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  1. Schwann cell myelination requires integration of laminin activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen K.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Patel, Rajesh; Chen, Zu-Lin; Strickland, Sidney; Takagi, Junichi; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Yurchenco, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Laminins promote early stages of peripheral nerve myelination by assembling basement membranes (BMs) on Schwann cell surfaces, leading to activation of β1 integrins and other receptors. The BM composition, structural bonds and ligands needed to mediate this process, however, are not well understood. Mice hypomorphic for laminin γ1-subunit expression that assembled endoneurial BMs with reduced component density exhibited an axonal sorting defect with amyelination but normal Schwann cell proliferation, the latter unlike the null. To identify the basis for this, and to dissect participating laminin interactions, LAMC1 gene-inactivated dorsal root ganglia were treated with recombinant laminin-211 and -111 lacking different architecture-forming and receptor-binding activities, to induce myelination. Myelin-wrapping of axons by Schwann cells was found to require higher laminin concentrations than either proliferation or axonal ensheathment. Laminins that were unable to polymerize through deletions that removed critical N-terminal (LN) domains, or that lacked cell-adhesive globular (LG) domains, caused reduced BMs and almost no myelination. Laminins engineered to bind weakly to α6β1 and/or α7β1 integrins through their LG domains, even though they could effectively assemble BMs, decreased myelination. Proliferation depended upon both integrin binding to LG domains and polymerization. Collectively these findings reveal that laminins integrate scaffold-forming and cell-adhesion activities to assemble an endoneurial BM, with myelination and proliferation requiring additional α6β1/α7β1-laminin LG domain interactions, and that a high BM ligand/structural density is needed for efficient myelination. PMID:22767514

  2. Retinal interneuron survival requires non-cell-autonomous Atrx activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagali, Pamela S; Medina, Chantal F; Zhao, Brandon Y H; Yan, Keqin; Baker, Adam N; Coupland, Stuart G; Tsilfidis, Catherine; Wallace, Valerie A; Picketts, David J

    2016-11-01

    ATRX is a chromatin remodeling protein that is mutated in several intellectual disability disorders including alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked (ATR-X) syndrome. We previously reported the prevalence of ophthalmological defects in ATR-X syndrome patients, and accordingly we find morphological and functional visual abnormalities in a mouse model harboring a mutation occurring in ATR-X patients. The visual system abnormalities observed in these mice parallels the Atrx-null retinal phenotype characterized by interneuron defects and selective loss of amacrine and horizontal cells. The mechanisms that underlie selective neuronal vulnerability and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system upon Atrx mutation or deletion are unknown. To interrogate the cellular specificity of Atrx for its retinal neuroprotective functions, we employed a combination of temporal and lineage-restricted conditional ablation strategies to generate five different conditional knockout mouse models, and subsequently identified a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Atrx in bipolar cells for inhibitory interneuron survival in the retina. Atrx-deficient retinal bipolar cells exhibit functional, structural and molecular alterations consistent with impairments in neuronal activity and connectivity. Gene expression changes in the Atrx-null retina indicate defective synaptic structure and neuronal circuitry, suggest excitotoxic mechanisms of neurodegeneration, and demonstrate that common targets of ATRX in the forebrain and retina may contribute to similar neuropathological processes underlying cognitive impairment and visual dysfunction in ATR-X syndrome.

  3. Core Fucosylation of the T Cell Receptor Is Required for T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Mao, Shanshan; Sun, Shijie; Li, Ming; Li, Zhi; Yu, Rui; Ma, Tonghui; Gu, Jianguo; Zhang, Jianing; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Li, Wenzhe

    2018-01-01

    CD4 + T cell activation promotes the pathogenic process of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). T cell receptor (TCR) complex are highly core fucosylated glycoproteins, which play important roles in T cell activation. In this study, we found that the core fucosylation of CD4 + T cells was significantly increased in SLE patients. Loss of core fucosyltransferase (Fut8), the sole enzyme for catalyzing the core fucosylation of N-glycan, significantly reduced CD4 + T cell activation and ameliorated the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced syndrome in Fut8 -/- mice. T cell activation with OVA 323-339 loaded major histocompatibility complex II (pMHC-II) on B cell was dramatically attenuated in Fut8 -/- OT-II CD4 + T cells compared with Fut8 +/+ OT-II CD4 + T cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 was significantly reduced in Fut8 +/+ OT-II CD4 + T cells by the treatment of fucosidase. Our results suggest that core fucosylation is required for efficient TCR-pMHC-II contacts in CD4 + T cell activation, and hyper core fucosylation may serve as a potential novel biomarker in the sera from SLE patients.

  4. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter. When

  5. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    Immune impairment mediated by microgravity threatens the success of space exploration requiring long-duration spaceflight. The cells of most concern, T lymphocytes, coordinate the host response against microbial and cancerous challenges leading to elimination and long-term protection. T cells are activated upon recognition of specific microbial peptides bound on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Subsequently, this engagement results in T cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T cells driven by autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. Finally, the effector T cells acquire the weaponry needed to destroy microbial invaders and tumors. Studies conducted on T cells during spaceflight, or using Earth-based culture systems, have shown reduced production of cytokines, proliferation and effector functions as compared to controls. This may account for the cases of viral reactivation events and opportunistic infections associated with astronauts of numerous missions. This work has largely been based upon the outcome of T cell activation by stimulatory factors that target select T cell signaling pathways rather than the complex, signaling events related to the natural process of antigen presentation by DC. This study tested the response of an ovalbumin peptide-specific T cell line, OT-II TCH, to activation by DC when the T cells were cultured 24-120 h in a simulated microgravity (SMG) environment generated by a rotary cell culture system. Following 72 h culture of T cells in SMG (SMG-T) or control static (Static-T) conditions, IL-2 production by the T cells was reduced in SMG-T cells compared to Static-T cells upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. However, when the SMG-T cells were stimulated with DC and peptide, IL-2 was significantly increased compared to Static-T cells. Such enhanced IL-2 production by SMG-T cells peaked at 72 h SMG culture time and decreased thereafter

  6. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Feracci, Helene [Universite Bordeaux 1, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS UPR 8641, 33600 Pessac (France); Raptis, Leda, E-mail: raptisl@queensu.ca [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  7. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-01-01

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac V12 ), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac V12 with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac V12 -expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac V12 is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac V12 expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac V12 . The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac V12 , as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  8. Distinct requirements for activation of NKT and NK cells during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J; Verma, Shilpi; Wang, Qiao; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Benedict, Chris A

    2014-04-15

    NK cells are key regulators of innate defense against mouse CMV (MCMV). Like NK cells, NKT cells also produce high levels of IFN-γ rapidly after MCMV infection. However, whether similar mechanisms govern activation of these two cell types, as well as the significance of NKT cells for host resistance, remain unknown. In this article, we show that, although both NKT and NK cells are activated via cytokines, their particular cytokine requirements differ significantly in vitro and in vivo. IL-12 is required for NKT cell activation in vitro but is not sufficient, whereas NK cells have the capacity to be activated more promiscuously in response to individual cytokines from innate cells. In line with these results, GM-CSF-derived dendritic cells activated only NK cells upon MCMV infection, consistent with their virtual lack of IL-12 production, whereas Flt3 ligand-derived dendritic cells produced IL-12 and activated both NK and NKT cells. In vivo, NKT cell activation was abolished in IL-12(-/-) mice infected with MCMV, whereas NK cells were still activated. In turn, splenic NK cell activation was more IL-18 dependent. The differential requirements for IL-12 and IL-18 correlated with the levels of cytokine receptor expression by NK and NKT cells. Finally, mice lacking NKT cells showed reduced control of MCMV, and depleting NK cells further enhanced viral replication. Taken together, our results show that NKT and NK cells have differing requirements for cytokine-mediated activation, and both can contribute nonredundantly to MCMV defense, revealing that these two innate lymphocyte subsets function together to fine-tune antiviral responses.

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell development requires transient Wnt/β-catenin activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Guiu, Jordi; D'Altri, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. We show here that β-catenin is nuclear and active in few endothelial nonhematopoietic cells closely associated with the emerging hematopoietic clusters of the embryonic aorta during mouse development. Importantly, Wnt/β-catenin activity is transiently required...... of mutant cells toward the hematopoietic lineage; however, these mutant cells still contribute to the adult endothelium. Together, those findings indicate that Wnt/β-catenin activity is needed for the emergence but not the maintenance of HSCs in mouse embryos....

  10. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  11. Distinct oxysterol requirements for positioning naïve and activated dendritic cells in the spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Erick; Dang, Eric V.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Cyster, Jason G.

    2017-01-01

    Correct positioning of dendritic cells (DCs) is critical for efficient pathogen encounter and antigen presentation. Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 2 (EBI2) has been identified as a chemoattractant receptor required for naïve CD4+DCIR2+ DC positioning in response to 7α,25-hydroxycholesterol (7α,25-HC). We now provide evidence that a second EBI2 ligand, 7α,27-HC, is involved in splenic DCIR2+ DC positioning and homeostasis. Cyp27a1, the enzyme uniquely required for 7α,27-HC synthesis, is expressed by stromal cells in the region of naïve DC localization. After activation, DCIR2+ DCs move into the T cell zone. We find that EBI2 is rapidly up-regulated in DCIR2+ DCs under certain activation conditions, and positioning at the B-T zone interface depends on EBI2. Under conditions of type I interferon induction, EBI2 ligand levels are elevated, causing activated DCIR2+ DCs to disperse throughout the T zone. Last, we provide evidence that oxysterol metabolism by Batf3-dependent DCs is important for EBI2-dependent positioning of activated DCIR2+DCs. This work indicates that 7α,27-HC functions as a guidance cue in vivo and reveals a multitiered role for EBI2 in DC positioning. Deficiency in this organizing system results in defective CD4+ T cell responses. PMID:28738017

  12. Protein S binding to human endothelial cells is required for expression of cofactor activity for activated protein C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackeng, T. M.; Hessing, M.; van 't Veer, C.; Meijer-Huizinga, F.; Meijers, J. C.; de Groot, P. G.; van Mourik, J. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1993-01-01

    An important feedback mechanism in blood coagulation is supplied by the protein C/protein S anticoagulant pathway. In this study we demonstrate that the binding of human protein S to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) is required for the expression of cofactor activity of

  13. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Akinori, E-mail: morita@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiological Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8509 (Japan); Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Hosoi, Yoshio, E-mail: hosoi@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Department of Radiation Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  14. UTX demethylase activity is required for satellite cell-mediated muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Hervé; Wang, Chaochen; Nakka, Kiran; Benyoucef, Aissa; Sebastian, Soji; Zhuang, Lenan; Chu, Alphonse; Palii, Carmen G; Liu, Chengyu; Camellato, Brendan; Brand, Marjorie; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The X chromosome-encoded histone demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to establish transcriptionally permissive chromatin. Loss of UTX in female mice is embryonic lethal. Unexpectedly, male UTX-null mice escape embryonic lethality due to expression of UTY, a paralog that lacks H3K27 demethylase activity, suggesting an enzyme-independent role for UTX in development and thereby challenging the need for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo. However, the requirement for active H3K27 demethylation in stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration remains untested. Here, we employed an inducible mouse KO that specifically ablates Utx in satellite cells (SCs) and demonstrated that active H3K27 demethylation is necessary for muscle regeneration. Loss of UTX in SCs blocked myofiber regeneration in both male and female mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that UTX mediates muscle regeneration through its H3K27 demethylase activity, as loss of demethylase activity either by chemical inhibition or knock-in of demethylase-dead UTX resulted in defective muscle repair. Mechanistically, dissection of the muscle regenerative process revealed that the demethylase activity of UTX is required for expression of the transcription factor myogenin, which in turn drives differentiation of muscle progenitors. Thus, we have identified a critical role for the enzymatic activity of UTX in activating muscle-specific gene expression during myofiber regeneration and have revealed a physiological role for active H3K27 demethylation in vivo.

  15. Drosophila p115 is required for Cdk1 activation and G2/M cell cycle transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2017-04-01

    Golgi complex inheritance and its relationship with the cell cycle are central in cell biology. Golgi matrix proteins, known as golgins, are one of the components that underlie the shape and functionality of this organelle. In mammalian cells, golgins are phosphorylated during mitosis to allow fragmentation of the Golgi ribbon and they also participate in spindle dynamics; both processes are required for cell cycle progression. Little is known about the function of golgins during mitosis in metazoans in vivo. This is particularly significant in Drosophila, in which the Golgi architecture is distributed in numerous units scattered throughout the cytoplasm, in contrast with mammalian cells. We examined the function of the ER/cis-Golgi golgin p115 during the proliferative phase of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. Knockdown of p115 decreased tissue size. This phenotype was not caused by programmed cell death or cell size reductions, but by a reduction in the final cell number due to an accumulation of cells at the G2/M transition. This phenomenon frequently allows mitotic bypass and re-replication of DNA. These outcomes are similar to those observed following the partial loss of function of positive regulators of Cdk1 in Drosophila. In agreement with this, Cdk1 activation was reduced upon p115 knockdown. Interestingly, these phenotypes were fully rescued by Cdk1 overexpression and partially rescued by Myt1 depletion, but not by String (also known as Cdc25) overexpression. Additionally, we confirmed the physical interaction between p115 and Cdk1, suggesting that the formation of a complex where both proteins are present is essential for the full activation of Cdk1 and thus the correct progression of mitosis in proliferating tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells are not inhibited by cyclosporin A, but do require IL 2 for activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucy, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells are activated from normal murine spleen cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR). These T cells are radioresistant and suppress the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in second primary MLR cultures. This report demonstrates that cyclosporin A (CsA) blocks the activation of these suppressor cells at a dose of 1 microgram/ml. However, reconstitution of CsA blocked cultures with IL 2 restores the activation of the suppressor T cells, but fails to significantly restore the activation of CTL in these same cultures. This differential activation requirement was used to establish T cell lines that demonstrate enriched suppressor cell activity but depletion of CTL activity. These findings are discussed in terms of the mechanism of action of CsA in these distinct T cell subsets and the relevance to models of allograft unresponsiveness

  17. Quantitative requirement for ATP for active transport in isolated renal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessitore, N.; Sakhrani, L.M.; Massry, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the quantitative relationship between cellular ATP concentration and Na+-K+-ATPase activity as measured by ouabain-sensitive 86Rb influx in rabbit proximal renal cells. Cellular ATP was reduced in a stepwise manner by rotenone (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and was increased by 10 mM adenosine. During these maneuvers, ouabain-sensitive 86Rb influx was linearly related to cellular ATP and did not saturate up to 9.9 mM ATP. In contrast, Na+-K+-ATPase activity in membranes prepared from these cells saturated at 2.0 mM ATP at various sodium (10-100 mM) and potassium (4-100 mM) concentrations. Sodium-dependent phosphate uptake and alpha-methylglucoside (alpha-MG) uptake were both inhibited to a similar degree when cellular ATP was reduced. We conclude that 1) the ATP requirement for saturation of Na+-K+-ATPase is higher in intact renal cells than in the membranes, and 2) the uptake of phosphate and alpha-MG are similarly influenced by reduction in ATP. This effect of ATP on phosphate and AMG uptake is most likely an indirect one and is secondary to changes in the sodium gradient across the cell

  18. Activation of the blood-brain barrier by SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) requires cell-associated virus and is not restricted to endothelial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, A G; Rasmussen, T A; Bieniemy, D; Lackner, A A

    2004-11-01

    The primary cell infected during acute HIV neuropathogenesis is the monocyte-derived macrophage. We have demonstrated that there is activation of the BBB (blood-brain barrier) during acute viral infection and at terminal AIDS. However, it has never been determined if there is a requirement for the virus to be carried through the BBB or how these Trojan horses would be induced to cross the BBB. We added SIVmac251-infected (SIV is simian immunodeficiency virus) mononuclear cells (and their supernatants) to the luminal or abluminal compartment of our BBB model. There was activation of both sides of the BBB model, only if viral-infected cells were added to the luminal compartment, as opposed to the addition of cell-free supernatants. This suggests that cell-associated virus is essential for the activation of the BBB. This, in turn, would be expected to lead to further infiltration of cells capable of viral infection. VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1) staining revealed, for the first time, that there is an absolute requirement for virally infected cells, and not just the presence of virus for the activation of the BBB.

  19. Human T cell colony formation in microculture: analysis of growth requirements and functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, E W; Lee, J W; Dosch, H M; Price, G B

    1981-03-01

    A microculture method in methylcellulose has been developed for the study of human T cell colony formation. The technique is simple, reliable, does not require preincubation with lectin and requires small numbers of cells. Colony formation was dependent on the presence of phytohemagglutin-conditioned medium, a T colony precursor cell (TCPC), and a "helper" or accessory T cell. Plating efficiency was increased 10-fold in the presence of irradiated feeder cells. Progenitors of the T colony cells were identified in peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen but not in thymus or thoracic duct. They were isolated in the E-rosetting, theophylline-resistant, Fc-IgG-negative cell populations. In peripheral blood the frequency of TCPC and accessory cells, the T colony forming unit, was estimated to be 8 X 10(-3). Colony cells proliferated in response to lectins and allogeneic cells. Forty to 80% of the cells were Ia-positive and stimulated both autologous and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte responses. They were incapable of mediating antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. In contrast, they were effective in assays of spontaneous cytotoxicity but only against certain target cells. This method for the analysis of T colony formation should prove valuable in the functional analysis of T cell subsets in immunodeficiency states or the transplant recipient.

  20. W/kit gene required for interstitial cells of Cajal and for intestinal pacemaker activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizinga, J D; Thuneberg, L; Klüppel, M

    1995-01-01

    The pacemaker activity in the mammalian gut is responsible for generating anally propagating phasic contractions. The cellular basis for this intrinsic activity is unknown. The smooth muscle cells of the external muscle layers and the innervated cellular network of interstitial cells of Cajal......, which is closely associated with the external muscle layers of the mammalian gut, have both been proposed to stimulate pacemaker activity. The interstitial cells of Cajal were identified in the last century but their developmental origin and function have remained unclear. Here we show...... of Cajal associated with Auerbach's nerve plexus and intestinal pacemaker activity....

  1. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. © 2015 Institut Curie/Inserm. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  2. Co-stimulation by anti-immunoglobulin is required for B cell activation by CD40Llow T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    cell Ag specificity by using anti-CD3/T cell receptor (TcR) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to activate T cells. To study the role of sIg engagement in the responsiveness of B cells to T help, we pre-treated small resting B cells with soluble anti-kappa mAb prior to contact with an activated Th1 clone...... strongly. Low buoyant density B cells also responded to CD40Llow Th cells. There was no B cell response to resting Th cells. mAb against CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II completely inhibited B cell responses to CD40Llow Th1 cells, equivalent...

  3. NKG2D is required for NK cell activation and function in response to E1-deleted adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2010-12-15

    Despite high transduction efficiency in vivo, the application of recombinant E1-deleted adenoviral vectors for in vivo gene therapy has been limited by the attendant innate and adaptive immune responses to adenoviral vectors. NK cells have been shown to play an important role in innate immune elimination of adenoviral vectors in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying NK cell activation and function in response to adenoviral vectors remain largely undefined. In this study, we showed that NK cell activation upon adenoviral infection was dependent on accessory cells such as dendritic cells and macrophages and that cell contact-dependent signals from the accessory cells are necessary for NK cell activation. We further demonstrated that ligands of the NK activating receptor NKG2D were upregulated in accessory cells upon adenoviral infection and that blockade of NKG2D inhibited NK cell activation upon adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in adenoviral clearance in vivo. In addition, NKG2D was required for NK cell-mediated cytolysis on adenovirus-infected targets. Taken together, these results suggest that efficient NK cell activation and function in response to adenoviral infection is critically dependent on the NKG2D pathway, which understanding may assist in the design of effective strategies to improve the outcome of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy.

  4. HDAC6 deacetylase activity is required for hypoxia-induced invadopodia formation and cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Arsenault

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in the cancer field, tumor cell invasion and metastasis remain a major clinical challenge. Cell invasion across tissue boundaries depends largely on extracellular matrix degradation, which can be initiated by formation of actin-rich cell structures specialized in matrix degradation called invadopodia. Although the hypoxic microenvironment within solid tumors has been increasingly recognized as an important driver of local invasion and metastasis, little is known about how hypoxia influences invadopodia biogenesis. Here, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6, a cytoplasmic member of the histone deacetylase family, is a novel modulator of hypoxia-induced invadopodia formation. Hypoxia was found to enhance HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity through activation of the EGFR pathway. Activated HDAC6, in turn, triggered Smad3 phosphorylation resulting in nuclear accumulation. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity or knockdown of the protein inhibited both hypoxia-induced Smad3 activation and invadopodia formation. Our data provide evidence that hypoxia influences invadopodia formation in a biphasic manner, which involves the activation of HDAC6 deacetylase activity by EGFR, resulting in enhanced Smad phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. The identification of HDAC6 as a key participant of hypoxia-induced cell invasion may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of metastasis in cancer patients.

  5. Leukemia stem cells in T-ALL require active Hif1α and Wnt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Vincenzo; Jenkins, Catherine E.; Lam, Sonya H.; Hoofd, Catherine; Belmonte, Miriam; Wang, Xuehai; Gusscott, Sam; Gracias, Deanne

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to play important roles in normal hematopoietic stem cell biology and in the development of both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Its role in maintaining established leukemia stem cells, which are more directly relevant to patients with disease, however, is less clear. To address what role Wnt signaling may play in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we used a stably integrated fluorescent Wnt reporter construct to interrogate endogenous Wnt signaling activity in vivo. In this study, we report that active Wnt signaling is restricted to minor subpopulations within bulk tumors, that these Wnt-active subsets are highly enriched for leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), and that genetic inactivation of β-catenin severely reduces LIC frequency. We show further that β-catenin transcription is upregulated by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) stabilization, and that deletion of Hif1α also severely reduces LIC frequency. Of note, the deletion of β-catenin or Hif1α did not impair the growth or viability of bulk tumor cells, suggesting that elements of the Wnt and Hif pathways specifically support leukemia stem cells. We also confirm the relevance of these findings to human disease using cell lines and patient-derived xenografts, suggesting that targeting these pathways could benefit patients with T-ALL. PMID:25934477

  6. JNK activation is required for TNFα-induced apoptosis in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minero, Valerio Giacomo; Khadjavi, Amina; Costelli, Paola; Baccino, Francesco Maria; Bonelli, Gabriella

    2013-09-01

    A frequent distinctive feature of tumors, hepatocellular carcinomas included, is resistance to apoptosis induced by a variety of agents, among which the pleiotropic cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). Compared to other cell types, hepatocytes and hepatoma-derived cell lines are poorly susceptible to TNF-induced apoptosis, which is largely ascribed to activation of the prosurvival transcription factor NF-κB and can be overcome by associating TNF to low doses of protein synthesis inhibitors or other drugs. This study analyses the molecular mechanisms by which TNF, in combination with cycloheximide (CHX), induces apoptosis in human hepatoma-derived Huh7 cells, focusing on the role played by JNK. Huh7 cell cultures were treated with TNF + CHX in the presence or in the absence of the pancaspase inhibitor zVADfmk or of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 as well as after suppression of JNK expression by RNAi. Apoptosis was assessed both by light microscopy and by flow cytometry, JNK and caspase activation by western blotting and/or enzymatic assay. TNF + CHX-induced death of Huh7 cells involved JNK activation since it was partially prevented by suppressing JNK activity or expression. Moreover, apoptosis was significantly reduced also by zVADfmk, while SP600125 and zVADfmk combined totally abrogated cell death in an additive fashion. These results demonstrate a causal role for JNK and caspases in TNF+CHX-induced apoptosis of Huh7 human hepatoma cells. Therefore, strategies aimed at enhancing both pathways should provide a profitable basis to overcome the resistance of hepatocarcinoma cells to TNF-dependent apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Requirement for noncognate interaction with T cells for the activation of B cell immunoglobulin secretion by IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    23.1+ TH1 clone E9.D4 in F23.1 (anti-T cell receptor V-beta 8)-coated microwells. This induced polyclonal B cell activation to enter cell cycle (thymidine incorporation) at 2 days and to secrete immunoglobulin at 5 days. An anti-IL-2 mAb (S4B6) inhibited antibody production completely. Anti-IL-2 did......The mechanism whereby noncognate contact with activated IL-2-producing Type 1 helper T cells (TH1) induces B cell activation was examined. Small resting B cells from C57B1/6 mice were cultured, in the absence of any ligand for surface Ig, with irradiated cells of the hapten-specific, CBA-derived, F...... not inhibit either LPS-induced B cell responses, or T cell activation (measured as IL-3 secretion). Anti-IL-2 receptor (anti-Tac) mAbs also inhibited T-dependent B cell responses, without affecting LPS responses. An anti-IFN-gamma mAb partially inhibited Ig secretion, without affecting entry into cycle. LPS...

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase is required for cell survival and growth in HeLa-S3 cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuhong; Huang, Dongyang; Liu, Yanmin; Pan, Xiaokang; Zhang, Jing; Liang, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Activation of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is linked to cancer cell survival in a variety of cancer cell lines, particularly under conditions of stress. As a potent activator of AMPK, metformin has become a hot topic of discussion for its effect on cancer cell. Here, we report that AMPK activated by metformin promotes HeLa-S3 cell survival and growth in vivo. Our results show that metformin inhibited cell proliferation in MCF-7 cells, but not in LKB1-deficient HeLa-S3 cells. Re-expression of LKB-1 in HeLa-S3 cells restored the growth inhibitory effect of metformin, indicating a requirement for LKB-1 in metformin-induced growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPK activation exerted a protective effect in HeLa-S3 cells by relieving ER stress, modulating ER Ca(2+) storage, and finally contributing to cellular adaptation and resistance to apoptosis. Our findings identify a link between AMPK activation and cell survival in HeLa-S3 cells, which demonstrates a beneficial effect of AMPK activated by metformin in cancer cell, and suggests a discrete re-evaluation on the role of metformin/AMPK activation on tumor cell growth, proliferation, and on clinical application in cancer therapy. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Melatonin antiproliferative effects require active mitochondrial function in embryonal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Rute; Magalhães-Novais, Silvia; Mesquita, Katia A.; Baldeiras, Ines; Sousa, Isabel S.; Tavares, Ludgero C.; Barbosa, Ines A.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Although melatonin oncostatic and cytotoxic effects have been described in different types of cancer cells, the specific mechanisms leading to its antitumoral effects and their metabolic context specificity are still not completely understood. Here, we evaluated the effects of melatonin in P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells (CSCs) and in their differentiated counterparts, cultured in either high glucose medium or in a galactose (glucose-free) medium which leads to glycolytic suppression and increased mitochondrial metabolism. We found that highly glycolytic P19 CSCs were less susceptible to melatonin antitumoral effects while cell populations relying on oxidative metabolism for ATP production were more affected. The observed antiproliferative action of melatonin was associated with an arrest at S-phase, decreased oxygen consumption, down-regulation of BCL-2 expression and an increase in oxidative stress culminating with caspase-3-independent cell death. Interestingly, the combined treatment of melatonin and dichloroacetate had a synergistic effect in cells grown in the galactose medium and resulted in an inhibitory effect in the highly resistant P19 CSCs. Melatonin appears to exert its antiproliferative activity in P19 carcinoma cells through a mitochondrially-mediated action which in turn allows the amplification of the effects of dichloroacetate, even in cells with a more glycolytic phenotype. PMID:26025920

  10. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  11. Active Stat3 is required for survival of human squamous cell carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiGiovanni John

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the skin is the most aggressive form of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, and is the single most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S., with over one million new cases reported each year. Recent studies have revealed an oncogenic role of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 in many human tumors, especially in those of epithelial origin, including skin SCC. Stat3 is a mediator of numerous growth factor and cytokine signaling pathways, all of which activate it through phosphorylation of tyrosine 705. Results To further address the role of Stat3 in skin SCC tumorigenesis, we have analyzed a panel of human skin-derived cell lines ranging from normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK, to non-tumorigenic transformed skin cells (HaCaT, to highly tumorigenic cells (SRB1-m7 and SRB12-p9 and observed a positive correlation between Stat3 phosphorylation and SCC malignancy. We next determined the role of Stat3 activity in cell proliferation and viability under serum-free culture conditions. This was accomplished by suppressing Stat3 activity in the SRB12-p9 cells through stable expression of a dominant negative acting form of Stat3β, which contains a tyrosine 705 to phenylalanine mutation (S3DN. The S3DN cells behaved similar to parental SRB12-p9 cells when cultured in optimal growth conditions, in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. However, unlike the SRB12-p9 cells, S3DN cells underwent apoptotic cell death when cultured in serum-free medium (SFM. This was evidenced by multiple criteria, including accumulation of sub-G1 particles, induced PARP cleavage, and acquisition of the characteristic morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence for a role for Stat3 in maintaining cell survival in the conditions of exogenous growth factor deprivation produced by culture in SFM. We also propose that delivery of the S3DN gene or

  12. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability.

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    Sabine S Lange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents.

  13. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sabine S; Tomida, Junya; Boulware, Karen S; Bhetawal, Sarita; Wood, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ) is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents.

  14. Deacetylase activity of histone deacetylase 3 is required for productiveVDJrecombination and B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Kristy R; Barnett, Kelly R; Wang, Jing; Liu, Qi; Hodges, Emily; Hiebert, Scott W; Bhaskara, Srividya

    2017-08-08

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is the catalytic component of NCoR/SMRT corepressor complexes that mediate the actions of transcription factors implicated in the regulation of B-cell development and function. We crossed Hdac3 conditional knockout mice with Mb1-Cre knockin animals to delete Hdac3 in early progenitor B cells. The spleens of Hdac3 F/- Mb1-Cre +/- mice were virtually devoid of mature B cells, and B220 + CD43 + B-cell progenitors accumulated within the bone marrow. Quantitative deep sequencing of the Ig heavy chain locus from B220 + CD43 + populations identified a defect in V H DJ H recombination with a severe reduction in productive rearrangements, which directly corresponded to the loss of pre-B cells from Hdac3 Δ /- bone marrow. For Hdac3 Δ /- B cells that did show productive VDJ rearrangement, there was significant skewing toward the incorporation of proximal V H gene segments and a corresponding reduction in distal V H gene segment use. Although transcriptional effects within these loci were modest, Hdac3 Δ /- progenitor cells displayed global changes in chromatin structure that likely hindered effective distal V-DJ recombination. Reintroduction of wild-type Hdac3 restored normal B-cell development, whereas an Hdac3 point mutant lacking deacetylase activity failed to complement this defect. Thus, the deacetylase activity of Hdac3 is required for the generation of mature B cells.

  15. Deacetylase activity of histone deacetylase 3 is required for productive VDJ recombination and B-cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Kristy R.; Barnett, Kelly R.; Wang, Jing; Liu, Qi; Hodges, Emily; Hiebert, Scott W.; Bhaskara, Srividya

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is the catalytic component of NCoR/SMRT corepressor complexes that mediate the actions of transcription factors implicated in the regulation of B-cell development and function. We crossed Hdac3 conditional knockout mice with Mb1-Cre knockin animals to delete Hdac3 in early progenitor B cells. The spleens of Hdac3F/−Mb1-Cre+/− mice were virtually devoid of mature B cells, and B220+CD43+ B-cell progenitors accumulated within the bone marrow. Quantitative deep sequencing of the Ig heavy chain locus from B220+CD43+ populations identified a defect in VHDJH recombination with a severe reduction in productive rearrangements, which directly corresponded to the loss of pre-B cells from Hdac3Δ/− bone marrow. For Hdac3Δ/− B cells that did show productive VDJ rearrangement, there was significant skewing toward the incorporation of proximal VH gene segments and a corresponding reduction in distal VH gene segment use. Although transcriptional effects within these loci were modest, Hdac3Δ/− progenitor cells displayed global changes in chromatin structure that likely hindered effective distal V-DJ recombination. Reintroduction of wild-type Hdac3 restored normal B-cell development, whereas an Hdac3 point mutant lacking deacetylase activity failed to complement this defect. Thus, the deacetylase activity of Hdac3 is required for the generation of mature B cells. PMID:28739911

  16. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric; Zon, Leonard I

    2017-08-23

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a screen in primary zebrafish embryo cultures for chemicals that disrupt neural crest development, as read out by crestin:EGFP expression. We found that the natural product caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) disrupts neural crest gene expression, migration, and melanocytic differentiation by reducing Sox10 activity. CAPE inhibits FGF-stimulated PI3K/Akt signaling, and neural crest defects in CAPE-treated embryos are suppressed by constitutively active Akt1. Inhibition of Akt activity by constitutively active PTEN similarly decreases crestin expression and Sox10 activity. Our study has identified Akt as a novel intracellular pathway required for neural crest differentiation.

  17. I kappa B kinase alpha (IKKα) activity is required for functional maturation of dendritic cells and acquired immunity to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Alessandra; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Johnson, Ella; Luron, Lionel; Bebien, Magali; Memet, Sylvie; Fong, Carol; Bajenoff, Marc; Wu, Xuefeng; Karin, Michael; Caamano, Jorge; Chi, Hongbo; Seed, Michael; Lawrence, Toby

    2013-03-20

    Dendritic cells (DC) are required for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to many important human pathogens, including Mycobacteriuim tuberculosis (TB) and influenza. However, inappropriate priming of auto-reactive T cells is linked with autoimmune disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the priming and activation of naïve T cells is critical for development of new improved vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The serine/threonine kinase IKKα (CHUK) has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity and inhibit innate immunity. Here, we show that IKKα is required in DC for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We describe a new role for IKKα in regulation of IRF3 activity and the functional maturation of DC. This presents a unique role for IKKα in dampening inflammation while simultaneously promoting adaptive immunity that could have important implications for the development of new vaccine adjuvants and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Mek activity is required for ErbB2 expression in breast cancer cells detached from the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iman A; Yoo, Byong H; Rak, Janusz; Rosen, Kirill V

    2017-12-01

    Detachment of non-malignant epithelial cells from the extracellullar matrix (ECM) triggers their growth arrest and apoptosis. Conversely, carcinoma cells can grow without adhesion to the ECM. This capacity for anchorage-independent growth is thought to be critical for tumor progression. ErbB2/Her2 oncoprotein is overproduced by a significant fraction of breast cancers and promotes anchorage-independent tumor cell growth by poorly understood mechanisms. In an effort to understand them we found that in order to produce ErbB2, detached breast cancer cells require the activity of an ErbB2 effector protein kinase Mek and that Mek-driven ErbB2 expression is neccesary for anchorage-independent growth of such cells. We observed that Mek inhibition does not alter ErbB2 mRNA levels in detached cancer cells and that ErbB2 protein loss induced by this inhibition can be blocked by a lysosomal inhibitor. We also noticed that an increase of the density of cancer cells detached from the ECM downregulates a Mek effector protein kinase Erk and causes ErbB2 loss. Those cells that survive after ErbB2 loss display resistance to trastuzumab, an anti-ErbB2 antibody used for ErbB2-positive breast cancer treatment. Thus, Mek-induced ErbB2 stabilization in detached breast cancer cells is critical for their ability to grow anchorage-independently and their trastuzumab sensitivity.

  19. Hippocalcin Is Required for Astrocytic Differentiation through Activation of Stat3 in Hippocampal Neural Precursor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jeong Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hippocalcin (Hpca is a neuronal calcium sensor protein expressed in the mammalian brain. However, its function in neural stem/precursor cells has not yet been studied. Here, we clarify the function of Hpca in astrocytic differentiation in hippocampal neural precursor cells (HNPCs. When we overexpressed Hpca in HNPCs in the presence or absence of bFGF, expression levels of nerve-growth factors such as neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, together with the proneural basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factors neuroD and neurogenin 1 (ngn1, increased significantly. In addition, there was an increase in the number of cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte marker, and in dendrite outgrowth, indicating astrocytic differentiation of the HNPCs. Downregulation of Hpca by transfection with Hpca siRNA reduced expression of NT-3, NT-4/5, BDNF, neuroD and ngn1 as well as levels of GFAP protein. Furthermore, overexpression of Hpca increased the phosphorylation of STAT3 (Ser727, and this effect was abolished by treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor (S3I-201, suggesting that STAT3 (Ser727 activation is involved in Hpca-mediated astrocytic differentiation. As expected, treatment with Stat3 siRNA or STAT3 inhibitor caused a complete inhibition of astrogliogenesis induced by Hpca overexpression. Taken together, this is the first report to show that Hpca, acting through Stat3, has an important role in the expression of neurotrophins and proneural bHLH transcription factors, and that it is an essential regulator of astrocytic differentiation and dendrite outgrowth in HNPCs.

  20. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-regulated cathepsin D is required for lipid antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Britt; Varga, Tamas; Szatmari, Istvan; Szeles, Lajos; Gyongyosi, Adrienn; Illarionov, Petr A; Dezso, Balazs; Gogolak, Peter; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Nagy, Laszlo

    2011-07-01

    It is well established that dendritic cells (DCs) take up, process, and present lipid Ags in complex with CD1d molecules to invariant NKT cells. The lipid-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), has previously been shown to regulate CD1d expression in human monocyte-derived DCs, providing a link between lipid metabolism and lipid Ag presentation. We report that PPARγ regulates the expression of a lysosomal protease, cathepsin D (CatD), in human monocyte-derived DCs. Inhibition of CatD specifically reduced the expansion of invariant NKT cells and furthermore resulted in decreased maturation of saposins, a group of lipid transfer proteins required for lysosomal lipid Ag processing and loading. These results reveal a novel mechanism of lipid Ag presentation and identify CatD as a key component of this machinery and firmly place PPARγ as the transcriptional regulator linking lipid metabolism and lipid Ag processing.

  2. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is required for NK cell cytotoxicity and colocalizes with actin to NK cell-activating immunologic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, Jordan S.; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Sasahara, Yoji; Koopman, Louise; Byrne, Michael; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Rosen, Fred S.; Geha, Raif S.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2002-08-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by a mutation in WAS protein (WASp) that results in defective actin polymerization. Although the function of many hematopoietic cells requires WASp, the specific expression and function of this molecule in natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. Here, we report that WAS patients have increased percentages of peripheral blood NK cells and that fresh enriched NK cells from two patients with a WASp mutation have defective cytolytic function. In normal NK cells, WASp was expressed and localized to the activating immunologic synapse (IS) with filamentous actin (F-actin). Perforin also localized to the NK cell-activating IS but at a lesser frequency than F-actin and WASp. The accumulation of F-actin and WASp at the activating IS was decreased significantly in NK cells that had been treated with the inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin D. NK cells from WAS patients lacked expression of WASp and accumulated F-actin at the activating IS infrequently. Thus, WASp has an important function in NK cells. In patients with WASp mutations, the resulting NK cell defects are likely to contribute to their disease.

  3. Naive and memory human B cells have distinct requirements for STAT3 activation to differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenick, Elissa K.; Avery, Danielle T.; Chan, Anna; Berglund, Lucinda J.; Ives, Megan L.; Moens, Leen; Stoddard, Jennifer L.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Tsumura, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D.; Averbuch, Diana; Engelhard, Dan; Roesler, Joachim; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Choo, Sharon; Smart, Joanne M.; French, Martyn A.; Fulcher, David A.; Cook, Matthew C.; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Klein, Christoph; Holland, Steven M.; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Ma, Cindy S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived antibody memory is mediated by the combined effects of long-lived plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells generated in response to T cell–dependent antigens (Ags). IL-10 and IL-21 can activate multiple signaling pathways, including STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5; ERK; PI3K/Akt, and potently promote human B cell differentiation. We previously showed that loss-of-function mutations in STAT3, but not STAT1, abrogate IL-10– and IL-21–mediated differentiation of human naive B cells into plasmablasts. We report here that, in contrast to naive B cells, STAT3-deficient memory B cells responded to these STAT3-activating cytokines, differentiating into plasmablasts and secreting high levels of IgM, IgG, and IgA, as well as Ag-specific IgG. This was associated with the induction of the molecular machinery necessary for PC formation. Mutations in IL21R, however, abolished IL-21–induced responses of both naive and memory human B cells and compromised memory B cell formation in vivo. These findings reveal a key role for IL-21R/STAT3 signaling in regulating human B cell function. Furthermore, our results indicate that the threshold of STAT3 activation required for differentiation is lower in memory compared with naive B cells, thereby identifying an intrinsic difference in the mechanism underlying differentiation of naive versus memory B cells. PMID:24218138

  4. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiulong, E-mail: songxiulong@hotmail.com; Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A., E-mail: zshaikh@uri.edu

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  5. Distinct regions in the C-Terminus required for GLP-1R cell surface expression, activity and internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-09-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), an important drug target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates insulin secretion by GLP-1. The N-terminus controls GLP-1R biosynthetic trafficking to the cell surface but the C-terminus involvement in that trafficking is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify distinct regions within the C-terminal domain required for human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) cell surface expression, activity and internalisation using a number of C-terminal deletions and site-directed mutations. The results of this study revealed that the residues 411-418 within the C-terminal domain of the hGLP-1R are critical in targeting the newly synthesised receptor to the plasma membrane. The residues 419-430 are important for cAMP producing activity of the receptor, most likely by coupling to Gαs. However, the residues 431-450 within the C-terminus are essential for agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the hGLP-1R has distinct regions within the C-terminal domain required for its cell surface expression, activity and agonist-induced internalisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson, Anthony J.

    2013-03-25

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  7. Specific binding sites for an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia (Dahlia merckii) on fungal cells are required for antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, K; Osborn, R W; Acland, D P; Broekaert, W F

    2000-01-01

    Dm-AMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from seeds of dahlia (Dahlia merckii), was radioactively labeled with t-butoxycarbonyl-[35S]-L-methionine N-hydroxy-succinimi-dylester. This procedure yielded a 35S-labeled peptide with unaltered antifungal activity. [35S]Dm-AMP1 was used to assess binding on living cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and the unicellular fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to fungal cells was saturable and could be competed for by preincubation with excess, unlabeled Dm-AMP1 as well as with Ah-AMP1 and Ct-AMP1, two plant defensins that are highly homologous to Dm-AMP1. In contrast, binding could not be competed for by more distantly related plant defensins or structurally unrelated antimicrobial peptides. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to either N. crassa or S. cerevisiae cells was apparently irreversible. In addition, whole cells and microsomal membrane fractions from two independently obtained S. cerevisiae mutants selected for resistance to Dm-AMP1 exhibited severely reduced binding affinity for [35S]Dm-AMP1, compared with wild-type yeast. This finding suggests that binding of Dm-AMP1 to S. cerevisiae plasma membranes is required for antifungal activity of this protein.

  8. Alpha-hemolysin is required for the activation of the autophagic pathway in Staphylococcus aureus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Belén; Fader, Claudio M; Sola, Claudia; Colombo, María Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes serious infectious diseases eventually leading to septic and toxic shock. Classically S. aureus has been considered an extracellular pathogen, but cumulative evidence indicates that it invades cells and replicates intracellularly leading to staphylococcal persistence and chronic disease. It has been previously shown that this pathogen localizes to LC3-labeled compartments and subverts the autophagy pathway. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. In the present report we present evidence that the pore-forming toxin alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a S. aureus secreted factor which participates in the activation of the autophagic pathway. In addition, our results indicate that although the toxin elicits an autophagic response this pathway is dysfunctional as indicated by the accumulation of the LC3-II form in cell lysates obtained from intoxicated cells. In addition, not only the purified Hla toxin but also the toxin-secreting pathogen prevented the maturation of autophagosomes. Interestingly, in cells infected with the wild-type strain of S. aureus the bacteria-containing compartments which recruited LC3 onto the limiting membrane did not accumulate the acidotropic probe LysoTracker. In contrast, those phagosomes containing the Hla(-) mutant (unable to produce the toxin) localized in an acidic compartment unlabeled by LC3. These results suggest that the LC3 protein is recruited only to those damaged vacuoles (i.e., perforated by the toxin), perhaps as an attempt to protect the cells. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the toxin-dependent activation of autophagy (although it is regulated by calcium and requires Atg5) is independent of both PI3Kinase activity and Beclin 1 suggesting the involvement of a non-canonical autophagy pathway.

  9. Mitogen requirement for cell cycle progression in the absence of pocket protein activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, Floris; Wolthuis, Rob M F; Doodeman, Valerie; Medema, René H; te Riele, Hein

    2005-01-01

    Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking expression of all three retinoblastoma protein family members (TKO MEFs) have lost the G1 restriction point. However, in the absence of mitogens these cells become highly sensitive to apoptosis. Here, we show that TKO MEFs that survive serum depletion pass

  10. Lysyl oxidase activity is required for ordered collagen fibrillogenesis by tendon cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska Katharina; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation...... tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation....

  11. Protection against HPV-16-Associated Tumors Requires the Activation of CD8+ Effector Memory T Cells and the Control of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Mariana O; Sales, Natiely S; Silva, Jamile R; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2016-08-01

    Active anticancer immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to induce cellular or humoral immune responses in patients, but, thus far, the observed outcomes did not ensure their recommendation for clinical use. The induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, although required for the clearance of most solid tumors, was shown to be insufficient for the development of a successful immunotherapeutic approach. The suppressive immune environment triggered by tumors, including the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), is detrimental to the development of antitumor immune responses and precludes the generation of more promising clinical outcomes. In this work, we characterized the CD8(+) T-cell population specifically involved in the control of tumor growth and the role of MDSCs after administration of an antitumor therapeutic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated tumors. Activation of cytotoxic high-avidity CD8(+) T cells with an effector memory phenotype was found in mice grafted with tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. In addition, MDSC antibody depletion further enhanced the immunotherapeutic effects of the vaccine, resulting in the complete eradication of tumor cells. Collectively, the current results indicate that the simultaneous control of MDSCs and activation of high-avidity tumor-specific effector memory CD8(+) T cells are key features for tumor protection by immunotherapeutic approaches and deserve further testing under clinical conditions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1920-30. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins pneumolysin and streptolysin O require binding to red blood cell glycans for hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewell, Lucy K; Harvey, Richard M; Higgins, Melanie A; Day, Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Chen, Austen Y; Gillen, Christine M; James, David B A; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J; Walker, Mark J; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Jennings, Michael P

    2014-12-09

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pneumolysin (Ply) is a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Membrane cholesterol is required for the cytolytic activity of this toxin, but it is not clear whether cholesterol is the only cellular receptor. Analysis of Ply binding to a glycan microarray revealed that Ply has lectin activity and binds glycans, including the Lewis histo-blood group antigens. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that Ply has the highest affinity for the sialyl LewisX (sLeX) structure, with a K(d) of 1.88 × 10(-5) M. Ply hemolytic activity against human RBCs showed dose-dependent inhibition by sLeX. Flow cytometric analysis and Western blots showed that blocking binding of Ply to the sLeX glycolipid on RBCs prevents deposition of the toxin in the membrane. The lectin domain responsible for sLeX binding is in domain 4 of Ply, which contains candidate carbohydrate-binding sites. Mutagenesis of these predicted carbohydrate-binding residues of Ply resulted in a decrease in hemolytic activity and a reduced affinity for sLeX. This study reveals that this archetypal CDC requires interaction with the sLeX glycolipid cellular receptor as an essential step before membrane insertion. A similar analysis conducted on streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes revealed that this CDC also has glycan-binding properties and that hemolytic activity against RBCs can be blocked with the glycan lacto-N-neotetraose by inhibiting binding to the cell surface. Together, these data support the emerging paradigm shift that pore-forming toxins, including CDCs, have cellular receptors other than cholesterol that define target cell tropism.

  13. Stat3 Activation by Src Induces Specific Gene Regulation and Is Required for Cell Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkson, James; Bowman, Tammy; Gracia, Roy; Caldenhoven, Eric; Groot, R.P. de; Jove, Richard

    1998-01-01

    While signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) were originally discovered as intracellular effectors of normal signaling by cytokines, increasing evidence also points to a role for STAT transcription factors in oncogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that one STAT family

  14. Heparin antiproliferative activity on bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells requires both N-acetylation and N-sulfonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longas, María O; Garg, Hari G; Trinkle-Pereira, Jennifer M; Hales, Charles A

    2003-01-31

    The antiproliferative activity of Heparin (HP) on bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (BPASMC) in vitro requires both N-acetylation and N-sulfonation. This was demonstrated by quantifying the relative N-acetylation of three commercial heparins of known antiproliferative activities, using their Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) band areas at 1381-1378 and 1320-1317 cm(-1), which combined resulted in 1.0, 1.0 and 1.3 cm2 for Choay, Elkins-Sinn and Upjohn HP, respectively. These results show that Upjohn HP, which is at least 44% more antiproliferative than the other two, is 30% more N-acetylated. Upjohn HP was also N-desulfonated chemically, and its antiproliferative activity was determined. Its total sulfonate (--SO 3 -) content (O- and N-sulfonate) was quantified using the FTIR band area at 1260-1200 cm(-1) for the S=O stretching; a drop in sulfonate content from 21.87% (w/w) before N-desulfonation to 16.51% (w/w) after N-desulfonation, resulted in a 67% decrease in its inhibitory potency. In addition to the requirement that approximately 24% of the sulfonate content be bonded to N, the data show a direct correlation between the extent of Upjohn HP N-acetylation and its antiproliferative activity on BPASMC.

  15. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to...

  16. Three mitogen-activated protein kinases required for cell wall integrity contribute greatly to biocontrol potential of a fungal entomopathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 are three mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases constituting cell wall integrity (CWI pathway that may control multi-stress responses via crosstalk with high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG pathway in budding yeast. In this study, Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 orthologues in Beauveria bassiana were confirmed as the three-module cascade essential for CWI because cell wall impairment occurred in the hyphae and conidia of Δbck1, Δmkk1 and Δslt2 examined in multiple experiments. Strikingly, all the deletion mutants became more sensitive to hyperosmotic NaCl and sorbitol with the Western blot of Hog1 phosphorylation being weakened in Δbck1 and absent in Δmkk1 and Δslt2. Apart from crossing responses to cell wall perturbation and high osmolarity, three deletion mutants exhibited faster growth and conidiation on nutrition-rich medium, much less virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae, and higher sensitivity to nutritional, fungicidal, thermal and UV-B irradiative stresses, accompanied with less accumulation of intracellular mannitol and trehalose. Moreover, Δmkk1 and Δslt2 were equally more sensitive to all the stresses of different types except wet-heat stress than wild type and more or less different from Δbck1 in sensitivity to most of the stresses despite their null responses to two oxidants. All the changes in three deletion mutants were restored by each targeted gene complementation. Taken together, the CWI-required Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 are all positive, but differential, regulators of multi-stress tolerance and virulence perhaps due to interplay with the HOG pathway essential for osmoregulation, thereby contributing greatly to the biocontrol potential of the fungal entomopathogen.

  17. p21-Activated kinases are required for transformation in a cell-based model of neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Yee Chow

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available NF2 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by development of bilateral vestibular schwannomas and other benign tumors in central nervous system. Loss of the NF2 gene product, Merlin, leads to aberrant Schwann cell proliferation, motility, and survival, but the mechanisms by which this tumor suppressor functions remain unclear. One well-defined target of Merlin is the group I family of p21-activated kinases, which are allosterically inhibited by Merlin and which, when activated, stimulate cell cycle progression, motility, and increased survival. Here, we examine the effect of Pak inhibition on cells with diminished Merlin function.Using a specific peptide inhibitor of group I Paks, we show that loss of Pak activity restores normal cell movement in cells lacking Merlin function. In addition, xenografts of such cells form fewer and smaller tumors than do cells without Pak inhibition. However, in tumors, loss of Pak activity does not reduce Erk or Akt activity, two signaling proteins that are thought to mediate Pak function in growth factor pathways.These results suggest that Pak functions in novel signaling pathways in NF2, and may serve as a useful therapeutic target in this disease.

  18. Induction of nonapoptotic cell death by activated Ras requires inverse regulation of Rac1 and Arf6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M; Overmeyer, Jean H; Maltese, William A

    2010-10-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of nonapoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or coexpression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in the recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to the activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by short hairpin RNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together, the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1 combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter seems to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for the induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death.

  19. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or co-expression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by shRNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1, combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter appears to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death. PMID:20713492

  20. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belakavadi, Madesh; Prabhakar, B.T.; Salimath, Bharathi P.

    2005-01-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells

  1. Requirement of 8-mercaptoguanosine as a costimulus for IL-4-dependent μ to γ1 class switch recombination in CD38-activated B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Uehara, Shoji; Mizoguchi, Chieko; Sato, Atsushi; Horikawa, Keisuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Mature B-2 cells expressing surface IgM and IgD proliferate upon stimulation by CD38, CD40 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and differentiate into IgG1-producing plasma cells in the presence of cytokines. The process of class switch recombination (CSR) from IgM to other isotypes is highly regulated by cytokines and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Blimp-1 and XBP-1 play an essential role in the terminal differentiation of switched B-2 cells to Ig-producing plasma cells. IL-5 induces AID and Blimp-1 expression in CD38- and CD40-activated B-2 cells, leading to μ to γ1 CSR at DNA level and IgG1 production. IL-4, a well-known IgG1-inducing factor, does not induce μ to γ1 CSR in CD38-activated B-2 cells or Blimp-1, while IL-4 induces μ to γ1 CSR, XBP-1 expression, and IgG1 production expression in CD40-activated B-2 cells. Interestingly, the addition of 8-mercaptoguanosine (8-SGuo) with IL-4 to the culture of CD38-activated B cells can induce μ to γ1 CSR, Blimp-1 expression, and IgG1 production. Intriguingly, 8-SGuo by itself induces AID expression in CD38-activated B cells. However, it does not induce μ to γ1 CSR. These results imply that the mode of B-cell activation for extracellular stimulation affects the outcome of cytokine stimulation with respect to the efficiency and direction of CSR, and the requirements of the transcriptional regulator and the generation of antibody-secreting cells. Furthermore, our data suggest the requirement of additional molecules in addition to AID for CSR

  2. H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase MLL4 is required for enhancer activation during cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Wang, Chaochen; Xu, Shiliyang; Cho, Young-Wook; Wang, Lifeng; Feng, Xuesong; Baldridge, Anne; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Zhuang, Lenan; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Enhancers play a central role in cell-type-specific gene expression and are marked by H3K4me1/2. Active enhancers are further marked by H3K27ac. However, the methyltransferases responsible for H3K4me1/2 on enhancers remain elusive. Furthermore, how these enzymes function on enhancers to regulate cell-type-specific gene expression is unclear. In this study, we identify MLL4 (KMT2D) as a major mammalian H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase with partial functional redundancy with MLL3 (KMT2C). Using adipogenesis and myogenesis as model systems, we show that MLL4 exhibits cell-type- and differentiation-stage-specific genomic binding and is predominantly localized on enhancers. MLL4 co-localizes with lineage-determining transcription factors (TFs) on active enhancers during differentiation. Deletion of Mll4 markedly decreases H3K4me1/2, H3K27ac, Mediator and Polymerase II levels on enhancers and leads to severe defects in cell-type-specific gene expression and cell differentiation. Together, these findings identify MLL4 as a major mammalian H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase essential for enhancer activation during cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01503.001 PMID:24368734

  3. Suppression of NYVAC Infection in HeLa Cells Requires RNase L but Is Independent of Protein Kinase R Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Nájera, José Luis; Baldanta, Sara; Rodriguez, Dolores; Way, Michael; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase R (PKR) and RNase L are host cell components that function to contain viral spread after infections. In this study, we analyzed the role of both proteins in the abortive infection of human HeLa cells with the poxvirus strain NYVAC, for which an inhibition of viral A27L and B5R gene expression is described. Specifically, the translation of these viral genes is independent of PKR activation, but their expression is dependent on the RNase L activity. PMID:26656695

  4. Neurite outgrowth induced by a synthetic peptide ligand of neural cell adhesion molecule requires fibroblast growth factor receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, L C; Doherty, P; Holm, A

    2000-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM is involved in axonal outgrowth and target recognition in the developing nervous system. In vitro, NCAM-NCAM binding has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth, presumably through an activation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). We have recently...

  5. The FGF-4 promoter is required for transformation and is active in both embryonal and somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, J M; Bryans, M; Lo, K; Wilkie, N M; Freshney, M; Thornton, D; Lang, J C

    1994-01-01

    We report the independent isolation of a rearranged FGF-4 gene from a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia. We show that the FGF-4 gene has been truncated 30 nucleotides 3' to the coding sequence and has been fused to the RNA processing signals from a putative unknown gene on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that the promoter region of the FGF-4 gene is active in NIH3T3 cells and is indeed necessary for transformation. Using the luciferase reporter assay we have shown that the FGF-4 5' flanking sequences possess easily detectable promoter activity in both F9 and HeLa cell lines. 5' deletion analysis of the FGF-4 promoter has delineated regions containing cis-acting elements of functional importance. These regulatory regions are common to both embryonal and somatic cell lines. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, using nuclear extracts from F9 and HeLa cells, has allowed detection of DNA-protein interactions occurring in the functionally significant regions. Subsequent comparison of the human and murine FGF-4 promoters show that the regions of functional significance are highly conserved. We suggest that the FGF-4 gene may be suppressed through a distal suppressor locus and becomes active when separated from this suppressor.

  6. Neurite outgrowth induced by a synthetic peptide ligand of neural cell adhesion molecule requires fibroblast growth factor receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, L C; Doherty, P; Holm, A

    2000-01-01

    identified a neuritogenic ligand, termed the C3 peptide, of the first immunoglobulin (lg) module of NCAM using a combinatorial library of synthetic peptides. Here we investigate whether stimulation of neurite outgrowth by this synthetic ligand of NCAM involves FGFRs. In primary cultures of cerebellar neurons...... from wild-type mice, the C3 peptide stimulated neurite outgrowth. This response was virtually absent in cultures of cerebellar neurons from transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of the FGFR1. Likewise, in PC12E2 cells transiently expressing a dominant-negative form of the mouse FGFR1......, induction of neurites by the C3 peptide was abrogated. These findings suggest that the neuritogenic effect of the C3 peptide requires the presence of functional FGFRs and support the hypothesis that FGFRs are essential in cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth. The C3 peptide appears...

  7. Nucleolin and YB-1 are required for JNK-mediated interleukin-2 mRNA stabilization during T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, C Y; Gherzi, R; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    Regulated mRNA turnover is a highly important process, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Using interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA as a model, we described a role for the JNK-signaling pathway in stabilization of IL-2 mRNA during T-cell activation, acting via a JNK response element (JRE) in the 5......' untranslated region (UTR). We have now identified two major RNA-binding proteins, nucleolin and YB-1, that specifically bind to the JRE. Binding of both proteins is required for IL-2 mRNA stabilization induced by T-cell activation signals and for JNK-induced stabilization in a cell-free system that duplicates...... essential features of regulated mRNA decay. Nucleolin and YB-1 are required for formation of an IL-2 mRNP complex that responds to specific mRNA stabilizing signals....

  8. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE (DEP)-INDUCED ACTIV ATION OF STAT3 REQUIRES ACTIVITIES OF EGFR AND SRC IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vivo exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) elicits acute inflammatory responses in the lung characterized by inflammatory cell influx and elevated expression of mediators such as cytokines, and chemokines. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein...

  9. Polyclonal activation of rat B cells. I. A single mitogenic signal can stimulate proliferation, but three signals are required for differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stunz, L.L.; Feldbush, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    A water-soluble, proteinaceous preparation derived from the cell walls of Salmonella typhimurium Re mutants has recently been tested in this laboratory for its ability to act as a mitogen for rat lymphocytes. This preparation (STM) has been found to be a potent simulator of B lymphocyte proliferation, as measured both by 3 H-TdR incorporation and by cell cycle analysis performed with flow cytofluorometry. STM stimulates approximately 50% of rat B cells to enter cycle. Previous investigations by others have shown that at least two sets of signals are required for B cell differentiation; (a) proliferation signals that may consist of both a stimulator of B cell conversion from G 0 to G 1 and growth factors, and (b) differentiation signals that probably include at least two B cell differentiation factors (BCDF). When STM was tested in a differentiation system it did not drive purified B cells to differentiate to PFC, either alone or when supplemented with a supernatant from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells (CAS). However, when both CAS and dextran sulfate (DXS) were supplied to the STM-stimulated cells, a large number of PFC resulted. DXT does not act by stimulating an additional, CAS-responsive B cell subset, since it has only a marginal effect upon 3 H-TdR uptake and does not increase the number of B cells in cycle when used together with STM. The authors that the two agents may be acting sequentially: STM stimulates the B cells to proliferate, and DXS drives the proliferating cells to become responsive to CAS. This suggests that the signals for B cell differentiation must consist of at least three activities: a trigger to stimulate the cells to proliferate, a factor to drive the cells to a BCDF-responsive state, and a BCDF that can drive the cells to secrete antibody

  10. Restoration of E-cadherin Cell-Cell Junctions Requires Both Expression of E-cadherin and Suppression of ERK MAP Kinase Activation in Ras-Transformed Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is a main component of the cell-cell adhesion junctions that play a principal role in maintaining normal breast epithelial cell morphology. Breast and other cancers that have up-regulated activity of Ras are often found to have down-regulated or mislocalized E-cadherin expression. Disruption of E-cadherin junctions and consequent gain of cell motility contribute to the process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Enforced expression of E-cadherin or inhibition of Ras-signal transduction pathway has been shown to be effective in causing reversion of EMT in several oncogene-transformed and cancer-derived cell lines. In this study, we investigated MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and derivatives that were transformed with either activated H-Ras or N-Ras to test for the reversion of EMT by inhibition of Ras-driven signaling pathways. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase, but not PI3-kinase, Rac, or myosin light chain kinase, was able to completely restore E-cadherin cell-cell junctions and epithelial morphology in cell lines with moderate H-Ras expression. In MCF10A cells transformed by a high-level expression of activated H-Ras or N-Ras, restoration of E-cadherin junction required both the enforced reexpression of E-cadherin and suppression of MAPK kinase. Enforced expression of E-cadherin alone did not induce reversion from the mesenchymal phenotype. Our results suggest that Ras transformation has at least two independent actions to disrupt E-cadherin junctions, with effects to cause both mislocalization of E-cadherin away from the cell surface and profound decrease in the expression of E-cadherin.

  11. Transiently Active Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Is Not Required but Must Be Silenced for Stem Cell Function during Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malea M. Murphy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult muscle’s exceptional capacity for regeneration is mediated by muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. As with many stem cells, Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been proposed to be critical in satellite cells during regeneration. Using new genetic reagents, we explicitly test in vivo whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary and sufficient within satellite cells and their derivatives for regeneration. We find that signaling is transiently active in transit-amplifying myoblasts, but is not required for regeneration or satellite cell self-renewal. Instead, downregulation of transiently activated β-catenin is important to limit the regenerative response, as continuous regeneration is deleterious. Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult satellite cells may simply be a vestige of their developmental lineage, in which β-catenin signaling is critical for fetal myogenesis. In the adult, surprisingly, we show that it is not activation but rather silencing of Wnt/β-catenin signaling that is important for muscle regeneration.

  12. Expression of the RAE-1 Family of Stimulatory NK-Cell Ligands Requires Activation of the PI3K Pathway during Viral Infection and Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Maria; Lorin, Clarisse; Delebecque, Frederic; Jung, Heiyoun; Raulet, David H.; Coscoy, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that play a major role in the elimination of virally-infected cells and tumor cells. NK cells recognize and target abnormal cells through activation of stimulatory receptors such as NKG2D. NKG2D ligands are self-proteins, which are absent or expressed at low levels on healthy cells but are induced upon cellular stress, transformation, or viral infection. The exact molecular mechanisms driving expression of these ligands remain poorly understood. Here we show that murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and that this activation is required for the induction of the RAE-1 family of mouse NKG2D ligands. Among the multiple PI3K catalytic subunits, inhibition of the p110α catalytic subunit blocks this induction. Similarly, inhibition of p110α PI3K reduces cell surface expression of RAE-1 on transformed cells. Many viruses manipulate the PI3K pathway, and tumors frequently mutate the p110α oncogene. Thus, our findings suggest that dysregulation of the PI3K pathway is an important signal to induce expression of RAE-1, and this may represent a commonality among various types of cellular stresses that result in the induction of NKG2D ligands. PMID:21966273

  13. Flow-induced endothelial cell alignment requires the RhoGEF Trio as a scaffold protein to polarize active Rac1 distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Heemskerk, Niels; Kalsbeek, Martin J T; de Waard, Vivian; van Rijssel, Jos; van Buul, Jaap D

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of the vessel wall and are exposed to flow. In linear parts of the vessel, the endothelial cells experience laminar flow, resulting in endothelial cell alignment in the direction of flow, thereby protecting the vessel wall from inflammation and permeability. In order for endothelial cells to align, they undergo rapid remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton by local activation of the small GTPase Rac1. However, it is not clear whether sustained and local activation of Rac1 is required for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Using a FRET-based DORA Rac1 biosensor, we show that local Rac1 activity remains for 12 h upon long-term flow. Silencing studies show that the RhoGEF Trio is crucial for keeping active Rac1 at the downstream side of the cell and, as a result, for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Surprisingly, Trio appears to be not involved in flow-induced activation of Rac1. Our data show that flow induces Rac1 activity at the downstream side of the cell in a Trio-dependent manner and that Trio functions as a scaffold protein rather than a functional GEF under long-term flow conditions. © 2017 Kroon et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. TORC1 and TORC2 Coactivators Are Required for Tax Activation of the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Long Terminal Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Yeung-Tung; Chin, King-Tung; Siu, Kam-Leung; Yee Wai Choy, Elizabeth; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2006-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein activates viral transcription from the long terminal repeats (LTR). Mechanisms through which Tax activates LTR have been established, but coactivators of this process remain to be identified and characterized. Here we show that all three members of the TORC family of transcriptional regulators are coactivators of Tax for LTR-driven expression. TORC coactivation requires CREB, but not ATF4 or other bZIP factors. Tax physically interacts with TORC1, TORC2, and TORC3 (TORC1/2/3), and the depletion of TORC1/2/3 inhibited Tax activity. TORC coactivation can be further enhanced by transcriptional coactivator p300. In addition, coactivators in the p300 family are required for full activity of Tax independently of TORC1/2/3. Thus, both TORC and p300 families of coactivators are essential for optimal activation of HTLV-1 transcription by Tax. PMID:16809310

  15. FAK/src-family dependent activation of the Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for microtubule-dependent focal adhesion turnover and cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Wagner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration involves a multitude of signals that converge on cytoskeletal reorganization, essential for development, immune responses and tissue repair. Using knockdown and dominant negative approaches, we show that the microtubule-associated Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for focal adhesion turnover and cell migration downstream of the FAK/c-src complex. Our results show that SLK co-localizes with paxillin, Rac1 and the microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells and is activated by scratch wounding. SLK activation is dependent on FAK/c-src/MAPK signaling, whereas SLK recruitment to the leading edge is src-dependent but FAK independent. Our results show that SLK represents a novel focal adhesion disassembly signal.

  16. Chemical genetics reveals a specific requirement for Cdk2 activity in the DNA damage response and identifies Nbs1 as a Cdk2 substrate in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Wohlbold

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs that promote cell-cycle progression are targets for negative regulation by signals from damaged or unreplicated DNA, but also play active roles in response to DNA lesions. The requirement for activity in the face of DNA damage implies that there are mechanisms to insulate certain CDKs from checkpoint inhibition. It remains difficult, however, to assign precise functions to specific CDKs in protecting genomic integrity. In mammals, Cdk2 is active throughout S and G2 phases, but Cdk2 protein is dispensable for survival, owing to compensation by other CDKs. That plasticity obscured a requirement for Cdk2 activity in proliferation of human cells, which we uncovered by replacement of wild-type Cdk2 with a mutant version sensitized to inhibition by bulky adenine analogs. Here we show that transient, selective inhibition of analog-sensitive (AS Cdk2 after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR enhances cell-killing. In extracts supplemented with an ATP analog used preferentially by AS kinases, Cdk2(as phosphorylated the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome gene product Nbs1-a component of the conserved Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex required for normal DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling-dependent on a consensus CDK recognition site at Ser432. In vivo, selective inhibition of Cdk2 delayed and diminished Nbs1-Ser432 phosphorylation during S phase, and mutation of Ser432 to Ala or Asp increased IR-sensitivity. Therefore, by chemical genetics, we uncovered both a non-redundant requirement for Cdk2 activity in response to DNA damage and a specific target of Cdk2 within the DNA repair machinery.

  17. Nitric oxide is required for, and promotes auxin-mediated activation of, cell division and embryogenic cell formation but does not influence cell cycle progression in alfalfa cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvös, Krisztina; Pasternak, Taras P; Miskolczi, Pál; Domoki, Mónika; Dorjgotov, Dulguun; Szucs, Attila; Bottka, Sándor; Dudits, Dénes; Fehér, Attila

    2005-09-01

    It is now well established that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a signaling molecule in plant cells. In this paper experimental data are presented which indicate that NO can stimulate the activation of cell division and embryogenic cell formation in leaf protoplast-derived cells of alfalfa in the presence of auxin. It was found that various NO-releasing compounds promoted auxin-dependent division (as shown by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine) of leaf protoplast-derived alfalfa cells. In contrast, application of NO scavenger or NO synthesis inhibitor inhibited the same process. Both the promotion and the inhibition of cell cycle activation correlated with the amount and activity of the cognate alfalfa p34cdc2 protein Medsa;CDKA;1,2. The effect of l-NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was transient, and protoplast-derived cells spending more than 3 days in culture become insensitive to the inhibitor as far as cell cycle progression was concerned. L-NMMA had no effect on the cell cycle parameters of cycling suspension-cultured cells, but had a moderate transient inhibitory effect on cells re-entering the cell cycle following phosphate starvation. Cycling cultured cells, however, could respond to NO, as indicated by the sodium nitroprusside (SNP)- and 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO)-dependent accumulation of the ferritin protein. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that L-NMMA-sensitive generation of NO is involved in the activation, but not the progression of the plant cell division cycle. In addition, SNP promoted and L-NMMA delayed the exogenous auxin [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)] concentration-dependent formation of embryogenic cell clusters expressing the MsSERK1 gene; this further supports a link between auxin- and NO-dependent signaling pathways in plant cells.

  18. Herpes simplex virus internalization into epithelial cells requires Na+/H+ exchangers and p21-activated kinases but neither clathrin- nor caveolin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Deepika; Koithan, Thalea; Diestel, Randi; Prank, Ute; Sodeik, Beate; Döhner, Katinka

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus that has been reported to infect some epithelial cell types by fusion at the plasma membrane but others by endocytosis. To determine the molecular mechanisms of productive HSV-1 cell entry, we perturbed key endocytosis host factors using specific inhibitors, RNA interference (RNAi), or overexpression of dominant negative proteins and investigated their effects on HSV-1 infection in the permissive epithelial cell lines Vero, HeLa, HEp-2, and PtK2. HSV-1 internalization required neither endosomal acidification nor clathrin- or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, HSV-1 gene expression and internalization were significantly reduced after treatment with 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). EIPA blocks the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, which are plasma membrane proteins implicated in all forms of macropinocytosis. HSV-1 internalization furthermore required the function of p21-activated kinases that contribute to macropinosome formation. However, in contrast to some forms of macropinocytosis, HSV-1 did not enlist the activities of protein kinase C (PKC), tyrosine kinases, C-terminal binding protein 1, or dynamin to activate its internalization. These data suggest that HSV-1 depends on Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and p21-activated kinases either for macropinocytosis or for local actin rearrangements required for fusion at the plasma membrane or subsequent passage through the actin cortex underneath the plasma membrane. After initial replication in epithelial cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) establish latent infections in neurons innervating these regions. Upon primary infection and reactivation from latency, HSVs cause many human skin and neurological diseases, particularly in immunocompromised hosts, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Many viruses use macropinocytosis for virus internalization, and many host factors mediating this entry route have been identified, although the

  19. Progesterone initiates Wnt-beta-catenin signaling but estradiol is required for nuclear activation and synchronous proliferation of rat uterine stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Virginia; Isuzugawa, Kazuto; Twarog, Meryl; Jones, Stacy; Cameron, Brent; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Fang, Jianwen

    2006-12-01

    Progesterone pretreatment of ovariectomized rat uteri increases the number of synchronously proliferating stromal cells in response to estradiol 17-beta. To identify the signals involved in stimulating synchronous proliferation, sexually mature ovariectomized rats were injected with progesterone (2 mg) for 3 consecutive days. Estradiol 17-beta (0.2 microg) was administered to initiate cell cycle entry. Uterine samples were removed at various times after hormone administration and changes in wingless (Wnt) pathway effectors and gene targets were identified by microarray. Progesterone pretreatment decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and increased expression of T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF). GSK-3beta protein decreased markedly in the uterine stroma of progesterone-pretreated uteri with the concomitant appearance of beta-catenin in these stromal cells. Translocation of beta-catenin from the cytosol to the nuclei in progesterone-pretreated stromal cells was stimulated in response to estradiol. Beta-catenin binding to TCF/LEF increased (P<0.05) in progesterone-pretreated uteri in response to estradiol. Progesterone stimulated the expression of the Wnt target gene urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPA-R) in the periluminal uterine stromal cells. The expression of uPA-R increased in progesterone-pretreated stromal cells in response to estradiol administration. Together, the results indicate that progesterone initiates Wnt signaling in the uterine stroma by down-regulating GSK-3beta. However, nuclear translocation of beta-catenin and sufficient complex formation with TCF/LEF to activate stromal cell cycle entry requires estradiol. Stimulation of a uterine stromal cell line to proliferate and differentiate resulted in beta-catenin accumulation, suggesting that endocrine-dependent Wnt signaling controls proliferation and differentiation (decidualization).

  20. Molecular requirements for radiation-activated recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Craig W.; Zeng Ming; Stamato, Thomas; Cerniglia, George

    1997-01-01

    % of treated cells) into cellular DNA. The mechanism of radiation enhanced stable gene transfer requires effector proteins to accomplish the recombination. The Ku proteins, which are required for V(D)J recombination, account for at least 90% of radiation induced recombination. There is also an absolute requirement for the Ataxia Telangiectasia gene (ATM) for any radiation induced recombination to occur, although the transfection efficiency in unirradiated cells is unaffected by ATM. Removal of p53 by transfection of E6 (Human Papilloma Virus) significantly inhibits radiation activated recombination, and this is confirmed in nuclear extract recombination assays. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation activates a recombination pathway which may be useful in gene therapy. The molecular mechanism of radiation activated recombination requires a number of DNA-damage-repair proteins

  1. Activation of PKA in cell requires higher concentration of cAMP than in vitro: implications for compartmentalization of cAMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-10-26

    cAMP is a ubiquitous second messenger responsible for the cellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters via activation of its main effector, protein kinase A (PKA). Multiple studies have shown that the basal concentration of cAMP in several cell types is about 1 μM. This value is well above the reported concentration of cAMP required to half-maximally activate PKA, which measures in the 100-300 nM range. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain this apparent discrepancy including inaccurate measurements of intracellular free cAMP, inaccurate measurement of the apparent activation constant of PKA or shielding of PKA from bulk cytosolic cAMP via localization of the enzyme to microdomains with lower basal cAMP concentration. However, direct experimental evidence in support of any of these models is limited and a firm conclusion is missing. In this study we use multiple FRET-based reporters for the detection of cAMP and PKA activity in intact cells and we establish that the sensitivity of PKA to cAMP is almost twenty times lower when measured in cell than when measured in vitro. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of compartmentalized cAMP signalling.

  2. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  3. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protease-activated receptor 1 and hematopoietic cell tissue factor are required for hepatic steatosis in mice fed a Western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Karen M; Owens, A Phillip; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Sullivan, Bradley P; Wang, Ruipeng; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Guodong; Guo, Grace L; Mackman, Nigel; Luyendyk, James P

    2011-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and liver-related morbidity and mortality. Indeed, obese patients with metabolic syndrome generate greater amounts of thrombin, an indication of coagulation cascade activation. However, the role of the coagulation cascade in Western diet-induced NAFLD has not been investigated. Using an established mouse model of Western diet-induced NAFLD, we tested whether the thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and hematopoietic cell-derived tissue factor (TF) contribute to hepatic steatosis. In association with hepatic steatosis, plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and hepatic fibrin deposition increased significantly in C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet for 3 months. PAR-1 deficiency reduced hepatic inflammation, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage accumulation. In addition, PAR-1 deficiency was associated with reduced steatosis in mice fed a Western diet, including reduced liver triglyceride accumulation and CD36 expression. Similar to PAR-1 deficiency, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency was associated with reduced inflammation and reduced steatosis in livers of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice fed a Western diet. Moreover, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency reduced hepatic fibrin deposition. These studies indicate that PAR-1 and hematopoietic cell TF are required for liver inflammation and steatosis in mice fed a Western diet. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanforlin, Tamiris; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Cortez, Cristian; Almeida, Igor C; Yoshida, Nobuko; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP) comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD) responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP) and polyclonal (anti-SAP) antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs). Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE) that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP proteins and proposes a triggering role for extracellular SAP

  6. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi SAP proteins with host-cell lysosome exocytosis-inducing activity required for parasite invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiris Zanforlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To invade target cells, Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms engage distinct sets of surface and secreted molecules that interact with host components. Serine-, alanine-, and proline-rich proteins (SAP comprise a multigene family constituted of molecules with a high serine, alanine and proline residue content. SAP proteins have a central domain (SAP-CD responsible for interaction with and invasion of mammalian cells by metacyclic forms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a 513 bp sequence from SAP-CD in blastn analysis, we identified 39 full-length SAP genes in the genome of T. cruzi. Although most of these genes were mapped in the T. cruzi in silico chromosome TcChr41, several SAP sequences were spread out across the genome. The level of SAP transcripts was twice as high in metacyclic forms as in epimastigotes. Monoclonal (MAb-SAP and polyclonal (anti-SAP antibodies produced against the recombinant protein SAP-CD were used to investigate the expression and localization of SAP proteins. MAb-SAP reacted with a 55 kDa SAP protein released by epimastigotes and metacyclic forms and with distinct sets of SAP variants expressed in amastigotes and tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCTs. Anti-SAP antibodies reacted with components located in the anterior region of epimastigotes and between the nucleus and the kinetoplast in metacyclic trypomastigotes. In contrast, anti-SAP recognized surface components of amastigotes and TCTs, suggesting that SAP proteins are directed to different cellular compartments. Ten SAP peptides were identified by mass spectrometry in vesicle and soluble-protein fractions obtained from parasite conditioned medium. Using overlapping sequences from SAP-CD, we identified a 54-aa peptide (SAP-CE that was able to induce host-cell lysosome exocytosis and inhibit parasite internalization by 52%. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides novel information about the genomic organization, expression and cellular localization of SAP

  7. Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Hematopoietic Cell Tissue Factor Are Required for Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a Western Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Karen M.; Owens, A. Phillip; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Wang, Ruipeng; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Guodong; Guo, Grace L.; Mackman, Nigel; Luyendyk, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and liver-related morbidity and mortality. Indeed, obese patients with metabolic syndrome generate greater amounts of thrombin, an indication of coagulation cascade activation. However, the role of the coagulation cascade in Western diet–induced NAFLD has not been investigated. Using an established mouse model of Western diet–induced NAFLD, we tested whether the thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and hematopoietic cell–derived tissue factor (TF) contribute to hepatic steatosis. In association with hepatic steatosis, plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and hepatic fibrin deposition increased significantly in C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet for 3 months. PAR-1 deficiency reduced hepatic inflammation, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage accumulation. In addition, PAR-1 deficiency was associated with reduced steatosis in mice fed a Western diet, including reduced liver triglyceride accumulation and CD36 expression. Similar to PAR-1 deficiency, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency was associated with reduced inflammation and reduced steatosis in livers of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice fed a Western diet. Moreover, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency reduced hepatic fibrin deposition. These studies indicate that PAR-1 and hematopoietic cell TF are required for liver inflammation and steatosis in mice fed a Western diet. PMID:21907177

  8. Using in vitro maturation and cell-free expression to explore [FeFe] hydrogenase activation and protein scaffolding requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Final Project Report describing work to elucidate mechanisms for the activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and to explore the impact of the polypeptide scaffolding on the function of the Fe-S redox and catalytic centers with emphasis on improving oxygen tolerance.

  9. Interaction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen with PMS2 is required for MutLα activation and function in mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genschel, Jochen; Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Iyer, Ravi R; Dahal, Basanta K; Kadyrov, Farid A; Modrich, Paul

    2017-05-09

    Eukaryotic MutLα (mammalian MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer; MLH1-PMS1 in yeast) functions in early steps of mismatch repair as a latent endonuclease that requires a mismatch, MutSα/β, and DNA-loaded proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for activation. We show here that human PCNA and MutLα interact specifically but weakly in solution to form a complex of approximately 1:1 stoichiometry that depends on PCNA interaction with the C-terminal endonuclease domain of the MutLα PMS2 subunit. Amino acid substitution mutations within a PMS2 C-terminal 721 QRLIAP motif attenuate or abolish human MutLα interaction with PCNA, as well as PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, PCNA- and DNA-dependent activation of MutLα ATPase, and MutLα function in in vitro mismatch repair. Amino acid substitution mutations within the corresponding yeast PMS1 motif ( 723 QKLIIP) reduce or abolish mismatch repair in vivo. Coupling of a weak allele within this motif ( 723 AKLIIP) with an exo1 Δ null mutation, which individually confer only weak mutator phenotypes, inactivates mismatch repair in the yeast cell.

  10. Interaction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen with PMS2 is required for MutLα activation and function in mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genschel, Jochen; Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Dahal, Basanta K.; Kadyrov, Farid A.; Modrich, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic MutLα (mammalian MLH1–PMS2 heterodimer; MLH1–PMS1 in yeast) functions in early steps of mismatch repair as a latent endonuclease that requires a mismatch, MutSα/β, and DNA-loaded proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for activation. We show here that human PCNA and MutLα interact specifically but weakly in solution to form a complex of approximately 1:1 stoichiometry that depends on PCNA interaction with the C-terminal endonuclease domain of the MutLα PMS2 subunit. Amino acid substitution mutations within a PMS2 C-terminal 721QRLIAP motif attenuate or abolish human MutLα interaction with PCNA, as well as PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, PCNA- and DNA-dependent activation of MutLα ATPase, and MutLα function in in vitro mismatch repair. Amino acid substitution mutations within the corresponding yeast PMS1 motif (723QKLIIP) reduce or abolish mismatch repair in vivo. Coupling of a weak allele within this motif (723AKLIIP) with an exo1Δ null mutation, which individually confer only weak mutator phenotypes, inactivates mismatch repair in the yeast cell. PMID:28439008

  11. Human CD8+ T lymphocytes can be divided into CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ cells with different requirements for activation and differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.; Brouwer, M.; Miedema, F.; van Lier, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The functional distinction between CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ cells within the human CD4+ T cell subset is well established. This study was undertaken to investigate whether a similar division can be made within the CD8+ T cell population. A quantitative comparison was made of the requirements for

  12. The adaptor-like protein ROG-1 is required for activation of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway and meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Urushiyama, Seiichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Shirakata, Masaki; Iino, Yuichi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    The Ras-MAP kinase pathway regulates varieties of fundamental cellular events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this pathway is required for oocyte development; however, the nature of its up-stream regulators has remained elusive. Here, we identified a C. elegans gene, rog-1, which encodes the only protein having the IRS-type phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain in the worms. ROG-1 has no obvious domain structure aside from the PTB domain, suggesting that it could serve as an adaptor down-stream of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of rog-1 mRNA significantly decreased brood size. rog-1(tm1031) truncation mutants showed a severe disruption in progression of developing oocytes from pachytene to diakinesis, as was seen in worms carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras or mpk-1 MAP kinase gene. Furthermore, let-60 Ras-regulated activation of MPK-1 in the gonad is undetectable in rog-1(tm1031) mutants. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras gene rescues the brood size reduction and germ cell abnormality in rog-1(tm1031) worms. Consistently, rog-1 is preferentially expressed in the germ cells and its expression in the gonad is essential for oocyte development. Thus, ROG-1 is a key positive regulator of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway that permits germ cells to exit from pachytene.

  13. Mouse Schwann cells activate MHC class I and II restricted T-cell responses, but require external peptide processing for MHC class II presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer Zu Hörste, Gerd; Heidenreich, Holger; Mausberg, Anne K.; Lehmann, Helmar C.; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L. M. A.; Saavedra, José T.; Baas, Frank; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Wiendl, Heinz; Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells are the myelinating glia cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In inflammatory neuropathies like the Guillain-Barr syndrome (GBS) Schwann cells become target of an autoimmune response, but may also modulate local inflammation. Here, we tested the functional relevance of Schwann

  14. Adaxial cell migration in the zebrafish embryo is an active cell autonomous property that requires the Prdm1a transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yosuke; Yu, Weimiao; Jackson, Harriet E; Parkin, Caroline A; Ingham, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    Adaxial cells, the progenitors of slow-twitch muscle fibres in zebrafish, exhibit a stereotypic migratory behaviour during somitogenesis. Although this process is known to be disrupted in various mutants, its precise nature has remained unclear. Here, using in vivo imaging and chimera analysis, we show that adaxial cell migration is a cell autonomous process, during which cells become polarised and extend filopodia at their leading edge. Loss of function of the Prdm1a transcription factor disrupts the polarisation and migration of adaxial cells, reflecting a role that is independent of its repression of sox6 expression. Expression of the M- and N-cadherins, previously implicated in driving adaxial cell migration, is largely unaffected by loss of Prdm1a function, suggesting that differential cadherin expression is not sufficient for adaxial cell migration. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Blood basophils also participate in allergic and other inflammatory reactions in the same way as mast cells.4. The capacity of mast cells and basophil to release mediators of anaphylaxis in response to cell activation, also termed releasability, depends on a number of different factors, including the primary underlying disease ...

  16. Polysaccharide-specific memory B cells generated by conjugate vaccines in humans conform to the CD27+IgG+ isotype-switched memory B Cell phenotype and require contact-dependent signals from bystander T cells activated by bacterial proteins to differentiate into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Edward T; Williams, Neil A; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Heyderman, Robert S; Finn, Adam

    2013-12-15

    The polysaccharides (PS) surrounding encapsulated bacteria are generally unable to activate T cells and hence do not induce B cell memory (BMEM). PS conjugate vaccines recruit CD4(+) T cells via a carrier protein, such as tetanus toxoid (TT), resulting in the induction of PS-specific BMEM. However, the requirement for T cells in the subsequent activation of the BMEM at the time of bacterial encounter is poorly understood, despite having critical implications for protection. We demonstrate that the PS-specific BMEM induced in humans by a meningococcal serogroup C PS (Men C)-TT conjugate vaccine conform to the isotype-switched (IgG(+)CD27(+)) rather than the IgM memory (IgM(+)CD27(+)) phenotype. Both Men C and TT-specific BMEM require CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into plasma cells. However, noncognate bystander T cells provide such signals to PS-specific BMEM with comparable effect to the cognate T cells available to TT-specific BMEM. The interaction between the two populations is contact-dependent and is mediated in part through CD40. Meningococci drive the differentiation of the Men C-specific BMEM through the activation of bystander T cells by bacterial proteins, although these signals are enhanced by T cell-independent innate signals. An effect of the TT-specific T cells activated by the vaccine on unrelated BMEM in vivo is also demonstrated. These data highlight that any protection conferred by PS-specific BMEM at the time of bacterial encounter will depend on the effectiveness with which bacterial proteins are able to activate bystander T cells. Priming for T cell memory against bacterial proteins through their inclusion in vaccine preparations must continue to be pursued.

  17. NGF-Dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells overexpressing the Src homology 2-domain protein shb requires activation of the Rap1 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, L.; Annerén, C.; Reedquist, K. A.; Bos, J. L.; Welsh, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain adaptor protein Shb has been shown to transmit NGF- and FGF-2-dependent differentiation signals in PC12 cells. To study if this involves signaling through the small GTPase Rap1, Rap1 activity was assessed in Shb-overexpressing PC12 cells. We demonstrate that NGF and

  18. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  19. Protein disulfide isomerase is required for platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration, Nox1 NADPH oxidase expression, and RhoGTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Luciana A; Bonatto, Diego; Forti, Fábio L; Sadok, Amine; Kovacic, Hervé; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2012-08-24

    Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell (VSMC) migration into vessel neointima is a therapeutic target for atherosclerosis and postinjury restenosis. Nox1 NADPH oxidase-derived oxidants synergize with growth factors to support VSMC migration. We previously described the interaction between NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum redox chaperone protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) in many cell types. However, physiological implications, as well as mechanisms of such association, are yet unclear. We show here that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promoted subcellular redistribution of PDI concomitant to Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production and that siRNA-mediated PDI silencing inhibited such reactive oxygen species production, while nearly totally suppressing the increase in Nox1 expression, with no change in Nox4. Furthermore, PDI silencing inhibited PDGF-induced VSMC migration assessed by distinct methods, whereas PDI overexpression increased spontaneous basal VSMC migration. To address possible mechanisms of PDI effects, we searched for PDI interactome by systems biology analysis of physical protein-protein interaction networks, which indicated convergence with small GTPases and their regulator RhoGDI. PDI silencing decreased PDGF-induced Rac1 and RhoA activities, without changing their expression. PDI co-immunoprecipitated with RhoGDI at base line, whereas such association was decreased after PDGF. Also, PDI co-immunoprecipitated with Rac1 and RhoA in a PDGF-independent way and displayed detectable spots of perinuclear co-localization with Rac1 and RhoGDI. Moreover, PDI silencing promoted strong cytoskeletal changes: disorganization of stress fibers, decreased number of focal adhesions, and reduced number of RhoGDI-containing vesicular recycling adhesion structures. Overall, these data suggest that PDI is required to support Nox1/redox and GTPase-dependent VSMC migration.

  20. Tim-4 inhibition of T-cell activation and T helper type 17 differentiation requires both the immunoglobulin V and mucin domains and occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cao, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Emerging experimental data suggest an important role for the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 1 (Tim-1):Tim-4 pathway in autoimmune and alloimmune responses in vivo. Using a Tim-4 ectodomain human IgG Fc fusion protein we studied the role of Tim-4 in T-cell activation, signalling and differentiation responses in vitro. We demonstrate that Tim-4Fc can inhibit naive and pre-activated T-cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion via a Tim-1-independent pathway. Tim-4 contains immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and mucin domains; to identify which domain accounts for the inhibitory effect novel Tim-4 fusion proteins containing either the IgV or mucin domain were generated. We demonstrate that both IgV and mucin domains are required for the inhibitory effects and that they are mediated at least in part by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity. Given the emerging interest in the role of the Tim family in T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, which play an important role in autoimmune disease and transplantation tolerance, our data show that Tim-4Fc can prevent polarization of CD4(+) T cells to the Th17 phenotype. Collectively, our results highlight an inhibitory role for Tim-4Fc in vitro, which we propose is mediated by a receptor other than Tim-1. In addition, this study provides new insights into the role of Tim-4Fc in regulating Th17 immune responses and may open a new avenue for autoimmune therapy.

  1. Activation of MAPK Is Required for ROS Generation and Exocytosis in HMC-1 Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Derived Secretory Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narantsogt, Giimaa; Min, Arim; Nam, Young Hee; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Agvaandaram, Gurbadam; Dorjsuren, Temuulen; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes vaginitis and cervicitis in women and asymptomatic urethritis and prostatitis in men. Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in vaginal smears and vaginal walls of patients infected with T. vaginalis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activated by various stimuli, have been shown to regulate the transcriptional activity of various cytokine genes in mast cells. In this study, we investigated whether MAPK is involved in ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 cells induced by T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP). We found that TvSP induces the activation of MAPK and NADPH oxidase in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP induced phosphorylation of MAPK and p47(phox) in HMC-1 cells. Stimulation with TvSP also induced up-regulation of CD63, a marker for exocytosis, along the surfaces of human mast cells. Pretreatment with MAPK inhibitors strongly inhibited TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation. Finally, our results suggest that TvSP induces intracellular ROS generation and exocytotic degranulation in HMC-1 via MAPK signaling.

  2. Nucleolin and YB-1 are required for JNK-mediated interleukin-2 mRNA stabilization during T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, C Y; Gherzi, R; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    Regulated mRNA turnover is a highly important process, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Using interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA as a model, we described a role for the JNK-signaling pathway in stabilization of IL-2 mRNA during T-cell activation, acting via a JNK response element (JRE) in the 5' un...

  3. The CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase is required for the completion of the activation program leading to lymphokine production in the Jurkat human T cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peyron, J. F.; Verma, S.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Sancho, J.; Terhorst, C.; Spits, H.

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of the T cell antigen receptor, TCR-CD3, induces tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular proteins through activation of a tyrosine kinase. The possible regulatory role of the CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase in this process was explored by studying the functional properties of

  4. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  5. Interleukin-4-mediated 15-lipoxygenase-1 trans-activation requires UTX recruitment and H3K27me3 demethylation at the promoter in A549 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongya Han

    Full Text Available Arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15 oxygenates polyunsaturated fatty acids and bio-membranes, generating multiple lipid signalling mediators involved in inflammation. Several lines of evidence indicate that ALOX15 activation in the respiratory tract contributes to asthma progression. Recent experimental data reveals that histone modification at the promoter plays a critical role in ALOX15 gene transcription. In the present study, we examined the status of histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3 at the ALOX15 promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in human lung epithelial carcinoma A549 cells incubated with or without interleukin (IL-4. We identified demethylation of H3K27me3 at the ALOX15 promoter after IL-4 treatment. Furthermore, we found that the H3K27me2/3-specific demethylase, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat, X chromosome (UTX, mediates the H3K27me3 demethylation during ALOX15 transcriptional activation. When UTX expression was knocked down using siRNA, IL-4-mediated H3K27me3 demethylation and ALOX15 induction were significantly attenuated. The critical role of UTX in ALOX15 expression was confirmed in human monocytes and the Hodgkin lymphoma (HL cell line L1236, but was in these cells not related to H3K27me3-demethylase activity. These results demonstrate that UTX is implicated in IL-4 mediated transcriptional activation of the ALOX15 gene.

  6. Structural requirements for the flavonoid-mediated modulation of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and GS-X pump activity in MCF7 breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van J.J.; Geraets, L.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structural requirements necessary for inhibition of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) and GS-X pump (MRP1 and MRP2) activity by structurally related flavonoids, in GSTP1-1 transfected MCF7 cells (pMTG5). The results reveal that GSTP1-1

  7. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Katherine J.; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F.; Keezer, Susan M.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser938 were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K·mg protein−1·min−1 and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser938 is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  8. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  9. Activation of H2O2-induced VSOR Cl- currents in HTC cells require phospholipase Cgamma1 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe; Olivero, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channels participate in several physiological processes such as regulatory volume decrease, cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Recent evidence points to a significant role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in VSOR Cl(-) channel...... activation. The aim of this study was to determine the signalling pathways responsible for H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. In rat hepatoma (HTC) cells, H(2)O(2) elicited a transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) that was blocked by PP2, a Src......-family protein kinases inhibitor. Also, H(2)O(2) triggered an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] that paralleled the time course of PLCgamma1 phosphorylation. The H(2)O(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise was prevented by the generic phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-receptor (IP(3...

  10. The Transmodulation of HER2 and EGFR by Substance P in Breast Cancer Cells Requires c-Src and Metalloproteinase Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Garcia-Recio

    Full Text Available Substance P (SP is a pleiotropic cytokine/neuropeptide that enhances breast cancer (BC aggressiveness by transactivating tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and HER2. We previously showed that SP and its cognate receptor NK-1 (SP/NK1-R signaling modulates the basal phosphorylation of HER2 and EGFR in BC, increasing aggressiveness and drug resistance. In order to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for NK-1R-mediated HER2 and EGFR transactivation, we investigated the involvement of c-Src (a ligand-independent mediator and of metalloproteinases (ligand-dependent mediators in HER2/EGFR activation.Overexpression of NK-1R in MDA-MB-231 and its chemical inhibition in SK-BR-3, BT-474 and MDA-MB-468 BC cells significantly modulated c-Src activation, suggesting that this protein is a mediator of NK-1R signaling. In addition, the c-Src inhibitor 4-(4'-phenoxyanilino-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline prevented SP-induced activation of HER2. On the other hand, SP-dependent phosphorylation of HER2 and EGFR decreased substantially in the presence of the MMP inhibitor 1-10, phenanthroline monohydrate, and the dual inhibition of both c-Src and MMP almost abolished the activation of HER2 and EGFR. Moreover, the use of these inhibitors demonstrated that this Src and MMP-dependent signaling is important to the cell viability and migration capacity of HER2+ and EGFR+ cell lines.Our results indicate that the transactivation of HER2 and EGFR by the pro-inflammatory cytokine/neuropeptide SP in BC cells is a c-Src and MMP-dependent process.

  11. Acute insulin action requires insulin receptor kinase activity: introduction of an inhibitory monoclonal antibody into mammalian cells blocks the rapid effects of insulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, D O; Roth, R A

    1987-01-01

    The role of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (protein-tyrosine kinase, EC 2.7.1.112) in various rapid insulin effects was studied by injecting four different cell types (by osmotic lysis of pinocytotic vesicles) with a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits the kinase activity of the insulin receptor and the closely related receptor for insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. Injection of this inhibitory antibody resulted in a decreased ability of insulin to stimulate the uptake of 2-...

  12. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  13. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. → Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. → Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  14. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  15. Epigenetic activation of the Foxa2 gene is required for maintaining the potential of neural precursor cells to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons after expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, So-Young; Kwon, So Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Yi, Sang Ah; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Jang, Choon-Gon; You, Jueng Soo; Lee, Sang-Hun; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2015-02-15

    Dysregulation of forkhead box protein A2 (Foxa2) expression in fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM)-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) appears to be associated with the loss of their potential to differentiate into dopaminergic (DA) neurons after mitogenic expansion in vitro, hindering their efficient use as a transplantable cell source. Here, we report that epigenetic activation of Foxa2 in VM-derived NPCs by inducing histone hyperacetylation rescues the mitogenic-expansion-dependent decrease of differentiation potential to DA neurons. The silencing of Foxa2 gene expression after expansion is accompanied by repressive histone modifications, including hypoacetylation of histone H3 and H4 and trimethylation of H3K27 on the Foxa2 promoter, as well as on the global level. In addition, histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) is highly expressed during differentiation and recruited to the Foxa2 promoter. Induction of histone acetylation in VM-derived NPCs by either knockdown of HDAC7 or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor apicidin upregulates Foxa2 expression via hyperacetylation of H3 and a decrease in H3K27 trimethylation on the promoter regions, leading to the expression of DA neuron developmental genes and enhanced differentiation of DA neurons. These effects are antagonized by the expression of shRNAs specific for Foxa2 but enhanced by shRNA for HDAC7. Collectively, these findings indicate that loss of differentiation potential of expanded VM-derived NPCs is attributed to a decrease in Foxa2 expression and suggest that activation of the endogenous Foxa2 gene by epigenetic regulation might be an approach to enhance the generation of DA neurons.

  16. ERK5 activity is required for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth and stabilization of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yutaro; Yamauchi, Arata; Takehara, Shin; Nemoto, Wataru; Takahashi, Maho; Stork, Philip J S; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2009-08-28

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) play important physiological roles in proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression. ERK5 is approximately twice the size of ERK1/2, and its amino-terminal half contains the kinase domain that shares homology with ERK1/2 and TEY activation motif, whereas the carboxyl-terminal half is unique. In this study, we examined a physiological role of ERK5 in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12), comparing it with ERK1/2. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induced phosphorylation of both ERK5 and ERK1/2, whereas the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (Bt(2)cAMP) caused only ERK1/2 phosphorylation. U0126, at 30 mum, that blocks ERK1/2 signaling selectively attenuated neurite outgrowth induced by NGF and Bt(2)cAMP, but BIX02188 and BIX02189, at 30 mum, that block ERK5 signaling and an ERK5 dominant-negative mutant suppressed only NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Next, we examined the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis. Both NGF and Bt(2)cAMP increased tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter activity in an ERK1/2-dependent manner but was ERK5-independent. However, when both ERK5 and ERK1/2 signalings were inhibited, tyrosine hydroxylase protein up-regulation by NGF and Bt(2)cAMP was abolished, because of the loss of stabilization of tyrosine hydroxylase protein by ERK5. Taking these results together, ERK5 is involved in neurite outgrowth and stabilization of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells, and ERK5, along with ERK1/2, plays essential roles in the neural differentiation process.

  17. Metabolic requirements for cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keibler, Mark A; Wasylenko, Thomas M; Kelleher, Joanne K; Iliopoulos, Othon; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The study of cancer metabolism has been largely dedicated to exploring the hypothesis that oncogenic transformation rewires cellular metabolism to sustain elevated rates of growth and division. Intense examination of tumors and cancer cell lines has confirmed that many cancer-associated metabolic phenotypes allow robust growth and survival; however, little attention has been given to explicitly identifying the biochemical requirements for cell proliferation in a rigorous manner in the context of cancer metabolism. Using a well-studied hybridoma line as a model, we comprehensively and quantitatively enumerate the metabolic requirements for generating new biomass in mammalian cells; this indicated a large biosynthetic requirement for ATP, NADPH, NAD(+), acetyl-CoA, and amino acids. Extension of this approach to serine/glycine and glutamine metabolic pathways suggested lower limits on serine and glycine catabolism to supply one-carbon unit synthesis and significant availability of glutamine-derived carbon for biosynthesis resulting from nitrogen demands alone, respectively. We integrated our biomass composition results into a flux balance analysis model, placing upper bounds on mitochondrial NADH oxidation to simulate metformin treatment; these simulations reproduced several empirically observed metabolic phenotypes, including increased reductive isocitrate dehydrogenase flux. Our analysis clarifies the differential needs for central carbon metabolism precursors, glutamine-derived nitrogen, and cofactors such as ATP, NADPH, and NAD(+), while also providing justification for various extracellular nutrient uptake behaviors observed in tumors. Collectively, these results demonstrate how stoichiometric considerations alone can successfully predict empirically observed phenotypes and provide insight into biochemical dynamics that underlie responses to metabolic perturbations.

  18. Cyclophilin B interacts with sodium-potassium ATPase and is required for pump activity in proximal tubule cells of the kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Suñé

    Full Text Available Cyclophilins (Cyps, the intracellular receptors for Cyclosporine A (CsA, are responsible for peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerisation and for chaperoning several membrane proteins. Those functions are inhibited upon CsA binding. Albeit its great benefits as immunosuppressant, the use of CsA has been limited by undesirable nephrotoxic effects, including sodium retention, hypertension, hyperkalemia, interstial fibrosis and progressive renal failure in transplant recipients. In this report, we focused on the identification of novel CypB-interacting proteins to understand the role of CypB in kidney function and, in turn, to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of CsA-induced toxicity. By means of yeast two-hybrid screens with human kidney cDNA, we discovered a novel interaction between CypB and the membrane Na/K-ATPase β1 subunit protein (Na/K-β1 that was confirmed by pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, in proximal tubule-derived HK-2 cells. The Na/K-ATPase pump, a key plasma membrane transporter, is responsible for maintenance of electrical Na+ and K+ gradients across the membrane. We showed that CypB silencing produced similar effects on Na/K-ATPase activity than CsA treatment in HK-2 cells. It was also observed an enrichment of both alpha and beta subunits in the ER, what suggested a possible failure on the maturation and routing of the pump from this compartment towards the plasma membrane. These data indicate that CypB through its interaction with Na/K-β1 might regulate maturation and trafficking of the pump through the secretory pathway, offering new insights into the relationship between cyclophilins and the nephrotoxic effects of CsA.

  19. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S

    1999-01-01

    beta1 prevented the disruption of intercellular adhesions and cell scattering. In addition, using biochemical activity assays for Rho-like GTPases, we show that the expression of beta1A, beta1D, or IL2R-beta1A in GE11 or GD25 cells triggers activation of both RhoA and Rac1, but not of Cdc42. Moreover......, dominant negative Rac1 (N17Rac1) inhibited the disruption of cell-cell adhesions when expressed before beta1. However, all three GTPases might be involved in the morphological transition, since expression of either N19RhoA, N17Rac1, or N17Cdc42 reversed cell scattering and partially restored cadherin......-based adhesions in GE11-beta1A cells. Our results indicate that beta1 integrins regulate the polarity and motility of epithelial cells by the induction of intracellular molecular events involving a downregulation of alpha-catenin function and the activation of the Rho-like G proteins Rac1 and RhoA....

  20. CXCR3-dependent CD4⁺ T cells are required to activate inflammatory monocytes for defense against intestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Cohen

    Full Text Available Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in orchestrating immunity to microbial pathogens, including the orally acquired Th1-inducing protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Chemokine receptor CXCR3 is associated with Th1 responses, and here we use bicistronic CXCR3-eGFP knock-in reporter mice to demonstrate upregulation of this chemokine receptor on CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes during Toxoplasma infection. We show a critical role for CXCR3 in resistance to the parasite in the intestinal mucosa. Absence of the receptor in Cxcr3⁻/⁻ mice resulted in selective loss of ability to control T. gondii specifically in the lamina propria compartment. CD4⁺ T cells were impaired both in their recruitment to the intestinal lamina propria and in their ability to secrete IFN-γ upon stimulation. Local recruitment of CD11b⁺Ly6C/G⁺ inflammatory monocytes, recently reported to be major anti-Toxoplasma effectors in the intestine, was not impacted by loss of CXCR3. However, inflammatory monocyte activation status, as measured by dual production of TNF-α and IL-12, was severely impaired in Cxcr3⁻/⁻ mice. Strikingly, adoptive transfer of wild-type but not Ifnγ⁻/⁻ CD4⁺ T lymphocytes into Cxcr3⁻/⁻ animals prior to infection corrected the defect in inflammatory macrophage activation, simultaneously reversing the susceptibility phenotype of the knockout animals. Our results establish a central role for CXCR3 in coordinating innate and adaptive immunity, ensuring generation of Th1 effectors and their trafficking to the frontline of infection to program microbial killing by inflammatory monocytes.

  1. Flow-induced endothelial cell alignment requires the RhoGEF Trio as a scaffold protein to polarize active Rac1 distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Heemskerk, Niels; Kalsbeek, Martin J. T.; de Waard, Vivian; van Rijssel, Jos; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of the vessel wall and are exposed to flow. In linear parts of the vessel, the endothelial cells experience laminar flow, resulting in endothelial cell alignment in the direction of flow, thereby protecting the vessel wall from inflammation and permeability. In order

  2. Timing-dependent actions of NGF required for cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous NGF stimulation induces PC12 cell differentiation. However, why continuous NGF stimulation is required for differentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the timing-dependent requirement of NGF action for cell differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the timing-dependency of the NGF action, we performed a discontinuous stimulation assay consisting of a first transient stimulation followed by an interval and then a second sustained stimulation and quantified the neurite extension level. Consequently, we observed a timing-dependent action of NGF on cell differentiation, and discontinuous NGF stimulation similarly induced differentiation. The first stimulation did not induce neurite extension, whereas the second stimulation induced fast neurite extension; therefore, the first stimulation is likely required as a prerequisite condition. These observations indicate that the action of NGF can be divided into two processes: an initial stimulation-driven latent process and a second stimulation-driven extension process. The latent process appears to require the activities of ERK and transcription, but not PI3K, whereas the extension-process requires the activities of ERK and PI3K, but not transcription. We also found that during the first stimulation, the activity of NGF can be replaced by PACAP, but not by insulin, EGF, bFGF or forskolin; during the second stimulation, however, the activity of NGF cannot be replaced by any of these stimulants. These findings allowed us to identify potential genes specifically involved in the latent process, rather than in other processes, using a microarray. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that NGF induces the differentiation of PC12 cells via mechanically distinct processes: an ERK-driven and transcription-dependent latent process, and an ERK- and PI3K-driven and transcription-independent extension process.

  3. CNTF-mediated protection of photoreceptors requires initial activation of the cytokine receptor gp130 in Müller glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Kun Do; Nusinowitz, Steven; Chao, Kevin; Yu, Fei; Bok, Dean; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) acts as a potent neuroprotective agent in multiple retinal degeneration animal models. Recently, CNTF has been evaluated in clinical trials for the inherited degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Despite its potential as a broad-spectrum therapeutic treatment for blinding diseases, the target cells of exogenous CNTF and its mechanism of action remain poorly understood. We have shown previously that constitutive expression of CNTF prevents photoreceptor death but alters the retinal transcriptome and suppresses visual function. Here, we use a lentivirus to deliver the same secreted human CNTF used in clinical trials to a mouse model of RP. We found that low levels of CNTF halt photoreceptor death, improve photoreceptor morphology, and correct opsin mislocalization. However, we did not detect corresponding improvement of retinal function as measured by the electroretinogram. Disruption of the cytokine receptor gp130 gene in Müller glia reduces CNTF-dependent photoreceptor survival and prevents phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK in Müller glia and the rest of the retina. Targeted deletion of gp130 in rods also demolishes neuroprotection by CNTF and prevents further activation of Müller glia. Moreover, CNTF elevates the expression of LIF and endothelin 2, thus positively promoting Müller and photoreceptor interactions. We propose that exogenous CNTF initially targets Müller glia, and subsequently induces cytokines acting through gp130 in photoreceptors to promote neuronal survival. These results elucidate a cellular mechanism for exogenous CNTF-triggered neuroprotection and provide insight into the complex cellular responses induced by CNTF in diseased retinas. PMID:24191003

  4. Bruton's tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C µ are required for TLR7/9-induced IKKα and IRF-1 activation and interferon-β production in conventional dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Li

    Full Text Available Stimulation of TLR7/9 by their respective ligands leads to the activation of IκB kinase α (IKKα and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF-1 and results in interferon (IFN-β production in conventional dendritic cells (cDC. However, which other signaling molecules are involved in IKKα and IRF-1 activation during TLR7/9 signaling pathway are not known. We and others have shown that Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK played a part in TLR9-mediated cytokine production in B cells and macrophages. However, it is unclear if BTK participates in TLR7/9-induced IFN-β production in cDC. In this study, we show that BTK is required for IFN-β synthesis in cDC upon TLR7/9 stimulation and that stimulated BTK-deficient cDC are defective in the induction of IKKα/β phosphorylation and IRF-1 activation. In addition, we demonstrate that Protein Kinase C µ (PKCµ is also required for TLR7/9-induced IRF-1 activation and IFN-β upregulation in cDC and acts downstream of BTK. Taken together, we have uncovered two new molecules, BTK and PKCµ, that are involved in TLR7/9-triggered IFN-β production in cDC.

  5. Alloantigen-specific CD4(+) regulatory T cells induced in vivo by ultraviolet irradiation after alloantigen immunization require interleukin-10 for their induction and activation, and flexibly mediate bystander immunosuppression of allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomohide; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Saito, Kanako; Wang, Linan; Torii, Mie; Uemoto, Shinji; Kato, Takuma

    2015-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation prior to antigen immunization is employed to induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs). UV-induced Tregs demonstrate unique bystander suppression, although antigen-specific activation is required initially. We previously reported the phenotype of alloantigen-specific transferable Tregs induced by UV-B irradiation after immunization was the same as T regulatory type 1-like CD4(+) T cells, with antigen-specific interleukin (IL)-10 production. Here, by using semi-allogeneic transplantation models in vivo, we investigated the role of IL-10 in the induction and activation of these Tregs, and the possibility of bystander suppression of third-party allograft rejection. Naïve mice (H-2(b)) were immunized with alloantigen (H-2(b/d)), and received UV-B irradiation (40 kJ/m(2)) 1 week later. Four weeks afterwards, splenic CD4(+) T cells were purified from the UV-irradiated immunized mice, and were transferred into naïve mice (H-2(b)). Allografts expressing the same alloantigen as T-cell donors were immunized against (H-2(b/d)) or an irrelevant alloantigen (H-2(b/k)) were transplanted to CD4(+) T-cell-transferred mice, and an alloantigen-specific prolongation of allograft survival observed. Experiments where IL-10 was neutralized by monoclonal antibody in the induction or effector phase revealed that IL-10 is critical, not only for induction but also for immunosuppressive function of CD4(+) Tregs induced by UV irradiation after alloantigen immunization. Third-party allografts (H-2(d/k)) were transplanted to CD4(+) T-cell-transferred mice, and graft survival was also prolonged. Even a graft only partially compatible with immunized alloantigen worked well in vivo to activate CD4(+) Tregs induced by UV irradiation after alloantigen immunization, which resulted in the bystander suppression of third-party allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Requirement for Interactions of Natural Killer T Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells for Transplantation Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Baker, Jeanette; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which a clinically applicable immune tolerance regimen of combined bone marrow and heart transplants in mice results in mixed chimerism and graft acceptance. The conditioning regimen of lymphoid irradiation and anti-T cell antibodies changed the balance of cells in the lymphoid tissues to create a tolerogenic microenvironment favoring the increase of natural killer T (NKT) cells, CD4+CD25+ Tregs, and Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), over conventional T cells. The depletion of MDSCs abrogated chimerism and tolerance, and add back of these purified cells was restorative. The conditioning regimen activated the MDSCs as judged by the increased expression of arginase-1, IL-4Rα, and PDL1, and the activated cells gained the capacity to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells to alloantigens in the mixed leukocyte reaction. MDSC activation was dependent on the presence of host invariant NKT cells. The conditioning regimen polarized the host invariant NKT cells toward IL-4 secretion, and MDSC activation was dependent on IL-4. In conclusion, there was a requirement for MDSCs for chimerism and tolerance, and their suppressive function was dependent on their interactions with NKT cells and IL-4. PMID:25311657

  7. CNTF-mediated protection of photoreceptors requires initial activation of the cytokine receptor gp130 in Müller glial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Kun Do; Nusinowitz, Steven; Chao, Kevin; Yu, Fei; Bok, Dean; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine CNTF has been approved by the FDA as a neuroprotective treatment for major retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of CNTF-triggered protection and CNTF-responsive cells in the retina remains unknown. Using molecular genetic analyses in a retinal degeneration mouse model, we identify the Müller glial cell as the direct initial target of exogenous CNTF signals. We provide evidence that CNTF signals stimulate a Müller glia and photoreceptor intercellular signaling loo...

  8. Mast cells and their activations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Bayramgürler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells which are traditionally known as the major cells of IgE-dependent immediate hypersensitivity reactions are currently recognized to have a role as effector cells in many settings of the both innate and adaptive immunity. Mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active mediators with proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosupressive functions, in response to several stimuli. Current knowledge about mast cells and their activation, mast cell mediators, their roel s in inflammation and immune system will be discussed in thisr eview.

  9. TGF-β1-induced cell migration in pancreatic carcinoma cells is RAC1 and NOX4-dependent and requires RAC1 and NOX4-dependent activation of p38 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, David; Bartscht, Tobias; Kaufmann, Roland; Pries, Ralph; Settmacher, Utz; Lehnert, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2017-12-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell invasion of cancer cells in part through the small GTPase RAC1. Since RAC1 can signal through reactive oxygen species (ROS), we probed the role of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase (NOX) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in mediating TGF-β1/RAC1-driven random cell migration (chemokinesis). Although the NOX isoforms NOX2, 4, 5, 6, and RAC1 were readily detectable by RT-PCR in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)-derived Panc1 and Colo357 cells, only NOX4 and RAC1 were expressed at higher levels comparable to those in peripheral blood monocytes. TGF-β1 treatment resulted in upregulation of NOX4 (and NOX2) and rapid intracellular production of ROS. To analyze whether RAC1 functions through NOX and ROS to promote cell motility, we performed real-time cell migration assays with xCELLigence® technology in the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and various NOX inhibitors. NAC, the NOX4 inhibitor diphenylene iodonium or small interfering RNA (siRNA) to NOX4, and the NOX2 inhibitor apocynin all suppressed TGF-β1-induced chemokinesis of Panc1 and Colo357 cells as did various inhibitors of RAC1 used as control. In addition, we showed that blocking NOX4 or RAC1 function abrogated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK signaling by TGF-β1 and that inhibition of p38 MAPK reduced TGF-β1-induced random cell migration, while ectopic expression of a kinase-active version of the p38 activating kinase MKK6 was able to partially rescue the decline in migration after RAC1 inhibition. Our data suggest that TGF-β1-induced chemokinesis in PDAC cells is mediated through a RAC1/NOX4/ROS/p38 MAPK cascade.

  10. Continuous requirement of ErbB2 kinase activity for loss of cell polarity and lumen formation in a novel ErbB2/Neu-driven murine cell line model of metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar F Ortega-Cava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well over a quarter of human breast cancers are ErbB2-driven and constitute a distinct subtype with substantially poorer prognosis. Yet, there are substantial gaps in our understanding of how ErbB2 tyrosine kinase activity unleashes a coordinated program of cellular and extracellular alterations that culminate in aggressive breast cancers. Cellular models that exhibit ErbB2 kinase dependency and can induce metastatic breast cancer in immune competent hosts are likely to help bridge this gap. Materials and Methods: Here, we derived and characterized a cell line model obtained from a transgenic ErbB2/Neu-driven mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Results: The MPPS1 cell line produces metastatic breast cancers when implanted in the mammary fat pads of immune-compromised as well as syngeneic immune-competent hosts. MPPS1 cells maintain high ErbB2 overexpression when propagated in DFCI-1 or related media, and their growth is ErbB2-dependent, as demonstrated by concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation with the ErbB kinase inhibitor Lapatinib. When grown in 3-dimensional (3-D culture on Matrigel, MPPS1 cells predominantly form large irregular cystic and solid structures. Remarkably, low concentrations of Lapatinib led to a switch to regular acinar growth on Matrigel. Immunofluorescence staining of control vs. Lapatinib-treated acini for markers of epithelial polarity revealed that inhibition of ErbB2 signaling led to rapid resumption of normal mammary epithelium-like cell polarity. Conclusions: The strict dependence of the MPPS1 cell system on ErbB2 signals for proliferation and alterations in cell polarity should allow its use to dissect ErbB2 kinase-dependent signaling pathways that promote loss of cell polarity, a key component of the epithelial mesenchymal transition and aggressiveness of ErbB2-driven breast cancers.

  11. Induction of cell scattering by expression of beta1 integrins in beta1-deficient epithelial cells requires activation of members of the rho family of GTPases and downregulation of cadherin and catenin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimond, C; van Der Flier, A; van Delft, S

    1999-01-01

    Adhesion receptors, which connect cells to each other and to the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), play a crucial role in the control of tissue structure and of morphogenesis. In this work, we have studied how intercellular adhesion molecules and beta1 integrins influence each other using two......-catenin protein levels accompanied by their redistribution from the cytoskeleton-associated fraction to the detergent-soluble fraction. Regulation of alpha-catenin protein levels by beta1 integrins is likely to play a role in the morphological transition, since overexpression of alpha-catenin in GE11 cells before...... beta1 prevented the disruption of intercellular adhesions and cell scattering. In addition, using biochemical activity assays for Rho-like GTPases, we show that the expression of beta1A, beta1D, or IL2R-beta1A in GE11 or GD25 cells triggers activation of both RhoA and Rac1, but not of Cdc42. Moreover...

  12. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Regulation of protein biosynthesis by non-lymphoid cells requires the participation of receptors, which recognize the same protein through a center analogous to the antibody active center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kul'berg, A.Y.; Ivanovska, N.D.; Tarkhanova, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the mechanism for regulating the biosynthesis of one of the complement components (anti-idiotypic antibodies CI /SUB q/ ) by macrophages. The experiments were conducted on mouse resident peritoneal macrophages cultivated in medium containing C 14-glycine. The synthesis of CI /SUB q/ was evaluated according to the content of protein which was bound by rabbit antibodies against mouse CI /SUB q/ immobilized on bromocyan-Sepharose 4B. The study of the kinetics of the biosynthesis of CI /SUB q/ by propagated macrophages shows that the biosynthesis was initially recorded and in the subsequent period the culture contained no other cells apart from macrophages

  14. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  15. CD28 expression is required after T cell priming for helper T cell responses and protective immunity to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linterman, Michelle A; Denton, Alice E; Divekar, Devina P; Zvetkova, Ilona; Kane, Leanne; Ferreira, Cristina; Veldhoen, Marc; Clare, Simon; Dougan, Gordon; Espéli, Marion; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2014-10-27

    The co-stimulatory molecule CD28 is essential for activation of helper T cells. Despite this critical role, it is not known whether CD28 has functions in maintaining T cell responses following activation. To determine the role for CD28 after T cell priming, we generated a strain of mice where CD28 is removed from CD4(+) T cells after priming. We show that continued CD28 expression is important for effector CD4(+) T cells following infection; maintained CD28 is required for the expansion of T helper type 1 cells, and for the differentiation and maintenance of T follicular helper cells during viral infection. Persistent CD28 is also required for clearance of the bacterium Citrobacter rodentium from the gastrointestinal tract. Together, this study demonstrates that CD28 persistence is required for helper T cell polarization in response to infection, describing a novel function for CD28 that is distinct from its role in T cell priming.

  16. Vav1-phospholipase C-γ1 (Vav1-PLC-γ1) Pathway Initiated by T Cell Antigen Receptor (TCRγδ) Activation Is Required to Overcome Inhibition by Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b during γδT Cell Cytotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shanshan; Zhang, Jianmin; Mao, Yujia; Hu, Yu; Cui, Lianxian; Kang, Ning; He, Wei

    2013-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor γδ (TCRγδ) and natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) are two crucial receptors for γδT cell cytotoxicity. Compelling evidences suggest that γδT cell cytotoxicity is TCRγδ-dependent and can be co-stimulated by NKG2D. However, the molecular mechanism of underlying TCRγδ-dependent activation of γδT cells remains unclear. In this study we demonstrated that TCRγδ but not NKG2D engagement induced lytic granule polarization and promoted γδT cell cytotoxicity. TCRγδ activation alone was sufficient to trigger Vav1-dependent phospholipase C-γ1 signaling, resulting in lytic granule polarization and effective killing, whereas NKG2D engagement alone failed to trigger cytotoxicity-related signaling to overcome the inhibitory effect of Cbl-b; therefore, NKG2D engagement alone could not induce effective killing. However, NKG2D ligation augmented the activation of γδT cell cytotoxicity through the Vav1-phospholipase C-γ1 pathway. Vav1 overexpression or Cbl-b knockdown not only enhanced TCRγδ activation-initiated killing but also enabled NKG2D activation alone to induce γδT cell cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that the activation of γδT cell cytotoxicity requires a strong activation signal to overcome the inhibitory effect of Cbl-b. Our finding provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of γδT cell cytotoxicity and likely implications for optimizing γδT cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23897818

  17. TNF activity and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit K; Gracias, Donald T; Croft, Michael

    2018-01-01

    TNF (tumor necrosis factor) is both a pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine that is central to the development of autoimmune disease, cancer, and protection against infectious pathogens. As well as a myriad other activities, TNF can be a product of T cells and can act on T cells. Here we review old and new data on the importance of TNF produced by T cells and how TNF signaling via TNFR2 may directly impact alternate aspects of T cell biology. TNF can promote the activation and proliferation of naïve and effector T cells, but also can induce apoptosis of highly activated effector T cells, further determining the size of the pathogenic or protective conventional T cell pool. Moreover, TNF can have divergent effects on regulatory T cells. It can both downregulate their suppressive capacity, but also contribute in other instances to their development or accumulation. Biologics that block TNF or stimulate TNFR2 therefore have the potential to strongly modulate the balance between effector T cells and Treg cells which could impact disease in both positive and negative manners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel

  19. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  20. Requirements engineering for human activity systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Guide for System Life Cycle Processes. Version 3.2. Edited by C. Haskins. San Diego, California: International Council on Systems Engineering, 2010. Jordan, J. Scott, ed. Systems Theories and A Priori Aspects of Perception. Amsterdam: Elsevier... to ensure that such requirements are properly developed and managed, by applying well defined rules and techniques (Hull, Jackson and Dick 2011). For example, a requirement should not be unrealistic and each requirement must be accompanied by criteria...

  1. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the by what method the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun, in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of ongoing efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  2. Metabolic activity is necessary for activation of T suppressor cells by B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, K.L.; Stashak, P.W.; Baker, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ag-primed B cells must express cell-surface IgM, but not IgD or Ia Ag, and must remain metabolically active, in order to activate suppressor T cells (Ts) specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. Ag-primed B cells that were gamma-irradiated with 1000r, or less, retained the ability to activate Ts; however, Ag-primed B cells exposed to UV light were not able to do so. gamma-Irradiated and UV-treated Ag-primed B cells both expressed comparable levels of cell-surface IgM, and both localized to the spleen after in vivo transfer; neither could proliferate in vitro in response to mitogens. By contrast, gamma-irradiated primed B cells were still able to synthesize proteins, whereas UV-treated primed B cells could not. These findings suggest that in order for Ag-primed B cells to activate Ts, they must (a) express cell-associated IgM (sIgM) antibody bearing the idiotypic determinants of antibody specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide, and (b) be able to synthesize protein for either the continued expression of sIgM after cell transfer, or for the elaboration of another protein molecule that is also required for the activation of Ts; this molecule does not appear to be Ia Ag

  3. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Synthesize Glucocorticoids and Regulate T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Igor; Corazza, Nadia; Dick, Bernhard; Fuhrer, Andrea; Herren, Simon; Jakob, Sabine; Ayuni, Erick; Mueller, Christoph; Brunner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important steroid hormones with widespread activities in metabolism, development, and immune regulation. The adrenal glands are the major source of GCs and release these hormones in response to psychological and immunological stress. However, there is increasing evidence that GCs may also be synthesized by nonadrenal tissues. Here, we report that the intestinal mucosa expresses steroidogenic enzymes and releases the GC corticosterone in response to T cell activation. T cell activation causes an increase in the intestinal expression of the steroidogenic enzymes required for GC synthesis. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that these enzymes are confined to the crypt region of the intestinal epithelial layer. Surprisingly, in situ–produced GCs exhibit both an inhibitory and a costimulatory role on intestinal T cell activation. In the absence of intestinal GCs in vivo, activation by anti-CD3 injection resulted in reduced CD69 expression and interferon-γ production by intestinal T cells, whereas activation by viral infection led to increased T cell activation. We conclude that the intestinal mucosa is a potent source of immunoregulatory GCs. PMID:15596520

  4. Fuel cell vehicle technologies, infrastructure and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) use hydrogen as fuel and exhaust only water and heat. They : provide driving ranges and fueling times comparable to gasoline vehicles. Despite the advantages, : FCEVs have been in and out of the spot light of the a...

  5. Retinoic acid activates two pathways required for meiosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Koubova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In all sexually reproducing organisms, cells of the germ line must transition from mitosis to meiosis. In mice, retinoic acid (RA, the extrinsic signal for meiotic initiation, activates transcription of Stra8, which is required for meiotic DNA replication and the subsequent processes of meiotic prophase. Here we report that RA also activates transcription of Rec8, which encodes a component of the cohesin complex that accumulates during meiotic S phase, and which is essential for chromosome synapsis and segregation. This RA induction of Rec8 occurs in parallel with the induction of Stra8, and independently of Stra8 function, and it is conserved between the sexes. Further, RA induction of Rec8, like that of Stra8, requires the germ-cell-intrinsic competence factor Dazl. Our findings strengthen the importance of RA and Dazl in the meiotic transition, provide important details about the Stra8 pathway, and open avenues to investigate early meiosis through analysis of Rec8 induction and function.

  6. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is active in primitive and definitive erythroid cells and is required for the function of 5'HS3 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, R; Gillemans, N; Wijgerde, M; Nuez, B; von Lindern, M; Grosveld, F; Philipsen, S

    1998-04-15

    Disruption of the gene for transcription factor EKLF (erythroid Krüppel-like factor) results in fatal anaemia caused by severely reduced expression of the adult beta-globin gene, while other erythroid-specific genes, including the embryonic epsilon- and fetal gamma-globin genes, are expressed normally. Thus, EKLF is thought to be a stage-specific factor acting through the CACC box in the beta-gene promoter, even though it is already present in embryonic red cells. Here, we show that a beta-globin gene linked directly to the locus control region (LCR) is expressed at embryonic stages, and that this is only modestly reduced in EKLF-/- embryos. Thus, embryonic beta-globin expression is not intrinsically dependent on EKLF. To investigate whether EKLF functions in the locus control region, we analysed the expression of LCR-driven lacZ reporters. This shows that EKLF is not required for reporter activation by the complete LCR. However, embryonic expression of reporters driven by 5'HS3 of the LCR requires EKLF. This suggests that EKLF interacts directly with the CACC motifs in 5'HS3 and demonstrates that EKLF is also a transcriptional activator in embryonic erythropoiesis. Finally, we show that overexpression of EKLF results in an earlier switch from gamma- to beta-globin expression. Adult mice with the EKLF transgene have reduced platelet counts, suggesting that EKLF levels affect the balance between the megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages. Interestingly, the EKLF transgene rescues the lethal phenotype of EKLF null mice, setting the stage for future studies aimed at the analysis of the EKLF protein and its role in beta-globin gene activation.

  7. Fibronectin-mediated cell spreading requires ABBA-Rac1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Chun; Luo, Xuesong; Wang, San-Xia; Zhan, Xi

    2013-04-01

    ABBA was reported to be an actin dynamics regulator. However, the molecular mechanism of action of ABBA is still totally obscure. Here, we show that ABBA is ubiquitously expressed in all the examined cultured cells. We found that expression of ABBA in NIH3T3 cells promotes cell spreading. ABBA binds to and markedly promotes cell spreading-induced Rac1 activation. Cell spreading stimulates ABBA activation probably by inducing it tyrosine phosphorylation, which endows ABBA much higher activity to activate Rac1, and attenuates the interaction between ABBA and Rac1. Loss of function suggests that deletion of ABBA in C6-R cells markedly inhibits Rac1 activation and cell spreading; this suggests that and the interaction between ABBA and activated Rac1 is required for ABBA-promoted cell spreading. Taken together, our results indicate that ABBA is activated in response to cell spreading, which markedly promotes cell spreading, and ABBA is required for Rac1 activation and cell spreading. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Photosensitization is required for antiretroviral activity of hypericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Susan; Tossberg, John; Kraus, George A.

    1991-06-01

    In a seminal series of papers, Meruelo and co-workers have described the potent antiretroviral effect of hypericin. Interestingly, hypericin was found to inhibit not only the production of infectious virus from chronically infected cells, but was also shown to directly inhibit reverse transcriptase activity of mature virions. The effect of hypericin on cells chronically infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a retrovirus genetically related to HIV, is demonstrated. At concentrations of 10 (mu) g/ml, hypericin reduced production of infectious EIAV by 99.99 without causing obvious cytopathic effects. Interestingly, the results indicated that the antiretroviral activity of hypericin was wholly dependent on the presence of light. No decrease in viral infectivity was observed when hypericin and virus were incubated in the dark. Moreover, it appeared that light was an absolute requirement for the antiviral activity, as even high concentrations of hypericin (10 (mu) g/ml) were unable to reduce infectivity of as few as 100 infectious virions.

  9. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echizen, Kanae [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Nakada, Mitsutoshi, E-mail: mnakada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Hayashi, Tomoatsu [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Morishita, Yasuyuki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirano, Shinji [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Okoh-cho, Nangoku-City, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Terai, Kenta [Laboratory of Function and Morphology, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  10. Activation of the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in CVB1 or HAV/18f infected FRhK-4 cells does not require induction of OAS1 or OAS2 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulka, Michael; Calvo, Mona S.; Ngo, Diana T.; Wales, Samantha Q.; Goswami, Biswendu B.

    2009-01-01

    The latent, constitutively expressed protein RNase L is activated in coxsackievirus and HAV strain 18f infected FRhK-4 cells. Endogenous oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) from uninfected and virus infected cell extracts synthesizes active forms of the triphosphorylated 2-5A oligomer (the only known activator of RNase L) in vitro and endogenous 2-5A is detected in infected cell extracts. However, only the largest OAS isoform, OAS3, is readily detected throughout the time course of infection. While IFNβ treatment results in an increase in the level of all three OAS isoforms in FRhK-4 cells, IFNβ pretreatment does not affect the temporal onset or enhancement of RNase L activity nor inhibit virus replication. Our results indicate that CVB1 and HAV/18f activate the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway in FRhK-4 cells during permissive infection through endogenous levels of OAS, but contrary to that reported for some picornaviruses, CVB1 and HAV/18f replication is insensitive to this activated antiviral pathway.

  11. The polycomb group protein Suz12 is required for embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Hansen, Jacob Bo Højberg

    2007-01-01

    results in early lethality of mouse embryos. Here, we demonstrate that Suz12(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be established and expanded in tissue culture. The Suz12(-/-) ES cells are characterized by global loss of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and higher expression levels of differentiation......-specific genes. Moreover, Suz12(-/-) ES cells are impaired in proper differentiation, resulting in a lack of repression of ES cell markers as well as activation of differentiation-specific genes. Finally, we demonstrate that the PcGs are actively recruited to several genes during ES cell differentiation, which...... despite an increase in H3K27me3 levels is not always sufficient to prevent transcriptional activation. In summary, we demonstrate that Suz12 is required for the establishment of specific expression programs required for ES cell differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that PcGs have different...

  12. Requirement of GM2 ganglioside activator for phospholipase D activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Akisue, T; Jinnai, H; Hitomi, T; Sarkar, S; Miwa, N; Okada, T; Yoshida, K; Kuroda, S; Kikkawa, U; Nishizuka, Y

    1998-10-13

    Sequence analysis of a heat-stable protein necessary for the activation of ADP ribosylation factor-dependent phospholipase D (PLD) reveals that this protein has a structure highly homologous to the previously known GM2 ganglioside activator whose deficiency results in the AB-variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. The heat-stable activator protein indeed has the capacity to enhance enzymatic conversion of GM2 to GM3 ganglioside that is catalyzed by beta-hexosaminidase A. Inversely, GM2 ganglioside activator purified separately from tissues as described earlier [Conzelmann, E. & Sandhoff, K. (1987) Methods Enzymol. 138, 792-815] stimulates ADP ribosylation factor-dependent PLD in a dose-dependent manner. At higher concentrations of ammonium sulfate, the PLD activator protein apparently substitutes for protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, both of which are known as effective stimulators of the PLD reaction. The mechanism of action of the heat-stable PLD activator protein remains unknown.

  13. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  14. LSD1 is Required for Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Cai, Chengfu; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A) plays an important role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression. It has recently been demonstrated that during development, downregulation of LSD1 inhibits cell proliferation, modulates the expression of cell cycle regulators, and reduces hair cell formation in the zebrafish lateral line, which suggests that LSD1-mediated epigenetic regulation plays a key role in the development of hair cells. However, the role of LSD1 in hair cell regeneration after hair cell loss remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the effect of LSD1 on hair cell regeneration following neomycin-induced hair cell loss. We show that the LSD1 inhibitor trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (2-PCPA) significantly decreases the regeneration of hair cells in zebrafish after neomycin damage. In addition, immunofluorescent staining demonstrates that 2-PCPA administration suppresses supporting cell proliferation and alters cell cycle progression. Finally, in situ hybridization shows that 2-PCPA significantly downregulates the expression of genes related to Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf activation. Altogether, our data suggest that downregulation of LSD1 significantly decreases hair cell regeneration after neomycin-induced hair cell loss through inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf signaling pathways. Thus, LSD1 plays a critical role in hair cell regeneration and might represent a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of hearing loss.

  15. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M.; Liu, Jinsong; Chadee, Deborah N.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. ► MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. ► MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. ► MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  16. Distinct Requirements for HIV-Cell Fusion and HIV-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Naoyuki; Marin, Mariana; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Desai, Tanay M.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    Whether HIV-1 enters cells by fusing with the plasma membrane or with endosomes is a subject of active debate. The ability of HIV-1 to mediate fusion between adjacent cells, a process referred to as “fusion-from-without” (FFWO), shows that this virus can fuse with the plasma membrane. To compare FFWO occurring at the cell surface with HIV-cell fusion through a conventional entry route, we designed an experimental approach that enabled the measurements of both processes in the same sample. The following key differences were observed. First, a very small fraction of viruses fusing with target cells participated in FFWO. Second, whereas HIV-1 fusion with adherent cells was insensitive to actin inhibitors, post-CD4/coreceptor binding steps during FFWO were abrogated. A partial dependence of HIV-cell fusion on actin remodeling was observed in CD4+ T cells, but this effect appeared to be due to the actin dependence of virus uptake. Third, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 dramatically enhanced the ability of the virus to promote FFWO, while having a modest effect on virus-cell fusion. Distinct efficiencies and actin dependences of FFWO versus HIV-cell fusion are consistent with the notion that, except for a minor fraction of particles that mediate fusion between the plasma membranes of adjacent cells, HIV-1 enters through an endocytic pathway. We surmise, however, that cell-cell contacts enabling HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane could be favored at the sites of high density of target cells, such as lymph nodes. PMID:25589785

  17. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  18. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  19. Signaling for synergistic activation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Hun Sik

    2012-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in early surveillance against virus infection and cellular transformation, and are also implicated in the control of inflammatory response through their effector functions of direct lysis of target cells and cytokine secretion. NK cell activation toward target cell is determined by the net balance of signals transmitted from diverse activating and inhibitory receptors. A distinct feature of NK cell activation is that stimulation of resting NK cells with single activating receptor on its own cannot mount natural cytotoxicity. Instead, specific pairs of co-activation receptors are required to unleash NK cell activation via synergy-dependent mechanism. Because each co-activation receptor uses distinct signaling modules, NK cell synergy relies on the integration of such disparate signals. This explains why the study of the mechanism underlying NK cell synergy is important and necessary. Recent studies revealed that NK cell synergy depends on the integration of complementary signals converged at a critical checkpoint element but not on simple amplification of the individual signaling to overcome intrinsic activation threshold. This review focuses on the signaling events during NK cells activation and recent advances in the study of NK cell synergy.

  20. 12 CFR 980.3 - New business activity notice requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... undertaking a new business activity, except as provided in § 980.4(b), a Bank shall submit to the Finance... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New business activity notice requirement. 980.3 Section 980.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD NEW FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ACTIVITIES NEW...

  1. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Marie Pedersen

    Full Text Available In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC, leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi, a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosylation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2. Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi.

  2. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  3. Validation of Power Requirement Model for Active Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Madsen, Anders Normann; Bjerregaard, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    The actual power requirement of an active loudspeaker during playback of music has not received much attention in the literature. This is probably because no single and simple solution exists and because a complete system knowledge from input voltage to output sound pressure level is required...

  4. 10 CFR 60.46 - Particular activities requiring license amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Particular activities requiring license amendment. 60.46 Section 60.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES... or disposal of records required to be maintained under the provisions of this part. (5) Any...

  5. Verifying cell loss requirements in high-speed communication networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry W. Fendick

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In high-speed communication networks it is common to have requirements of very small cell loss probabilities due to buffer overflow. Losses are measured to verify that the cell loss requirements are being met, but it is not clear how to interpret such measurements. We propose methods for determining whether or not cell loss requirements are being met. A key idea is to look at the stream of losses as successive clusters of losses. Often clusters of losses, rather than individual losses, should be regarded as the important “loss events”. Thus we propose modeling the cell loss process by a batch Poisson stochastic process. Successive clusters of losses are assumed to arrive according to a Poisson process. Within each cluster, cell losses do not occur at a single time, but the distance between losses within a cluster should be negligible compared to the distance between clusters. Thus, for the purpose of estimating the cell loss probability, we ignore the spaces between successive cell losses in a cluster of losses. Asymptotic theory suggests that the counting process of losses initiating clusters often should be approximately a Poisson process even though the cell arrival process is not nearly Poisson. The batch Poisson model is relatively easy to test statistically and fit; e.g., the batch-size distribution and the batch arrival rate can readily be estimated from cell loss data. Since batch (cluster sizes may be highly variable, it may be useful to focus on the number of batches instead of the number of cells in a measurement interval. We also propose a method for approximately determining the parameters of a special batch Poisson cell loss with geometric batch-size distribution from a queueing model of the buffer content. For this step, we use a reflected Brownian motion (RBM approximation of a G/D/1/C queueing model. We also use the RBM model to estimate the input burstiness given the cell loss rate. In addition, we use the RBM model to

  6. Rapid and dynamic arginylation of the leading edge β-actin is required for cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlyk, Iuliia; Leu, Nicolae A; Vedula, Pavan; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kashina, Anna

    2018-04-01

    β-actin plays key roles in cell migration. Our previous work demonstrated that β-actin in migratory non-muscle cells is N-terminally arginylated and that this arginylation is required for normal lamellipodia extension. Here, we examined the function of β-actin arginylation in cell migration. We found that arginylated β-actin is concentrated at the leading edge of lamellipodia and that this enrichment is abolished after serum starvation as well as in contact-inhibited cells in confluent cultures, suggesting that arginylated β-actin at the cell leading edge is coupled to active migration. Arginylated actin levels exhibit dynamic changes in response to cell stimuli, lowered after serum starvation and dramatically elevating within minutes after cell stimulation by readdition of serum or lysophosphatidic acid. These dynamic changes require active translation and are not seen in confluent contact-inhibited cell cultures. Microinjection of arginylated actin antibodies into cells severely and specifically inhibits their migration rates. Together, these data strongly suggest that arginylation of β-actin is a tightly regulated dynamic process that occurs at the leading edge of locomoting cells in response to stimuli and is integral to the signaling network that regulates cell migration. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Functional hair cell mechanotransducer channels are required for aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Alharazneh

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss.

  8. CD40L and TNF both activate the classical NF-κB pathway, which is not required for the CD40L induced alternative pathway in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigner, J; Basilio, J; Resch, U; de Martin, R

    2018-01-01

    CD40L and TNF signal through engagement of their respective receptors, which are both members of the TNF receptor family. They use partially common signaling molecules leading, among others, to activation of the NF-κB pathway. However, whereas TNF activates the classical, CD40L has been reported to activate the alternative NF-κB pathway, leading to the anticipation that differences in the pattern of inflammatory gene expression would occur. Here, we have compared the gene expression repertoire of CD40L (CD154) and TNF stimulated HUVEC and report that unexpectedly, apart from a stronger response to TNF, no major qualitative differences could be observed. This applies for the period of up to 6 h, a time where the alternative pathway has already been activated. Analysis of the early events after receptor engagement revealed that both TNF and CD40L activate the classical NF-κB pathway, and confirm activation of the alternative by the latter. Furthermore, using genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the classical pathway we show that activation of the alternative occurs independently of the former. This reveals novel insights into NF-κB signaling by CD40L and TNF in endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. CD4+ regulatory T cells require CTLA-4 for the maintenance of systemic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Randall H; Brown, David S; Nguyen, Hai; Kornfeld, Hardy; Lee, Jinhee; Zhang, Yi; Appleby, Mark; Der, Sandy D; Kang, Joonsoo; Chambers, Cynthia A

    2009-02-16

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) plays a critical role in negatively regulating T cell responses and has also been implicated in the development and function of natural FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells. CTLA-4-deficient mice develop fatal, early onset lymphoproliferative disease. However, chimeric mice containing both CTLA-4-deficient and -sufficient bone marrow (BM)-derived cells do not develop disease, indicating that CTLA-4 can act in trans to maintain T cell self-tolerance. Using genetically mixed blastocyst and BM chimaeras as well as in vivo T cell transfer systems, we demonstrate that in vivo regulation of Ctla4(-/-) T cells in trans by CTLA-4-sufficient T cells is a reversible process that requires the persistent presence of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells with a diverse TCR repertoire. Based on gene expression studies, the regulatory T cells do not appear to act directly on T cells, suggesting they may instead modulate the stimulatory activities of antigen-presenting cells. These results demonstrate that CTLA-4 is absolutely required for FOXP3(+) regulatory T cell function in vivo.

  10. Chiral Orientation of Skeletal Muscle Cells Requires Rigid Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghao Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of tissue morphology with inherent left–right (LR asymmetry is essential for tissue/organ functions. For skeletal muscle, the largest tissue in mammalian organisms, successful myogenesis requires the regulation of the LR asymmetry to form the appropriate muscle alignment. However, the key factor for reproducing the LR asymmetry of skeletal tissues in a controllable, engineering context remains largely unknown. Recent reports indicate that cell chirality may underlie the LR development in tissue morphogenesis. Here, we report that a rigid substrate is required for the chirality of skeletal muscle cells. By using alternating micropatterned cell-adherent and cell-repellent stripes on a rigid substrate, we found that C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts exhibited a unidirectional tilted orientation with respect to the stripe boundary. Importantly, such chiral orientation was reduced when soft substrates were used instead. In addition, we demonstrated the key role of actin stress fibers in the formation of the chiral orientation. This study reveals that a rigid substrate is required for the chiral pattern of myoblasts, paving the way for reconstructing damaged muscle tissue with inherent LR asymmetry in the future.

  11. Establishment of human papillomavirus infection requires cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohun Pyeon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these

  12. Autophagy is required for ectoplasmic specialization assembly in sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Hongna; Shang, Yongliang; Liu, Weixiao; Song, Zhenhua; Zhao, Haichao; Wang, Lina; Jia, Pengfei; Gao, Fengyi; Xu, Zhiliang; Yang, Lin; Gao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ectoplasmic specialization (ES) is essential for Sertoli-germ cell communication to support all phases of germ cell development and maturity. Its formation and remodeling requires rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ES assembly is still largely unknown. Here, we show that Sertoli cell-specific disruption of autophagy influenced male mouse fertility due to the resulting disorganized seminiferous tubules and spermatozoa with malformed heads. In autophagy-deficient mouse testes, cytoskeleton structures were disordered and ES assembly was disrupted. The disorganization of the cytoskeleton structures might be caused by the accumulation of a negative cytoskeleton organization regulator, PDLIM1, and these defects could be partially rescued by Pdlim1 knockdown in autophagy-deficient Sertoli cells. Altogether, our works reveal that the degradation of PDLIM1 by autophagy in Sertoli cells is important for the proper assembly of the ES, and these findings define a novel role for autophagy in Sertoli cell-germ cell communication. PMID:26986811

  13. Mind bomb-1 in dendritic cells is specifically required for Notch-mediated T helper type 2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Jeong

    Full Text Available In dendritic cell (DC-CD4(+ T cell interaction, Notch signaling has been implicated in the CD4(+ T cell activation, proliferation, and subset differentiation. However, there has been a lot of debate on the exact role of Notch signaling. Here, we observed that expression of Mind bomb-1 (Mib1, a critical regulator of Notch ligands for the activation of Notch signaling, increases gradually as precursor cells differentiate into DCs in mice. To clarify the role of Mib1 in DC-CD4(+ T cell interactions, we generated Mib1-null bone marrow-derived DCs. These cells readily expressed Notch ligands but failed to initiate Notch activation in the adjacent cells. Nevertheless, Mib1-null DCs were able to prime the activation and proliferation of CD4(+ T cells, suggesting that Notch activation in CD4(+ T cells is not required for these processes. Intriguingly, stimulation of CD4(+ T cells with Mib1-null DCs resulted in dramatically diminished Th2 cell populations, while preserving Th1 cell populations, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that Mib1 in DCs is critical for the activation of Notch signaling in CD4(+ T cells, and Notch signaling reinforces Th2 differentiation, but is not required for the activation or proliferation of the CD4(+ T cells.

  14. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type and SAP Domain Mutant Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Porcine Cells Identifies the Ubiquitin-Activating Enzyme UBE1 Required for Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zixiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Keshan; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Wang, Guoqing; Mao, Ruoqing; Li, Dan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-02

    Leader protein (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manipulates the activities of several host proteins to promote viral replication and pathogenicity. L(pro) has a conserved protein domain SAP that is suggested to subvert interferon (IFN) production to block antiviral responses. However, apart from blocking IFN production, the roles of the SAP domain during FMDV infection in host cells remain unknown. Therefore, we identified host proteins associated with the SAP domain of L(pro) by a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in conjunction with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry]. Comparison of the differentially regulated proteins in rA/FMDVΔmSAP- versus rA/FMDV-infected SK6 cells revealed 45 down-regulated and 32 up-regulated proteins that were mostly associated with metabolic, ribosome, spliceosome, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. The results also imply that the SAP domain has a function similar to SAF-A/B besides its potential protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (PIAS) function. One of the identified proteins UBE1 was further analyzed and displayed a novel role for the SAP domain of L(pro). Overexpression of UBE1 enhanced the replication of FMDV, and knockdown of UBE1 decreased FMDV replication. This shows that FMDV manipulates UBE1 for increased viral replication, and the SAP domain was involved in this process.

  16. Sonic hedgehog-induced histone deacetylase activation is required for cerebellar granule precursor hyperplasia in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor, is thought to arise from deregulated proliferation of cerebellar granule precursor (CGP cells. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is the primary mitogen that regulates proliferation of CGP cells during the early stages of postnatal cerebellum development. Aberrant activation of Shh signaling during this time has been associated with hyperplasia of CGP cells and eventually may lead to the development of medulloblastoma. The molecular targets of Shh signaling involved in medulloblastoma formation are still not well-understood. Here, we show that Shh regulates sustained activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs and that this activity is required for continued proliferation of CGP cells. Suppression of HDAC activity not only blocked the Shh-induced CGP proliferation in primary cell cultures, but also ameliorated aberrant CGP proliferation at the external germinal layer (EGL in a medulloblastoma mouse model. Increased levels of mRNA and protein of several HDAC family members were found in medulloblastoma compared to wild type cerebellum suggesting that HDAC activity is required for the survival/progression of tumor cells. The identification of a role of HDACs in the early steps of medulloblastoma formation suggests there may be a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors in this disease.

  17. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...

  18. Requirements Specication for Ampliers and Power Supplies in Active Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Jensen, Lasse Crone; Petersen, Lars Press

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to provide designers with a method to develop a requirements specication for power supplies and ampliers in active loudspeakers. The motivation is to avoid over-sizing and unnecessary cost. A realistic estimation of the power supplied during playback of audio in a given loudspeaker...

  19. Equipment maintenance activities required for the sustenance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate those equipment maintenance activities required for the sustenance and growth of woodwork industries in Niger State. Three (3) research questions were formulated to guide this study. Three (3) null hypotheses were also formulated and tested at 0.05 level of significances.

  20. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kimberly C; Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-05-15

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CD18 is required for optimal lymphopenia-induced proliferation of mouse T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphocyte numbers are tightly regulated; with acute lymphopenia, T cell numbers are reestablished through lymphopenia-induced proliferation. In contrast to the costimulation requirements of antigen-driven proliferation, a number of costimulatory molecules are not required for lymphopenia-induced proliferation. However, the requirement for major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-T cell receptor (TCR) interactions and the enhanced lymphopenia-induced proliferation in T cells with higher TCR affinity argue for a role for surface molecules that contribute to efficient MHC-TCR interactions, in particular adhesion molecules. CD18 is an integrin that contributes to the activation of peripheral and intestinal T cells through adhesive and costimulatory mechanisms. We found that CD18 is required for optimal polyclonal and monoclonal CD4+ T cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (RAG-1−/−) mice; this requirement persisted over time. Uniquely, the dependency on CD18 in CD4+ T cells is in the rapid proliferation in RAG-1−/− recipients and in the slow homeostatic proliferation in irradiated Balb/c recipients. Consistent with the proposed role for intestinal microbiota in lymphopenia-induced rapid proliferation in RAG−/− mice, we observed a significant reduction in rapid proliferation upon treatment of mice with antibiotics; however, the dependency on CD18 for optimal lymphopenia-induced proliferation persisted. Moreover, the dependency for CD18 is maintained over a wide range of numbers of initially transferred T cells, including a low number of initially transferred T cells, when the drive for proliferation is very strong and proliferation is more rapid. Overall, these data argue for an essential and broad role for CD18 in lymphopenia-induced proliferation. PMID:22821945

  2. Energy-requiring uptake of prostasomes and PC3 cell-derived exosomes into non-malignant and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Göran Ronquist

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells lining the prostate acini release, in a regulated manner (exocytosis, nanosized vesicles called prostasomes that belong to the exosome family. Prostate cancer cells have preserved this ability to generate and export exosomes to the extracellular space. We previously demonstrated that human prostasomes have an ATP-forming capacity. In this study, we compared the capacity of extracellular vesicles (EVs to generate ATP between normal seminal prostasomes and exosomes secreted by PC3 cells (PC3 exosomes, a prostate cancer cell line. Proteomic analyses identified enzymes of the glycolytic chain in both prostasomes and PC3 exosomes, and we found that both of them were capable of generating ATP when supplied with substrates. Notably, the net production of extracellular ATP was low for prostasomes due to a high ATPase activity contrary to an elevated net ATP level for PC3 exosomes because of their low ATPase activity. The uptake of the 2 types of EVs by normal prostate epithelial cells (CRL2221 and prostate cancer cells (PC3 was visualized and measured, demonstrating differential kinetics. Interestingly, this uptake was dependent upon an ongoing glycolytic flux involving extracellular ATP formation by EVs and/or intracellular ATP produced from the recipient cells. We conclude that the internalization of EVs into recipient cells is an energy-requiring process also demanding an active V-ATPase and the capacity of EVs to generate extracellular ATP may play a role in this process.

  3. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  4. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the growth of the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...

  5. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra; Lidke, Diane S

    2015-08-31

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell-cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell-cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC-DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. © 2015 Carroll-Portillo et al.

  6. JNK Controls the Onset of Mitosis in Planarian Stem Cells and Triggers Apoptotic Cell Death Required for Regeneration and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun–NH2–kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal. PMID:24922054

  7. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Almuedo-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  8. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo-Yanez, Xenia; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  9. Time required for motor activity in lucid dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between the time required for specific tasks (counting and performing squats) in lucid dreams and in the waking state. Five proficient lucid dreamers (26-34 yr. old, M=29.8, SD=3.0; one woman and four men) participated. Analysis showed that the time needed for counting in a lucid dream is comparable to the time needed for counting in wakefulness, but motor activities required more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state.

  10. Multiple modes of proepicardial cell migration require heartbeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavicki, Jessica S; Hofsteen, Peter; Yue, Monica S; Lanham, Kevin A; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2014-05-15

    injected hearts. Epicardial cells stem from a heterogeneous population of progenitors, suggesting that the progenitors in the PE have distinct identities. PE cells attach to the heart via a cellular bridge and free-floating cell clusters. Pericardiac fluid advections are not necessary for the development of the PE cluster, however heartbeat is required for epicardium formation. Epicardium formation can occur in culture without normal hydrodynamic and hemodynamic forces, but not without contraction.

  11. The Histone H2B Monoubiquitination Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Differentiation of Multipotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpiuk, Oleksandra; Najafova, Zeynab; Kramer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Extensive changes in posttranslational histone modifications accompany the rewiring of the transcriptional program during stem cell differentiation. However, the mechanisms controlling the changes in specific chromatin modifications and their function during differentiation remain only poorly...... understood. We show that histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) significantly increases during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and various lineage-committed precursor cells and in diverse organisms. Furthermore, the H2B ubiquitin ligase RNF40 is required for the induction...... during the transition from an inactive to an active chromatin conformation. Thus, these data indicate that H2Bub1 is required for maintaining multipotency of hMSCs and plays a central role in controlling stem cell differentiation....

  12. SaCas9 Requires 5'-NNGRRT-3' PAM for Sufficient Cleavage and Possesses Higher Cleavage Activity than SpCas9 or FnCpf1 in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haihua; Tang, Lianchao; He, Xiubin; Liu, Xiexie; Zhou, Chenchen; Liu, Junjie; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Jin; Liu, Changbao; Zhao, Junzhao; Qu, Jia; Song, Zongming; Gu, Feng

    2018-04-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of human diseases. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), the sequence adjacent to the target sequence, is an essential targeting component for the design of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing. However, currently, very few studies have attempted to directly study the PAM sequence in human cells. To address this issue, the authors develop a dual fluorescence reporter system that could be harnessed for identifying functional PAMs for genome editing endonuclease, including Cas9. With this system, the authors investigate the effects of different PAM sequences for SaCas9, which is small and has the advantage of allowing in vivo genome editing, and found only 5'-NNGRRT-3' PAM could induced sufficient target cleavage with multi-sites. The authors also found SaCas9 possesses higher activity than SpCas9 or FnCpf1 via plasmids (episomal) and chromosomes with integrated eGFP-based comparison. Taken together, the authors show that a dual fluorescence reporter system is a means to identifying a functional PAM and quantitatively comparing the efficiency of different genome editing endonucleases with the similar or identical target sequence in human cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Eph receptor interclass cooperation is required for the regulation of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurek, Aleksandra; Genander, Maria; Kundu, Parag; Catchpole, Timothy; He, Xiao; Strååt, Klas; Sabelström, Hanna; Xu, Nan-Jie; Pettersson, Sven; Henkemeyer, Mark; Frisén, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Cancer often arises by the constitutive activation of mitogenic pathways by mutations in stem cells. Eph receptors are unusual in that although they regulate the proliferation of stem/progenitor cells in many adult organs, they typically fail to transform cells. Multiple ephrins and Eph receptors are often co-expressed and are thought to be redundant, but we here describe an unexpected dichotomy with two homologous ligands, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2, regulating specifically migration or proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. We demonstrate that the combined activity of two different coexpressed Eph receptors of the A and B class assembled into common signaling clusters in response to ephrin-B2 is required for mitogenic signaling. The requirement of two different Eph receptors to convey mitogenic signals identifies a new type of cooperation within this receptor family and helps explain why constitutive activation of a single receptor fails to transform cells. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 have largely non-overlapping functions in the intestinal stem cell niche. • Ephrin-B1 regulates cell positioning and ephrin-B2 regulates cell proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. • EphA4/B2 receptor cooperation in response to ephrin-B2 binding is obligatory to convey mitogenic signals in the intestine. • EphA4 facilitates EphB2 phosphorylation in response to ephrin-B2 in SW480 adenocarcinoma cells. • Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 induce phosphorylation and degradation of the EphB2 receptor with different kinetics.

  14. Eph receptor interclass cooperation is required for the regulation of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurek, Aleksandra; Genander, Maria [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kundu, Parag [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Catchpole, Timothy [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); He, Xiao; Strååt, Klas; Sabelström, Hanna [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Xu, Nan-Jie [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); Pettersson, Sven [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); The National Cancer Centre, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Henkemeyer, Mark [Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 (United States); Frisén, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.frisen@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-10-15

    Cancer often arises by the constitutive activation of mitogenic pathways by mutations in stem cells. Eph receptors are unusual in that although they regulate the proliferation of stem/progenitor cells in many adult organs, they typically fail to transform cells. Multiple ephrins and Eph receptors are often co-expressed and are thought to be redundant, but we here describe an unexpected dichotomy with two homologous ligands, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2, regulating specifically migration or proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. We demonstrate that the combined activity of two different coexpressed Eph receptors of the A and B class assembled into common signaling clusters in response to ephrin-B2 is required for mitogenic signaling. The requirement of two different Eph receptors to convey mitogenic signals identifies a new type of cooperation within this receptor family and helps explain why constitutive activation of a single receptor fails to transform cells. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 have largely non-overlapping functions in the intestinal stem cell niche. • Ephrin-B1 regulates cell positioning and ephrin-B2 regulates cell proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche. • EphA4/B2 receptor cooperation in response to ephrin-B2 binding is obligatory to convey mitogenic signals in the intestine. • EphA4 facilitates EphB2 phosphorylation in response to ephrin-B2 in SW480 adenocarcinoma cells. • Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 induce phosphorylation and degradation of the EphB2 receptor with different kinetics.

  15. Utx Is Required for Proper Induction of Ectoderm and Mesoderm during Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Torres, Cristina; Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    for the activation of lineage choice genes in response to developmental signals. To further understand the function of Utx in pluripotency and differentiation we generated Utx knockout embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we show that Utx is not required for the proliferation of ESCs, however, Utx contributes......Embryonic development requires chromatin remodeling for dynamic regulation of gene expression patterns to ensure silencing of pluripotent transcription factors and activation of developmental regulators. Demethylation of H3K27me3 by the histone demethylases Utx and Jmjd3 is important...

  16. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Promotes Pro-Glycolytic Metabolic Perturbations Required for Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Berrios

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV is an etiological agent of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a highly aggressive skin cancer. The MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST is required for maintenance of MCC and can transform normal cells. To gain insight into cellular perturbations induced by MCPyV ST, we performed transcriptome analysis of normal human fibroblasts with inducible expression of ST. MCPyV ST dynamically alters the cellular transcriptome with increased levels of glycolytic genes, including the monocarboxylate lactate transporter SLC16A1 (MCT1. Extracellular flux analysis revealed increased lactate export reflecting elevated aerobic glycolysis in ST expressing cells. Inhibition of MCT1 activity suppressed the growth of MCC cell lines and impaired MCPyV-dependent transformation of IMR90 cells. Both NF-κB and MYC have been shown to regulate MCT1 expression. While MYC was required for MCT1 induction, MCPyV-induced MCT1 levels decreased following knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, supporting a synergistic activity between MCPyV and MYC in regulating MCT1 levels. Several MCC lines had high levels of MYCL and MYCN but not MYC. Increased levels of MYCL was more effective than MYC or MYCN in increasing extracellular acidification in MCC cells. Our results demonstrate the effects of MCPyV ST on the cellular transcriptome and reveal that transformation is dependent, at least in part, on elevated aerobic glycolysis.

  17. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  18. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Sara Y; Kang, Sohyeong; Ford, Mandy L; Harder, Kenneth W; Priatel, John J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8 + T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8 + T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8 + T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8 + T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8 + T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas.

  19. Activated T cells can induce high levels of CTLA-4 expression on B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, H. M.; Brouwer, M.; Linsley, P. S.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Engagement of the TCR/CD3 complex together with ligation of CD28 by its counterstructures B7-1 (CD80) and B7-2 (CD86) on APC are required for mitogenic T cell activation. After activation, T cells not only express B7-1 and B7-2 molecules, but a second receptor for the B7 ligands, CTLA-4, can be

  20. Class I HDAC activity is required for renal protection and regeneration after acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinhua; Yan, Yanli; Zhao, Ting C; Gong, Rujun; Bayliss, George; Yan, Haidong; Zhuang, Shougang

    2014-08-01

    Activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is required for renal epithelial cell proliferation and kidney development. However, their role in renal tubular cell survival and regeneration after acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that all class I HDAC isoforms (1, 2, 3, and 8) were expressed in the renal epithelial cells of the mouse kidney. Inhibition of class I HDACs with MS-275, a highly selective inhibitor, resulted in more severe tubular injury in the mouse model of AKI induced by folic acid or rhabdomyolysis, as indicated by worsening renal dysfunction, increased neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin expression, and enhanced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. Blocking class I HDAC activity also impaired renal regeneration as evidenced by decreased expression of renal Pax-2, vimentin, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Injury to the kidney is accompanied by increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), and Akt. Inhibition of class I HDACs suppressed EGFR phosphorylation as well as reduced its expression. MS-275 was also effective in inhibiting STAT3 and Akt phosphorylation, but this treatment did not affect their expression levels. Taken together, these data suggest that the class I HDAC activity contributes to renal protection and functional recovery and is required for renal regeneration after AKI. Furthermore, renal EGFR signaling is subject to regulation by this class of HDACs. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Force Dynamics During T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    T cell activation is an essential step in the adaptive immune response. The binding of the T cell receptor (TCR) with antigen triggers signaling cascades and cell spreading. Physical forces exerted on the TCR by the cytoskeleton have been shown to induce signaling events. While cellular forces are known to depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the biophysical mechanisms underlying force induced activation of TCR-antigen interactions unknown. Here, we use traction force microscopy to measure the force dynamics of activated Jurkat T cells. The movements of beads embedded in an elastic gel serve as a non-invasive reporter of cytoskeletal and molecular motor dynamics. We examined the statistical structure of the force profiles throughout the cell during signaling activation. We found two spatially distinct active regimes of force generation characterized by different time scales. Typically, the interior of the cells was found to be more active than the periphery. Inhibition of myosin motor activity altered the correlation time of the bead displacements indicating additional sources of stochastic force generation. Our results indicate a complex interaction between myosin activity and actin polymerization dynamics in producing cellular forces in immune cells.

  2. Autophagy is Required for the Maintenance of Liver Progenitor Cell Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiji Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver progenitor cells (LPCs are bipotent stem cells existing in the adult liver, which could be activated upon massive liver injury and contribute to liver regeneration. However, mechanisms of maintenance of LPC functionality remain poorly understood. Previous studies found that autophagy was required for the self-renewal and differentiation of several tissue stem cells. Methods: The study compared the level of autophagic activity in LPCs and differentiated hepatocytes. Then, autophagic activity was inhibited in LPCs by lentivirus-mediated autophagy-related gene 5 or Beclin 1 knockdown. Clonogenic assay, cell viability assays, hepatic differentiation assay, and senescence analysis were conducted to assess the role of autophagy in regulating self-renewal, hepatic differentiation and senescence of LPCs. Results: We observed high autophagic activity in LPCs compared with differentiated hepatocytes. We found that inhibition of autophagy impaired the self-renewal, proliferation, and hepatic differentiation capability of LPCs under normal cultural condition, but had little impact on cell viability. Interestingly, while wild-type LPCs remained rarely affected by the toxin, etoposide, inhibition of autophagy induced the senescent phenotype of LPCs. Overexpression of Beclin 1 in Beclin 1-knockdown LPCs restored the functionality of stem cells. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that autophagy may function as a critical regulator of LPC functionality under both physiological and pathological condition.

  3. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heizmann, Beate [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Sellars, MacLean [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Macias-Garcia, Alejandra [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chan, Susan, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Kastner, Philippe, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  4. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  5. Linc-RAM is required for FGF2 function in regulating myogenic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yixia; Cao, Fengqi; Yu, Xiaohua; Chen, Chuyan; Meng, Jiao; Zhong, Ran; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Dahai

    2018-01-24

    Myogenic differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells, also known satellite cells, is tightly orchestrated by extrinsic and intrinsic regulators. Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) is well documented to be implicated in satellite cell self-renewal and differentiation by repressing MyoD. We recently identified a MyoD-regulated and skeletal muscle-specifically expressed long non-coding RNA Linc-RAM which enhances myogenic differentiation by facilitating MyoD/Baf60c/Brg1 complex assembly. Herein, we investigated the transcriptional regulation and intracellular signaling pathway in mediating Linc-RAM gene expression during muscle cell differentiation. Firstly, we demonstrate Linc-RAM is negatively regulated by FGF2 via Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway in muscle cells. Overexpression of MyoD significantly attenuates repression of Linc-RAM promoter activities in C2C12 cells treated with FGF2. Knockout of MyoD abolishes FGF2-mediated repression of Linc-RAM gene transcription in satellite cells sorted from skeletal muscle of MyoD - / - ;Pax7-nGFP mice, suggesting inhibition of MyoD is required for FGF2-mediated expression of Linc-RAM. For the functional significance, we show that overexpression of Linc-RAM rescues FGF2-induced inhibition of C2C12 cell differentiation, indicating inhibition of Linc-RAM is required for FGF2-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation. Consistently, we are able to further corroborate the requirement of Linc-RAM inhibition for FGF2-modulated repression of myogenic differentiation by using an ex vivo cultured single fiber system and satellite cells sorted from Linc-RAM - / - ;Pax7-nGFP knockout mice. Collectively, the present study not only reveals the intracellular signaling in FGF2-mediated Linc-RAM gene expression but also demonstrate the functional significance of Linc-RAM in FGF2-mediated muscle cell differentiation.

  6. The potential of a dielectrophoresis activated cell sorter (DACS) as a next generation cell sorter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Hwang, Bohyun; Kim, Byungkyu

    2016-12-01

    Originally introduced by H. A. Pohl in 1951, dielectrophoretic (DEP) force has been used as a striking tool for biological particle manipulation (or separation) for the last few decades. In particular, dielectrophoresis activated cell sorters (DACSes) have been developed for applications in various biomedical fields. These applications include cell replacement therapy, drug screening and medical diagnostics. Since a DACS does not require a specific bio-marker, it is able to function as a biological particle sorting tool with numerous configurations for various cells [e.g. red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), circulating tumor cells, leukemia cells, breast cancer cells, bacterial cells, yeast cells and sperm cells]. This article explores current DACS capabilities worldwide, and it also looks at recent developments intended to overcome particular limitations. First, the basic theories are reviewed. Then, representative DACSes based on DEP trapping, traveling wave DEP systems, DEP field-flow fractionation and DEP barriers are introduced, and the strong and weak points of each DACS are discussed. Finally, for the purposes of commercialization, prerequisites regarding throughput, efficiency and recovery rates are discussed in detail through comparisons with commercial cell sorters (e.g. fluorescent activated and magnetic activated cell sorters).

  7. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear.Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction.Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  8. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhen, Yun-fang; Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  9. Salinomycin Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Autophagy in Cultured Osteoblastoma Cells: A Negative Regulator against Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Key Findings Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Conclusions Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin’s effect in cancer cells. PMID:24358342

  10. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Competencies required for nursing telehealth activities: A Delphi-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M; Moerman, Anna H; Ettema, Roelof G A; Kort, Helianthe S M; Ten Cate, Olle

    2016-04-01

    Telehealth is viewed as a major strategy to address the increasing demand for care and a shrinking care professional population. However, most nurses are not trained or are insufficiently trained to use these technologies effectively. Therefore, the potential of telehealth fails to reach full utilization. A better understanding of nursing telehealth entrustable professional activities (NT-EPAs) and the required competencies can contribute to the development of nursing telehealth education. In a four-round Delphi-study, a panel of experts discussed which NT-EPAs are relevant for nurses and which competencies nurses need to possess to execute these activities effectively. The 51 experts, including nurses, nursing faculty, clients and technicians all familiar with telehealth, were asked to select items from a list of 52 competencies based on the literature and on a previous study. Additionally, the panelists could add competencies based on their experience in practice. The threshold used for consensus was set at 80%. Consensus was achieved on the importance of fourteen NT-EPAs, requiring one or more of the following core competencies; coaching skills, the ability to combine clinical experience with telehealth, communication skills, clinical knowledge, ethical awareness, and a supportive attitude. Each NT-EPA requires a specific set of competencies (at least ten). In total, 52 competencies were identified as essential in telehealth. Many competencies for telehealth, including clinical knowledge and communication skills, are not novel competencies. They are fundamental to nursing care as a whole and therefore are also indispensable for telehealth. Additionally, the fourteen NT-EPAs appeared to require additional subject specific competencies, such as the ability to put patients at ease when they feel insecure about using technology. The NT-EPAs and related competencies presented in this study can be used by nursing schools that are considering including or expanding

  12. Activated NKT cells imprint NK-cell differentiation, functionality and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Peggy; Trittel, Stephanie; May, Tobias; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Chambers, Benedict J; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    NK cells represent a vital component of the innate immune system. The recent discoveries demonstrating that the functionality of NK cells depends on their differentiation and education status underscore their potential as targets for immune intervention. However, to exploit their full potential, a detailed understanding of the cellular interactions involved in these processes is required. In this regard, the cross-talk between NKT cells and NK cells needs to be better understood. Our results provide strong evidence for NKT cell-induced effects on key biological features of NK cells. NKT-cell activation results in the generation of highly active CD27(high) NK cells with improved functionality. In this context, degranulation activity and IFNγ production were mainly detected in the educated subset. In a mCMV infection model, we also demonstrated that NKT-cell stimulation induced the generation of highly functional educated and uneducated NK cells, crucial players in viral control. Thus, our findings reveal new fundamental aspects of the NKT-NK cell axis that provide important hints for the manipulation of NK cells in clinical settings. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electromechanical Nanogenerator-Cell Interaction Modulates Cell Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Blanquer, Andreu; Vargas-Estevez, Carolina; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme; Esteve, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    Noninvasive methods for in situ electrical stimulation of human cells open new frontiers to future bioelectronic therapies, where controlled electrical impulses could replace the use of chemical drugs for disease treatment. Here, this study demonstrates that the interaction of living cells with piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) induces a local electric field that self-stimulates and modulates their cell activity, without applying an additional chemical or physical external stimulation. When cells are cultured on top of the NGs, based on 2D ZnO nanosheets, the electromechanical NG-cell interactions stimulate the motility of macrophages and trigger the opening of ion channels present in the plasma membrane of osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) inducing intracellular calcium transients. In addition, excellent cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation are validated. This in situ cell-scale electrical stimulation of osteoblast-like cells can be extrapolated to other excitable cells such as neurons or muscle cells, paving the way for future bioelectronic medicines based on cell-targeted electrical impulses. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. NK-cell activity in immunotoxicity drug evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederbrant, Karin; Marcusson-Staaahl, Maritha; Condevaux, Fabienne; Descotes, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    NK-cell activity as a tool for detection of immunotoxic effects of new human drugs has gained further attention when the recent European note for guidance CPMP/SWP/1042/99 was adopted. The inclusion of NK-cell activity plus distribution of lymphocyte subsets were suggested as an alternative to the primary antibody response to a T-cell dependent antigen. Either of the two test alternatives should be included as a routine parameter in at least one repeated dose-toxicity study, rats or mice being the species of choice. The standard procedure for measuring NK-cell activity is the 51 Cr-release assay. However, a new flow-cytometric assay, adapted for rat peripheral blood, does not require dedicated groups of animals, offers the possibility of repeated testing, and shows at least as sensitive as the conventional 51 Cr-release assay

  15. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten.

  16. International inspection activity impacts upon DOE safeguards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zack, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    The US has placed certain special nuclear materials declared excess to their strategic needs under international safeguards through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This Presidential initiative has obligated materials at several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for these safeguards activities to demonstrate the willingness of the US to ban production or use of nuclear materials outside of international safeguards. However, IAEA inspection activities generally tend to be intrusive in nature and are not consistent with several domestic safeguards procedures implemented to reduce worker radiation exposures and increase the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of accounting for and storing of special nuclear materials. To help identify and provide workable solutions to these concerns, the Office of Safeguards and Security has conducted a program to determine possible changes to the DOE safeguards and security requirements designed to help facilities under international safeguards inspections more easily comply with domestic safeguards goals during international inspection activities. This paper will discuss the impact of international inspection activities on facility safeguards operations and departmental safeguards procedures and policies

  17. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (PMEK phosphorylation levels were comparable between 1, 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml EGF treatments. Phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA) did not activate MEK in mitotic cells. Following treatment of COS7 cells at the interphase with AG1478 or U0126, MEK phosphorylation was blocked. In addition, the investigation of the expression of proteins downstream of MEK demonstrated that EGF does not significantly affect the phosphorylation level of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and Elk in mitotic cells (P>0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  18. Amelioration of NK cell function driven by Vα24+ invariant NKT cell activation in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, Tomonori; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Abe, Yu; Suzuki, Kenshi; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Shimizu, Kanako; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2018-02-01

    NK cells represent a first line of immune defense, but are progressively dysregulated in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. To restore and facilitate their antitumor effect, NK cells are required in sufficient quantities and must be stimulated. We initially assessed the proportions of NKT and NK cells in 34 MM patients. The frequencies of both in PBMC populations correlated with those in BMMNCs irrespective of low BMMNC numbers. We then assessed the adjunctive effect of stimulating NKT cells with CD1d and α-GalCer complexes on the NK cells. The expression of NKG2D on CD56 dim CD16 + NK cells and DNAM-1 on CD56 bright CD16 - NK cells increased after NKT cell activation. Apparently, NK cell-mediated anti-tumor effects were dependent on NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands on myeloma cells. Thus, NK cell function in patients could be ameliorated, beyond the effect of immunosuppression, by NKT cell activation. This NKT-driven NK cell therapy could represent a potential new treatment modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ATM Kinase Is Required for Telomere Elongation in Mouse and Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Suyong Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Short telomeres induce a DNA damage response, senescence, and apoptosis, thus maintaining telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell viability. Telomerase addition of telomere repeats is tightly regulated in cells. To probe pathways that regulate telomere addition, we developed the ADDIT assay to measure new telomere addition at a single telomere in vivo. Sequence analysis showed telomerase-specific addition of repeats onto a new telomere occurred in just 48 hr. Using the ADDIT assay, we found that ATM is required for addition of new repeats onto telomeres in mouse cells. Evaluation of bulk telomeres, in both human and mouse cells, showed that blocking ATM inhibited telomere elongation. Finally, the activation of ATM through the inhibition of PARP1 resulted in increased telomere elongation, supporting the central role of the ATM pathway in regulating telomere addition. Understanding this role of ATM may yield new areas for possible therapeutic intervention in telomere-mediated disease.

  20. Nitazoxanide Analogs Require Nitroreduction for Antimicrobial Activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchieri, Maria V; Cimino, Mena; Rebollo-Ramirez, Sonia; Beauvineau, Claire; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Favre-Rochex, Sandrine; Helynck, Olivier; Naud-Martin, Delphine; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2017-09-14

    In this study, we aimed to decipher the natural resistance mechanisms of mycobacteria against novel compounds isolated by whole-cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS). We identified active compounds using Mycobacterium aurum. Further analyses were performed to determine the resistance mechanism of M. smegmatis against one hit, 3-bromo-N-(5-nitrothiazol-2-yl)-4-propoxybenzamide (3), which turned out to be an analog of the drug nitazoxanide (1). We found that the repression of the gene nfnB coding for the nitroreductase NfnB was responsible for the natural resistance of M. smegmatis against 3. The overexpression of nfnB resulted in sensitivity of M. smegmatis to 3. This compound must be metabolized into hydroxylamine intermediate for exhibiting antibacterial activity. Thus, we describe, for the first time, the activity of a mycobacterial nitroreductase against 1 analogs, highlighting the differences in the metabolism of nitro compounds among mycobacterial species and emphasizing the potential of nitro drugs as antibacterials in various bacterial species.

  1. Transparent electrode requirements for thin film solar cell modules

    KAUST Repository

    Rowell, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The transparent conductor (TC) layer in thin film solar cell modules has a significant impact on the power conversion efficiency. Reflection, absorption, resistive losses and lost active area either from the scribed interconnect region in monolithically integrated modules or from the shadow losses of a metal grid in standard modules typically reduce the efficiency by 10-25%. Here, we perform calculations to show that a competitive TC must have a transparency of at least 90% at a sheet resistance of less than 10 Ω/sq (conductivity/absorptivity ≥ 1 Ω -1) for monolithically integrated modules. For standard modules, losses are much lower and the performance of alternative lower cost TC materials may already be sufficient to replace conducting oxides in this geometry. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lan; Jiang, Sufang; Fu, Qiang; Smith, Kelly; Tu, Kailing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    Both fatty acid synthase (FASN) and ErbB2 have been shown to promote breast cancer cell migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood and there is no reported evidence that directly links glycolysis to breast cancer cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis in breast cancer cell migration. First, we compared lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration between FASN, ErbB2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 cells and FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Then, SK-BR-3 cells were treated with cerulenin (Cer), an inhibitor of FASN, and ErbB2, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis, and cell migration were detected. Next, we transiently transfected ErbB2 plasmid into MCF7 cells and detected FASN, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration. Heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1) is an activator of ErbB2 and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and oxamate (OX) are inhibitors of glycolysis. MCF7 cells were treated with HRG-β1 alone, HRG-β1 plus 2-DG, OX or cerulenin and glycolysis, and cell migration were measured. We found that FASN, ErbB2-high-expressing SK-BR-3 cells displayed higher levels of glycolysis and migration than FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Inhibition of FASN by cerulenin impaired glycolysis and migration in SK-BR-3 cells. Transient overexpression of ErbB2 in MCF7 cells promotes glycolysis and migration. Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), oxamate (OX), or cerulenin partially reverses heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)-induced glycolysis and migration in MCF7 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration. These novel findings indicate that targeting FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis may be a new approach to reverse breast cancer cell migration.

  3. Measurement of GPCR-G protein activity in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Kasun; Kankanamge, Dinesh; Senarath, Kanishka; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Weis, Nicole; Tennakoon, Mithila; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors in eukaryotic genomes. They control a variety of cellular and physiological processes such as hormone secretion and heart rate, and therefore are associated with a majority of pathological conditions including cancer and heart diseases. Currently established assays to measure ligand-induced activation of GPCRs and G proteins possess limitations such as being time consuming, indirect, and expensive. Thus, an efficient method to measure GPCR-G protein activation is required to identify novel pharmacological modulators to control them and gain insights about molecular underpinnings of the associated pathways. Activation of GPCRs induces dissociation of G protein heterotrimers to form GαGTP and free Gβγ. Free Gβγ subunits have been shown to translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes. Gβγ translocation therefore represents the GPCR-G protein activation, and thus, imaging of this process can be used to quantify the kinetics and magnitude of the pathway activation-deactivation in real time in living cells. The objective of this chapter is to elaborate the protocols of (i) generation and optimization of the required sensor constructs; (ii) development of cell culture, transient transfection, imaging, and optogenetic procedures; (iii) imaging and data analysis methods; and (iv) stable cell line generation, pertaining to this assay to measure GPCR-G protein activation. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike; Nicolson, Teresa

    2015-12-16

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of these mechanosensitive

  5. Pasteurella multocida toxin- induced osteoclastogenesis requires mTOR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, Bianca; Chakraborty, Sushmita; Lindner, Sonja G; Noack, Katrin; Harre, Ulrike; Schett, Georg; Krämer, Oliver H; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2015-09-14

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a potent inducer of osteoclast formation. Pigs suffering from an infection with toxigenic Pasteurella multocida strains develop atrophic rhinitis characterised by a loss of turbinate bones and conchae. However, on the molecular level the process of bone loss remains largely uncharacterised. Recently it was found that PMT activates the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts. Using RAW264.7 macrophages, we investigated the role of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in PMT-mediated osteoclast formation. PMT induces the differentiation of RAW264.7 macrophages into multinucleated, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive osteoclasts that are capable to resorb bone. In the presence of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, PMT was significantly less able to induce the formation of TRAP-positive osteoclasts. Accordingly, the resulting resorption of bone was strongly reduced. A major target of mTOR is the 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p70 S6K1). Activated p70 S6K1 decreases the expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4), a negative transcriptional regulator of osteoclastogenesis, at the protein and gene level. Ultimately this results in the activation of c-Jun, a component of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) complex, which is a major transcription factor for the induction of osteoclast-specific genes. We now demonstrate that c-Jun and its downstream target, the osteoclast-specific bone degrading protease cathepsin K, are upregulated upon PMT treatment in an mTOR-dependent manner. Activation of mTOR signalling plays a central role in the formation of osteoclasts through the bacterial toxin PMT. On the molecular level, PMT-induced activation of mTOR leads to down regulation of PDCD4, a known repressor of AP-1 complex, culminating in the activation of c-Jun, an essential transcription factor for triggering osteoclastogenesis.

  6. PKCθ is required for the activation of human T lymphocytes induced by CD43 engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, Roxana del; Rincon, Mercedes; Layseca-Espinosa, Esther; Fierro, Nora A.; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    The turnover of phosphoinositides leading to PKC activation constitutes one of the principal axes of intracellular signaling. In T lymphocytes, the enhanced and prolonged PKC activation resulting from the engagement of the TcR and co-receptor molecules ensures a productive T cell response. The CD43 co-receptor promotes activation and proliferation, by inducing IL-2 secretion and CD69 expression. CD43 engagement has been shown to promote phosphoinositide turnover and DAG production. Moreover, PKC activation was found to be required for the activation of the MAP kinase pathway in response to CD43 ligation. Here we show that CD43 engagement led to the membrane translocation and enzymatic activity of specific PKC isoenzymes: cPKC (α/β), nPKC (ε and θ), aPKC (ζ) and PKCμ. We also show that activation of PKCθ resulting from CD43 ligation induced CD69 expression through an ERK-dependent pathway leading to AP-1, NF-κB activation and an ERK independent pathway promoting NFAT activation. Together, these data suggest that PKCθ plays a critical role in the co-stimulatory functions of CD43 in human T cells

  7. [Analysis of activated cells in apical granuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márton, I; Radics, T; Szakáll, S; Kiss, C

    1999-12-01

    The ratio and in situ distribution of CD3+ T-lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, CD14+ macrophages, CD56+ natural killer cells and CD25+ activated T-lymphocytes and CD68+ activated macrophages were determined in 20 chronic peripical granulomas by immunohistochemical method using monoclonal antibodies. CD3+ T-lymphocytes made up about 50% of the mononuclear cells. CD14+ macrophages were distributed all over the area but their proportion was much less that that of the T-lymphocytes. CD56+ natural killer cells made up a small proportion of the cells. The major proportion of the T-lymphocytes and macrophages were in activated stage within the lesion.

  8. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipids induce hepatic NKT cells deficiency through activation-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongfang Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD through alternation of liver innate immune response. AIMS: The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. METHODS: Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. RESULTS: High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. CONCLUSION: High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD.

  9. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipids induce hepatic NKT cells deficiency through activation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tongfang; Sui, Yongheng; Lian, Min; Li, Zhiping; Hua, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through alternation of liver innate immune response. The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD.

  10. Enhanced excision repair activity in mammalian cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.; Franklin, W.A.; Moy, T.; Mendez, F.

    1992-01-01

    Monkey CV-1 cells which had received 5 Gy 12 h before harvesting lysates from their cultures contained approximately three times as much DNA excision repair enzyme activity as unirradiated cells, determined in crude cell lysates by the release of intermediate mobility DNA fragments and fragments with 3'-phosphoryl ends from 5'- 32 P-end labelled irradiated 95 bp αDNA. Different 3'-termini endow fragments with differing mobilities, signifying steps in the processing of radiation damaged DNA. Similar results were obtained when Krebs II mouse tumour cells growing in mice as ascites received 5Gy 12 h before harvest. Enzyme activities from CV-1 cells and from Krebs II cells were partially purified as 60-70 kDa proteins on Superose 12 or Ultrogel AcA-54 columns. Divalent cations were not required for enzyme activity. A 23 nucleotide long defined duplex oligodeoxynucleotide substrate containing a single 8-oxodG residue was also very actively cleaved by partially purified cell enzymes. 8-oxoguanine is a major product of ionizing radiation's action on DNA and recognized by the enzymes described here. (author)

  11. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.

  12. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-01-01

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation

  13. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  14. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle......-dependent changes in the capacity for conductive Cl- transport. It is suggested that in ELA cells, entrance into the S phase requires an increase in VRAC activity and/or an increased potential for regulatory volume decrease (RVD), and at the same time a decrease in CaCC magnitude....

  15. Activation and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pravin J; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells and exhibit two main characteristics that define stem cells: self-renewal and differentiation. MSCs can migrate to sites of injury, inflammation, and tumor. Moreover, MSCs undergo myofibroblast like differentiation, including increased production of α-SMA in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a growth factor commonly secreted by tumor cells to evade immune surveillance. Based on our previous finding hMSCs become activated and resemble carcinoma-associated myofibroblasts upon prolonged exposure to conditioned medium from MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that keratinocyte conditioned medium (KCM) induces differentiation of MSCs to resemble dermal myofibroblast like cells using immunofluorescence techniques demonstrating punctate vinculin staining, and F-actin filaments.

  16. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell

  17. The invisible addiction: Cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students

    OpenAIRE

    ROBERTS, JAMES A.; PETNJI YAYA, LUC HONORE; MANOLIS, CHRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The primary objective of the present study was to investigate which cell-phone activities are associated with cell-phone addiction. No research to date has studied the full-range of cell-phone activities, and their relationship to cell-phone addiction, across male and female cell-phone users. Methods: College undergraduates (N = 164) participated in an online survey. Participants completed the questionnaire as part of their class requirements. The questionnaire took 10 an...

  18. Slicing-independent RISC activation requires the argonaute PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuo; Jin, Lan; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2012-08-21

    Small RNAs regulate genetic networks through a ribonucleoprotein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which, in mammals, contains at its center one of four Argonaute proteins (Ago1-Ago4). A key regulatory event in the RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways is Ago loading, wherein double-stranded small-RNA duplexes are incorporated into RISC (pre-RISC) and then become single-stranded (mature RISC), a process that is not well understood. The Agos contain an evolutionarily conserved PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain whose primary function is to bind the 3' end of small RNAs. We created multiple PAZ-domain-disrupted mutant Ago proteins and studied their biochemical properties and biological functionality in cells. We found that the PAZ domain is dispensable for Ago loading of slicing-competent RISC. In contrast, in the absence of slicer activity or slicer-substrate duplex RNAs, PAZ-disrupted Agos bound duplex small interfering RNAs, but were unable to unwind or eject the passenger strand and form functional RISC complexes. We have discovered that the highly conserved PAZ domain plays an important role in RISC activation, providing new mechanistic insights into how miRNAs regulate genes, as well as new insights for future design of miRNA- and RNAi-based therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactate dehydrogenase activity drives hair follicle stem cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimee, Flores; John, Schell; Abby, Krall; David, Jelinek; Matilde, Miranda; Melina, Grigorian; Daniel, Braas; White Andrew, C; Jessica, Zhou; Nick, Graham; Thomas, Graeber; Pankaj, Seth; Denis, Evseenko; Hilary, Coller; Jared, Rutter; Heather, Christofk; Lowry William, E

    2017-01-01

    Summary While normally dormant, Hair Follicle Stem Cells (HFSCs) quickly become activated to divide during a new hair cycle. The quiescence of HFSCs is known to be regulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Here we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate that HFSCs utilize glycolytic metabolism and produce significantly more lactate than other cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, lactate generation appears to be critical for the activation of HFSCs as deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldha) prevented their activation. Conversely, genetically promoting lactate production in HFSCs through mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (Mpc1) deletion accelerated their activation and the hair cycle. Finally, we identify small molecules that increase lactate production by stimulating Myc levels or inhibiting Mpc1 carrier activity and can topically induce the hair cycle. These data suggest that HFSCs maintain a metabolic state that allow them to remain dormant and yet quickly respond to appropriate proliferative stimuli. PMID:28812580

  20. SAP is required for the development of innate phenotype in H2-M3-restricted CD8+ T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, Yaw; Bian, Yao; Zhang, Hong; Cho, Hoonsik; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2012-01-01

    H2-M3-restricted T cells have a pre-activated surface phenotype, rapidly expand and produce cytokines upon stimulation and as such, are classified as innate T cells. Unlike most innate T cells, M3-restricted T cells also express CD8αβ co-receptors and a diverse TCR repertoire: hallmarks of conventional MHC Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells. Although iNKT cells are also innate lymphocytes, they are selected exclusively on hematopoietic cells (HC), while M3-restricted T cells can be selected on either hematopoietic or thymic epithelial cells (TEC). Moreover, their phenotypes differ depending on what cells mediate their selection. Though there is a clear correlation between selection on HC and development of innate phenotype, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. SAP is required for the development of iNKT cells and mediates signals from SLAM receptors that are exclusively expressed on HC. Based on their dual selection pathway, M3-restricted T cells present a unique model for studying the development of innate T cell phenotype. Using both polyclonal and transgenic mouse models we demonstrate that while M3-restricted T cells are capable of developing in the absence of SAP, SAP is required for HC-mediated selection, development of pre-activated phenotype and heightened effector functions of M3-restricted T cells. These findings are significant because they directly demonstrate the need for SAP in HC-mediated acquisition of innate T cell phenotype and suggest that due to their SAP-dependent HC-mediated selection, M3-restricted T cells develop a pre-activated phenotype and an intrinsic ability to proliferate faster upon stimulation, allowing for an important role in the early response to infection. PMID:23041566

  1. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  2. Large stationary fuel cell systems: Status and dynamic requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    Molten carbonate fuel cell demonstrations to-date, have been able to show the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies (>50%) of any stand-alone fuel cell type. The primary developer of this type of fuel cell in United States is Fuel Cell Energy Corporation (FCE), the developer and manufacturer of the Direct FuelCell ™ concept. FCE and MTU CFC Solutions in Germany, a licensee of FCE have demonstrated carbonate fuel cells from 10 kW to 2 MW of electrical output on a variety of fuels. IHI in Japan are also developing carbonate fuel cells for stationary power and have recently successfully demonstrated the technology in Kawagoe, Japan. In Italy, Ansaldo fuel cell have demonstrated a 100 kW carbonate fuel cell in Milan. In Korea, the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy has committed to install 300 fuel cell units, sized 250 kW to 1 MW, for distributed power generation by 2012. Carbonate fuel cell technology is more fuel flexible than lower temperature fuel cell technologies and is well suited for on-site stationary CHP applications as well as to marine, military, and traction applications. The present paper gives an overview about the commercialisation efforts for the molten carbonate fuel cell technology.

  3. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  4. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Substance P receptor desensitization requires receptor activation but not phospholipase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiya, Hiroshi; Putney, J.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of parotid acinar cells to substance P at 37 degree C results in activation of phospholipase C, formation of [ 3 H]inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ), and persistent desensitization of the substance P response. In cells treated with antimycin in medium containing glucose, ATP was decreased to ∼20% of control values, IP 3 formation was completely inhibited, but desensitization was unaffected. When cells were treated with antimycin in the absence of glucose, cellular ATP was decreased to ∼5% of control values, and both IP 3 formation and desensitization were blocked. A series of substance P-related peptides increased the formation of [ 3 H]IP 3 and induced desensitization of the substance P response with a similar rank order of potencies. The substance P antagonist, [D-Pro 2 , D-Try 7,9 ]-substance P, inhibited substance P-induced IP 3 formation and desensitization but did not induce desensitization. These results suggest that the desensitization of substance P-induced IP 3 formation requires agonist activation of a P-type substance P receptor, and that one or more cellular ATP-dependent processes are required for this reaction. However, activation of phospholipase C and the generation of inositol phosphates does not seem to be a prerequisite for desensitization

  6. T cell activation in APECED patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mannerström, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidasis-ectodermal dystrophy, APECED, is a rare monogenic autoimmune disease in humans, which is caused by loss-of-function mutation in Autoimmune Regulator gene, AIRE. Previous results have shown impairments in the circulating T cells of the APECED patients. In this study we wanted to look closer on the disturbance in the T cell receptor development of APECED patients. By studying the TCR-mediated responsiveness of CD3 stimulation and comparing the activation...

  7. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  8. Activation of caspase-9 is required for UV-induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitailo, Leonid A; Tibudan, Shalini S; Denning, Mitchell F

    2002-05-31

    UV radiation from the sun activates both the membrane death receptor and the intrinsic or mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathways in epidermal keratinocytes, triggering apoptosis and affording protection against skin cancer formation. We have investigated the involvement of caspase-9 in the UV death effector pathway in human keratinocytes, since this is the initiating caspase in the mitochondrial pathway required for UV-induced apoptosis in some, but not all, cell types. UV radiation triggered activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8 with similar kinetics, although the rank order of activation was caspase-3 > caspase-9 > caspase-8. Inhibition of caspase-9 with either the peptide inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Leu-Glu(OCH(3))-His-Asp(OCH(3))-fluoromethyl ketone, or expression of a catalytically inactive caspase-9 by retroviral transduction, protected normal keratinocytes from UV-induced apoptosis. HaCaT keratinocytes harboring mutant p53 alleles were also protected from UV-induced apoptosis by the dominant negative caspase-9. The dominant negative caspase-9 blocked UV-induced activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8, and also protected cells from the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast, the dominant negative caspase-9 did not protect from anti-Fas-induced apoptosis or caspase activation. These results identify caspase-9 as the critical upstream caspase initiating apoptosis by UV radiation in human keratinocytes, the relevant cell type for this important environmental carcinogen.

  9. T cell antigen receptor activation and actin cytoskeleton remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Curado, Silvia; Mayya, Viveka

    2013-01-01

    T cells constitute a crucial arm of the adaptive immune system and their optimal function is required for a healthy immune response. After the initial step of T cell-receptor (TCR) triggering by antigenic peptide complexes on antigen presenting cell (APC), the T cell exhibits extensive cytoskeletal remodeling. This cytoskeletal remodeling leads to formation of an “immunological synapse” [1] characterized by regulated clustering, segregation and movement of receptors at the interface. Synapse formation regulates T cell activation and response to antigenic peptides and proceeds via feedback between actin cytoskeleton and TCR signaling. Actin polymerization participates in various events during the synapse formation, maturation, and eventually its disassembly. There is increasing knowledge about the actin effectors that couple TCR activation to actin rearrangements [2, 3], and how defects in these effectors translate into impairment of T cell activation. In this review we aim to summarize and integrate parts of what is currently known about this feedback process. In addition, in light of recent advancements in our understanding of TCR triggering and translocation at the synapse, we speculate on the organizational and functional diversity of microfilament architecture in the T cell. PMID:23680625

  10. HURTLE CELLS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ACTIVITIES IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS PARENCHYMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Z; Kvachadze, T; Melikadze, E; Metreveli, L; Nikobadze, E; Gogiashvili, L

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the participation and utility of Hǘrtle cells morphological requirment and transformation under Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis versus Riedel´s struma. Several markers have been evaluated to detect induced activities of Hǘrtle cells. Study subject - specimens (tissue fragments) collected from TG surgery (thyroidectomy) for mollecular (receptor) diagnosis of Hǘrtle cells activities using routine histological and immunohistochemical samples. 89 cases were selected in Hashimoto thyroiditis diagnosis with Hǘrtle cells history (adenoma and adenomatous grouth of oncocytes). Markers as: TSH receptors, TTF-1, S-100 protein, also anti-TPO and anti-TG levels in blood plasm were detected. It was shown that solid cell claster-nests like agregation of oncocytes and adenomatous growth foci in parafollicular areas with anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies levels arising while Riedel´s struma shown only large intra- and extra glandular inflammatory proliferative fibrosing process. Large positive expression of TTF-1 and S-100 protein and the negative reaction of TSH receptor factor suggest that Thyroid parenchyma disorganization and mollecular biological atypia with Hǘrtle cells are proceses due to hypothyreoidismus, as well as neuroectodermal cells prominent activities in 70% of Hashimoto cases.

  11. Mitochondrial Control and Guidance of Cellular Activities of T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chih Ho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune cells protect us against infection and cancer cells, as well as functioning during healing processes to support tissue repairing and regeneration. These behaviors require that upon stimulation from immune activation the appropriate subsets of immune cells are generated. In addition to activation-induced signaling cascades, metabolic reprogramming (profound changes in metabolic pathways also provides a novel form of regulation to control the formation of desirable immune responses. Immune cells encounter various nutrient compositions by circulating in bloodstream and infiltrating into peripheral tissues; therefore, proper engagement of metabolic pathways is critical to fulfill the metabolic demands of immune cells. Metabolic pathways are tightly regulated mainly via mitochondrial dynamics and the activities of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the electron transport chain. In this review, we will discuss how metabolic reprogramming influences activation, effector functions, and lineage polarization in T cells, with a particular focus on mitochondria-regulated metabolic checkpoints. Additionally, we will further explore how in various diseases deregulation and manipulation of mitochondrial regulation can occur and be exploited. Furthermore, we will discuss how this knowledge can facilitate the design of immunotherapies.

  12. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  13. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-02-10

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy.

  14. Drosophila Sulf1 is required for the termination of intestinal stem cell division during regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Masahiko; Nakato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-15

    Stem cell division is activated to trigger regeneration in response to tissue damage. The molecular mechanisms by which this stem cell mitotic activity is properly repressed at the end of regeneration are poorly understood. Here, we show that a specific modification of heparan sulfate is crucial for regulating Drosophila intestinal stem cell (ISC) division during normal midgut homeostasis and regeneration. Loss of the extracellular heparan sulfate endosulfatase Sulf1 resulted in increased ISC division during normal homeostasis, which was caused by upregulation of mitogenic signaling including the JAK-STAT, EGFR and Hedgehog pathways. Using a regeneration model, we found that ISCs failed to properly halt division at the termination stage in Sulf1 mutants, showing that Sulf1 is required for terminating ISC division at the end of regeneration. We propose that post-transcriptional regulation of mitogen signaling by heparan sulfate structural modifications provides a new regulatory step for precise temporal control of stem cell activity during regeneration. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  16. Aerobic Glycolysis: Meeting the Metabolic Requirements of Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Lunt, Sophia Yunkyungkwon

    2011-01-01

    Warburg's observation that cancer cells exhibit a high rate of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) sparked debate over the role of glycolysis in normal and cancer cells. Although it has been established that defects in mitochondrial respiration are not the cause of cancer or aerobic glycolysis, the advantages of enhanced glycolysis in cancer remain controversial. Many cells ranging from microbes to lymphocytes use aerobic glycolysis during rapid proliferation, which...

  17. β-Catenin activation regulates tissue growth non-cell autonomously in the hair stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschene, Elizabeth R; Myung, Peggy; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Zito, Giovanni; Sun, Thomas Yang; Taketo, Makoto M; Saotome, Ichiko; Greco, Valentina

    2014-03-21

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for tissue regeneration. However, it is unclear how β-catenin controls stem cell behaviors to coordinate organized growth. Using live imaging, we show that activation of β-catenin specifically within mouse hair follicle stem cells generates new hair growth through oriented cell divisions and cellular displacement. β-Catenin activation is sufficient to induce hair growth independently of mesenchymal dermal papilla niche signals normally required for hair regeneration. Wild-type cells are co-opted into new hair growths by β-catenin mutant cells, which non-cell autonomously activate Wnt signaling within the neighboring wild-type cells via Wnt ligands. This study demonstrates a mechanism by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls stem cell-dependent tissue growth non-cell autonomously and advances our understanding of the mechanisms that drive coordinated regeneration.

  18. Inflammasome-independent NLRP3 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Du, Qianming; Lu, Ping; Fan, Huimin; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-03-15

    Inflammasome NLRP3 plays a crucial role in the process of colitis and colitis--associated colon cancer. Even though much is known regarding the NLRP3 inflammasome that regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release in innate immune cells, the role of NLRP3 in non-immune cells is still unclear. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like colon cancer cells (SW620), and was upregulated by tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) respectively, during EMT in colon cancer epithelial cells HCT116 and HT29. Knockdown of NLRP3 retained epithelial spindle-like morphology of HCT116 and HT29 cells and reversed the mesenchymal characteristic of SW620 cells, indicated by the decreased expression of vimentin and MMP9 and increased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, knockdown of NLRP3 in colorectal carcinoma cells displayed diminished cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, during the EMT process induced by TNF-α or TGF-β1, the cleaved caspase-1 and ASC speck were not detected, indicating that NLRP3 functions in an inflammasome-independent way. Further studies demonstrated that NLRP3 protein expression was regulated by NF-κB signaling in TNF-α or TGF-β1-induced EMT, as verified by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Moreover, NLRP3 knockdown reduced the expression of Snail1, indicating that NLRP3 may promote EMT through regulating Snail1. In summary, our results showed that the NLRP3 expression, not the inflammasome activation, was required for EMT in colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. p53 requires the stress sensor USF1 to direct appropriate cell fate decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bouafia

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a major hallmark of cancer. To maintain genomic integrity, cells are equipped with dedicated sensors to monitor DNA repair or to force damaged cells into death programs. The tumor suppressor p53 is central in this process. Here, we report that the ubiquitous transcription factor Upstream Stimulatory factor 1 (USF1 coordinates p53 function in making proper cell fate decisions. USF1 stabilizes the p53 protein and promotes a transient cell cycle arrest, in the presence of DNA damage. Thus, cell proliferation is maintained inappropriately in Usf1 KO mice and in USF1-deficient melanoma cells challenged by genotoxic stress. We further demonstrate that the loss of USF1 compromises p53 stability by enhancing p53-MDM2 complex formation and MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. In USF1-deficient cells, the level of p53 can be restored by the re-expression of full-length USF1 protein similarly to what is observed using Nutlin-3, a specific inhibitor that prevents p53-MDM2 interaction. Consistent with a new function for USF1, a USF1 truncated protein lacking its DNA-binding and transactivation domains can also restore the induction and activity of p53. These findings establish that p53 function requires the ubiquitous stress sensor USF1 for appropriate cell fate decisions in response to DNA-damage. They underscore the new role of USF1 and give new clues of how p53 loss of function can occur in any cell type. Finally, these findings are of clinical relevance because they provide new therapeutic prospects in stabilizing and reactivating the p53 pathway.

  20. C. elegans nucleostemin is required for larval growth and germline stem cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Kudron

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolus has shown to be integral for many processes related to cell growth and proliferation. Stem cells in particular are likely to depend upon nucleolus-based processes to remain in a proliferative state. A highly conserved nucleolar factor named nucleostemin is proposed to be a critical link between nucleolar function and stem-cell-specific processes. Currently, it is unclear whether nucleostemin modulates proliferation by affecting ribosome biogenesis or by another nucleolus-based activity that is specific to stem cells and/or highly proliferating cells. Here, we investigate nucleostemin (nst-1 in the nematode C. elegans, which enables us to examine nst-1 function during both proliferation and differentiation in vivo. Like mammalian nucleostemin, the NST-1 protein is localized to the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm; however, its expression is found in both differentiated and proliferating cells. Global loss of C. elegans nucleostemin (nst-1 leads to a larval arrest phenotype due to a growth defect in the soma, while loss of nst-1 specifically in the germ line causes germline stem cells to undergo a cell cycle arrest. nst-1 mutants exhibit reduced levels of rRNAs, suggesting defects in ribosome biogenesis. However, NST-1 is generally not present in regions of the nucleolus where rRNA transcription and processing occurs, so this reduction is likely secondary to a different defect in ribosome biogenesis. Transgenic studies indicate that NST-1 requires its N-terminal domain for stable expression and both its G1 GTPase and intermediate domains for proper germ line function. Our data support a role for C. elegans nucleostemin in cell growth and proliferation by promoting ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Steve Palmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The Warburg effect originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  2. Notch1 is required for hypoxia-induced proliferation, invasion and chemoresistance of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notch1 is a potent regulator known to play an oncogenic role in many malignancies including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. Tumor hypoxia and increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α activity can act as major stimuli for tumor aggressiveness and progression. Although hypoxia-mediated activation of the Notch1 pathway plays an important role in tumor cell survival and invasiveness, the interaction between HIF-1α and Notch1 has not yet been identified in T-ALL. This study was designed to investigate whether hypoxia activates Notch1 signalling through HIF-1α stabilization and to determine the contribution of hypoxia and HIF-1α to proliferation, invasion and chemoresistance in T-ALL. Methods T-ALL cell lines (Jurkat, Sup-T1 transfected with HIF-1α or Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA were incubated in normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Their potential for proliferation and invasion was measured by WST-8 and transwell assays. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis and assess cell cycle regulation. Expression and regulation of components of the HIF-1α and Notch1 pathways and of genes related to proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR or Western blot. Results Hypoxia potentiated Notch1 signalling via stabilization and activation of the transcription factor HIF-1α. Hypoxia/HIF-1α-activated Notch1 signalling altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and accelerated cell proliferation. Hypoxia-induced Notch1 activation increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2 and MMP9, which increased invasiveness. Of greater clinical significance, knockdown of Notch1 prevented the protective effect of hypoxia/HIF-1α against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. This sensitization correlated with losing the effect of hypoxia/HIF-1α on Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression. Conclusions Notch1 signalling is required for hypoxia/HIF-1α-induced proliferation

  3. Initial requirements for embryogenic calluses initiation in thin cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... But as it is a typical mono- cotyledonous species, oil palm has a single growth .... (1987), who cites that in tissue culture from mono- cotyledons, it is essential that the source of explant .... nucleus (n) and dense cytoplasm (c) and demonstrating intense cell division (arrow); C, detail of the region of cells with ...

  4. A conditional Orco requirement in the somatic cyst cells for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-06

    May 6, 2016 ... It plays a key role in the finding of food, egg laying sites and mates, as well as in avoiding predators and ... 2004), especially food and social odors. Each. OSN expresses a single OR gene and ..... Olfactory receptors are displayed on dog mature sperm cells. J. Cell Biol. 123 1441–1452. Veitinger T, Riffell ...

  5. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carlos A; Drost, Jarno; Wijchers, Patrick J; van de Werken, Harmen; de Wit, Elzo; Oude Vrielink, Joachim A F; Elkon, Ran; Melo, Sónia A; Léveillé, Nicolas; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Agami, Reuven

    2013-02-07

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any known p53 target gene. Interestingly, many of these regions possess conserved p53-binding sites and all known hallmarks of enhancer regions. We demonstrate that these p53-bound enhancer regions (p53BERs) indeed contain enhancer activity and interact intrachromosomally with multiple neighboring genes to convey long-distance p53-dependent transcription regulation. Furthermore, p53BERs produce, in a p53-dependent manner, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are required for efficient transcriptional enhancement of interacting target genes and induction of a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Thus, our results ascribe transcription enhancement activity to p53 with the capacity to regulate multiple genes from a single genomic binding site. Moreover, eRNA production from p53BERs is required for efficient p53 transcription enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    Leguminous plants engage into symbiotic relationships with soil bacteria, rhizobia, and develop root nodules. This process initiates with recognition of bacteria derived signalling molecules called nod factors. The subsequent events lead to symbiotic infection and, occurring in parallel, de novo...... was shown to require auxin signalling. Cytokinin, in contrast, exert a negative regulation of bacterial entry into the root. During organogenesis, auxin and cytokinin maxima are known to accompany nodule primordia development and together regulate progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, application...... the two hormones require further investigation. In order to improve understanding in these areas we aimed to develop and characterise hormone and cell division markers in Lotus japonicus. Using the extensive genetic resources available in L. japonicus, these markers may then be used to develop a more...

  7. The Wnt receptor, Lrp5, is expressed by mouse mammary stem cells and is required to maintain the basal lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha M Badders

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic Wnt signaling induces increased stem/progenitor cell activity in the mouse mammary gland, followed by tumor development. The Wnt signaling receptors, Lrp5/6, are uniquely required for canonical Wnt activity. Previous data has shown that the absence of Lrp5 confers resistance to Wnt1-induced tumor development.Here, we show that all basal mammary cells express Lrp5, and co-express Lrp6 in a similar fashion. Though Wnt dependent transcription of key target genes is relatively unchanged in mammary epithelial cell cultures, the absence of Lrp5 specifically depletes adult regenerative stem cell activity (to less than 1%. Stem cell activity can be enriched by >200 fold (over 80% of activity, based on high Lrp5 expression alone. Though Lrp5 null glands have apparent normal function, the basal lineage is relatively reduced (from 42% basal/total epithelial cells to 22% and Lrp5-/- mammary epithelial cells show enhanced expression of senescence-associated markers in vitro, as measured by expression of p16(Ink4a and TA-p63.This is the first single biomarker that has been demonstrated to be functionally involved in stem cell maintenance. Together, these results demonstrate that Wnt signaling through Lrp5 is an important component of normal mammary stem cell function.

  8. Bromodomain Protein BRD4 Is Required for Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Enhancer Activation and Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankari Nagarajan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ERα controls cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by recruiting various cofactors to estrogen response elements (EREs to control gene transcription. A deeper understanding of these transcriptional mechanisms may uncover therapeutic targets for ERα-dependent cancers. We show that BRD4 regulates ERα-induced gene expression by affecting elongation-associated phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and histone H2B monoubiquitination. Consistently, BRD4 activity is required for proliferation of ER+ breast and endometrial cancer cells and uterine growth in mice. Genome-wide studies revealed an enrichment of BRD4 on transcriptional start sites of active genes and a requirement of BRD4 for H2B monoubiquitination in the transcribed region of estrogen-responsive genes. Importantly, we demonstrate that BRD4 occupancy on distal EREs enriched for H3K27ac is required for recruitment and elongation of RNAPII on EREs and the production of ERα-dependent enhancer RNAs. These results uncover BRD4 as a central regulator of ERα function and potential therapeutic target.

  9. Krebs cycle function is required for activation of the Spo0A transcription factor in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ireton, K; Jin, S; Grossman, A D; Sonenshein, A L

    1995-01-01

    Expression of genes early during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis requires the activity of the transcription factor encoded by spo0A. The active, phosphorylated form of Spo0A is produced through the action of a multicomponent pathway, the phosphorelay. A mutant defective in the first three enzymes of the Krebs citric acid cycle was unable to express early sporulation genes, apparently because of a failure to activate the phosphorelay. Cells that produce an altered Spo0A protein that can be ph...

  10. Epigenetic Changes during Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Götze

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cells (HSC, which can participate in liver regeneration and fibrogenesis, have recently been identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. During their activation HSC adopt a myofibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound changes in the gene expression profile. DNA methylation changes at single genes have been reported during HSC activation and may participate in the regulation of this process, but comprehensive DNA methylation analyses are still missing. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of DNA methylation during in vitro activation of HSC.The analysis of DNA methylation changes by antibody-based assays revealed a strong decrease in the global DNA methylation level during culture-induced activation of HSC. To identify genes which may be regulated by DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide Methyl-MiniSeq EpiQuest sequencing comparing quiescent and early culture-activated HSC. Approximately 400 differentially methylated regions with a methylation change of at least 20% were identified, showing either hypo- or hypermethylation during activation. Further analysis of selected genes for DNA methylation and expression were performed revealing a good correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression. Furthermore, global DNA demethylation during HSC activation was investigated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay and L-mimosine treatment showing that demethylation was independent of DNA synthesis and thereby excluding a passive DNA demethylation mechanism.In summary, in vitro activation of HSC initiated strong DNA methylation changes, which were associated with gene regulation. These results indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are important for the control of early HSC activation. Furthermore, the data show that global DNA demethylation during activation is based on an active DNA demethylation mechanism.

  11. Promoter and Cofactor Requirements for SERM-ER Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Project Program Grant retreat 2005 - Poster presented at DOD conference 2005 - Manuscript published in Cell 2005 - Development of new analysis...Nishidate, T. et al. Genome-wide gene-expression profiles of breast-cancer cells purified with laser microbeam microdissection: identification of

  12. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sanchez-Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.□

  13. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.; Porrata Maury, C.; Jimenez Acosta, S.; Gonzalez Perez, T.; Diaz, M.E.; Martin, I.; Sanchez, V.; Monterrey, P.

    1999-01-01

    Obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Previous studies done in Havana showed values of physical activity level (PAL) which are lower than the reported for elderly subjects. Elderly people living in rural areas use to have physical activity levels which differ from the observed in urban areas. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 40 apparently healthy people older than 60 years of age living in a rural mountain community will be submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary, anthropometric and insulin resistance study. Physical activity will be determined by questionnaire and by the calculation of the PAL from the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) measured with the doubly-labelled water method (DLW). Associations with the prevalence of insulin resistance and obesity will be assessed. (author)

  14. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  15. Brown adipose tissue thermogenic adaptation requires Nrf1-mediated proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, Alexander; Widenmaier, Scott B; Schlein, Christian; Johann, Kornelia; Goncalves, Renata L S; Eguchi, Kosei; Fischer, Alexander W; Parlakgül, Günes; Snyder, Nicole A; Nguyen, Truc B; Bruns, Oliver T; Franke, Daniel; Bawendi, Moungi G; Lynes, Matthew D; Leiria, Luiz O; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Inouye, Karen E; Arruda, Ana Paula; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2018-03-01

    Adipocytes possess remarkable adaptive capacity to respond to nutrient excess, fasting or cold exposure, and they are thus an important cell type for the maintenance of proper metabolic health. Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a critical organelle for cellular homeostasis, the mechanisms that mediate adaptation of the ER to metabolic challenges in adipocytes are unclear. Here we show that brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic function requires an adaptive increase in proteasomal activity to secure cellular protein quality control, and we identify the ER-localized transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 1 (Nfe2l1, also known as Nrf1) as a critical driver of this process. We show that cold adaptation induces Nrf1 in BAT to increase proteasomal activity and that this is crucial for maintaining ER homeostasis and cellular integrity, specifically when the cells are in a state of high thermogenic activity. In mice, under thermogenic conditions, brown-adipocyte-specific deletion of Nfe2l1 (Nrf1) resulted in ER stress, tissue inflammation, markedly diminished mitochondrial function and whitening of the BAT. In mouse models of both genetic and dietary obesity, stimulation of proteasomal activity by exogenously expressing Nrf1 or by treatment with the proteasome activator PA28α in BAT resulted in improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, Nrf1 emerges as a novel guardian of brown adipocyte function, providing increased proteometabolic quality control for adapting to cold or to obesity.

  16. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.H.; Sanchez, V.; Basabe-Tuero, B.; Gonzalez-Calderin, S.; Diaz, M.E.; Aleman-Mateo, H.; Valencia-Julleirat, M.; Salazar, G.

    2002-01-01

    Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 % of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1.77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The total energy expenditure: The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11 % and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW-method. The value of 1.51 x BMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated

  17. Energy requirements and physical activity level of active elderly people in rural areas of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.; Aleman Mateo, H.; Valencia Julleirat, M.

    2002-01-01

    Obesity and NIDDM are common in the Third Age and increasing in Cuba. Among the life-style changes associated with increased prevalence of obesity and its related disorders, diet and activity patterns are prime candidates. The transition to this life-style model may induce a decrease in the energy needs. There is an urgent need for tools which have been validated for measuring diet and physical activity in nutritional studies in the developing world, but also a more urgent need for reference values for the total energy requirements of healthy elderly people. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood to develop diseases that characterise the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. With the purpose of estimating the energy requirements, a group of 48 elderly people aged 61-74 years living in a rural mountain community was submitted to a medical, epidemiological, dietary and biochemical study of the nutritional status. Glucose intolerance was diagnosed in 40% and arterial hypertension was present in 23 of them. Ten subjects without signs or symptoms of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome were submitted to a measurement of the total energy expenditure by the doubly labelled water method. PAL values of 2.13 and 1. 77 were measured for men and women, values which were significantly higher that the recommended value of 1.51 for elderly subjects. The estimation of energy requirements by the energy intake or by the factorial method using the physical activity questionnaires generated values, which were 11% and 30% lower than the values obtained by the DLW-method The value of 1.51 x BMR for the estimation of the energy requirements of elderly subjects living in rural areas and submitted to higher levels of physical activity seems to be sub estimated. (author)

  18. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  19. Inca: a novel p21-activated kinase-associated protein required for cranial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Xu, Yanhua; Hoffman, Trevor L; Zhang, Tailin; Schilling, Thomas; Sargent, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Inca (induced in neural crest by AP2) is a novel protein discovered in a microarray screen for genes that are upregulated in Xenopus embryos by the transcriptional activator protein Tfap2a. It has no significant similarity to any known protein, but is conserved among vertebrates. In Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos, Inca is expressed predominantly in the premigratory and migrating neural crest (NC). Knockdown experiments in frog and fish using antisense morpholinos reveal essential functions for Inca in a subset of NC cells that form craniofacial cartilage. Cells lacking Inca migrate successfully but fail to condense into skeletal primordia. Overexpression of Inca disrupts cortical actin and prevents formation of actin "purse strings", which are required for wound healing in Xenopus embryos. We show that Inca physically interacts with p21-activated kinase 5 (PAK5), a known regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that is co-expressed with Inca in embryonic ectoderm, including in the NC. These results suggest that Inca and PAK5 cooperate in restructuring cytoskeletal organization and in the regulation of cell adhesion in the early embryo and in NC cells during craniofacial development.

  20. Ku70 is required for late B cell development and immunoglobulin heavy chain class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manis, J P; Gu, Y; Lansford, R; Sonoda, E; Ferrini, R; Davidson, L; Rajewsky, K; Alt, F W

    1998-06-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) class switch recombination (CSR) is a late B cell process that involves intrachromosomal DNA rearrangement. Ku70 and Ku80 form a DNA end-binding complex required for DNA double strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Ku70(-/-) (K70T) mice, like recombination activating gene (RAG)-1- or RAG-2-deficient (R1T or R2T) mice, have impaired B and T cell development at an early progenitor stage, which is thought to result at least in part from defective V(D)J recombination (Gu, Y., K.J. Seidl, G.A. Rathbun, C. Zhu, J.P. Manis, N. van der Stoep, L. Davidson, H.L. Cheng, J.M. Sekiguchi, K. Frank, et al. 1997. Immunity. 7:653-665; Ouyang, H., A. Nussenzweig, A. Kurimasa, V.C. Soares, X. Li, C. Cordon-Cardo, W. Li, N. Cheong, M. Nussenzweig, G. Iliakis, et al. 1997. J. Exp. Med. 186:921-929). Therefore, to examine the potential role of Ku70 in CSR, we generated K70T mice that carry a germline Ig HC locus in which the JH region was replaced with a functionally rearranged VH(D)JH and Ig lambda light chain transgene (referred to as K70T/HL mice). Previously, we have shown that B cells from R1T or R2T mice carrying these rearranged Ig genes (R1T/HL or R2T/HL mice) can undergo CSR to IgG isotypes (Lansford, R., J. Manis, E. Sonoda, K. Rajewsky, and F. Alt. 1998. Int. Immunol. 10:325-332). K70T/HL mice had significant numbers of peripheral surface IgM+ B cells, which generated serum IgM levels similar to those of R2T/HL mice. However, in contrast to R2T/HL mice, K70T/HL mice had no detectable serum IgG isotypes. In vitro culture of K70T/HL B cells with agents that induce CSR in normal or R2T/HL B cells did lead to the induction of germline CH transcripts, indicating that initial signaling pathways for CSR were intact in K70T/HL cells. However, treatment with such agents did not lead to detectable CSR by K70T/HL B cells, and instead, led to cell death within 72 h. We conclude that Ku70 is required for the generation of B cells that have

  1. Advanced Extra-Vehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Rhodes, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the method by which the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun; in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of on-going efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  2. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... proteoglycan species in cellular signalling pathways are being determined. This review describes some of the recent advances in our understanding of the major transmembrane group of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, the syndecans, including evidence that they play an important role as accessory signalling...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  3. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  4. 20 CFR 665.330 - Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for rapid response also required activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Rapid Response Activities § 665.330 Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for... WIA are made available to workers who, under the NAFTA Implementation Act (Public Law 103-182), are...

  5. Glycosaminoglycans are required for translocation of amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Janely; Liivamägi, Laura; Lubenets, Dmitri; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are considered as one of the most promising tools to mediate the cellular delivery of various biologically active compounds that are otherwise cell impermeable. CPPs can internalize into cells via two different pathways - endocytosis and direct translocation across the plasma membrane. In both cases, the initial step of internalization requires interactions between CPPs and different plasma membrane components. Despite the extensive research, it is not yet fully understood, which of these cell surface molecules mediate the direct translocation of CPPs across the plasma- and endosomal membrane. In the present study we used giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) as a model membrane system to elucidate the specific molecular mechanisms behind the internalization and the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the translocation of four well-known CPPs, classified as cationic (nona-arginine, Tat peptide) and amphipathic (transportan and TP10). We demonstrate here that GAGs facilitate the translocation of amphipathic CPPs, but not the internalization of cationic CPPs; and that the uptake is not mediated by a specific GAG class, but rather the overall amount of these polysaccharides is crucial for the internalization of amphipathic peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Commensal Microbiota Are Required for Systemic Inflammation Triggered by Necrotic Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Young

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between dendritic cells (DCs and commensal microflora in shaping systemic immune responses is not well understood. Here, we report that mice deficient for the Fas-associated death domain in DCs developed systemic inflammation associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines and increased myeloid and B cells. These mice exhibited reduced DCs in gut-associated lymphoid tissues due to RIP3-dependent necroptosis, whereas DC functions remained intact. Induction of systemic inflammation required DC necroptosis and commensal microbiota signals that activated MyD88-dependent pathways in other cell types. Systemic inflammation was abrogated with the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics or complete, but not DC-specific, deletion of MyD88. Thus, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for commensal microbiota in priming immune cells for inflammatory responses against necrotic cells. These studies demonstrate the impact intestinal microflora have on the immune system and their role in eliciting proper immune responses to harmful stimuli.

  7. Folliculostellate Cells Are Required for Laminin Release from Gonadotrophs in Rat Anterior Pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takehiro; Fujiwara, Ken; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Azuma, Morio; Ramadhani, Dini; Tofrizal, Alimuddin; Batchuluun, Khongorzul; Maliza, Rita; Syaidah, Rahimi; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland is organized tissue comprising hormone-producing cells and folliculostellate (FS) cells. FS cells interconnect to form a meshwork, and their cytoplasmic processes are anchored by a basement membrane containing laminin. Recently, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture that reproduces this FS cell architecture. In this study of the novel function of FS cells, we used transgenic rats that express green fluorescent protein in FS cells for the 3D culture. Anterior pituitary cells were cultured with different proportions of FS cells (0%, 5%, 10%, and 20%). Anterior pituitary cells containing 5–20% FS cells formed round/oval cell aggregates, whereas amorphous cell aggregates were formed in the absence of FS cells. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry showed laminin-immunopositive cells instead of extracellular laminin deposition in FS cell-deficient cell aggregates. Double-immunostaining revealed that these laminin-immunopositive cells were gonadotrophs. Laminin mRNA expression did not differ in relation to the presence or absence of FS cells. When anterior pituitary cells with no FS cells were cultured with FS cell-conditioned medium, the proportion of laminin-immunopositive cells was lower than in control. These results suggest that a humoral factor from FS cells is required for laminin release from gonadotrophs

  8. Bim is required for T-cell allogeneic responses and graft-versus-host disease in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Yu, Jing; Iclozan, Cristina; Kaosaard, Kane; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Bim, a BH3-only Bcl-2-family protein, is essential for T-cell negative selection in the thymus as well as for the death of activated T cells in the periphery. The role of Bim has been extensively studied in T-cell responses to self-antigens and viral infections. Recent findings on Bim in autoimmunity triggered our interest in investigating whether Bim may play a role in another disease with inflammatory symptoms as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here we report that Bim is required for optimal T-cell responses to alloantigens in vivo and for the development of GVHD. Using murine models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we found that donor T cells deficient for Bim are impaired in the induction of GVHD primarily due to a significant defect in T cell activation and expansion in vivo. Upon TCR engagement, Bim-/- T cells exhibited selective defects in CD69 expression and phosphorylation of PLCγ1. Our studies uncover a novel aspect of Bim function in T-cell activation with important implications in understanding the mechanisms of T-cell activation and tolerance under allogeneic transplantation. PMID:22432091

  9. Recipient dendritic cells, but not B cells, are required antigen-presenting cells for peripheral alloreactive CD8+ T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, J L; Lucas, C L; Haspot, F; Gaspar, J Kurtz C; Guzman, A; Sykes, M

    2010-03-01

    Induction of mixed allogeneic chimerism is a promising approach for achieving donor-specific tolerance, thereby obviating the need for life-long immunosuppression for solid organ allograft acceptance. In mice receiving a low dose (3Gy) of total body irradiation, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation combined with anti-CD154 tolerizes peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells, allowing achievement of mixed chimerism with specific tolerance to donor. With this approach, peripheral CD8 T-cell tolerance requires recipient MHC class II, CD4 T cells, B cells and DCs. Recipient-type B cells from chimeras that were tolerant to donor still promoted CD8 T-cell tolerance, but their role could not be replaced by donor-type B cells. Using recipients whose B cells or DCs specifically lack MHC class I and/or class II or lack CD80 and CD86, we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) must express CD80/86 and either MHC class I or class II to promote CD8 tolerance. In contrast, B cells, though required, did not need to express MHC class I or class II or CD80/86 to promote CD8 tolerance. Moreover, recipient IDO and IL-10 were not required. Thus, antigen presentation by recipient DCs and not by B cells is critical for peripheral alloreactive CD8 T cell tolerance.

  10. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avalos, Ana M.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Witte, Martin D.; Tai, Albert K.; He, Jiang; Frushicheva, Maria P.; Thill, Peter D.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; Theile, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked using short synthetic peptides to allow antigen-specific engagement of the BCR.

  11. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Teng, E-mail: tengyu33@yahoo.com [Department of Dermatology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital Affiliated of Soochow University, SuZhou, Jiangsu Province 215000 (China); Guo, Yong-li [Department of Oncology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  12. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Teng; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Yong-li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

  13. A single tyrosine of the interleukin-9 (IL-9) receptor is required for STAT activation, antiapoptotic activity, and growth regulation by IL-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, J B; Uyttenhove, C; Van Roost, E; DeLestré, B; Donckers, D; Van Snick, J; Renauld, J C

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9), a T-cell-derived cytokine, interacts with a specific receptor associated with the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. In this report, we analyze the functional domains of the human IL-9 receptor transfected into mouse lymphoid cell lines. Three different functions were examined: growth stimulation in factor-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells, protection against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, and Ly-6A2 induction in BW5147 lymphoma cells. The results indicated that a single tyrosine, at position 116 in the cytoplasmic domain, was required for all three activities. In addition, we observed that human IL-9 reduced the proliferation rate of transfected BW5147 cells, an effect also dependent on the same tyrosine. This amino acid was necessary for IL-9-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and for STAT activation but not for IRS-2/4PS activation or for JAK1 phosphorylation, which depended on a domain closer to the plasma membrane. We also showed that JAK1 was constitutively associated with the IL-9 receptor. Activated STAT complexes induced by IL-9 were found to contain STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 transcription factors. Moreover, sequence homologies between human IL-9 receptor tyrosine 116 and tyrosines (of other receptors activating STAT3 and STAT5 were observed. Taken together, these data indicate that a single tyrosine of the IL-9 receptor, required for activation of three different STAT proteins, is necessary for distinct activities of this cytokine, including proliferative responses.

  14. EDF requirements for hot cells examinations on irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, J.C.; Ducros, G.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of increasing French Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) availability while lengthening the fuel irradiation cycle and reaching higher burnups lead EDF to carry out on site and hot cell examinations. The data issued from such fuel behaviour monitoring programmes will be used to ascertain that the design criteria are met. Data are also needed for modelling, development and validation. The paper deals quickly with the logistics linked to the selection and transport of fuel rods from NPP to hot cell laboratory. Hot cell PIEs remain a valuable method to obtain data in such fields as PCI (Pellet-Cladding Interaction), internal pressure, FGR (Fission Gas Release), oxide thickness, metallurgical aspects. The paper introduces burnup determination methods, inner pressure evaluation, preparation of samples for further irradiation such as power ramps for PCI and RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) testing. The nuclear microprobe of Perre Suee laboratory is also presented. (author)

  15. Human prostate luminal cell differentiation requires NOTCH3 induction by p38-MAPK and MYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Sander B; Berger, Penny L; Ljungman, Mats; Miranti, Cindy K

    2017-06-01

    Many pathways dysregulated in prostate cancer are also involved in epithelial differentiation. To better understand prostate tumor initiation, we sought to investigate specific genes and mechanisms required for normal basal to luminal cell differentiation. Utilizing human prostate basal epithelial cells and an in vitro differentiation model, we tested the hypothesis that regulation of NOTCH3 by the p38 MAPK family (hereafter p38-MAPK), via MYC, is required for luminal differentiation. Inhibition (SB202190 and BIRB796) or knockdown of p38α (also known as MAPK14) and/or p38δ (also known as MAPK13) prevented proper differentiation. Additionally, treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor (RO4929097) or knockdown of NOTCH1 and/or NOTCH3 greatly impaired differentiation and caused luminal cell death. Constitutive p38-MAPK activation through MKK6(CA) increased NOTCH3 (but not NOTCH1) mRNA and protein levels, which was diminished upon MYC inhibition (10058-F4 and JQ1) or knockdown. Furthermore, we validated two NOTCH3 enhancer elements through a combination of enhancer (e)RNA detection (BruUV-seq) and luciferase reporter assays. Finally, we found that the NOTCH3 mRNA half-life increased during differentiation or upon acute p38-MAPK activation. These results reveal a new connection between p38-MAPK, MYC and NOTCH signaling, demonstrate two mechanisms of NOTCH3 regulation and provide evidence for NOTCH3 involvement in prostate luminal cell differentiation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes

  17. Initial requirements for embryogenic calluses initiation in thin cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... 2PPGBIOTEC, Programa de Pós Graduação em Biotecnologia, Department of Biology, Universidade Federal do. Amazonas, Manaus ... This study highlights procedures for embryogenic calluses induction from immature female ..... division (arrow); C, detail of the region of cells with an accumulation of.

  18. Recognition of nonpeptide antigens by human V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells requires contact with cells of human origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A E; Lissina, A; Hutchinson, S L; Hewitt, R E; Temple, B; James, D; Boulter, J M; Price, D A; Sewell, A K

    2004-06-01

    SUMMARY It is becoming apparent that gamma delta T cells form an important part of the adaptive immune response. However, the ligands recognized by gamma delta T cell receptors (TCRs) and the exact biological function of the cells that express this receptor remain unclear. Numerous studies have shown that the dominant human peripheral blood subset of gamma delta T cells, which express a V gamma 9V delta 2 TCR, can activate in response to low molecular weight nonpeptidic molecules. Some of these components have been purified from bacteria or parasites. We examined the activation of polyclonal gamma delta T cell lines, clones with V gamma 9V delta 2 and V gamma 9V delta 1 TCRs, and gamma delta T cells directly ex vivo in response to multiple phosphate, alkylamine and aminobisphosphonate (nBP) antigens and purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (PPD). V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells were able to respond to multiple small organic molecules of highly variable structure whereas cells expressing a similar V gamma 9 chain paired with a V delta 1 chain failed to recognize these antigens. Thus, the TCR delta chain appears to make an important contribution to the recognition of these antigens. The kinetics of responses to alkylphosphate and alkylamine antigens differ from those of responses to the nBP pamidronate. These different classes of antigen are believed to have differed mechanisms of action. Such differences explain why nBPs can be pulsed onto antigen presenting cells (APCs) and still retain their ability to activate gamma delta T cells while alkylphosphate and alkylamine antigens cannot. We also demonstrate that a substantial proportion of the cells that produce IFN gamma directly ex vivo in response to PPD are gamma delta T cells and that gamma delta T cell activation requires contact with cells of human origin.

  19. Notch2 Is Required for Inflammatory Cytokine-Driven Goblet Cell Metaplasia in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Danahay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The balance and distribution of epithelial cell types is required to maintain tissue homeostasis. A hallmark of airway diseases is epithelial remodeling, leading to increased goblet cell numbers and an overproduction of mucus. In the conducting airway, basal cells act as progenitors for both secretory and ciliated cells. To identify mechanisms regulating basal cell fate, we developed a screenable 3D culture system of airway epithelial morphogenesis. We performed a high-throughput screen using a collection of secreted proteins and identified inflammatory cytokines that specifically biased basal cell differentiation toward a goblet cell fate, culminating in enhanced mucus production. We also demonstrate a specific requirement for Notch2 in cytokine-induced goblet cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that inhibition of Notch2 prevents goblet cell metaplasia induced by a broad range of stimuli and propose Notch2 neutralization as a therapeutic strategy for preventing goblet cell metaplasia in airway diseases.

  20. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-02-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

  1. Requirement of autolytic activity for bacteriocin-induced lysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Cuesta, M. Carmen; Kok, Jan; Herranz, Elisabet; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa; Buist, Girbe

    The bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis IFPL105 is bactericidal against several Lactococcus and Lactobacillus strains. Addition of the bacteriocin to exponential-growth-phase cells resulted in all cases in bacteriolysis. The bacteriolytic response of the strains was not related to differences

  2. P21-activated kinase 2 is essential in maintenance of peripheral Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinyong; Pease, David Randall; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Phee, Hyewon

    2018-01-03

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), an effector molecule of the Rho family GTPases Rac and Cdc42, regulates diverse functions of T cells. Previously, we showed that Pak2 is required for development and maturation of T cells in the thymus, including thymus-derived regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, whether Pak2 is required for the functions of various subsets of peripheral T cells, such as naive CD4 and helper T-cell subsets including Foxp3 + Treg cells, is unknown. To determine the role of Pak2 in CD4 T cells in the periphery, we generated inducible Pak2 knockout (KO) mice, in which Pak2 was deleted in CD4 T cells acutely by administration of tamoxifen. Temporal deletion of Pak2 greatly reduced the number of Foxp3 + Treg cells, while minimally affecting the homeostasis of naive CD4 T cells. Pak2 was required for proliferation and Foxp3 expression of Foxp3 + Treg cells upon T-cell receptor and interleukin-2 stimulation, differentiation of in vitro induced Treg cells, and activation of naive CD4 T cells. Together, Pak2 is essential in maintaining the peripheral Treg cell pool by providing proliferation and maintenance signals to Foxp3 + Treg cells. © 2018 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Impairment of Cellulose Synthases Required for Arabidopsis Secondary Cell Wall Formation Enhances Disease Resistance[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Feng, Dong Xin; Hu, Jian; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Deslandes, Laurent; Llorente, Francisco; Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Keller, Harald; Barlet, Xavier; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Anderson, Lisa K.; Somerville, Shauna; Marco, Yves; Molina, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Cellulose is synthesized by cellulose synthases (CESAs) contained in plasma membrane–localized complexes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three types of CESA subunits (CESA4/IRREGULAR XYLEM5 [IRX5], CESA7/IRX3, and CESA8/IRX1) are required for secondary cell wall formation. We report that mutations in these proteins conferred enhanced resistance to the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. By contrast, susceptibility to these pathogens was not altered in cell wall mutants of primary wall CESA subunits (CESA1, CESA3/ISOXABEN RESISTANT1 [IXR1], and CESA6/IXR2) or POWDERY MILDEW–RESISTANT5 (PMR5) and PMR6 genes. Double mutants indicated that irx-mediated resistance was independent of salicylic acid, ethylene, and jasmonate signaling. Comparative transcriptomic analyses identified a set of common irx upregulated genes, including a number of abscisic acid (ABA)–responsive, defense-related genes encoding antibiotic peptides and enzymes involved in the synthesis and activation of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. These data as well as the increased susceptibility of ABA mutants (abi1-1, abi2-1, and aba1-6) to R. solanacearum support a direct role of ABA in resistance to this pathogen. Our results also indicate that alteration of secondary cell wall integrity by inhibiting cellulose synthesis leads to specific activation of novel defense pathways that contribute to the generation of an antimicrobial-enriched environment hostile to pathogens. PMID:17351116

  4. Combinatorial Modulation of Signaling Pathways Reveals Cell-Type-Specific Requirements for Highly Efficient and Synchronous iPSC Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon E. Vidal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The differentiated state of somatic cells provides barriers for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. To address why some cell types reprogram more readily than others, we studied the effect of combined modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Surprisingly, inhibition of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β together with activation of Wnt signaling in the presence of ascorbic acid allows >80% of murine fibroblasts to acquire pluripotency after 1 week of reprogramming factor expression. In contrast, hepatic and blood progenitors predominantly required only TGF-β inhibition or canonical Wnt activation, respectively, to reprogram at efficiencies approaching 100%. Strikingly, blood progenitors reactivated endogenous pluripotency loci in a highly synchronous manner, and we demonstrate that expression of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes and reduced TGF-β/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase activity are intrinsic properties associated with the unique reprogramming response of these cells. Our observations define cell-type-specific requirements for the rapid and synchronous reprogramming of somatic cells.

  5. Xenopus Nanos1 is required to prevent endoderm gene expression and apoptosis in primordial germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Singh, Amar; King, Mary Lou

    2012-01-01

    Nanos is expressed in multipotent cells, stem cells and primordial germ cells (PGCs) of organisms as diverse as jellyfish and humans. It functions together with Pumilio to translationally repress targeted mRNAs. Here we show by loss-of-function experiments that Xenopus Nanos1 is required to preserve PGC fate. Morpholino knockdown of maternal Nanos1 resulted in a striking decrease in PGCs and a loss of germ cells from the gonads. Lineage tracing and TUNEL staining reveal that Nanos1-deficient PGCs fail to migrate out of the endoderm. They appear to undergo apoptosis rather than convert to normal endoderm. Whereas normal PGCs do not become transcriptionally active until neurula, Nanos1-depleted PGCs prematurely exhibit a hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain at the midblastula transition. Furthermore, they inappropriately express somatic genes characteristic of endoderm regulated by maternal VegT, including Xsox17α, Bix4, Mixer, GATA4 and Edd. We further demonstrate that Pumilio specifically binds VegT RNA in vitro and represses, along with Nanos1, VegT translation within PGCs. Repressed VegT RNA in wild-type PGCs is significantly less stable than VegT in Nanos1-depleted PGCs. Our data indicate that maternal VegT RNA is an authentic target of Nanos1/Pumilio translational repression. We propose that Nanos1 functions to translationally repress RNAs that normally specify endoderm and promote apoptosis, thus preserving the germline. PMID:22399685

  6. Histamine is required during neural stem cell proliferation to increase neuron differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, G; Velasco, I; García-López, G; Solís, K H; Flores-Herrera, H; Díaz, N F; Molina-Hernández, A

    2012-08-02

    Histamine in the adult central nervous system (CNS) acts as a neurotransmitter. This amine is one of the first neurotransmitters to appear during development reaching its maximum concentration simultaneously with neuron differentiation peak. This suggests that HA plays an important role in neurogenesis. We have previously shown that HA is able to increase neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro, by activating the histamine type 1 receptor. However the mechanism(s) by which HA has a neurogenic effect on NSCs has not been explored. Here we explore how HA is able to increase neuron phenotype. Cortex neuroepithelium progenitors were cultured and at passage two treatments with 100 μM HA were given during cell proliferation and differentiation or only during differentiation. Immunocytochemistry was performed on differentiated cultures to detect mature neurons. To explore the expression of certain important transcriptional factors involved on asymmetric cell division and commitment, RT-PCR and qRT-PCR were performed. Results indicate that HA is required during cell proliferation in order to increase neuron differentiation and suggest that this amine increases neuron commitment during the proliferative phase probably by rising prospero1 and neurogenin1 expression. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stearoyl CoA Desaturase Is Required to Produce Active, Lipid-Modified Wnt Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rios-Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation.

  8. Multidisciplinary and Active/Collaborative Approaches in Teaching Requirements Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    The requirements engineering course is a core component of the curriculum for the Master's in Software Engineering programme, at Monmouth University (MU). It covers the process, methods and tools specific to this area, together with the corresponding software quality issues. The need to produce software engineers with strong teamwork and…

  9. KC-46 Workforce Requirements for Depot Maintenance Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    as International Standard for Organization ( ISO 9001 ) rating, and Aerospace Standards (AS 9100) rating (International Organization for...In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Logistics and Supply Chain Management Jacob C. Jensen...Code AFSC: Air Force Sustainment Center ALC: Air Logistics Center ALCARS: Air Logistics Center Air Frame Rating System APG Airframe

  10. QA requirements for Czech nuclear activities and radiation practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarchovsky, D.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper former legislation and current legislation for the quality assurance are compared. The State Office for Nuclear Safety in its regulatory activity in the QA area, reflected in the new legislation, is based on a gradual transition from a formal evaluation of quality assurance programmes to supervising activities to QA performance approach which means, besides other, that an appropriate responsibility for the quality of work is imposed on those persons who actually perform and supervise the work

  11. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Ley, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers. © 2015 Jacque et al.

  12. Danish participation in the IEA solar cell activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In the 12-month period 01.05.93 - 30.04.94 the Danish activities in the IEA 'Solar Cell Agreement' consisted in: participation in the Executive Committee (ExCo) and participation in Task 1 'Exchange and Dissemination of Information on PV Power Systems'. ExCo has meetings every half-year and is a coordinating organ for the Agreement. Work on the Task 1 is organized in 4 subtasks: (1) mapping of solar cell activities in the OECD countries and preparation of an IEA handbook on solar cell technology; (2) publishing of a semiannual newsletter about the agreement; (3) an 'executive conference' on solar cell technology and its uses with participation of the decision-makers in respective power industries; (4) information dissemination whenever required. Demonstration projects, like a photovoltaic roof-integrated system connected to the grid. have been implemented. Three larger solar cell projects, subsidized by the EU means, comprehend 'real time monitoring' by a solar system, WHO project 'Solar Energy Applications for Primary Health Care Clinics for Remote Rural Areas' (SAPHIR) and a grid-connected photovoltaic system in a suburb residential settlement. (EG)

  13. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  14. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  15. X-ray-enhanced cancer cell migration requires the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Hiromasa; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishihara, Asuka; Minami, Kazumasa; Koizumi, Masahiko; Matsuura, Nariaki; Hieda, Miki

    2018-04-01

    The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex is a multifunctional protein complex that is involved in various processes at the nuclear envelope, including nuclear migration, mechanotransduction, chromatin tethering and DNA damage response. We recently showed that a nuclear envelope protein, Sad1 and UNC84 domain protein 1 (SUN1), a component of the LINC complex, has a critical function in cell migration. Although ionizing radiation activates cell migration and invasion in vivo and in vitro, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here, we examined the involvement of the LINC complex in radiation-enhanced cell migration and invasion. A sublethal dose of X-ray radiation promoted human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion, whereas carbon ion beam radiation suppressed these processes in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of SUN1 and SUN2 significantly suppressed X-ray-enhanced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, depletion or overexpression of each SUN1 splicing variant revealed that SUN1_888 containing 888 amino acids of SUN1 but not SUN1_916 was required for X-ray-enhanced migration and invasion. In addition, the results suggested that X-ray irradiation affected the expression level of SUN1 splicing variants and a SUN protein binding partner, nesprins. Taken together, our findings supported that the LINC complex contributed to photon-enhanced cell migration and invasion. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Zinc coordination is required for and regulates transcription activation by Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhesh Aras

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 is essential for Epstein-Barr virus to immortalize naïve B-cells. Upon binding a cluster of 20 cognate binding-sites termed the family of repeats, EBNA1 transactivates promoters for EBV genes that are required for immortalization. A small domain, termed UR1, that is 25 amino-acids in length, has been identified previously as essential for EBNA1 to activate transcription. In this study, we have elucidated how UR1 contributes to EBNA1's ability to transactivate. We show that zinc is necessary for EBNA1 to activate transcription, and that UR1 coordinates zinc through a pair of essential cysteines contained within it. UR1 dimerizes upon coordinating zinc, indicating that EBNA1 contains a second dimerization interface in its amino-terminus. There is a strong correlation between UR1-mediated dimerization and EBNA1's ability to transactivate cooperatively. Point mutants of EBNA1 that disrupt zinc coordination also prevent self-association, and do not activate transcription cooperatively. Further, we demonstrate that UR1 acts as a molecular sensor that regulates the ability of EBNA1 to activate transcription in response to changes in redox and oxygen partial pressure (pO(2. Mild oxidative stress mimicking such environmental changes decreases EBNA1-dependent transcription in a lymphoblastoid cell-line. Coincident with a reduction in EBNA1-dependent transcription, reductions are observed in EBNA2 and LMP1 protein levels. Although these changes do not affect LCL survival, treated cells accumulate in G0/G1. These findings are discussed in the context of EBV latency in body compartments that differ strikingly in their pO(2 and redox potential.

  17. Brain feminization requires active repression of masculinization via DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Bridget M.; Wright, Christopher L.; Shetty, Amol C.; Hodes, Georgia E.; Lenz, Kathryn M.; Mahurkar, Anup; Russo, Scott J.; Devine, Scott E.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    The developing mammalian brain is destined for a female phenotype unless exposed to gonadal hormones during a perinatal sensitive period. It has been assumed that the undifferentiated brain is masculinized by direct induction of transcription by ligand-activated nuclear steroid receptors. We found that a primary effect of gonadal steroids in the highly sexually-dimorphic preoptic area (POA) is to reduce activity of DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) enzymes, thereby decreasing DNA methylation and releasing masculinizing genes from epigenetic repression. Pharmacological inhibition of Dnmts mimicked gonadal steroids, resulting in masculinized neuronal markers and male sexual behavior in females. Conditional knockout of the de novo Dnmt isoform, Dnmt3a, also masculinized sexual behavior in female mice. RNA sequencing revealed gene and isoform variants modulated by methylation that may underlie the divergent reproductive behaviors of males versus females. Our data show that brain feminization is maintained by the active suppression of masculinization via DNA methylation. PMID:25821913

  18. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R.; Zheng, Timothy S.; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro. A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo. These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  19. Mind bomb 1 is required for pancreatic ß-cell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Signe; Kobberup, Sune; Jørgensen, Mette C

    2012-01-01

    the insulin producing ß-cells. However, signals that regulate proximodistal (P-D) patterning and thus formation of ß-cell progenitors are unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) is required for correct P-D patterning of the developing pancreas and ß-cell formation. We found that endoderm...

  20. Promotion of haematopoietic activity in embryonic stem cells by the aorta-gonad-mesonephros microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krassowska, Anna; Gordon-Keylock, Sabrina; Samuel, Kay; Gilchrist, Derek; Dzierzak, Elaine; Oostendorp, Robert; Forrester, Lesley M.; Ansell, John D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether the in vitro differentiation of ES cells into haematopoietic progenitors could be enhanced by exposure to the aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) microenvironment that is involved in the generation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during embryonic development. We established a co-culture system that combines the requirements for primary organ culture and differentiating ES cells and showed that exposure of differentiating ES cells to the primary AGM region results in a significant increase in the number of ES-derived haematopoietic progenitors. Co-culture of ES cells on the AM20-1B4 stromal cell line derived from the AGM region also increases haematopoietic activity. We conclude that factors promoting the haematopoietic activity of differentiating ES cells present in primary AGM explants are partially retained in the AM20.1B4 stromal cell line and that these factors are likely to be different to those required for adult HSC maintenance

  1. Continuous signaling of CD79b and CD19 is required for the fitness of Burkitt lymphoma B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaocui; Kläsener, Kathrin; Iype, Joseena M; Becker, Martin; Maity, Palash C; Cavallari, Marco; Nielsen, Peter J; Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2018-04-18

    Expression of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is essential not only for the development but also for the maintenance of mature B cells. Similarly, many B-cell lymphomas, including Burkitt lymphoma (BL), require continuous BCR signaling for their tumor growth. This growth is driven by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and PI3 kinase (PI3K) signaling. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas9 to delete BCR and B-cell co-receptor genes in the human BL cell line Ramos. We find that Ramos B cells require the expression of the BCR signaling component Igβ (CD79b), and the co-receptor CD19, for their fitness and competitive growth in culture. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of any other BCR component, Igβ can be expressed on the B-cell surface, where it is found in close proximity to CD19 and signals in an ITAM-dependent manner. These data suggest that Igβ and CD19 are part of an alternative B-cell signaling module that use continuous ITAM/PI3K signaling to promote the survival of B lymphoma and normal B cells. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Killing Breast Cancer Cells Through Activation of the Apoptosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    mitochodria. Once released, cytochrome known as Apaf-1, which oligomerizes and activates caspase cancer cells have apoptosomes which are hypersensitive to...develop cytoplasmic variants of cytochrome c and/or small to activate the apoptosome in breast cancer cells .

  3. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martínez-Bonet

    Full Text Available To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  4. The Activation of Phytophthora Effector Avr3b by Plant Cyclophilin is Required for the Nudix Hydrolase Activity of Avr3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Jing, Maofeng; Huang, Jie; Yang, Jin; Xia, Yeqiang; Kong, Liang; Ye, Wenwu; Xiong, Qin; Qiao, Yongli; Dong, Suomeng; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to impair host immunity. Some effectors possess enzymatic activities that can modify their host targets. Previously, we demonstrated that a Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector Avr3b acts as a Nudix hydrolase when expressed in planta; and this enzymatic activity is required for full virulence of P. sojae strain P6497 in soybean (Glycine max). Interestingly, recombinant Avr3b produced by E. coli does not have the hydrolase activity unless it was incubated with plant protein extracts. Here, we report the activation of Avr3b by a prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin, in plant cells. Avr3b directly interacts with soybean cyclophilin GmCYP1, which activates the hydrolase activity of Avr3b in a PPIase activity-dependent manner. Avr3b contains a putative Glycine-Proline (GP) motif; which is known to confer cyclophilin-binding in other protein substrates. Substitution of the Proline (P132) in the putative GP motif impaired the interaction of Avr3b with GmCYP1; as a result, the mutant Avr3bP132A can no longer be activated by GmCYP1, and is also unable to promote Phytophthora infection. Avr3b elicits hypersensitive response (HR) in soybean cultivars producing the resistance protein Rps3b, but Avr3bP132A lost its ability to trigger HR. Furthermore, silencing of GmCYP1 rendered reduced cell death triggered by Avr3b, suggesting that GmCYP1-mediated Avr3b maturation is also required for Rps3b recognition. Finally, cyclophilins of Nicotiana benthamiana can also interact with Avr3b and activate its enzymatic activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that cyclophilin is a "helper" that activates the enzymatic activity of Avr3b after it is delivered into plant cells; as such, cyclophilin is required for the avirulence and virulence functions of Avr3b.

  5. Switching on electrocatalytic activity in solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jae-Ha; Neagu, Dragos; Miller, David N.; Irvine, John T. S.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOCs) can operate with high efficiency in two ways—as fuel cells, oxidizing a fuel to produce electricity, and as electrolysis cells, electrolysing water to produce hydrogen and oxygen gases. Ideally, SOCs should perform well, be durable and be inexpensive, but there are often competitive tensions, meaning that, for example, performance is achieved at the expense of durability. SOCs consist of porous electrodes—the fuel and air electrodes—separated by a dense electrolyte. In terms of the electrodes, the greatest challenge is to deliver high, long-lasting electrocatalytic activity while ensuring cost- and time-efficient manufacture. This has typically been achieved through lengthy and intricate ex situ procedures. These often require dedicated precursors and equipment; moreover, although the degradation of such electrodes associated with their reversible operation can be mitigated, they are susceptible to many other forms of degradation. An alternative is to grow appropriate electrode nanoarchitectures under operationally relevant conditions, for example, via redox exsolution. Here we describe the growth of a finely dispersed array of anchored metal nanoparticles on an oxide electrode through electrochemical poling of a SOC at 2 volts for a few seconds. These electrode structures perform well as both fuel cells and electrolysis cells (for example, at 900 °C they deliver 2 watts per square centimetre of power in humidified hydrogen gas, and a current of 2.75 amps per square centimetre at 1.3 volts in 50% water/nitrogen gas). The nanostructures and corresponding electrochemical activity do not degrade in 150 hours of testing. These results not only prove that in operando methods can yield emergent nanomaterials, which in turn deliver exceptional performance, but also offer proof of concept that electrolysis and fuel cells can be unified in a single, high-performance, versatile and easily manufactured device. This opens up the possibility of

  6. Catalytic activity of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase requires a hexamer structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, E T; Bell, J E

    1984-01-01

    Previous workers have shown that the hexamers of glutamate dehydrogenase are dissociated first into trimers and subsequently into monomers by increasing guanidinium chloride concentrations. In renaturation experiments it is shown that trimers of glutamate dehydrogenase can be reassociated to give the hexamer form of the enzyme, with full regain of activity. Monomeric subunits produced at high guanidinium chloride concentrations cannot be renatured. The trimer form of the enzyme is shown to ha...

  7. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-05

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  8. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  9. Fuel cell systems for passenger cars - opportunities and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachtler, J. [BMW, Munich (Germany); Bourne, C. [Rover Group, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    From the point of view of energy density, handling and economy, present-day motor fuels are superior to all known alternatives. The internal combustion engine powered by them satisfies the requirements of customers to an excellent degree. The search for alternatives can therefore only be justified if emissions can be avoided totally and non-fossil primary energy sources can be used or at least partially our dependence on mineral oil can be reduced. What was long suspected has been increasingly confirmed, not least by developments at BMW: electricity (stored in batteries) and hydrogen offer the best prerequisites for achieving these goals in the long term. These forms of energy can be produced in sufficient quantities and with relatively little effect on the environment. They promise to produce an absolute minimum of pollutants when used in vehicles. Natural gas, which is very similar to hydrogen, and hybrid systems, that would compensate for battery risks, could perform a valuable function in the transitional phase.

  10. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-03-30

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin's activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types.

  11. Requirement for PLK1 kinase activity in the maintenance of a robust spindle assembly checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling O'Connor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During mitotic arrest induced by microtubule targeting drugs, the weakening of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC allows cells to progress through the cell cycle without chromosome segregation occurring. PLK1 kinase plays a major role in mitosis and emerging evidence indicates that PLK1 is also involved in establishing the checkpoint and maintaining SAC signalling. However, mechanistically, the role of PLK1 in the SAC is not fully understood, with several recent reports indicating that it can cooperate with either one of the major checkpoint kinases, Aurora B or MPS1. In this study, we assess the role of PLK1 in SAC maintenance. We find that in nocodazole-arrested U2OS cells, PLK1 activity is continuously required for maintaining Aurora B protein localisation and activity at kinetochores. Consistent with published data we find that upon PLK1 inhibition, phosphoThr3-H3, a marker of Haspin activity, is reduced. Intriguingly, Aurora B inhibition causes PLK1 to relocalise from kinetochores into fewer and much larger foci, possibly due to incomplete recruitment of outer kinetochore proteins. Importantly, PLK1 inhibition, together with partial inhibition of Aurora B, allows efficient SAC override to occur. This phenotype is more pronounced than the phenotype observed by combining the same PLK1 inhibitors with partial MPS1 inhibition. We also find that PLK1 inhibition does not obviously cooperate with Haspin inhibition to promote SAC override. These results indicate that PLK1 is directly involved in maintaining efficient SAC signalling, possibly by cooperating in a positive feedback loop with Aurora B, and that partially redundant mechanisms exist which reinforce the SAC.

  12. Cathepsin L is required for endothelial progenitor cell-induced neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbich, Carmen; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Bruhl, Thomas; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin D.; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2004-01-15

    Infusion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not of mature endothelial cells (ECs), promotes neovascularization after ischemia. We performed a gene expression profiling of EPCs and ECs to identify genes, which might be important for the neovascularization capacity of EPCs. Intriguingly, the protease cathepsin L (CathL) was highly expressed in EPCs as opposed to ECs and is essential for matrix degradation and invasion by EPCs in vitro. CathL deficient mice showed impaired functional recovery after hind limb ischemia supporting the concept for an important role of CathL in postnatal neovascularization. Infused CathL deficient progenitor cells failed to home to sites of ischemia and to augment neovascularization. In contrast, over expression of CathL in mature ECs significantly enhanced their invasive activity and induced their neovascularization capacity in vivo. Taken together, CathL plays a crucial role for the integration of circulating EPCs into the ischemic tissue and is required for neovascularization mediated by EPCs.

  13. An Interbacterial NAD(P)+ Glycohydrolase Toxin Requires Elongation Factor Tu for Delivery to Target Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, John C.; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; LeRoux, Michele; Harding, Brittany N.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Tran, Bao Q.; Robinson, Howard; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R.; Raunser, Stefan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2015-10-08

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD+ and NADP+. Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria.

  14. Regulatory requirements for clinical trial and marketing authorisation application for cell-based medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmikangas, P; Flory, E; Reinhardt, J; Hinz, T; Maciulaitis, R

    2010-01-01

    The new era of regenerative medicine has led to rapid development of new innovative therapies especially for diseases and tissue/organ defects for which traditional therapies and medicinal products have not provided satisfactory outcome. Although the clinical use and developments of cell-based medicinal products (CBMPs) could be witnessed already for a decade, robust scientific and regulatory provisions for these products have only recently been enacted. The new Regulation for Advanced Therapies (EC) 1394/2007 together with the revised Annex I, Part IV of Directive 2001/83/EC provides the new legal framework for CBMPs. The wide variety of cell-based products and the foreseen limitations (small sample sizes, short shelf life) vs. particular risks (microbiological purity, variability, immunogenicity, tumourigenicity) associated with CBMPs have called for a flexible, case-by-case regulatory approach for these products. Consequently, a risk-based approach has been developed to allow definition of the amount of scientific data needed for a Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) of each CBMP. The article provides further insight into the initial risk evaluation, as well as to the quality, non-clinical, and clinical requirements of CBMPs. Special somatic cell therapies designed for active immunotherapy are also addressed.

  15. P-glycoprotein ATPase activity requires lipids to activate a switch at the first transmission interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) drug pump. A common feature of ABC proteins is that they are organized into two wings. Each wing contains a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Drug substrates and ATP bind at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Drug transport involves ATP-dependent conformational changes between inward- (open, NBDs far apart) and outward-facing (closed, NBDs close together) conformations. P-gps crystallized in the presence of detergent show an open structure. Human P-gp is inactive in detergent but basal ATPase activity is restored upon addition of lipids. The lipids might cause closure of the wings to bring the NBDs close together to allow ATP hydrolysis. We show however, that cross-linking the wings together did not activate ATPase activity when lipids were absent suggesting that lipids may induce other structural changes required for ATPase activity. We then tested the effect of lipids on disulfide cross-linking of mutants at the first transmission interface between intracellular loop 4 (TMD2) and NBD1. Mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C but not G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C were cross-linked with oxidant when in membranes. The mutants were then purified and cross-linked with or without lipids. Mutants G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C cross-linked only in the absence of lipids whereas mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C were cross-linked only in the presence of lipids. The results suggest that lipids activate a switch at the first transmission interface and that the structure of P-gp is different in detergents and lipids. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Steroids are required for epidermal cell fate establishment in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Kavitha T; Chen, Andrew Y; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2009-05-12

    The simple structure of Arabidopsis roots provides an excellent model system to study epidermal cell fate specification. Epidermal cells in contact with 2 underlying cortical cells differentiate into hair cells (H cells; trichoblasts), whereas cells that contact only a single cortical cell differentiate into mature hairless cells (N cells; atrichoblasts). This position-dependent patterning, in combination with the constrained orientation of cell divisions, results in hair and nonhair cell files running longitudinally along the root epidermis. Here, we present strong evidence that steroid hormones called brassinosteroids (BRs) are required to maintain position-dependent fate specification in roots. We show that BRs are required for normal expression levels and patterns of WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), master regulators of epidermal patterning. Loss of BR signaling results in loss of hair cells in H positions, likely as a consequence of reduced expression of CAPRICE (CPC), a direct downstream target of WER. Our observations demonstrate that in addition to their well-known role in cell expansion, BRs play an essential role in directing cell fate.

  17. 76 FR 39416 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... techniques or other forms of information. Title: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Documentation Requirements for Articles Entered Under Various Special Tariff Treatment Provisions...

  18. The kinesin motor protein Kif7 is required for T-cell development and normal MHC expression on thymic epithelial cells (TEC) in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ching-In; Barbarulo, Alessandro; Solanki, Anisha; Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2017-04-11

    Kif7 is a ciliary kinesin motor protein that regulates mammalian Hedgehog pathway activation through influencing structure of the primary cilium. Here we show that Kif7 is required for normal T-cell development, despite the fact that T-cells lack primary cilia. Analysis of Kif7-deficient thymus showed that Kif7-deficiency increases the early CD44+CD25+CD4-CD8- thymocyte progenitor population but reduces differentiation to CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) cell. At the transition from DP to mature T-cell, Kif7-deficiency selectively delayed maturation to the CD8 lineage. Expression of CD5, which correlates with TCR signal strength, was reduced on DP and mature CD4 and CD8 cells, as a result of thymocyte-intrinsic Kif7-deficiency, and Kif7-deficient T-cells from radiation chimeras activated less efficiently when stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 in vitro. Kif7-deficient thymocytes showed higher expression of the Hedgehog target gene Ptch1 than WT, but were less sensitive to treatment with recombinant Shh, and Kif7-deficient T-cell development was refractory to neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins, indicating that Kif7-deficient thymocytes were unable to interpret changes in the Hedgehog signal. In addition, Kif7-deficiency reduced cell-surface MHCII expression on thymic epithelial cells.

  19. Lifestyles and mental health status are associated with natural killer cell and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T; Inoue-Sakurai, C; Maruyama, S

    2001-04-10

    We investigated the association of lifestyle and mental health status with natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities in healthy males. NK cell activity was determined in 105 male workers and LAK cell activity was determined in 54 male workers. Peripheral blood was obtained from each subject and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood. These PBMC were used as effector cells. LAK cells were generated by incubation of PBMC with interleukin-2 for 72 h. NK cell activity against NK-sensitive K562 cells and LAK cell activity against NK-resistant Raji cells were examined by 51Cr release assay. Overall lifestyles were evaluated according to the answers on a questionnaire regarding eight health practices (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, eating breakfast, hours of sleep, hours of work, physical exercise, nutritional balance, mental stress). Subjects with a good overall lifestyle showed significantly higher NK cell (P mental status had significantly lower NK cell activity than those who reported stable mental status. When subjects were divided into four groups by lifestyle and mental health status, subjects who had poor or moderate lifestyle and reported unstable mental status showed the lowest NK cell activity and subjects who had good lifestyle and reported stable mental status showed the highest NK cell activity among four groups.

  20. Oligosaccharide composition of the neurotoxin responsive Na+ channel and the requirement of sialic acid for activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negishi, M.; Shaw, G.W.; Glick, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The neurotoxin responsive Na + channel was purified to homogeneity in an 18% yield from a clonal cell line of mouse neuroblastoma, N-18, metabolically labeled with L-[ 3 H]fucose. The Na + channel, a glycoprotein, M/sub r/=200,000 (gradient 7-14% PAGE) was digested with Pronase and the glycopeptides were characterized by serial lectin affinity chromatography. greater than 90% of the oligosaccharides contained sialic acid and 18% were biantennary, 39% were triantennary and 30% tetraantennary. The glycoprotein was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles and 86 Rb flux was stimulated (65%) by 200 μM veratridine and 1.2 μg of scorpion venom and was inhibited (95%) by 5 μM tetrodotoxin. The requirement of sialic acid for Na + channel activity was demonstrated since neuraminidase (0.01 U) treatment of the reconstituted glycoprotein eliminated the response of 86 Rb flux to the stimulating neurotoxins. In other experiments, treatment of N-18 cells with 10 μM swainsonine, an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing, altered the oligosaccharide composition of the Na + channel. When the abnormally glycosylated Na + channel was reconstituted into artificial phospholipid vesicles, 86 Rb flux in response to neurotoxins was impaired. Thus, glycosylation of the polypeptide with oligosaccharides of specific composition and structure is essential for expression of the biological activity of the neurotoxin responsive Na + channel

  1. The European Utility Requirements (EUR). Status and near term activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbey, Pierre; Hedin, Francois

    2010-01-01

    In 1991 5 major European Utilities participating in the US ALWR program decided to develop together a common specification that would contribute to keep the nuclear option open. The European Utility Requirements (EUR) are addressed to the designers and suppliers of LWR plants in order to allow the development of standards designs that can be build and licensed in several European countries with only minor variations. The EUR organization has kept enlarging; today 16 utilities are members of the EUR organization. Seven compliance analyses dedicated respectively to the BWR90, EPR, EPP, ABWR, SWR1000, AP1000 and to the AES92 projects have been already published. The revised version of the EPR subset of the EUR volume 3 was finalized in mid 2009. New LWR projects of potential interest for the EUR utilities are being contemplated. For instance a preliminary assessment of compliance of MHI's APWR project has been worked out in the first months of 2008. Recently EUR organization has decided to launch coordinated actions with other industry groups and other stakeholders. In particular EUR and ENISS organizations have decided to join their efforts in their relations with the IAEA and WENRA organizations with respect to the LWR Gen3 designs. In addition EUR and CORDEL (Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing), which is a WNA (World Nuclear Association) working group decided also to coordinate their efforts for the industry benefit, in relation with the MDEP (Multinational Design Evaluation Program) initiative of safety nuclear regulators. Contacts have been also initiated with ENEN and the WNU in order to develop new courses for young professionals. (orig.)

  2. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Wei, Jerry; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA) (5μg/ml), including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2), early growth response 1 (EGR1), growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), early growth response 2 (EGR2), hemogen (HEMGN), polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3). Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in cell cycle

  3. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally-Anne Mortlock

    Full Text Available T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR, and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA (5μg/ml, including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2, early growth response 1 (EGR1, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS, early growth response 2 (EGR2, hemogen (HEMGN, polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2 and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3. Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in

  4. TRIM5α association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5α, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5α proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5α from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5α proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5α-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5α fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5α domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α

  5. T helper-independent activation of human CD8+ cells: the role of CD28 costimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, S W; Zhang, Y; Kasran, A; de Boer, M; Ceuppens, J L

    1996-07-01

    The concept that activation of MHC class I-restricted CD8+ cells entirely depends on help from MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells has recently been supplemented with an alternative model in which CD8+ cells can directly be activated by MHC class I-expressing professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), which are able to deliver an accessory signal. The authors analysed the role of CD28-mediated costimulation for T helper cell-independent activation of purified human CD8+ T cells in two different in vitro models. Freshly isolated CD8+ cells could be activated (proliferation, IL-2 production and cytotoxic activity) by anti-CD3-presenting Fc gamma R+ mouse cells transfected with the human CD28 ligand, CD80, as the only accessory signal. On the other hand, activation of CD8+ cells by allogeneic MHC class I on EBV-transformed B cells, which express two different CD28 ligands, CD80 and CD86, also proceeded very efficiently (proliferation, cytotoxic activity and CD25 expression), but was either not, or only partially, blocked by anti-CD80 and anti-CD86 MoAb or CTLA-4Ig. This indicates that other costimulatory signals are also effective, and that CD28 triggering is not absolutely required for initial T-cell activation. CsA and CD80/CD86-blocking agents were synergistic in completely inhibiting activation of CD8+ cells in the MLR with allogeneic B-cell lines. This combination also induced non-responsiveness of CD8+ cells upon restimulation in the absence of blocking agents. Therefore, although professional APC can apparently provide multiple costimulatory signals for direct activation of CD8+ T cells, the signal derived from CD80/CD86 is unique in providing CsA-resistance.

  6. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development. PMID:27056332

  7. Activation of ganglion cells and axon bundles using epiretinal electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosberg, Lauren E; Ganesan, Karthik; Goetz, Georges A; Madugula, Sasidhar S; Bhaskhar, Nandita; Fan, Victoria; Li, Peter; Hottowy, Pawel; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Mitra, Subhasish; Chichilnisky, E J

    2017-09-01

    Epiretinal prostheses for treating blindness activate axon bundles, causing large, arc-shaped visual percepts that limit the quality of artificial vision. Improving the function of epiretinal prostheses therefore requires understanding and avoiding axon bundle activation. This study introduces a method to detect axon bundle activation on the basis of its electrical signature and uses the method to test whether epiretinal stimulation can directly elicit spikes in individual retinal ganglion cells without activating nearby axon bundles. Combined electrical stimulation and recording from isolated primate retina were performed using a custom multielectrode system (512 electrodes, 10-μm diameter, 60-μm pitch). Axon bundle signals were identified by their bidirectional propagation, speed, and increasing amplitude as a function of stimulation current. The threshold for bundle activation varied across electrodes and retinas, and was in the same range as the threshold for activating retinal ganglion cells near their somas. In the peripheral retina, 45% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (17% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. This permitted selective activation of 21% of recorded ganglion cells (7% of expected ganglion cells) over the array. In one recording in the central retina, 75% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (16% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. The ability to selectively activate a subset of retinal ganglion cells without axon bundles suggests a possible novel architecture for future epiretinal prostheses. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Large-scale multielectrode recording and stimulation were used to test how selectively retinal ganglion cells can be electrically activated without activating axon bundles. A novel method was developed to identify axon activation on the basis of its unique electrical signature and was used to find that a subset of ganglion cells can be activated at single-cell

  8. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  9. Stomatin-like protein 2 is required for in vivo mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplex formation and optimal cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D; Langer, Thomas; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV(1-3) RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Growth factor-dependent activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway in the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PANC-1 carrying activated K-ras: implications for cell proliferation and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, K; Skripczynski, B; Mansard, A; Menke, A; Gierschik, P

    2000-06-08

    Human ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas frequently carry activating point mutations in the K-ras protooncogene. We have analysed the activity of the Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK cascade in the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PANC-1 carrying an activating K-ras mutation. Serum-starved cells and cells grown in medium with serum did not show constitutively activated c-Raf, MEK-1, or p42 MAPK. Stimulation of cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) or fetal calf serum (FCS) resulted in activation of N-Ras, but not K-Ras, as well as activation of c-Raf, MEK-1, and p42 MAPK. Preincubation of serum-starved cells with MEK-1 inhibitor PD98059 abolished EGF- and FCS-induced MAPK activation, identifying MEK as the upstream activator of MAPK. PANC-1 cells exhibited marked serum-dependence of anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth as well as cell migration. EGF, alone or in combination with insulin and transferrin, did not induce cell proliferation of serum-starved PANC-1 cells, indicating that activation of MAPK alone was not sufficient to induce cell proliferation. FCS-induced DNA synthesis was inhibited by 40% by the MEK-1 inhibitor. On the other hand, treatment with either FCS or EGF alone resulted in marked, MEK-dependent increase of directed cell migration. Collectively, our results show that the activating K-ras mutation in PANC-1 cells does not result in constitutively increased Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling. Signal transduction via the Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK cascade is maintained in these cells and is required for growth factor-induced cell proliferation and directed cell migration. Oncogene (2000).

  11. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... activity was observed after premedication with diazepam per os. The activity increased further during a combined anaesthesia (thiopentone + N2O + O2 + buprenorphene + pancuronium) and remained increased during surgery. Postoperatively, NK cell activity fell and remained depressed for a period of at least 5...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...

  12. Antitumor Activity of Propolis on Differantiated Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    , Neşe Ersöz Gülçelik, Dilara Zeybek, Fige

    2012-01-01

    Propolis is a natural bee product with several pharmacological activities. Nowadays, it is also investigated for its antitumor properties. There are contraversies on the antitumor activity of propolis, not all tumour cells seem to respond to propolis treatment. The aim of our study is to evaluate the activity of propolis on differantiated thyroid cancer cell lines. Tyripan blue test and MTT assay were performed to evaluate the cell viability of B-CPAP cells after propolis treatment and compar...

  13. T-cell-independent immune responses do not require CXC ligand 13-mediated B1 cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Matthew J; Sun, Guizhi; Alugupalli, Kishore R

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic movement of B cells increases the probability of encountering specific antigen and facilitates cell-cell interactions required for mounting a rapid antibody response. B1a and B1b cells are enriched in the coelomic cavity, contribute to T-cell-independent (TI) antibody responses, and increase in number upon antigen exposure. B1 cell movement is largely governed by Cxc ligand 13 (Cxcl13), and mice deficient in this chemokine have a severe reduction in peritoneal B1 cells. In this study, we examined the role of Cxcl13-dependent B cell migration using Borrelia hermsii infection or intraperitoneal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide or 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl-acetyl (NP)-Ficoll, all of which induce robust antibody responses from B1b cells. Surprisingly, we found that antibody responses to B. hermsii or to FhbA, an antigenic target of B1b cells, and the resolution of bacteremia were indistinguishable between wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice. Importantly, we did not observe an expansion of peritoneal B1b cell numbers in Cxcl13-/- mice. Nonetheless, mice that had resolved infection were resistant to reinfection, indicating that the peritoneal B1b cell reservoir is not required for controlling B. hermsii. Furthermore, despite a reduced peritoneal B1b compartment, immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine yielded comparable antigen-specific antibody responses in wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice and conferred protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Likewise, immunization with NP-Ficoll elicited similar antibody responses in wild-type and Cxcl13-/- mice. These data demonstrate that homing of B1 cells into the coelomic cavity is not a requirement for generating protective TI antibody responses, even when antigen is initially localized to this anatomical compartment.

  14. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lu

    Full Text Available Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs, which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, "genomic" signaling pathway and via a more recently-described "rapid" signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the "genomic" pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen.

  15. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Ueda, Kazutaka; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Diomede, Olga I.; Andrade, Tiffany; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen) in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, “genomic” signaling pathway and via a more recently-described “rapid” signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα) that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the “genomic” pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen. PMID:27035664

  16. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  17. Histone demethylases UTX and JMJD3 are required for NKT cell development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Daniel; Yagi, Ryoji; Cui, Kairong; Proctor, William R; Wang, Chaochen; Placek, Katarzyna; Pohl, Lance R; Wang, Rongfu; Ge, Kai; Zhu, Jinfang; Zhao, Keji

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK)T cells and conventional T cells share phenotypic characteristic however they differ in transcription factor requirements and functional properties. The role of histone modifying enzymes in conventional T cell development has been extensively studied, little is known about the function of enzymes regulating histone methylation in NKT cells. We show that conditional deletion of histone demethylases UTX and JMJD3 by CD4-Cre leads to near complete loss of liver NKT cells, while conventional T cells are less affected. Loss of NKT cells is cell intrinsic and not due to an insufficient selection environment. The absence of NKT cells in UTX/JMJD3-deficient mice protects mice from concanavalin A-induced liver injury, a model of NKT-mediated hepatitis. GO-analysis of RNA-seq data indicates that cell cycle genes are downregulated in UTX/JMJD3-deleted NKT progenitors, and suggest that failed expansion may account for some of the cellular deficiency. The phenotype appears to be demethylase-dependent, because UTY, a homolog of UTX that lacks catalytic function, is not sufficient to restore their development and removal of H3K27me3 by deletion of EZH2 partially rescues the defect. NKT cell development and gene expression is sensitive to proper regulation of H3K27 methylation. The H3K27me3 demethylase enzymes, in particular UTX, promote NKT cell development, and are required for effective NKT function.

  18. Tissue Factor promotes breast cancer stem cell activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Hudhaifah; Harrison, Hannah; Clarke, Robert; Landberg, Goran; Bundred, Nigel J; Versteeg, Henri H; Kirwan, Cliona C

    2017-04-18

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cells that can self-renew and initiate tumours. The clotting-initiating protein Tissue Factor (TF) promotes metastasis and may be overexpressed in cancer cells with increased CSC activity. We sought to determine whether TF promotes breast CSC activity in vitro using human breast cancer cell lines. TF expression was compared in anoikis-resistant (CSC-enriched) and unselected cells. In cells sorted into of TF-expressing and TF-negative (FACS), and in cells transfected to knockdown TF (siRNA) and overexpress TF (cDNA), CSC activity was compared by (i) mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) (ii) holoclone colony formation (Hc) and (iii) ALDH1 activity. TF expression was increased in anoikis-resistant and high ALDH1-activity T47D cells compared to unselected cells. FACS sorted TF-expressing T47Ds and TF-overexpressing MCF7s had increased CSC activity compared to TF-low cells. TF siRNA cells (MDAMB231,T47D) had reduced CSC activity compared to control cells. FVIIa increased MFE and ALDH1 in a dose-dependent manner (MDAMB231, T47D). The effects of FVIIa on MFE were abrogated by TF siRNA (T47D). Breast CSCs (in vitro) demonstrate increased activity when selected for high TF expression, when induced to overexpress TF, and when stimulated (with FVIIa). Targeting the TF pathway in vivo may abrogate CSC activity.

  19. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  20. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. Dystroglycan is required for polarizing the epithelial cells and the oocyte in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Wu-Min; Schneider, Martina; Frock, Richard

    2003-01-01

    , and plays a role in linking the ECM to the actin cytoskeleton; however, how these interactions are regulated and their basic cellular functions are poorly understood. Using mosaic analysis and RNAi in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we show that Dystroglycan is required cell......-autonomously for cellular polarity in two different cell types, the epithelial cells (apicobasal polarity) and the oocyte (anteroposterior polarity). Loss of Dystroglycan function in follicle and disc epithelia results in expansion of apical markers to the basal side of cells and overexpression results in a reduced apical...... localization of these same markers. In Dystroglycan germline clones early oocyte polarity markers fail to be localized to the posterior, and oocyte cortical F-actin organization is abnormal. Dystroglycan is also required non-cell-autonomously to organize the planar polarity of basal actin in follicle cells...

  2. cAMP-dependent cell differentiation triggered by activated CRHR1 in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Bonfiglio, Juan José; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Senin, Sergio A; Armando, Natalia G; Deussing, Jan M; Silberstein, Susana

    2017-05-16

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Both cAMP sources were shown to be required for the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 triggered by activated G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) CRHR1 in neuronal and neuroendocrine contexts. Here, we show that activated CRHR1 promotes growth arrest and neurite elongation in neuronal hippocampal cells (HT22-CRHR1 cells). By characterising CRHR1 signalling mechanisms involved in the neuritogenic effect, we demonstrate that neurite outgrowth in HT22-CRHR1 cells takes place by a sAC-dependent, ERK1/2-independent signalling cascade. Both tmACs and sAC are involved in corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-mediated CREB phosphorylation and c-fos induction, but only sAC-generated cAMP pools are critical for the neuritogenic effect of CRH, further highlighting the engagement of two sources of cAMP downstream of the activation of a GPCR, and reinforcing the notion that restricted cAMP microdomains may regulate independent cellular processes.

  3. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo, E-mail: jbyue@me.com

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ●Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ●Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ●B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ●All Raf members are

  4. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ●Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ●Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ●B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ●All Raf members are

  5. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  6. Induction of aversive learning through thermogenetic activation of Kenyon cell ensembles in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eVasmer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila represents a model organism to analyze neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Kenyon cells of the Drosophila mushroom body are required for associative odor learning and memory retrieval. But is the mushroom body sufficient to acquire and retrieve an associative memory? To answer this question we have conceived an experimental approach to bypass olfactory sensory input and to thermogenetically activate sparse and random ensembles of Kenyon cells directly. We found that if the artifical activation of Kenyon cell ensembles coincides with a salient, aversive stimulus learning was induced The animals adjusted their behavior in a subsequent test situation and actively avoided reactivation of these Kenyon cells. Our results show that Kenyon cell activity in coincidence with a salient aversive stimulus can suffice to form an associative memory. Memory retrieval is characterized by a closed feedback loop between a behavioral action and the reactivation of sparse ensembles of Kenyon cells.

  7. Cdc42-dependent structural development of auditory supporting cells is required for wound healing at adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttonen, Tommi; Kirjavainen, Anna; Belevich, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Cdc42 regulates the initial establishment of cytoskeletal and junctional structures, but only little is known about its role at later stages of cellular differentiation. We studied Cdc42's role in vivo in auditory supporting cells, epithelial cells with high structural complexity. Cdc42 inactivat......, a process that is critical to scar formation. Thus, Cdc42 is required for structural differentiation of auditory supporting cells and this proper maturation is necessary for wound healing in adults....

  8. Cell Based GIS as Cellular Automata for Disaster Spreading Predictions and Required Data Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A method for prediction and simulation based on the Cell Based Geographic Information System(GIS as Cellular Automata (CA is proposed together with required data systems, in particular metasearch engine usage in an unified way. It is confirmed that the proposed cell based GIS as CA has flexible usage of the attribute information that is attached to the cell in concert with location information and does work for disaster spreading simulation and prediction.

  9. Modification of T cell responses by stem cell mobilization requires direct signaling of the T cell by G-CSF and IL-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Le Texier, Laetitia; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic stem cell transplants are currently undertaken using G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. G-CSF has diverse biological effects on a broad range of cells and IL-10 is a key regulator of many of these effects. Using mixed radiation chimeras in which...... the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartments were wild-type, IL-10(-/-), G-CSFR(-/-), or combinations thereof we demonstrated that the attenuation of alloreactive T cell responses after G-CSF mobilization required direct signaling of the T cell by both G-CSF and IL-10. IL-10 was generated principally by radio......, stem cell mobilization with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 did not alter the donor T cell's ability to induce acute GVHD. These studies provide an explanation for the effects of G-CSF on T cell function and demonstrate that IL-10 is required to license regulatory function but T cell production of IL-10...

  10. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0.05) w...

  11. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  12. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  13. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID, signifying class switch recombination (CSR. Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  14. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to be...

  15. 76 FR 69204 - Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity Reporting Requirements for Housing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... 1506-AB14 Anti-Money Laundering Program and Suspicious Activity Reporting Requirements for Housing... enterprises as financial institutions for the purpose of requiring them to establish anti-money laundering... organizations to establish anti-money laundering programs and report suspicious activities is intended to help...

  16. FORMATE-PYRUVATE EXCHANGE REACTION IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS. I. FACTOR REQUIREMENT FOR INTACT CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WOOD, N P; O'KANE, D J

    1964-01-01

    Wood, N. P. (A. & M. College of Texas, College Station), and D. J. O'Kane. Formate-pyruvate exchange reaction in Streptococcus faecalis. I. Factor requirement for whole cells. J. Bacteriol. 87:97-103. 1964.-A factor present in plant and animal sources was found necessary for the incorporation of formate-C(14) into pyruvate by Streptococcus faecalis 10Cl. Yeast extract produced a response linear in the range between 10 and 30 mg/ml of reaction mixture. Soy peptone, beef peptone, and Brain Heart Infusion replaced yeast extract, but various intermediates, cofactors, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and peptides did not stimulate the reaction. A lag occurred in the rate of formate incorporation that was not influenced by anaerobic conditions or growth of cells in a medium containing pyruvate and formate. Phosphate or maleate buffer permitted rapid exchange velocities but tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane or collidine buffer was inhibitory. Heating yeast extract at 121 C for 15 min in 3 n H(2)SO(4) produced 66% inactivation of the factor(s), whereas treatment with 3 n KOH produced 97% inactivation. The factor(s) was insoluble in butanol, benzene, ethyl acetate, or chloroform. The material adsorbed on Dowex-1 (OH(-)) and Amberlite IR-120 (H(+)) but not on Amberlite IR-4B (OH(-)). The active component(s) was highly polar, nonvolatile, dialyzable, and had amphoteric properties.

  17. Design requirements document for project W-520, immobilized low-activity waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-08-06

    This design requirements document (DRD) identifies the functions that must be performed to accept, handle, and dispose of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) private treatment contractors and close the facility. It identifies the requirements that are associated with those functions and that must be met. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized Low-Activity Waste disposal facility project (W-520) and provides traceability from the program-level requirements to the project design activity.

  18. Design requirements document for project W-520, immobilized low-activity waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    This design requirements document (DRD) identifies the functions that must be performed to accept, handle, and dispose of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) private treatment contractors and close the facility. It identifies the requirements that are associated with those functions and that must be met. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized Low-Activity Waste disposal facility project (W-520) and provides traceability from the program-level requirements to the project design activity

  19. The invisible addiction: Cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETNJI YAYA, LUC HONORE; MANOLIS, CHRIS

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: The primary objective of the present study was to investigate which cell-phone activities are associated with cell-phone addiction. No research to date has studied the full-range of cell-phone activities, and their relationship to cell-phone addiction, across male and female cell-phone users. Methods: College undergraduates (N = 164) participated in an online survey. Participants completed the questionnaire as part of their class requirements. The questionnaire took 10 and 15 minutes to complete and contained a measure of cell-phone addiction and questions that asked how much time participants spent daily on 24 cell-phone activities. Results: Findings revealed cell-phone activities that are associated significantly with cell-phone addiction (e.g., Instagram, Pinterest), as well as activities that one might logically assume would be associated with this form of addiction but are not (e.g., Internet use and Gaming). Cell-phone activities that drive cell-phone addiction (CPA) were found to vary considerably across male and female cell-phone users. Although a strong social component drove CPA for both males and females, the specific activities associated with CPA differed markedly. Conclusions: CPA amongst the total sample is largely driven by a desire to connect socially. The activities found to be associated with CPA, however, differed across the sexes. As the functionality of cell-phones continues to expand, addiction to this seemingly indispensable piece of technology becomes an increasingly realistic possibility. Future research must identify the activities that push cell-phone use beyond its “;tipping point” where it crosses the line from a helpful tool to one that undermines our personal well-being and that of others. PMID:25595966

  20. The invisible addiction: cell-phone activities and addiction among male and female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James A; Yaya, Luc Honore Petnji; Manolis, Chris

    2014-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to investigate which cell-phone activities are associated with cell-phone addiction. No research to date has studied the full-range of cell-phone activities, and their relationship to cell-phone addiction, across male and female cell-phone users. College undergraduates (N = 164) participated in an online survey. Participants completed the questionnaire as part of their class requirements. The questionnaire took 10 and 15 minutes to complete and contained a measure of cell-phone addiction and questions that asked how much time participants spent daily on 24 cell-phone activities. Findings revealed cell-phone activities that are associated significantly with cell-phone addiction (e.g., Instagram, Pinterest), as well as activities that one might logically assume would be associated with this form of addiction but are not (e.g., Internet use and Gaming). Cell-phone activities that drive cell-phone addiction (CPA) were found to vary considerably across male and female cell-phone users. Although a strong social component drove CPA for both males and females, the specific activities associated with CPA differed markedly. CPA amongst the total sample is largely driven by a desire to connect socially. The activities found to be associated with CPA, however, differed across the sexes. As the functionality of cell-phones continues to expand, addiction to this seemingly indispensable piece of technology becomes an increasingly realistic possibility. Future research must identify the activities that push cell-phone use beyond its “tipping point” where it crosses the line from a helpful tool to one that undermines our personal well-being and that of others.

  1. Dendritic cell, monocyte and T cell activation and response to glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Hesse, D; Limborg, S

    2012-01-01

    , monocytes and dendritic cells (DC) in relation to disease activity in MS patients treated with GA. Methods: Flow cytometry was used to study the activation of CD4+ T cells and T cell subsets (CD25high and CD26high cells), monocytes and DCs in a cross-sectional study of 39 untreated and 29 GA-treated MS...

  2. Mapping of ESE-1 subdomains required to initiate mammary epithelial cell transformation via a cytoplasmic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tentler John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ETS family transcription factor ESE-1 is often overexpressed in human breast cancer. ESE-1 initiates transformation of MCF-12A cells via a non-transcriptional, cytoplasmic process that is mediated by a unique 40-amino acid serine and aspartic acid rich (SAR subdomain, whereas, ESE-1's nuclear transcriptional property is required to maintain the transformed phenotype of MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D breast cancer cells. Results To map the minimal functional nuclear localization (NLS and nuclear export (NES signals, we fused in-frame putative NLS and NES motifs between GFP and the SAR domain. Using these GFP constructs as reporters of subcellular localization, we mapped a single NLS to six basic amino acids (242HGKRRR247 in the AT-hook and two CRM1-dependent NES motifs, one to the pointed domain (NES1: 102LCNCALEELRL112 and another to the DNA binding domain (DBD, (NES2: 275LWEFIRDILI284. Moreover, analysis of a putative NLS located in the DBD (316GQKKKNSN323 by a similar GFP-SAR reporter or by internal deletion of the DBD, revealed this sequence to lack NLS activity. To assess the role of NES2 in regulating ESE-1 subcellular localization and subsequent transformation potency, we site-specifically mutagenized NES2, within full-length GFP-ESE-1 and GFP-NES2-SAR reporter constructs. These studies show that site-specific mutation of NES2 completely abrogates ESE-1 transforming activity. Furthermore, we show that exclusive cytoplasmic targeting of the SAR domain is sufficient to initiate transformation, and we report that an intact SAR domain is required, since block mutagenesis reveals that an intact SAR domain is necessary to maintain its full transforming potency. Finally, using a monoclonal antibody targeting the SAR domain, we demonstrate that the SAR domain contains a region accessible for protein - protein interactions. Conclusions These data highlight that ESE-1 contains NLS and NES signals that play a critical role in

  3. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N.; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2012-01-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15–transduced NKT cells. PMID:22565311

  4. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2012-06-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15-transduced NKT cells.

  5. The Adaptor Protein and Arf GTPase-activating Protein Cat-1/Git-1 Is Required for Cellular Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sungsoo M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Cat-1/Git-1 is a multifunctional protein that acts as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Arf GTPases, as well as serves as a scaffold for a number of different signaling proteins. Cat-1 is best known for its role in regulating cell shape and promoting cell migration. However, whether Cat-1 might also contribute to cellular transformation is currently unknown. Here we show that ∼95% of cervical tumor samples examined overexpress Cat-1, suggesting that the up-regulation of Cat-1 expression is a frequent occurrence in this type of cancer. We demonstrate further that knocking down Cat-1 from NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing an activated form of Cdc42 (Cdc42 F28L), or from the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line, inhibits the ability of these cells to form colonies in soft agar, an in vitro measure of tumorgenicity. The requirement for Cat-1 when assaying the anchorage-independent growth of transformed fibroblasts and HeLa cells is dependent on its ability to bind paxillin, while being negatively impacted by its Arf-GAP activity. Moreover, the co-expression of Cat-1 and an activated form of Arf6 in fibroblasts was sufficient to induce their transformation. These findings highlight novel roles for Cat-1 and its interactions with the Arf GTPases and paxillin in oncogenic transformation. PMID:22807447

  6. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanan eGreenman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non cell-autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX as a non cell-autonomous regulator of neural stem cell proliferation. ATX (also known as ENPP2 is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA.

  7. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Raanan; Gorelik, Anna; Sapir, Tamar; Baumgart, Jan; Zamor, Vanessa; Segal-Salto, Michal; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Aidinis, Vassilis; Aoki, Junken; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Reiner, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non-cell autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX) as a non-cell autonomous regulator of neural stem cells. ATX (also known as ENPP2) is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA.

  8. Streptococcus salivarius-mediated CD8+T cell stimulation required antigen presentation by macrophages in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Yang, Lina; Mao, Xiaohe; Li, Zaiye; Lin, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Canhua

    2018-05-15

    It has been shown that the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients presented cytotoxic CD8 T cell response against Streptococcus salivarius (S. salivarius), of which the frequency was positively associated with recurrence-free survival in OSCC patients. To identify the conditions required for regulating S. salivarius-specific CD8 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we selectively depleted individual components of the PBMCs, and observed that the depletion of monocytes/macrophages, but not other immune cell subsets, significantly downregulated the S. salivarius-specific CD8 T cell cytotoxicity. Monocyte/macrophage alone was sufficient to reconstitute optimal granzyme B expression from S. salivarius-specific CD8 T cells. Also, both the memory and the naive CD8 T cells reacted to S. salivarius-stimulation, with the memory CD8 T cells presenting significantly higher S. salivarius-reactivity. Using M1- and M2-polarized macrophages from circulating monocytes, we found that M1-polarized macrophages, with significantly higher IL-12 expression and significantly lower IL-10 and MHC class II molecule expression, was more effective at promoting granzyme B responses in CD8 T cells, and required CD80/CD86 costimulating molecules for optimal responses. Interestingly, the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) from resected tumors presented characteristics of M2-polarized macrophages with high MHC class II expression and low IL-12 secretion. The frequency of tumor-infiltrating S. salivarius-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cell was inversely correlated with the level of IL-10 secretion and the MHC class II molecule expression in autologous TAMs. Together, we demonstrated that monocyte/macrophages presented essential antigen-presentation and costimulatory roles in CD8 T cell-mediated S. salivarius-specific granzyme B responses, and the polarization of macrophages could influence the potency of CD8 T cell responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc

  9. Requirement for CD40 ligand, CD4(+) T cells, and B cells in an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, J W; Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, J P

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68) results in productive infection of the lung, the establishment of latency in B lymphocytes and other cell types, transient splenomegaly, and prolonged clonal expansion of activated CD8(+) CD62L(lo) T cells, particularly a Vbeta4...

  10. Ecto-ATPase activity of vertebrate blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, D C; Yates, T J; Ingermann, R L

    1997-01-01

    Ecto-ATPase activity was measured for red blood cells, white blood cells, and whole blood from a variety of vertebrates. A large range of red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity was observed; for example, at 10 degrees C, red blood cells from a catastomid fish (Catostomus macrocheilus) and a newt (Taricha rivularis) had activities of 56 +/- 9 and 25,000,000 +/- 14,000,000 pmol ATP per 10(6) red blood cells per hour, respectively (mean +/- SD). Several control experiments verified that the measured ATPase activity was not the result of intracellular ATPases released due to cell damage or lysis nor due to the release of intracellular nucleoside triphosphate or uptake of extracellular ATP. Red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity was relatively low within the teleosts, was high within the reptiles, and had the greatest range and single highest value within the amphibians. Within the endotherms, avian red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities were greater than mammalian red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities, which were the lowest for all vertebrates examined. The lowest ecto-ATPase activities measured were for human and skunk red blood cells, which had activities of 13 +/- 1 and 11 +/- 2 pmol ATP per 10(6) red blood cells per hour, respectively, at 35 degrees C. Ecto-ATPase activity was measured in white blood cells of several vertebrate species and appeared generally high and less variable than red blood cell ecto-ATPase activity. Measured whole blood ecto-ATPase activity showed a range of three orders of magnitude and correlated positively with red blood cell ecto-ATPase activities. Ecto-ATPase activity was also determined for red blood cells from fetal, 1-3 d old neonatal, and pregnant garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans); these activities were not significantly different from the activity of red blood cells from nonpregnant adult females. Overall, the data from the present study demonstrate a wide range of red blood cell and whole blood ecto-ATPase activities among vertebrates

  11. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  12. Platelet-derived stromal cell-derived factor-1 is required for the transformation of circulating monocytes into multipotential cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Seta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14(+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs, which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s derived from circulating CD14(- cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. METHODS: We cultured CD14(+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14(- peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. RESULTS: The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1's critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14(+CXCR4(high cell population. CONCLUSION: The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs.

  13. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis.

  14. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhu Xiong

    Full Text Available The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL, encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone.

  15. Notch2 is required for inflammatory cytokine-driven goblet cell metaplasia in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danahay, Henry; Pessotti, Angelica D; Coote, Julie; Montgomery, Brooke E; Xia, Donghui; Wilson, Aaron; Yang, Haidi; Wang, Zhao; Bevan, Luke; Thomas, Chris; Petit, Stephanie; London, Anne; LeMotte, Peter; Doelemeyer, Arno; Vélez-Reyes, Germán L; Bernasconi, Paula; Fryer, Christy J; Edwards, Matt; Capodieci, Paola; Chen, Amy; Hild, Marc; Jaffe, Aron B

    2015-01-13

    The balance and distribution of epithelial cell types is required to maintain tissue homeostasis. A hallmark of airway diseases is epithelial remodeling, leading to increased goblet cell numbers and an overproduction of mucus. In the conducting airway, basal cells act as progenitors for both secretory and ciliated cells. To identify mechanisms regulating basal cell fate, we developed a screenable 3D culture system of airway epithelial morphogenesis. We performed a high-throughput screen using a collection of secreted proteins and identified inflammatory cytokines that specifically biased basal cell differentiation toward a goblet cell fate, culminating in enhanced mucus production. We also demonstrate a specific requirement for Notch2 in cytokine-induced goblet cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that inhibition of Notch2 prevents goblet cell metaplasia induced by a broad range of stimuli and propose Notch2 neutralization as a therapeutic strategy for preventing goblet cell metaplasia in airway diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mucus secretion-stimulating activity in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemann-Kloene, H; Krag, S S; Bang, F B

    1982-08-20

    Two fractions isolated from cultured lymphoblastoid cells stimulated mucus secretion from the urn cell complex of the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus. The activity detected in the nuclear fraction was trypsin-sensitive, and it increased in response to specific nucleotides.

  17. Tumour metastasis as an adaptation of tumour cells to fulfil their phosphorus requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Caramujo, Maria José

    2012-05-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a vital component of nucleotides, membrane phospholipids, and phosphorylated intermediates in cellular signalling. The Growth Rate Hypothesis (GRH) states that fast growing organisms should be richer in phosphorus (relatively low C:P and N:P cell content) than slow developing organisms as a result of high ribosome biogenesis. Cells that proliferate rapidly, such as cancer cells, require a high amount of ribosomes and other P-rich RNA components that are necessary to manufacture proteins. The GRH hypothesis may be applied to cancer predicting that tumour cells are richer in phosphorus than the surrounding tissue, and that they resort to metastasis in order to meet their nutrient demands. Considering that the cells most P-deprived should be located in the inner parts of the tumour we propose that changes in the membrane of these cells favour the detachment of the more peripheral cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of mast cell activation by complement-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Andrásfalvy, Márton; Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel

    2004-03-29

    It is known for more than 25 years that the complement-derived anaphylatoxic peptides, C3a, C4a and C5a are potent activators of basophils and certain types of mast cells. Although tissue distribution of receptors for C3a and C5a well exceeds myeloid cells, apparently they are not expressed on mucosal type mast cells, consequently these cells are not activated by C3a and C5a. Our results do however demonstrate that C3a and peptides related to this complement activation product are able to inhibit FcRI-clustering induced activation of mucosal type mast cells-such as RBL-2H3 cells and bone-marrow derived mast cells. Based on the current results we propose the presence of separate "activator" and "inhibitor" sequence motifs in C3a which are in balance under physiologic conditions.

  19. Invariant NKT cells are required for airway inflammation induced by environmental antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Wingender, Gerhard; Rogers, Paul; Batzer, Glenda; Lee, Myung Steve; Bai, Dong; Pei, Bo; Khurana, Archana; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Horner, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions. In this study, we report that a majority of sterile house dust extracts (HDEs) tested contained antigens capable of activating mouse and human iNKT cells. HDEs had adjuvant-like properties in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model, which were dependent on V?14i NKT cells, as vaccinated animals deficient for iNKT cells displayed significantly attenuated immune responses and airway ...

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  1. Function of adhesion molecules lymphocyte function-associated antigen-3 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human epidermal Langerhans cells in antigen-specific T cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, M. B.; Rongen, H. A.; Bos, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    In addition to the interaction between the TCR and the MHC/Ag complex on the APC, optimal T cell activation also requires interaction between adhesion molecules on the APC and their ligands on T cells. We determined the presence of adhesion molecules on human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) and

  2. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Requirements and testing methods for surfaces of metallic bipolar plates for low-temperature PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendras, P.; Lötsch, K.; von Unwerth, T.

    2017-03-01

    To reduce emissions and to substitute combustion engines automotive manufacturers, legislature and first users aspire hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Up to now the focus of research was set on ensuring functionality and increasing durability of fuel cell components. Therefore, expensive materials were used. Contemporary research and development try to substitute these substances by more cost-effective material combinations. The bipolar plate is a key component with the greatest influence on volume and mass of a fuel cell stack and they have to meet complex requirements. They support bending sensitive components of stack, spread reactants over active cell area and form the electrical contact to another cell. Furthermore, bipolar plates dissipate heat of reaction and separate one cell gastight from the other. Consequently, they need a low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) to the gas diffusion layer, high flexural strength, good thermal conductivity and a high durability. To reduce costs stainless steel is a favoured material for bipolar plates in automotive applications. Steel is characterized by good electrical and thermal conductivity but the acid environment requires a high chemical durability against corrosion as well. On the one hand formation of a passivating oxide layer increasing ICR should be inhibited. On the other hand pitting corrosion leading to increased permeation rate may not occur. Therefore, a suitable substrate lamination combination is wanted. In this study material testing methods for bipolar plates are considered.

  4. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoting Zhao, Yinan Guo, Wentao Yue, Lina Zhang, Meng Gu, Yue Wang Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Beijing TB and Thoracic Tumor Research Institute/Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4, is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods: ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion: ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. Keywords: ABCC4, cell proliferation, lung cancer, cell cycle

  5. Bim Regulates Alloimmune-Mediated Vascular Injury Through Effects on T Cell Activation and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rossum, Anna; Enns, Winnie; Shi, Yu P.; MacEwan, Grace E.; Malekesmaeli, Mehrnoush; Brinkman, Ryan; Choy, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bim is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein known to down-regulate immune responses and to also be required for antigen-induced T cell activation. However, it is not known how the effect of Bim on these offsetting processes determines the outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We have defined the role of Bim in regulating alloantigen-driven T cell responses in a model of vascular rejection. Approach and Results Bim was required for proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells, and for IL-2 production, in T cells stimulated with alloantigen in vitro. Moreover, a partial reduction in Bim expression was sufficient to attenuate T cell activation whereas a complete elimination of Bim was required to prevent CD4 T cell death in response to cytokine withdrawl. When alloimmune-mediated vascular rejection was examined using an aortic interposition model, there was significantly less intimal thickening in Bim+/−, but not Bim−/−, graft recipients. T cell proliferation in response to allograft arteries was significantly reduced in both Bim+/− and Bim−/− mice, but cell death was attenuated only in Bim−/− animals. Conclusions Bim controls both T cell activation and death in response to alloantigen stimulation. These processes act cooperatively to determine the outcome of immune responses in allograft arteries. PMID:24700126

  6. Bim regulates alloimmune-mediated vascular injury through effects on T-cell activation and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rossum, Anna; Enns, Winnie; Shi, Yu P; MacEwan, Grace E; Malekesmaeli, Mehrnoush; Brinkman, Ryan; Choy, Jonathan C

    2014-06-01

    Bim is a proapoptotic Bcl-2 protein known to downregulate immune responses and to also be required for antigen-induced T-cell activation. However, it is not known how the effect of Bim on these offsetting processes determines the outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We have defined the role of Bim in regulating alloantigen-driven T-cell responses in a model of vascular rejection. Bim was required for proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells, and for interleukin-2 production, in T cells stimulated with alloantigen in vitro. Moreover, a partial reduction in Bim expression was sufficient to attenuate T-cell activation, whereas a complete elimination of Bim was required to prevent CD4 T-cell death in response to cytokine withdrawl. When alloimmune-mediated vascular rejection was examined using an aortic interposition model, there was significantly less intimal thickening in Bim(+/-), but not Bim(-/-), graft recipients. T-cell proliferation in response to allograft arteries was significantly reduced in both Bim(+/-) and Bim(-/-) mice, but cell death was attenuated only in Bim(-/-) animals. Bim controls both T-cell activation and death in response to alloantigen stimulation. These processes act cooperatively to determine the outcome of immune responses in allograft arteries. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. H(+)/K(+) ATPase activity is required for biomineralization in sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzberg, Daphne; Lawton, Matthew; Hadyniak, Sarah E; Ross, Erik J; Carney, Tamara; Beane, Wendy S; Levin, Michael; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2015-10-15

    The bioelectrical signatures associated with regeneration, wound healing, development, and cancer are changes in the polarization state of the cell that persist over long durations, and are mediated by ion channel activity. To identify physiologically relevant bioelectrical changes that occur during normal development of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, we tested a range of ion channel inhibitors, and thereby identified SCH28080, a chemical inhibitor of the H(+)/K(+) ATPase (HKA), as an inhibitor of skeletogenesis. In sea urchin embryos, the primary mesodermal lineage, the PMCs, produce biomineral in response to signals from the ectoderm. However, in SCH28080-treated embryos, aside from randomization of the left-right axis, the ectoderm is normally specified and differentiated, indicating that the block to skeletogenesis observed in SCH28080-treated embryos is PMC-specific. HKA inhibition did not interfere with PMC specification, and was sufficient to block continuing biomineralization when embryos were treated with SCH28080 after the initiation of skeletogenesis, indicating that HKA activity is continuously required during biomineralization. Ion concentrations and voltage potential were abnormal in the PMCs in SCH28080-treated embryos, suggesting that these bioelectrical abnormalities prevent biomineralization. Our results indicate that this effect is due to the inhibition of amorphous calcium carbonate precipitation within PMC vesicles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A rapid and sensitive method for measuring N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mauri

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method to quantitatively assess N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG activity in cultured cells is highly desirable for both basic research and clinical studies. NAG activity is deficient in cells from patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB due to mutations in NAGLU, the gene that encodes NAG. Currently available techniques for measuring NAG activity in patient-derived cell lines include chromogenic and fluorogenic assays and provide a biochemical method for the diagnosis of MPS IIIB. However, standard protocols require large amounts of cells, cell disruption by sonication or freeze-thawing, and normalization to the cellular protein content, resulting in an error-prone procedure that is material- and time-consuming and that produces highly variable results. Here we report a new procedure for measuring NAG activity in cultured cells. This procedure is based on the use of the fluorogenic NAG substrate, 4-Methylumbelliferyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MUG, in a one-step cell assay that does not require cell disruption or post-assay normalization and that employs a low number of cells in 96-well plate format. We show that the NAG one-step cell assay greatly discriminates between wild-type and MPS IIIB patient-derived fibroblasts, thus providing a rapid method for the detection of deficiencies in NAG activity. We also show that the assay is sensitive to changes in NAG activity due to increases in NAGLU expression achieved by either overexpressing the transcription factor EB (TFEB, a master regulator of lysosomal function, or by inducing TFEB activation chemically. Because of its small format, rapidity, sensitivity and reproducibility, the NAG one-step cell assay is suitable for multiple procedures, including the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries to identify modulators of NAG expression, folding and activity, and the investigation of candidate molecules and constructs for applications in

  9. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific

  10. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor G Martínez

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application.

  11. Activation mechanisms of natural killer cells during influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilwoong Hwang

    Full Text Available During early viral infection, activation of natural killer (NK cells elicits the effector functions of target cell lysis and cytokine production. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to NK cell activation during viral infections are incompletely understood. In this study, using a model of acute viral infection, we investigated the mechanisms controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production in response to influenza (flu virus. Analysis of cytokine receptor deficient mice demonstrated that type I interferons (IFNs, but not IL-12 or IL-18, were critical for the NK cell expression of both IFN-γ and granzyme B in response to flu infection. Further, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that NK cell activation was mediated by type I IFNs acting directly on NK cells. Analysis of signal transduction molecules showed that during flu infection, STAT1 activation in NK cells was completely dependent on direct type I IFN signaling, whereas STAT4 activation was only partially dependent. In addition, granzyme B induction in NK cells was mediated by signaling primarily through STAT1, but not STAT4, while IFN-γ production was mediated by signaling through STAT4, but not STAT1. Therefore, our findings demonstrate the importance of direct action of type I IFNs on NK cells to mount effective NK cell responses in the context of flu infection and delineate NK cell signaling pathways responsible for controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production.

  12. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C Duwaerts

    Full Text Available Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry, mRNA expression (qtPCR, nitric oxide (NO (. production (Griess reaction, and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs were determined. To address the potential role of NO (. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (. , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury.

  13. Invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis activates human peripheral B cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, E; Carballeira, N; Vazquez, R; Dubinina, E; Bränden, H; Persson, H; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cell surface-located protein invasin was found to promote binding between the pathogen and resting peripheral B cells via beta 1 integrin receptors (CD29). B cells responded by expressing several activation markers and by growing, In contrast, T cells did not react, although these cells express CD29. An isogenic invA mutant failed to activate B cells. The mutation could be complemented by providing the invA+ gene in trans. Purified invasin alone did not activat...

  14. Resident Bacteria-Stimulated Interleukin-10-Secreting B Cells Ameliorate T-Cell-Mediated Colitis by Inducing T-Regulatory-1 Cells That Require Interleukin-27 SignalingSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Mishima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The regulatory roles of interleukin-10 (IL10-producing B cells in colitis are not fully understood, so we explored the molecular mechanisms by which these cells modulate mucosal homeostasis. Methods: CD4+ T cells from wild-type (WT, Il10−/−, or Il27ra−/− mice were cotransferred with B cells from specific pathogen-free (SPF or germ-free (GF WT or Il10−/− mice into Rag2−/−Il10−/−(double-knockout mice, and the severity of colitis and intestinal regulatory T-cell populations were characterized. In vitro, WT or Il10−/− B cells were cocultured with unfractionated, naïve or regulatory T cells plus Il10−/− antigen-presenting cells and stimulated with cecal bacterial lysate (CBL with or without IL27 or anti-IL10R blockade. Gene expressions, cytokines in the supernatant and cell populations were assessed. Results: WT but not Il10−/− B cells attenuated T helper cell TH1/TH17-mediated colitis in double-knockout mice that also received WT but not Il10−/− T cells. In vitro, CBL-stimulated WT B cells secrete abundant IL10 and suppress interferon-γ (IFNγ and IL17a-production by T cells without requiring cell contact. Although both WT and Il10−/− B cells induced Foxp3+CD4+ T-regulatory cells, only WT B cells induced IL10-producing (Foxp3-negative T regulatory-1 (Tr-1 cells both in vivo and in vitro. However, IL10-producing B cells did not attenuate colitis or induce Tr-1 cells in the absence of T cell IL27 signaling in vivo. WT B cell-dependent Tr-1 induction and concomitant decreased IFNγ-secretion were also mediated by T-cell IL27-signaling in vitro. Conclusions: IL10-secreting B cells activated by physiologically relevant bacteria ameliorate T-cell-mediated colitis and contribute to intestinal homeostasis by suppressing effector T cells and inducing Tr-1 cells via IL27-signaling on T cells. Keywords: Experimental

  15. GM-CSF produced by nonhematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2013-02-15

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, as well as dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn's disease in humans and colitis in murine models has mainly been considered to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF-deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type mice, caused marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF(-/-) mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Nonhematopoietic cells, and not myeloid cells, produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury, as revealed by bone marrow chimera and dendritic cell-depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell-produced GM-CSF has a novel nonredundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium.

  16. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58...

  17. Transcription factor miz-1 is required to regulate interleukin-7 receptor signaling at early commitment stages of B cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, Christian; Saba, Ingrid; Godmann, Maren; Herold, Stefanie; Herkert, Barbara; Eilers, Martin; Möröy, Tarik

    2010-12-14

    B cell development requires the coordinated action of transcription factors and cytokines, in particular interleukin-7 (IL-7). We report that mice lacking the POZ (Poxvirus and zinc finger) domain of the transcription factor Miz-1 (Zbtb17(ΔPOZ/ΔPOZ)) almost entirely lacked follicular B cells, as shown by the fact that their progenitors failed to activate the Jak-Stat5 pathway and to upregulate the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2 upon IL-7 stimulation. We show that Miz-1 exerted a dual role in the interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) pathway by directly repressing the Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (Socs1) and by activating Bcl2 expression. Zbtb17(ΔPOZ/ΔPOZ) (Miz-1-deficient) B cell progenitors had low expression of early B cell genes as transcription factor 3 (Tcf3) and early B cell factor 1 (Ebf1) and showed a propensity for apoptosis. Only the combined re-expression of Bcl2 and Ebf1 could reconstitute the ability of Miz-1-deficient precursors to develop into CD19(+) B cells.

  18. Negative selection of self-reactive chicken B cells requires B cell receptor signaling and is independent of the bursal microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davani, Dariush; Pancer, Zeev; Cheroutre, Hilde; Ratcliffe, Michael J H

    2014-04-01

    Although the negative selection of self-reactive B cells in the bone marrow of mammals has been clearly demonstrated, it remains unclear in models of gut-associated B cell lymphopoiesis, such as that of the chicken (Gallus gallus). We have generated chicken surface IgM-related receptors in which the diversity region of the lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) has been fused to the C region of chicken surface IgM (Tμ). Expression of a VLR:Tμ receptor with specificity for PE supported normal development of B cells, whereas a VLR:Tμ receptor specific to hen egg lysozyme (a self-antigen with respect to chicken B cells) induced, in vivo, complete deletion of VLR(HEL)Tμ-expressing B cells. In ovo i.v. injection of PE resulted in deletion of VLR(PE)Tμ-expressing Β cells in the embryo spleen, demonstrating that negative selection was independent of the bursal microenvironment. Although chickens transduced with a murine CD8α:chicken Igα fusion protein contained B cells expressing mCD8α:chIgα, cotransfection of the mCD8α:chIgα construct, together with thymus leukemia Ag (a natural ligand for mCD8α), resulted in reduced levels of mCD8α:chIgα-expressing B cells in inverse proportion to the levels of thymus leukemia Ag-expressing cells. Deletion of mCD8α:chIgα-expressing cells was specific for B cells and required active signaling downstream of the mCD8α:chIgα receptor. Ag-mediated negative selection of developing chicken B cells can therefore occur independently of the bursal microenvironment and is dependent on signaling downstream of the BCR.

  19. Automatic counting of microglial cell activation and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz I Gallego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by the damage and death of the retinal ganglion cells. This disease results in vision loss and blindness. Any vision loss resulting from the disease cannot be restored and nowadays there is no available cure for glaucoma; however an early detection and treatment, could offer neuronal protection and avoid later serious damages to the visual function. A full understanding of the etiology of the disease will still require the contribution of many scientific efforts. Glial activation has been observed in glaucoma, being microglial proliferation a hallmark in this neurodegenerative disease. A typical project studying these cellular changes involved in glaucoma often needs thousands of images - from several animals - covering different layers and regions of the retina. The gold standard to evaluate them is the manual count. This method requires a large amount of time from specialized personnel. It is a tedious process and prone to human error. We present here a new method to count microglial cells by using a computer algorithm. It counts in one hour the same number of images that a researcher counts in four weeks, with no loss of reliability.

  20. Cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways are required for adaptation of Alternaria brassicicola to cell wall stress caused by brassicaceous indolic phytoalexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Aymeric; Bataille-Simoneau, Nelly; Campion, Claire; Guillemette, Thomas; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Iacomi-Vasilescu, Béatrice; Leroy, Thibault; Pochon, Stéphanie; Poupard, Pascal; Simoneau, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Camalexin, the characteristic phytoalexin of Arabidopsis thaliana, inhibits growth of the fungal necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola. This plant metabolite probably exerts its antifungal toxicity by causing cell membrane damage. Here we observed that activation of a cellular response to this damage requires cell wall integrity (CWI) and the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathways. Camalexin was found to activate both AbHog1 and AbSlt2 MAP kinases, and activation of the latter was abrogated in a AbHog1 deficient strain. Mutant strains lacking functional MAP kinases showed hypersensitivity to camalexin and brassinin, a structurally related phytoalexin produced by several cultivated Brassica species. Enhanced susceptibility to the membrane permeabilization activity of camalexin was observed for MAP kinase deficient mutants. These results suggest that the two signalling pathways have a pivotal role in regulating a cellular compensatory response to preserve cell integrity during exposure to camalexin. AbHog1 and AbSlt2 deficient mutants had reduced virulence on host plants that may, at least for the latter mutants, partially result from their inability to cope with defence metabolites such as indolic phytoalexins. This constitutes the first evidence that a phytoalexin activates fungal MAP kinases and that outputs of activated cascades contribute to protecting the fungus against antimicrobial plant metabolites. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Natural Killer Cells and Their Activation Status in Normal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mosimann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased peripheral blood-activated NK cell counts are associated with increased risk of miscarriage and failed in vitro fertilization treatment. However, assessment of activated peripheral NK cells in normal and pathological pregnancies beyond implantation and early miscarriage has not been described. Total CD69 expressing NK cells counts were measured by flow cytometry in healthy women with singleton pregnancies, including 45 at 11+6–13+6 weeks’ gestation, 46 at 20+0–22+4 weeks, and 42 at 31+6–33+5 weeks. The number of peripheral blood NK cells decreased, whereas the percentage of activated CD69 expressing NK cells increased from the first to the third trimester of pregnancy. This study shows the course of peripheral blood NK cells and activated CD69 expressing NK cells in uncomplicated nulliparous singleton pregnancies. This is a first step in understanding their implication in pathological pregnancies.

  2. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm. © FASEB.

  3. Effect of p53 activation on cell growth, thymidine kinase-1 activity, and 3'-deoxy-3'fluorothymidine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Tamura, Yasuko; Jordan, Robert; Grierson, John R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of thymidine (TdR) and thymidine analogs such as 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine (FLT) as positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers of tumor proliferation rate is based on the hypothesis that measurement of uptake of these nucleosides, a function primarily of thymidine kinase-1 (TK 1 ) activity, provides an accurate measure of cell proliferation in tumors. Tumor growth is influenced by many factors including the oxygen concentration within tumors and whether tumor cells have been exposed to cytotoxic therapies. The p53 gene plays an important role in regulating growth under both of these conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of p53 activation on cell growth, TK 1 activity, and FLT uptake. To accomplish this, TK 1 activity, S phase fraction, and the uptake of FLT were determined in plateau-phase and exponentially growing cultures of an isogenic pair of human tumor cell lines in which p53 expression was normal or inactivated by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 expression. Ionizing radiation exposure was used to stimulate p53 activity and to induce alterations in cell cycle progression. We found that exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induced dose-dependent changes in cell cycle progression in both cell lines. The relationship between S phase percentage, TK 1 activity, and FLT uptake were essentially unchanged in the p53-normal cell line. In contrast, TK 1 activity and FLT uptake remained high in the p53-deficient variant even when S phase percentage was low due to a p53-dependent G2 arrest. We conclude that a functional p53 response is required to maintain the normal relationship between TK1 activity and S phase percentage following radiation exposure

  4. Maintenance of Clonogenic KIT+ Human Colon Tumor Cells Requires Secretion of Stem Cell Factor by Differentiated Tumor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatrai, Szabolcs; Van Schelven, Susanne J.; Ubink, Inge; Govaert, Klaas M.; Raats, Danielle; Koster, Jan; Verheem, Andre; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kranenburg, Onno

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon tumors contain a fraction of undifferentiated stem cell-like cancer cells with high tumorigenic potential. Little is known about the signals that maintain these stem-like cells. We investigated whether differentiated tumor cells provide support. Methods We established

  5. Mimicking cell/extracellular matrix adhesion with lipid membranes and solid substrates: requirements, pitfalls and proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Damien; Vezy, Cyrille; Viallat, Annie; Bassereau, Patricia; Nassoy, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    The interest in physical approaches to the study of cell adhesion has generated numerous recent works on the development of substrates mimicking the extracellular matrix and the use of giant synthetic liposomes, commonly considered as basic models of living cells. The use of well-characterized bioactive substrates and artificial cells should allow us to gain new insight into the cell-extracellular matrix interactions, provided that their biomimetic relevance has been really proved. The aim of this paper is to define some minimal requirements for effective biomimetic features and to propose simple adhesion assays. We show, for instance, that immobilization of specific ligands is sometimes not sufficient to ensure specific adhesion of cells expressing the corresponding receptors. By investigating comparatively the adhesive behaviour of decorated erythrocytes and vesicles, we also discuss the potentialities and limitations of synthetic vesicles as test cells.

  6. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

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    Jong W Yu

    Full Text Available CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  7. Nutritional requirements for methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells and growing cells of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500

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    Phisit Seesuriyachan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 possesses cytoplasmic azoreductase and can breakdown azo bonds under microaerophilic condition. It was found previously that a growing culture is more tolerant to a high initial dye concentration than freely suspended cells supplied only with sucrose. The present study is aimed at investigating the nutritive requirements for decolourisation by the growing cells and the freely suspended cells using Plackett-Burmann experimental design. In this study, the composition of the medium was found to play an important role in methyl orange decolourisation and biomass production. Sucrose, meat extract and peptone increased methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells, whereas sodium acetate exerted a negative effect on decolourisation. In addition, it was observed that the yeast and meat extracts enhanced the degradation of the dye by the growing cells. Sucrose was an important factor in biomass production by freely suspended cells and growing cells. On the other hand, dipotassium hydrogen phosphate and sodium acetate decreased the biomass production. These findings promote the understanding and knowledge about the requirements of azo dye decolourisation by Lactobacillus casei.

  8. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

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    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  9. Murine Hepatitis Virus nsp14 Exoribonuclease Activity Is Required for Resistance to Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, James Brett; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Lu, Xiaotao; Graepel, Kevin W; Sexton, Nicole R; Smith, Everett Clinton; Weiss, Susan R; Denison, Mark R

    2018-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-sense RNA viruses that infect numerous mammalian and avian species and are capable of causing severe and lethal disease in humans. CoVs encode several innate immune antagonists that counteract the host innate immune response to facilitate efficient viral replication. CoV nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) encodes 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity (ExoN), which performs a proofreading function and is required for high-fidelity replication. Outside of the order Nidovirales , arenaviruses are the only RNA viruses that encode an ExoN, which functions to degrade double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) replication intermediates. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CoV ExoN also functions to antagonize the innate immune response. We demonstrate that viruses lacking ExoN activity [ExoN(-)] are sensitive to cellular pretreatment with interferon beta (IFN-β) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ExoN(-) virus replication was attenuated in wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and partially restored in interferon alpha/beta receptor-deficient (IFNAR -/- ) BMMs. ExoN(-) virus replication did not result in IFN-β gene expression, and in the presence of an IFN-β-mediated antiviral state, ExoN(-) viral RNA levels were not substantially reduced relative to those of untreated samples. However, ExoN(-) virus generated from IFN-β-pretreated cells had reduced specific infectivity and decreased relative fitness, suggesting that ExoN(-) virus generated during an antiviral state is less viable to establish a subsequent infection. Overall, our data suggest murine hepatitis virus (MHV) ExoN activity is required for resistance to the innate immune response, and antiviral mechanisms affecting the viral RNA sequence and/or an RNA modification act on viruses lacking ExoN activity. IMPORTANCE CoVs encode multiple antagonists that prevent or disrupt an efficient innate immune response. Additionally, no specific antiviral therapies or vaccines

  10. Distinct accessory cell requirements define two types of rat T cell hybridomas specific for unique determinants in the encephalitogenic 68-86 region of myelin basic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannie, M.D.; Paterson, P.Y.; Thomas, D.W.; Nairn, R.

    1990-01-01

    Six clonotypically unique T cell hybridomas from Lewis rats were used to study accessory cell activities required for class II MHC restricted T cell responses to the 68-86 encephalitogenic sequence of myelin basic protein (MBP). T cell hybrids which were cultured with GP68-86 68-86 sequence of guinea pig MBP (GPMBP) and naive splenocytes (SPL) were induced to produce IL-2 as measured by the CTLL indicator cell line. The hybrids were categorized into two subsets (designated THYB-1 and THYB-2), because two distinct subset-specific pathways of communication between accessory cells and T cells were involved in GPMBP-induced IL-2 production. These pathways were distinguished by the following six observations. First, when the duration of a pulse of SPL with GPMBP was lengthened from 1 to 4 h, these SPL lost their ability to induce IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet nevertheless retained full stimulatory activity for THYB-1 hybrids. Second, paraformaldehyde fixation of GPMBP-pulsed SPL abrogated an activity necessary for Ag-induced IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids. These fixed SPL were nevertheless able to stimulate THYB-1 hybrids, albeit to a lesser extent than viable unfixed SPL. Third, the addition of either cycloheximide, cytochalasin B, or 2-deoxyglucose to an Ag pulse of SPL with GPMBP dramatically inhibited the subsequent responses of THYB-2 hybrids yet had little or no effect upon the reactivity of THYB-1 hybrids. Fourth, thymocytes lacked necessary activities for GPMBP evoked IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet strongly promoted THYB-1 hybrid responses. Fifth, exposure of SPL to as little as 500 rad of gamma-irradiation markedly attenuated THYB-2 hybrid response to GPMBP but did not affect THYB-1 responses. Sixth, anti-GPMBP responses by THYB-2 hybrids were observed only in the presence of both radioresistant adherent SPL and a distinct population of radiosensitive nonadherent SPL

  11. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms. © 2015 Song et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Cortisol patterns are associated with T cell activation in HIV.

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    Sarah Patterson

    Full Text Available The level of T cell activation in untreated HIV disease is strongly and independently associated with risk of immunologic and clinical progression. The factors that influence the level of activation, however, are not fully defined. Since endogenous glucocorticoids are important in regulating inflammation, we sought to determine whether less optimal diurnal cortisol patterns are associated with greater T cell activation.We studied 128 HIV-infected adults who were not on treatment and had a CD4(+ T cell count above 250 cells/µl. We assessed T cell activation by CD38 expression using flow cytometry, and diurnal cortisol was assessed with salivary measurements.Lower waking cortisol levels correlated with greater T cell immune activation, measured by CD38 mean fluorescent intensity, on CD4(+ T cells (r = -0.26, p = 0.006. Participants with lower waking cortisol also showed a trend toward greater activation on CD8(+ T cells (r = -0.17, p = 0.08. A greater diurnal decline in cortisol, usually considered a healthy pattern, correlated with less CD4(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.018 and CD8(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.017 activation.These data suggest that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis contributes to the regulation of T cell activation in HIV. This may represent an important pathway through which psychological states and the HPA axis influence progression of HIV.

  13. HIV-1 Nef-induced FasL induction and bystander killing requires p38 MAPK activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Choo, Andrew Y.; Hwang, Daniel S.; Premkumar, Arumugam; Dayes, Nathanael S.; Harris, Crafford; Green, Douglas R.; Wadsworth, Scott A.; Siekierka, John J.; Weiner, David B.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been reported to target noninfected CD4 and CD8 cells for destruction. This effect is manifested in part through up-regulation of the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) by HIV-1 negative factor (Nef), leading to bystander damage. However, the signal transduction and transcriptional regulation of this process remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for this process. Loss-of-function experiments through dominant-negative p38 isoform, p38 siRNA, and chemical inhibitors of p38 activation suggest that p38 is necessary for Nef-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, as inhibition leads to an attenuation of AP-1-dependent transcription. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the FasL promoter reveals that its AP-1 enhancer element is required for Nef-mediated transcriptional activation. Therefore, a linear pathway for Nef-induced FasL expression that encompasses p38 and AP-1 has been elucidated. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of the p38 pathway attenuates HIV-1-mediated bystander killing of CD8 cells in vitro. (Blood. 2005;106:2059-2068) PMID:15928037

  14. GRP78 is required for cell proliferation and protection from apoptosis in chicken embryo fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, M; Choi, H; Lee, S I; Kim, J S; Park, M; Kim, K; Lee, S; Byun, S J

    2016-05-01

    Chicken serum has been suggested as a supplement to promote chicken cell proliferation and development. However, the molecular mechanisms by which chicken serum stimulates chicken cell proliferation remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of chicken serum supplementation on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) and DF-1 cell proliferation. We also sought to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in mediating the effects of chicken serum on fibroblasts and DF-1 cells by overexpression of chicken 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (chGRP78), which is important for cell growth and the prevention of apoptosis. Our data demonstrated that the addition of 5% chicken serum significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of chGRP78 using siRNA decreased fibroblast proliferation and increased apoptosis. Based on these results, we suggest that the chGRP78-mediated signaling pathway plays a critical role in chicken serum-stimulated fibroblast survival and anti-apoptosis. Therefore, our findings have important implications for the maintenance of chicken fibroblast cells through the inhibition of apoptosis and may lead to the development of new treatments for avian disease. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. ACTIVITY OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS FROM PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL AND OVARIAN CANCERS

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    N. V. Yunusova

    2017-01-01

    ovarian tumors resulted in significantly decreased levels of NK-cells in peripheral blood and increased levels in ascites. The differences in the functional activity of NK-cells in ascites and peripheral blood of patients with ovarian cancer require further investigation of the lymphocyte receptor status and possibly cytokine-producing function of NK-cells. Key words: ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, natural killer cells, functional activity of peripheral blood, ascites.>< 0.05. The proportion of activated peripheral blood NK-cells, containing granules of cytolytic enzymes GB and perforin (PF increased with tumor growth. However, lymph node metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer did not affect the level and activation of NK-cells. The comparative analysis of NK-populations in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors revealed that the level of CD56 + cells was significantly higher in tumor ascites compared to peripheral blood. In patients with BTs, the levels of CD56 + CD107a + and activated CD56 + CD107a + GB-PF-degranulated cells was higher in ascites than in blood. In patients with ovarian cancer, the level of degranulated cells was higher in peripheral blood than in malignant ascites. Conclusion. The tumor cells and tumor microenvironment were found to affect the number and the functional activity of NK-cells. The accumulation of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity in patients with both benign and malignant ovarian tumors resulted in significantly decreased levels of NK-cells in peripheral blood and increased levels in ascites. The differences in the functional activity of NK-cells in ascites and peripheral blood of patients with ovarian cancer require further investigation of the lymphocyte receptor status and possibly cytokine-producing function of NK-cells

  16. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

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    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  17. Donor hematopoiesis in mice following total lymphoid irradiation requires host T-regulatory cells for durable engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Antonia M. S.; Poyser, Jessica; Küpper, Natascha J.; Burnett, Cassandra; Ko, Rose M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.K.; Florek, Mareike; Zhang, Pei; Negrin, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a unique regimen that prepares recipients for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation by targeting lymph nodes, while sparing large areas of the bone marrow. TLI is reported to increase the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells (Treg) relative to conventional T cells. In this study, barriers to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment following this nonmyeloablative conditioning were evaluated. TLI/ATG resulted in profound lymphoablation but endogenous host HSC remained. Initial donor HSC engraftment occurred only in radiation exposed marrow sites, but gradually distributed to bone marrow outside the radiation field. Sustained donor engraftment required host lymphoid cells insofar as lymphocyte deficient Rag2γc−/− recipients had unstable engraftment compared with wild-type. TLI/ATG treated wild-type recipients had increased proportions of Treg that were associated with increased HSC frequency and proliferation. In contrast, Rag2γc−/− recipients who lacked Treg did not. Adoptive transfer of Treg into Rag2γc−/− recipients resulted in increased cell cycling of endogenous HSC. Thus, we hypothesize that Treg influence donor engraftment post-TLI/ATG by increasing HSC cell cycling, thereby promoting the exit of host HSC from the marrow niche. Our study highlights the unique dynamics of donor hematopoiesis following TLI/ATG, and the effect of Treg on HSC activity. PMID:24591203

  18. Ikaros is absolutely required for pre-B cell differentiation by attenuating IL-7 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizmann, Beate; Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2013-12-16

    Pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) signaling and migration from IL-7-rich environments cooperate to drive pre-B cell differentiation via transcriptional programs that remain unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor is required for the differentiation of large pre-B to small pre-B cells. Mice deleted for Ikaros in pro/pre-B cells show a complete block of differentiation at the fraction C' stage, and Ikaros-null pre-B cells cannot differentiate upon withdrawal of IL-7 in vitro. Restoration of Ikaros function rescues pre-B cell differentiation in vitro and in vivo and depends on DNA binding. Ikaros is required for the down-regulation of the pre-BCR, Igκ germline transcription, and Ig L chain recombination. Furthermore, Ikaros antagonizes the IL-7-dependent regulation of >3,000 genes, many of which are up- or down-regulated between fractions C' and D. Affected genes include those important for survival, metabolism, B cell signaling, and function, as well as transcriptional regulators like Ebf1, Pax5, and the Foxo1 family. Our data thus identify Ikaros as a central regulator of IL-7 signaling and pre-B cell development.

  19. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the unknown protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B- lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap...protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B-lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap requires NQ01, a...leukemia cell line HL60 cells peroxide production in Trypanosoma cruzi . Acta Trop., 35: 35-40, 1978. undergoing apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Cancer

  20. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS.

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