mass and respiration. Inhibiting mitochondrial ROS production and calcium signals or blocking mitochondrial respiration largely blunted Hcy-induced T-cell interferon γ (IFN-γ) secretion and proliferation. Hcy also enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in T cells, and inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid blocked Hcy-induced T-cell activation. Mechanistically, Hcy increased ER-mitochondria coupling, and uncoupling ER-mitochondria by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole attenuated Hcy-stimulated mitochondrial reprogramming, IFN-γ secretion and proliferation in T cells, suggesting that juxtaposition of ER and mitochondria is required for Hcy-promoted mitochondrial function and T-cell activation. In conclusion, Hcy promotes T-cell activation by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling and regulating metabolic reprogramming.

  3. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M.; Sunde, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The current National Research Council (NRC) selenium (Se) requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet) as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase), liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29–0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1) in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07–0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06–0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13–0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet. PMID

  4. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M Taylor

    Full Text Available The current National Research Council (NRC selenium (Se requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase, liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29-0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1 in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07-0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06-0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13-0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet.

  5. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Sunde, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    The current National Research Council (NRC) selenium (Se) requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet) as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase), liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29-0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1) in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07-0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06-0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13-0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet.

  6. TLR4-activated microglia require IFN-γ to induce severe neuronal dysfunction and death in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Lewen, Andrea; Galow, Lukas V; Cesetti, Tiziana; Scheffel, Jörg; Regen, Tommy; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Kann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Microglia (tissue-resident macrophages) represent the main cell type of the innate immune system in the CNS; however, the mechanisms that control the activation of microglia are widely unknown. We systematically explored microglial activation and functional microglia-neuron interactions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, i.e., postnatal cortical tissue that lacks adaptive immunity. We applied electrophysiological recordings of local field potential and extracellular K(+) concentration, immunohistochemistry, design-based stereology, morphometry, Sholl analysis, and biochemical analyses. We show that chronic activation with either bacterial lipopolysaccharide through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or leukocyte cytokine IFN-γ induces reactive phenotypes in microglia associated with morphological changes, population expansion, CD11b and CD68 up-regulation, and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO) release. Notably, these reactive phenotypes only moderately alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and gamma oscillations (30-100 Hz), which emerge from precise synaptic communication of glutamatergic pyramidal cells and fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, in local hippocampal networks. Short-term synaptic plasticity and extracellular potassium homeostasis during neural excitation, also reflecting astrocyte function, are unaffected. In contrast, the coactivation of TLR4 and IFN-γ receptors results in neuronal dysfunction and death, caused mainly by enhanced microglial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO release, because iNOS inhibition is neuroprotective. Thus, activation of TLR4 in microglia in situ requires concomitant IFN-γ receptor signaling from peripheral immune cells, such as T helper type 1 and natural killer cells, to unleash neurotoxicity and inflammation-induced neurodegeneration. Our findings provide crucial mechanistic insight into the complex process of microglia activation, with

  7. Colchicum autumnale agglutinin activates all murine T-lymphocytes but does not induce the proliferation of all activated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, V; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Perret, R; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-08-25

    Plant lectins with mitogenic properties for T-lymphocytes have been particularly useful for the study of T-cell activation and effector functions. In the search for mitogenic lectins possessing activation features different from the ones associated with the already known mitogens, we found that an agglutinin isolated from Colchicum autumnale tubers, Colchicum autumnale agglutinin (CAA), possesses interesting properties. First, contrasting with the classical mitogens, CAA induces the proliferation of a fraction of the CD4+ and CD8+ mouse T-lymphocytes. Second, the CAA-induced proliferation requires MHC class II and CD4 molecules. Third, although only a fraction of T-cells enters into the cell cycle, all T-lymphocytes are activated and express high levels of the activation markers CD69 and CD44. Finally, CAA-stimulation is characterized by a particular pattern of the cytokine gene expression, reflected by the transcription of the IL2, IL5, and IFN-gamma genes, while the IL4 and IL10 genes remained silent. Taken together these data demonstrate that CAA activation does not conform to the pathway of T-cell triggering observed with classical mitogenes and represents a new tool for the analysis of T-cell activation.

  8. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...... support the notion that activation of PLD by PMA is dependent on PKC. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) caused a rapid stimulation of PLD activity in the cells. This activation was inhibited after downregulation of PKC, indicating that the agonist acts by a mechanism similar to that of PMA....

  9. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity

  10. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  11. Swelling-activated Ca2+ channels trigger Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Haeberle

    Full Text Available Merkel cell-neurite complexes are highly sensitive touch receptors comprising epidermal Merkel cells and sensory afferents. Based on morphological and molecular studies, Merkel cells are proposed to be mechanosensory cells that signal afferents via neurotransmission; however, functional studies testing this hypothesis in intact skin have produced conflicting results. To test this model in a simplified system, we asked whether purified Merkel cells are directly activated by mechanical stimulation. Cell shape was manipulated with anisotonic solution changes and responses were monitored by Ca2+ imaging with fura-2. We found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling, but not hypertonic solutions, triggered cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients. Several lines of evidence indicate that these signals arise from swelling-activated Ca2+-permeable ion channels. First, transients were reversibly abolished by chelating extracellular Ca2+, demonstrating a requirement for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Second, Ca2+ transients were initially observed near the plasma membrane in cytoplasmic processes. Third, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel (VACC antagonists reduced transients by half, suggesting that swelling-activated channels depolarize plasma membranes to activate VACCs. Finally, emptying internal Ca2+ stores attenuated transients by 80%, suggesting Ca2+ release from stores augments swelling-activated Ca2+ signals. To identify candidate mechanotransduction channels, we used RT-PCR to amplify ion-channel transcripts whose pharmacological profiles matched those of hypotonic-evoked Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells. We found 11 amplicons, including PKD1, PKD2, and TRPC1, channels previously implicated in mechanotransduction in other cells. Collectively, these results directly demonstrate that Merkel cells are activated by hypotonic-evoked swelling, identify cellular signaling mechanisms that mediate these responses, and support the hypothesis that Merkel cells contribute

  12. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

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    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  13. BMP2 Transfer to Neighboring Cells and Activation of Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Shaikhkarami, Marjan; Hortschansky, Peter; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Morphogen gradients and concentration are critical features during early embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Previously we reported the preparation of biologically active, fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed their binding to the cell surface and followed BMP2 endocytosis over time on the level of single endosomes. Here we show that this internalized BMP2 can be transferred to neighboring cells and, moreover, also activates downstream BMP signaling in adjacent cells, indicated by Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and activation of the downstream target gene id1. Using a 3D matrix to modulate cell-cell contacts in culture we could show that direct cell-cell contact significantly increased BMP2 transfer. Using inhibitors of vesicular transport, transfer was strongly inhibited. Interestingly, cotreatment with the physiological BMP inhibitor Noggin increased BMP2 uptake and transfer, albeit activation of Smad signaling in neighboring cells was completely suppressed. Our findings present a novel and interesting mechanism by which morphogens such as BMP2 can be transferred between cells and how this is modulated by BMP antagonists such as Noggin, and how this influences activation of Smad signaling by BMP2 in neighboring cells. PMID:27306974

  14. Microparticle-Induced Activation of the Vascular Endothelium Requires Caveolin-1/Caveolae.

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    Allison M Andrews

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are small membrane fragments shed from normal as well as activated, apoptotic or injured cells. Emerging evidence implicates MPs as a causal and/or contributing factor in altering normal vascular cell phenotype through initiation of proinflammatory signal transduction events and paracrine delivery of proteins, mRNA and miRNA. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which MPs influence these events. Caveolae are important membrane microdomains that function as centers of signal transduction and endocytosis. Here, we tested the concept that the MP-induced pro-inflammatory phenotype shift in endothelial cells (ECs depends on caveolae. Consistent with previous reports, MP challenge activated ECs as evidenced by upregulation of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression. ICAM-1 upregulation was mediated by activation of NF-κB, Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This response was absent in ECs lacking caveolin-1/caveolae. To test whether caveolae-mediated endocytosis, a dynamin-2 dependent process, is a feature of the proinflammatory response, EC's were pretreated with the dynamin-2 inhibitor dynasore. Similar to observations in cells lacking caveolin-1, inhibition of endocytosis significantly attenuated MPs effects including, EGFR phosphorylation, activation of NF-κB and upregulation of ICAM-1 expression. Thus, our results indicate that caveolae play a role in mediating the pro-inflammatory signaling pathways which lead to EC activation in response to MPs.

  15. Transcriptional activation of the nitrogenase promoter in vitro: adenosine nucleotides are required for inhibition of NIFA activity by NIFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eydmann, T; Söderbäck, E; Jones, T; Hill, S; Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1995-03-01

    The enhancer-binding protein NIFA is required for transcriptional activation of nif promoters by the alternative holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase, which contains the sigma factor sigma 54 (sigma N). NIFA hydrolyzes nucleoside triphosphates to catalyze the isomerization of closed promoter complexes to transcriptionally competent open complexes. The activity of NIFA is antagonized by the regulatory protein NIFL in response to oxygen and fixed nitrogen in vivo. We have investigated the requirement for nucleotides in the formation and stability of open promoter complexes by NIFA and inhibition of its activity by NIFL at the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoter. Open complexes formed by sigma 54-containing RNA polymerase are considerably more stable to heparin challenge in the presence of GTP than in the presence of ATP. This differential stability is most probably a consequence of GTP being the initiating nucleotide at this promoter. Adenosine nucleosides are specifically required for Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL to inhibit open complex formation by native NIFA, and the nucleoside triphosphatase activity of NIFA is strongly inhibited by NIFL under these conditions. We propose a model in which NIFL modulates the activity of NIFA via an adenosine nucleotide switch. PMID:7868590

  16. YAP/TEAD co-activator regulated pluripotency and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer initiated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that some solid tumors, including ovarian cancer, contain distinct populations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor initiation, growth, chemo-resistance, and recurrence. The Hippo pathway has attracted considerable attention and some investigators have focused on YAP functions for maintaining stemness and cell differentiation. In this study, we successfully isolated the ovarian cancer initiating cells (OCICs and demonstrated YAP promoted self-renewal of ovarian cancer initiated cell (OCIC through its downstream co-activator TEAD. YAP and TEAD families were required for maintaining the expression of specific genes that may be involved in OCICs' stemness and chemoresistance. Taken together, our data first indicate that YAP/TEAD co-activator regulated ovarian cancer initiated cell pluripotency and chemo-resistance. It proposed a new mechanism on the drug resistance in cancer stem cell that Hippo-YAP signal pathway might serve as therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer treatment in clinical.

  17. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Landmann

    2012-04-01

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P2 blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  18. Lipid Raft is required for PSGL-1 ligation induced HL-60 cell adhesion on ICAM-1.

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    Tingshuang Xu

    Full Text Available P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion.

  19. 30 CFR 285.617 - What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will MMS approve the revision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities require a revision to my SAP... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Requirements Activities Under An Approved Sap § 285.617 What activities require a revision to my SAP, and when will MMS approve the revision? (a) You...

  20. Synthesis and SAR requirements of adamantane-colchicine conjugates with both microtubule depolymerizing and tubulin clustering activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefirova, Olga N; Nurieva, Evgeniya V; Shishov, Dmitrii V; Baskin, Igor I; Fuchs, Fabian; Lemcke, Heiko; Schröder, Fabian; Weiss, Dieter G; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Kuznetsov, Sergei A

    2011-09-15

    A series of analogues of conjugate 1, combining an adamantane-based paclitaxel (taxol) mimetic with colchicine was synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity in a cell-based assay with the human lung carcinoma cell line A549. The most active compounds (10 EC(50) 2 ± 1.0 nM, 23 EC(50) 6 ± 1.4 nM, 26 EC(50) 5 ± 1.8 nM, 28 EC(50) 11 ± 1.7 nM, 30 EC(50) 4.8 ± 0.5 nM) were found to interfere with the microtubule dynamics in an interesting manner. Treatment of the cells with these compounds promoted disassembly of microtubules followed by the formation of stable tubulin clusters. Structure-activity relationships for the analogues of 23 revealed the sensitivity of both cytotoxicity and tubulin clustering ability to the linker length. The presence of adamantane (or another bulky hydrophobic and non-aromatic moiety) in 23 was found to play an important role in the formation of tubulin clusters. Structural requirements for optimal activity have been partially explained by molecular modeling. PMID:21873068

  1. Bmi1 is required for hepatic progenitor cell expansion and liver tumor development.

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    Lingling Fan

    Full Text Available Bmi1 is a polycomb group transcriptional repressor and it has been implicated in regulating self-renewal and proliferation of many types of stem or progenitor cells. In addition, Bmi1 has been shown to function as an oncogene in multiple tumor types. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of Bmi1 in regulating hepatic oval cells, the major type of bipotential progenitor cells in adult liver, as well as the role of Bmi1 during hepatocarcinogenesis using Bmi1 knockout mice. We found that loss of Bmi1 significantly restricted chemically induced oval cell expansion in the mouse liver. Concomitant deletion of Ink4a/Arf in Bmi1 deficient mice completely rescued the oval cell expansion phenotype. Furthermore, ablation of Bmi1 delayed hepatocarcinogenesis induced by AKT and Ras co-expression. This antineoplastic effect was accompanied by the loss of hepatic oval cell marker expression in the liver tumor samples. In summary, our data demonstrated that Bmi1 is required for hepatic oval cell expansion via deregulating the Ink4a/Arf locus in mice. Our study also provides the evidence, for the first time, that Bmi1 expression is required for liver cancer development in vivo, thus representing a promising target for innovative treatments against human liver cancer.

  2. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Aibo; Ma, Xiaopeng; Demarque, Maud; Jin, Wei; Xin, Huawei; Dejean, Anne; Dong, Chen

    2016-07-26

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells. PMID:27425617

  3. Division genes in Escherichia coli are expressed coordinately to cell septum requirements by gearbox promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Vicente, M

    1990-11-01

    The cell division ftsQAZ cluster and the ftsZ-dependent bolA morphogene of Escherichia coli are found to be driven by gearboxes, a distinct class of promoters characterized by showing an activity that is inversely dependent on growth rate. These promoters contain specific sequences upstream from the mRNA start point, and their -10 region is essential for the inverse growth rate dependence. Gearbox promoters are essential for driving ftsQAZ and bolA gene expression so that the encoded products are synthesized at constant amounts per cell independently of cell size. This mode of regulation would be expected for the expression of proteins that either play a regulatory role in cell division or form a stoichiometric component of the septum, a structure that, independently of cell size and growth rate, is produced once per cell cycle.

  4. The transcription factor NFAT5 is required for cyclin expression and cell cycle progression in cells exposed to hypertonic stress.

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    Katherine Drews-Elger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertonicity can perturb cellular functions, induce DNA damage-like responses and inhibit proliferation. The transcription factor NFAT5 induces osmoprotective gene products that allow cells to adapt to sustained hypertonic conditions. Although it is known that NFAT5-deficient lymphocytes and renal medullary cells have reduced proliferative capacity and viability under hypertonic stress, less is understood about the contribution of this factor to DNA damage responses and cell cycle regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated conditional knockout mice to obtain NFAT5(-/- T lymphocytes, which we used as a model of proliferating cells to study NFAT5-dependent responses. We show that hypertonicity triggered an early, NFAT5-independent, genotoxic stress-like response with induction of p53, p21 and GADD45, downregulation of cyclins, and cell cycle arrest. This was followed by an NFAT5-dependent adaptive phase in wild-type cells, which induced an osmoprotective gene expression program, downregulated stress markers, resumed cyclin expression and proliferation, and displayed enhanced NFAT5 transcriptional activity in S and G2/M. In contrast, NFAT5(-/- cells failed to induce osmoprotective genes and exhibited poorer viability. Although surviving NFAT5(-/- cells downregulated genotoxic stress markers, they underwent cell cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M, which was associated with reduced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1. We also show that pathologic hypertonicity levels, as occurring in plasma of patients and animal models of osmoregulatory disorders, inhibited the induction of cyclins and aurora B kinase in response to T cell receptor stimulation in fresh NFAT5(-/- lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that NFAT5 facilitates cell proliferation under hypertonic conditions by inducing an osmoadaptive response that enables cells to express fundamental regulators needed for cell cycle progression.

  5. Cloning of aminopeptidase Npromoter and its activity in hematopoietic cell and different tumor cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) promoter region was cloned and sequenced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The recombinant reporter construct containing the promoter and luciferase gene, designated pXP1-APNLuc, was introduced into myeloblastic cell line, T lymphocyte cell line and various tumor cell lines. Luciferase assay showed that APN upstream promoter is myeloid-specific for high expression in myeloblastic cell line and much lower expres sion in T lymphocyte cell line. The promoter activity was relatively high in lung adenoma cell line compared with other tumor cell lines including hepatoma cell line, tong cancer cell line and esophageal cancer cell line in which the promoter activity significantly diminished or was almost undetectable. The characteristics of APN promoter may pro vide a new strategy for specific myeloprotection while tumor patients are being treated with chemotherapy and/or radio therapy.

  6. EPAS1 trans-activation during hypoxia requires p42/p44 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P W; Freeman, T L; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-19

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stress that regulates gene expression and cell function. A number of hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified and have been shown to play critical roles in mediating cellular responses to hypoxia. One of these is the endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1/HIF2-alpha/HLF/HRF). This protein is 48% homologous to hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-alpha). To date, virtually nothing is known about the signaling pathways that lead to either EPAS1 or HIF1-alpha activation. Here we show that EPAS1 is phosphorylated when PC12 cells are exposed to hypoxia and that p42/p44 MAPK is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, completely blocked hypoxia-induced trans-activation of a hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter gene by transfected EPAS1. Likewise, expression of a constitutively active MEK1 mimicked the effects of hypoxia on HRE reporter gene expression. However, pretreatment with PD98059 had no effect on EPAS1 phosphorylation during hypoxia, suggesting that MAPK targets other proteins that are critical for the trans-activation of EPAS1. We further show that hypoxia-induced trans-activation of EPAS1 is independent of Ras. Finally, pretreatment with calmodulin antagonists nearly completely blocked both the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and the EPAS1 trans-activation of HRE-Luc. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation and that activation of MAPK and EPAS1 occurs through a calmodulin-sensitive pathway and not through the GTPase, Ras. These results are the first to identify a specific signaling pathway involved in EPAS1 activation. PMID:10559262

  7. Substrate stiffness regulates filopodial activities in lung cancer cells.

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    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and

  8. Lineage-Specific Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Requires a G2 Cell Cycle Pause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oudenhove, Jennifer J; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Ghule, Prachi N; Del Rio, Roxana; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Stein, Gary S

    2016-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have an abbreviated G1 phase of the cell cycle that allows rapid proliferation and maintenance of pluripotency. Lengthening of G1 corresponds to loss of pluripotency during differentiation. However, precise mechanisms that link alterations in the cell cycle and early differentiation remain to be defined. We investigated initial stages of mesendodermal lineage commitment in hESCs, and observed a cell cycle pause. Transcriptome profiling identified several genes with known roles in regulation of the G2/M transition that were differentially expressed early during lineage commitment. WEE1 kinase, which blocks entry into mitosis by phosphorylating CDK1 at Y15, was the most highly expressed of these genes. Inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation by a specific inhibitor of WEE1 restored cell cycle progression by preventing the G2 pause. Directed differentiation of hESCs revealed that cells paused during commitment to the endo- and mesodermal, but not ectodermal, lineages. Functionally, WEE1 inhibition during meso- and endodermal differentiation selectively decreased expression of definitive endodermal markers SOX17 and FOXA2. Our findings identify a novel G2 cell cycle pause that is required for endodermal differentiation and provide important new mechanistic insights into early events of lineage commitment. Stem Cells 2016;34:1765-1775. PMID:26946228

  9. Survival of cancer stem cells under hypoxia and serum depletion via decrease in PP2A activity and activation of p38-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Pei Lin

    Full Text Available Hypoxia and serum depletion are common features of solid tumors that occur upon antiangiogenesis, irradiation and chemotherapy across a wide variety of malignancies. Here we show that tumor cells expressing CD133, a marker for colorectal cancer initiating or stem cells, are enriched and survive under hypoxia and serum depletion conditions, whereas CD133- cells undergo apoptosis. CD133+ tumor cells increase cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition properties. Moreover, via screening a panel of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase pathways, we identified Hsp27 is constitutively activated in CD133+ cells rather than CD133- cell under hypoxia and serum depletion conditions. However, there was no difference in Hsp27 activation between CD133+ and CD133- cells under normal growth condition. Hsp27 activation, which was mediated by the p38MAPK-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27 pathway, is required for CD133+ cells to inhibit caspase 9 and 3 cleavage. In addition, inhibition of Hsp27 signaling sensitizes CD133+ cells to hypoxia and serum depletion -induced apoptosis. Moreover, the antiapoptotic pathway is also activated in spheroid culture-enriched CD133+ cancer stem cells from a variety of solid tumor cells including lung, brain and oral cancer, suggesting it is a common pathway activated in cancer stem cells from multiple tumor types. Thus, activation of PP2A or inactivation of the p38MAPK-MAPKAPK2-Hsp27 pathway may develop new strategies for cancer therapy by suppression of their TIC population.

  10. Telomerase activity in germline and embryonic cells of Xenopus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantell, L L; Greider, C W

    1994-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein which synthesizes telomere repeats onto chromosome ends. Telomerase activity is involved in telomere length maintenance. We used Xenopus laevis as a model system to study the expression of telomerase activity in germline cells and during early development. We identified a non-processive telomerase activity in manually dissected nuclei of Xenopus stage VI oocytes. Telomerase activity was detected throughout oogenesis and embryogenesis. Telomerase was active in...

  11. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  12. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  13. Glucose- and interleukin-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis requires Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation and is prevented by a sulfonylurea receptor 1/inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.2 (SUR/Kir6.2) selective potassium channel opener in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Størling, Joachim; Sturis, Jeppe;

    2004-01-01

    -regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, an effect that was abrogated by 3 micromol/l NN414. Similarly, 1 micromol/l of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1/2 inhibitor PD098059 or 1 micromol/l of the l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine prevented glucose- and IL-1beta-induced ERK activation, beta......-cell apoptosis, and impaired function. Finally, islet release of IL-1beta in response to high glucose could be abrogated by nimodipine, NN414, or PD098059. Thus, in human islets, glucose- and IL-1beta-induced beta-cell secretory dysfunction and apoptosis are Ca(2+) influx and ERK dependent and can be prevented...

  14. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  15. Pineal photoreceptor cells are required for maintaining the circadian rhythms of behavioral visual sensitivity in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinle Li

    Full Text Available In non-mammalian vertebrates, the pineal gland functions as the central pacemaker that regulates the circadian rhythms of animal behavior and physiology. We generated a transgenic zebrafish line [Tg(Gnat2:gal4-VP16/UAS:nfsB-mCherry] in which the E. coli nitroreductase is expressed in pineal photoreceptor cells. In developing embryos and young adults, the transgene is expressed in both retinal and pineal photoreceptor cells. During aging, the expression of the transgene in retinal photoreceptor cells gradually diminishes. By 8 months of age, the Gnat2 promoter-driven nitroreductase is no longer expressed in retinal photoreceptor cells, but its expression in pineal photoreceptor cells persists. This provides a tool for selective ablation of pineal photoreceptor cells, i.e., by treatments with metronidazole. In the absence of pineal photoreceptor cells, the behavioral visual sensitivity of the fish remains unchanged; however, the circadian rhythms of rod and cone sensitivity are diminished. Brief light exposures restore the circadian rhythms of behavioral visual sensitivity. Together, the data suggest that retinal photoreceptor cells respond to environmental cues and are capable of entraining the circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity; however, they are insufficient for maintaining the rhythms. Cellular signals from the pineal photoreceptor cells may be required for maintaining the circadian rhythms of visual sensitivity.

  16. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Qiong-yu [Department of Basic Medical Science, Yongzhou Vocational Technical College, Yong Zhou 425100 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: lingxiaocsu@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha 410018 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  17. 14-3-3ε Is required for germ cell migration in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kirki Tsigkari

    Full Text Available Although 14-3-3 proteins participate in multiple biological processes, isoform-specific specialized functions, as well as functional redundancy are emerging with tissue and developmental stage-specificity. Accordingly, the two 14-3-3ε proteins in Drosophila exhibit functional specificity and redundancy. Homozygotes for loss of function alleles of D14-3-3ε contain significantly fewer germ line cells (pole cells in their gonads, a phenotype not shared by mutants in the other 14-3-3 gene leo. We show that although D14-3-3ε is enriched within pole cells it is required in mesodermal somatic gonad precursor cells which guide pole cells in their migration through the mesoderm and coalesce with them to form the embryonic gonad. Loss of D14-3-3ε results in defective pole cell migration, reduced pole cell number. We present evidence that D14-3-3ε loss results in reduction or loss of the transcription factor Zfh-1, one of the main regulatory molecules of the pole cell migration, from the somatic gonad precursor cells.

  18. Fast Vesicle Fusion in Living Cells Requires at Least Three SNARE Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohrmann, Ralf; de Wit, Heidi; Verhage, Matthijs;

    2010-01-01

    relationship for fast (synchronous) fusion and a near-linear relationship for overall release. Thus, fast fusion typically observed in synapses and neurosecretory cells requires at least three functional SNARE complexes, while slower release might occur with fewer. Heterogeneity in SNARE-complex number may...

  19. Electrode activation and passivation of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Hendriksen, P.V.;

    2006-01-01

    resistance increased significantly over the next four days at open circuit conditions. Apparently, at OCV conditions cell passivation occurs. The cell gradually reactivates, once the current is switched on again. Part of this activation/passivation process is fast enough to influence the resistance...... of the cell during i-V measurements (over less than 1 hour) and a considerable hysteresis is observed in the cell voltage during these measurements. Impedance spectroscopy was used to investigate the activation/passivation process. It was found that the series resistance and the part of the polarisation...... impedance above approximately 100 Hz were not influenced by the activation/passivation process. The part of the polarisation impedance between I and 100 Hz was highly influenced by the activation/passivation process and during cell polarisation this part of the polarisation impedance was up to 40% lower...

  20. MEK kinase 1 activity is required for definitive erythropoiesis in the mouse fetal liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Barbara; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rasmussen, Susanne;

    2005-01-01

    KD) embryos have normal morphology but are anemic due to failure of definitive erythropoiesis. When Mekk1(DeltaKD) fetal liver cells were transferred to lethally irradiated wild-type hosts, mature red blood cells were generated from the mutant cells, suggesting that MEKK1 functions in a non-cell......Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal to regulated kinase (MEK) kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activating kinase known to be implicated in proinflammatory responses and cell motility. Using mice deficient for MEKK1 kinase activity (Mekk1(DeltaKD)) we show a role...... for MEKK1 in definitive mouse erythropoiesis. Although Mekk1(DeltaKD) mice are alive and fertile on a 129 x C57/BL6 background, the frequency of Mekk1(DeltaKD) embryos that develop past embryonic day (E) 14.5 is dramatically reduced when backcrossed into the C57/BL6 background. At E13.5, Mekk1(Delta...

  1. P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is required for metaphase spindle positioning and anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompard, G; Rabeharivelo, G; Cau, J; Abrieu, A; Delsert, C; Morin, N

    2013-02-14

    The oncogenic kinase PAK4 was recently found to be involved in the regulation of the G1 phase and the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. We have also identified that PAK4 regulates Ran GTPase activity during mitosis. Here, we show that after entering mitosis, PAK4-depleted cells maintain a prolonged metaphase-like state. In these cells, chromosome congression to the metaphase plate occurs with normal kinetics but is followed by an extended period during which membrane blebbing and spindle rotation are observed. These bipolar PAK4-depleted metaphase-like spindles have a defective astral microtubule (MT) network and are not centered in the cell but are in close contact with the cell cortex. As the metaphase-like state persists, centrosome fragmentation occurs, chromosomes scatter from the metaphase plate and move toward the spindle poles with an active spindle assembly checkpoint, a phenotype that is reminiscent of cohesion fatigue. PAK4 also regulates the acto-myosin cytoskeleton and we report that PAK4 depletion results in the induction of cortical membrane blebbing during prometaphase arrest. However, we show that membrane blebs, which are strongly enriched in phospho-cofilin, are not responsible for the poor anchoring of the spindle. As PAK4 depletion interferes with the localization of components of the dynein/dynactin complexes at the kinetochores and on the astral MTs, we propose that loss of PAK4 could induce a change in the activities of motor proteins. PMID:22450748

  2. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal. PMID:27091106

  3. Identification of the Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin Domain Active in the Cell Cytosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernard, Marina; Burroni, Daniela; Papini, Emanuele; Rappuoli, Rino; Telford, John; Montecucco, Cesare

    1998-01-01

    Cells exposed to Helicobacter pylori toxin VacA develop large vacuoles which originate from massive swelling of membranous compartments at late stages of the endocytic pathway. When expressed in the cytosol, VacA induces vacuolization as it does when added from outside. This and other evidence indicate that VacA is a toxin capable of entering the cell cytosol, where it displays its activity. In this study, we have used cytosolic expression to identify the portion of the toxin molecule responsible for the vacuolating activity. VacA mutants with deletions at the C and N termini were generated, and their activity was analyzed upon expression in HeLa cells. We found that the vacuolating activity of VacA resides in the amino-terminal region, the whole of which is required for its intracellular activity. PMID:9826387

  4. The development of innate lymphoid cells requires TOX-dependent generation of a common innate lymphoid cell progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined on the basis of effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways that lead to ILC-lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we found that the transcriptional regulator TOX was required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors into ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrated that TOX deficiency resulted in early defects in the survival or proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as ILC differentiation at a later stage. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors revealed that TOX-deficient cells failed to upregulate many genes of the ILC program, including genes that are targets of Notch, which indicated that TOX is a key determinant of early specification to the ILC lineage.

  5. Secretion and apparent activation of human hepatic lipase requires proper oligosaccharide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); B.P. Neve (Bernadette); H. Jansen (Hans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractHuman hepatic lipase (HL) is a glycoprotein with four N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. The importance of glycosylation for the secretion of catalytically active HL was studied in HepG2 cells by using inhibitors of intracellular trafficking, N-glycosylat

  6. Monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese Ravetto

    Full Text Available Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis.The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73-340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25-88% drop in the cell's shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall.Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte mechanical properties

  7. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  8. Differential requirement for MEK Partner 1 in DU145 prostate cancer cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Evangeline M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ERK signaling regulates focal adhesion disassembly during cell movement, and increased ERK signaling frequently contributes to enhanced motility of human tumor cells. We previously found that the ERK scaffold MEK Partner 1 (MP1 is required for focal adhesion disassembly in fibroblasts. Here we test the hypothesis that MP1-dependent ERK signaling regulates motility of DU145 prostate cancer cells. We find that MP1 is required for motility on fibronectin, but not for motility stimulated by serum or EGF. Surprisingly, MP1 appears not to function through its known binding partners MEK1 or PAK1, suggesting the existence of a novel pathway by which MP1 can regulate motility on fibronectin. MP1 may function by regulating the stability or expression of paxillin, a key regulator of motility.

  9. Dystroglycan is required for polarizing the epithelial cells and the oocyte in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Wu-Min; Schneider, Martina; Frock, Richard;

    2003-01-01

    , and plays a role in linking the ECM to the actin cytoskeleton; however, how these interactions are regulated and their basic cellular functions are poorly understood. Using mosaic analysis and RNAi in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we show that Dystroglycan is required cell...... localization of these same markers. In Dystroglycan germline clones early oocyte polarity markers fail to be localized to the posterior, and oocyte cortical F-actin organization is abnormal. Dystroglycan is also required non-cell-autonomously to organize the planar polarity of basal actin in follicle cells......, possibly by organizing the Laminin ECM. These data suggest that the primary function of Dystroglycan in oogenesis is to organize cellular polarity; and this study sets the stage for analyzing the Dystroglycan complex by using the power of Drosophila molecular genetics....

  10. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; HE Yanli; ZHANG Jiahua; ZHANG Jinghui; HUANG Tao

    2007-01-01

    Although all normal tissue cells,including stem cells,are genetically homologous,variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to t