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Sample records for celiac disease-associated tissue

  1. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

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    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  2. [Connective tissue dysplasia in patients with celiac desease as a problem of violation of adaptation reserve islands of the body].

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    Tkachenko, E; Oreshko, L S; Soloveva, E A; Shabanova, A A; Zhuravleva, M S

    2015-01-01

    Clinically significant dysplasia of connective tissue in patients with celiac disease is often responsible for various visceral disorders. Different disturbances of motor and evacuation functions are often determined in this patients (gastroesophageal reflux, duodenogastral reflux, spastic and hyperkinetic dyskinesia). The clinical course of the celiac disease, associated with connective tissue dysplasia, is characterized by asthenovegetative syndrome, reduced tolerance to physical activity, general weakness, fatigue and emotional instability. These data should be considered in choosing a treatment.

  3. Young Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with the Development of Celiac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Children Living in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

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    Pall, Harpreet; Newhook, Leigh A; Aaron, Hillary; Curtis, Joseph; Randell, Ed

    2015-10-14

    The objectives of this study were to establish the prevalence of positive antibodies to endomysium (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in children with type 1 diabetes living in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), and to examine clinical features associated with positive antibodies. Patients were recruited from the pediatric diabetes clinic. One hundred sixty-seven children with type 1 diabetes from the 280 children followed at the clinic were prospectively screened for celiac disease using EMA and tTG. The variables of Irish descent, age at onset of diabetes, duration of diabetes, sex, family history of celiac disease, hemoglobin A1C (A1C), ferritin, gastrointestinal symptoms, and body mass index were compiled for all patients. The group of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was compared to the group with negative antibodies. The prevalence of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was 16.8% (n = 28). One patient had also been previously diagnosed with symptomatic celiac disease. The two statistically significant variables with positive antibodies were an earlier age at onset of diabetes (Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test: mean difference 3.2 years, 95% CI 1.7-4.8 years, p celiac disease-associated antibodies in children living in NL with type 1 diabetes. Unlike other clinical features, an earlier age at onset of diabetes was predictive for positive antibodies. As the majority of children with positive antibodies did not have signs or symptoms of celiac disease, routine screening for celiac disease in type 1 diabetes is recommended.

  4. Celiac Disease Associated with a Benign Granulomatous Mass Demonstrating Self-Regression after Initiation of a Gluten-Free Diet.

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    Tiwari, Abhinav; Sharma, Himani; Qamar, Khola; Khan, Zubair; Darr, Umar; Renno, Anas; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy in which dietary gluten induces an inflammatory reaction predominantly in the duodenum. Celiac disease is known to be associated with benign small bowel thickening and reactive lymphadenopathy that often regresses after the institution of a gluten-free diet. A 66-year-old male patient with celiac disease presented with abdominal pain and diarrheal illness. Computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed a duodenal mass. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the mass revealed bizarre stromal cells which represent a nonspecific tissue reaction to inflammation. This inflammatory mass regressed after the institution of a gluten-free diet. This case report describes a unique presentation of celiac disease in the form of a granulomatous self-regressing mass. Also, this is the first reported case of bizarre stromal cells found in association with celiac disease. In addition to lymphoma and small bowel adenocarcinoma, celiac disease can present with a benign inflammatory mass, which should be serially monitored for resolution with a gluten-free diet.

  5. Celiac Disease Associated with a Benign Granulomatous Mass Demonstrating Self-Regression after Initiation of a Gluten-Free Diet

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    Abhinav Tiwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy in which dietary gluten induces an inflammatory reaction predominantly in the duodenum. Celiac disease is known to be associated with benign small bowel thickening and reactive lymphadenopathy that often regresses after the institution of a gluten-free diet. A 66-year-old male patient with celiac disease presented with abdominal pain and diarrheal illness. Computerized tomography of the abdomen revealed a duodenal mass. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the mass revealed bizarre stromal cells which represent a nonspecific tissue reaction to inflammation. This inflammatory mass regressed after the institution of a gluten-free diet. This case report describes a unique presentation of celiac disease in the form of a granulomatous self-regressing mass. Also, this is the first reported case of bizarre stromal cells found in association with celiac disease. In addition to lymphoma and small bowel adenocarcinoma, celiac disease can present with a benign inflammatory mass, which should be serially monitored for resolution with a gluten-free diet.

  6. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

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    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

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    ... do not have celiac disease . On average, a diagnosis of celiac disease is not made until 6 to 10 years ... and tissues and leads to the signs and symptoms of celiac disease . Almost all people with celiac disease have specific ...

  8. Enfermedad celiaca asociada a síndrome antifosfolípido Celiac disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome

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    O. Jorge

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la enfermedad celiaca puede asociarse a patologías de etiología inmunológica. Presentamos su asociación con síndrome antifosfolípido. Caso 1: mujer, 26 años, diagnosticada de enfermedad celiaca. Seis meses después queda embarazada, presentando muerte fetal. Al año siguiente nuevo embarazo. Anticuerpos anticardiolipina IgG: 20 GPL U/ml (valor normal Introduction: celiac disease may be associated with pathologies of immune etiology. We present its association with antiphospholipid syndrome. Case 1: a 26-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Six months later she became pregnant, and experienced fetal death. The following year she became pregnant again. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 20 GPL U/ml (normal value < 11, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 9 MPL U/ml (n. v. < 10. Hematological tests were otherwise uneventful. Medicated with acetylsalicylic acid she had a normal pregnancy. Case 2: a 48-year-old female diagnosed with celiac disease presented with thrombosis in her left lower limb and renal infarction. Hematological tests showed no prothrombotic alterations (antiphospholipid antibodies were not measured. A year and a half later she had thrombosis in a finger of her hand. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 10 GPL (n. v. < 13, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 35 MPL (n. v. < 12. Case 3: a 38-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Some time later she experienced two spontaneous abortions and a transient ischemic cerebral attack. Nowadays, she is in her sixth month of pregnancy. IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 75 MPL/ml (n. v. up to 20, and IgG anticardiolipin antibodies within normal values. Hematological tests revealed no other prothrombotic alterations. Discussion: antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, and spontaneous fetal death. Its association with celiac disease has been described in few cases. Celiac disease is associated with spontaneous fetal

  9. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

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    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-10-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD.

  10. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

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    Yamazaki, Souji; Tsukada, Atsuko; Furuya, Tatsutaka

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of serum iga anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody in the diagnosis of celiac disease

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    Lodhi, M. A.; Ayub, A.; Saleem, M. Z.; Munir, T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody in the diagnosis of celiac disease taking histopathology as gold standard. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at the department of Pediatrics, Military Hospital Rawalpindi from April 2015 to July 2016. Patients and Methods: Ninety-five consecutive children presenting with suspicion of celiac disease were included in this study after taking written informed consent. A predesigned proforma was used to record patient’s demographic details. Anti-tTG level of >=25 U/ml was taken as diagnostic of celiac disease while results of histopathology on endoscopic biopsy were taken as gold standard. Results: The mean age of the patients was 6.48 ± 3.20 years and majority (n=53, 55.8 percent) of the children were aged between 5 to 10 years. The serum anti-tTG level ranged from 8.0 U/ml to 759.0 U/ml with a mean of 298.75 ± 225.51 U/ml. Taking a cut-off value of >=25 U/ml for anti-tTG, 81 (85.3 percent) children were suspected of celiac disease. Histopathology of endoscopic biopsy confirmed celiac disease in 68 (71.6 percent) children with 62 true positive, 19 false positive, 6 false negative and 8 true negative cases. It yielded 91.18 percent sensitivity, 29.63 percent specificity and 73.68 percent accuracy for anti-tTG (>=25 U/ml) in the diagnosis of celiac disease with positive and negative predictive values of 76.54 percent and 57.14 percent respectively. Conclusion: IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (>=25 U/ml) was found to be highly sensitive test for the detection of celiac disease in children. (author)

  12. Interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases

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    Medina, Yimy F; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Iglesias, Antonio; Ojeda, Paulina; Matiz, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    An interstitial lung disease (ILD) belongs to a group of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases it should be differentiated from other pathologies among those are idiopathic and ILD associated to connective tissue diseases (CTD) New concepts have been developed in the last years and they have been classified in seven defined subgroups. It has been described the association of each one of these subgroups with CTD. Natural history and other aspects of its treatment is not known completely .For complete diagnose it is required clinical, image and histopathologic approaches. The biopsy lung plays an essential role. It is important to promote and to stimulate the subclasification of each subgroup with the purpose of knowing their natural history directing the treatment and to improve their outcome

  13. Cyclophosphamide for connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

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    Barnes, Hayley; Holland, Anne E; Westall, Glen P; Goh, Nicole Sl; Glaspole, Ian N

    2018-01-03

    Approximately one-third of individuals with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have associated connective tissue disease (CTD). The connective tissue disorders most commonly associated with ILD include scleroderma/systemic sclerosis (SSc), rheumatoid arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. Although many people with CTD-ILD do not develop progressive lung disease, a significant proportion do progress, leading to reduced physical function, decreased quality of life, and death. ILD is now the major cause of death amongst individuals with systemic sclerosis.Cyclophosphamide is a highly potent immunosuppressant that has demonstrated efficacy in inducing and maintaining remission in autoimmune and inflammatory illnesses. However this comes with potential toxicities, including nausea, haemorrhagic cystitis, bladder cancer, bone marrow suppression, increased risk of opportunistic infections, and haematological and solid organ malignancies.Decision-making in the treatment of individuals with CTD-ILD is difficult; the clinician needs to identify those who will develop progressive disease, and to weigh up the balance between a high level of need for therapy in a severely unwell patient population against the potential for adverse effects from highly toxic therapy, for which only relatively limited data on efficacy can be found. Similarly, it is not clear whether histological subtype, disease duration, or disease extent can be used to predict treatment responsiveness. To assess the efficacy and adverse effects of cyclophosphamide in the treatment of individuals with CTD-ILD. We performed searches on CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science up to May 2017. We handsearched review articles, clinical trial registries, and reference lists of retrieved articles. We included randomised controlled parallel-group trials that compared cyclophosphamide in any form, used individually or concomitantly with other immunomodulating therapies, versus non

  14. Increased accumulation of dendritic cells in celiac disease associates with increased expression of autophagy protein LC3

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    Paramaguru Rajaguru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD an immune-mediated disorder associates with accumulation of dendritic cell (DC in duodenal mucosa. Autophagy has recently been implicated in autoantigen formation. However, its role in CD is still unknown. Aim: To examine role of autophagic protein LC3 expressed by activated DC in CD. Materials and Methods : Thirty CD patients were analyzed at initial presentation and after 6 months of gluten-free diet (GFD. Duodenal biopsies were studied for histological changes and CD11c, CD86, and MAP1LC3A expressions by double immunohistochemistry (IHC. Masson′s trichrome (MT staining was used to assess basement membrane (BM thickness and Oil Red O (ORO staining for mucosal lipid deposit. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed for HLA-DQ system. Statistical analysis was done using paired and unpaired t test, chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and McNemar-Bowker test. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 alleles were present in all studied patients. Increased BM thickness was observed in 63% and 73% had ORO-positive lipid in surface lining epithelium. Pre-treatment biopsies showed increased DCs expressing LC3, which were significantly less in follow-up biopsies. The follow-up biopsies had shown significant reduction in BM thickness and ORO. Conclusion : Histological improvement in duodenal biopsies was associated with reduction in activated DCs expressing autophagic protein, which probably play important role in pathogenesis of an autoimmune disorder like CD.

  15. CT after gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma : significance of soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis

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    Baek, Seung Yon; Kim, Hae Young; Choi, Hye Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis, as seen on abdominal CT imaging after gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma, should be considered as the recurrence of carcinoma or postoperative change. One hundred and forty-one abdominal CT examinations of 71 patients who had undergone subtotal or total gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma were included in our study. Conventional CT scans were obtained with 1cm thickness and interval from the diaphragm to the kidneys after contrast enhancement. It was considered that carcinoma had not recurred if findings were negative on UGI series, endoscopy with biopsy and a normal level of carcinoembryonic antigen except for soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis on abdominal CT. We then divided subjects into a recurrence group(N=20) and normal group(N=51) and on initial follow-up CT(FU-CT), analyzed the incidence, margin, shape, extent, degree and pattern of attenuation of the soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis in both groups. Since the second FU-CT examination, we observed changes in the soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis. On initial follow-up CT, at mean 308 days after surgery, fifty-five percent(39/71) of total patients (70%(14/20) of the recurrence group and 49%(25/51) of the normal group) showed soft tissue surrounding the celiac axis. The margin was distinct in 12(86%) of the recurrence group and indistinct in 21(84%) of the normal group(p<0.001). Twelve (86%) of the recurrence group showed a nodular or confluent nodular shape and 21(84%) of the normal group showed a permeative shape (p<0.001). Extent was unilateral in eight (57%) of the recurrence group and bilateral in 16(64%) of the normal group. Attenuation was similar to that of the spleen and muscle in seven(50%) of the recurrence group and was similar to that of muscle in 18(72%) of the normal group. The pattern of attenuation was homogeneous in 13(93%) of the recurrence group and 21(84%) of the normal group. There was no significant difference in

  16. INCREASED TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE LEVELS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY IN ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY AMONG PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder in genetically predisposed individuals precipitated by gluten ingestion. Objective - In this study, we aimed to determine asymptomatic spike-and-wave findings on electroencephalography in children with celiac disease. Methods - A total of 175 children with the diagnosis of celiac disease (study group and 99 age- and sex-matched healthy children as controls (control group were included in the study. In order to determine the effects of gluten free diet on laboratory and electroencephalography findings, the celiac group is further subdivided into two as newly-diagnosed and formerly-diagnosed patients. Medical histories of all children and laboratory findings were all recorded and neurologic statuses were evaluated. All patients underwent a sleep and awake electroencephalography. Results - Among 175 celiac disease patients included in the study, 43 were newly diagnosed while 132 were formerly-diagnosed patients. In electroencephalography evaluation of patients the epileptiform activity was determined in 4 (9.3% of newly diagnosed and in 2 (1.5% of formerly diagnosed patients; on the other hand the epileptiform activity was present in only 1 (1.0% of control cases. There was a statistically significant difference between groups in regards to the presence of epileptiform activity in electroencephalography. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that epileptiform activity in both sleep and awake electroencephalography were positively correlated with tissue transglutaminase levels (P=0.014 and P=0.019, respectively. Conclusion - We have determined an increased epileptiform activity frequency among newly-diagnosed celiac disease patients compared with formerly-diagnosed celiac disease patients and control cases. Moreover the tissue transglutaminase levels were also correlated with the presence of epileptiform activity in electroencephalography. Among newly diagnosed celiac disease patients

  17. Celiac disease

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    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  18. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

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    Robinson Nicola J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function.

  19. Utility of Tissue Transglutaminase Immunohistochemistry in Pediatric Duodenal Biopsies: Patterns of Expression and Role in Celiac Disease—A Clinicopathologic Review

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    Saeeda Almarzooqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue transglutaminase (tTG is a ubiquitous multifunctional protein. It has roles in various cellular processes. tTG is a major target of autoantibodies in celiac disease, and its expression by immunohistochemistry in pediatric celiac disease has not been fully examined. We studied tTG expression in 78 pediatric duodenal biopsies by utilizing an antibody to transglutaminase 2. Serum tTG was positive in all celiac cases evaluated. Serum antiserum endomysial antibody (EMA and tTG were negative in all control subjects and in inflammatory bowel disease and eosinophilic gastroenteritis. There was a statistically significant difference between cases of celiac disease and normal controls in terms of tTG immunohistochemical staining in duodenal biopsies surface epithelium ( value = 0.0012. There was no significant statistical difference in terms of staining of the villous surface or crypt between the cases of celiac disease and cases with IBD ( value = 0.5970 and 0.5227, resp.. There was no detected correlation between serum tTG values and immunohistochemical positivity on duodenal biopsy in cases of celiac disease ( value = 1. There was no relationship between Marsh classification and positivity of villous surface for tTG ( value = 0.4955. We conclude that tTG has limited utility in diagnosis of celiac disease in pediatric duodenal biopsies.

  20. Association of Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody Titer with Duodenal Histological Changes in Children with Celiac Disease

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    Hasan Hawamdeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is usually diagnosed by demonstrating gluten enteropathy in small bowel biopsy. Celiac specific antibodies are used as an initial screening test. The goal of this study is to test the relationship of the anti-tTG titer and severity of histological changes in Jordanian children with celiac disease. Method. The medical records of 81 children who had elevated anti-tTG titer and had duodenal biopsies available were retrospectively reviewed. Result. Assessing the association of anti-tTG titer with duodenal histopathological changes, 94% of those with high anti-tTG titer (≥180 U/mL had histological evidence of celiac disease. There was statistically significant positive association between high anti-tTG titer and Marsh grading as 82% of patients with Marsh III had high anti-tTG titer (Chi2 18.5; P value 0.00; Odds Ratio 8.5. The fraction of patients with Marsh III who were correctly identified as positive by anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL was high (sensitivity = 81.6. Moreover, the fraction of patients with anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL who had Marsh III was also high (positive predictive value = 78.4. Conclusion. Anti-tTG titer ≥ 180 U/mL had significant positive association with Marsh III histopathological changes of celiac disease.

  1. Celiac disease: clinical observations

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    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  2. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

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    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% symptoms with gluten exposure did not demonstrate any effect. Interest in medication was associated with a worse quality of life (CD-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  3. Disease-associated prion protein in neural and lymphoid tissues of mink (Mustela vison) inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy.

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    Schneider, D A; Harrington, R D; Zhuang, D; Yan, H; Truscott, T C; Dassanayake, R P; O'Rourke, K I

    2012-11-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are diagnosed by immunodetection of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)). The distribution of PrP(d) within the body varies with the time-course of infection and between species, during interspecies transmission, as well as with prion strain. Mink are susceptible to a form of TSE known as transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), presumed to arise due to consumption of feed contaminated with a single prion strain of ruminant origin. After extended passage of TME isolates in hamsters, two strains emerge, HY and DY, each of which is associated with unique structural isoforms of PrP(TME) and of which only the HY strain is associated with accumulation of PrP(TME) in lymphoid tissues. Information on the structural nature and lymphoid accumulation of PrP(TME) in mink is limited. In this study, 13 mink were challenged by intracerebral inoculation using late passage TME inoculum, after which brain and lymphoid tissues were collected at preclinical and clinical time points. The distribution and molecular nature of PrP(TME) was investigated by techniques including blotting of paraffin wax-embedded tissue and epitope mapping by western blotting. PrP(TME) was detected readily in the brain and retropharyngeal lymph node during preclinical infection, with delayed progression of accumulation within other lymphoid tissues. For comparison, three mink were inoculated by the oral route and examined during clinical disease. Accumulation of PrP(TME) in these mink was greater and more widespread, including follicles of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Western blot analyses revealed that PrP(TME) accumulating in the brain of mink is structurally most similar to that accumulating in the brain of hamsters infected with the DY strain. Collectively, the results of extended passage in mink are consistent with the presence of only a single strain of TME, the DY strain, capable of inducing accumulation of PrP(TME) in the lymphoid

  4. Binding of peptides from the N-terminal region of alpha-gliadin to the celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 molecule assessed in biochemical and T cell assays

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    Johansen, B H; Gjertsen, H A; Vartdal, F

    1996-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is most probably an immunological disease, precipitated in susceptible individuals by ingestion of wheat gliadin and related proteins from other cereals. The disease shows a strong HLA association predominantly to the cis- or trans-encoded HLA-DQ(alpha1*0501, beta1*02) (i.e., DQ...

  5. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  6. Lung cancer in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease: clinical features and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Saeki, Keigo; Waseda, Yuko; Murata, Akari; Takato, Hazuki; Ichikawa, Yukari; Yasui, Masahide; Kimura, Hideharu; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Matsushita, Takashi; Yamada, Kazunori; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2018-02-01

    Lung cancer (LC) adversely impacts survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about LC in patients with connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for LC in CTD-ILD, and the clinical characteristics and survival of CTD-ILD patients with LC. We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of patients with CTD-ILD from 2003 to 2016. Patients with pathologically diagnosed LC were identified. The prevalence, risk factors, and clinical features of LC and the impact of LC on CTD-ILD patient outcomes were observed. Of 266 patients with CTD-ILD, 24 (9.0%) had LC. CTD-ILD with LC was more likely in patients who were older, male, and smokers; had rheumatoid arthritis, a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, emphysema on chest computed tomography scan, and lower diffusing capacity of the lung carbon monoxide (DLco)% predicted; and were not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that the presence of emphysema [odds ratio (OR), 8.473; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.241-32.033] and nonuse of immunosuppressive therapy (OR, 8.111; 95% CI, 2.457-26.775) were independent risk factors for LC. CTD-ILD patients with LC had significantly worse survival than patients without LC (10-year survival rate: 28.5% vs. 81.8%, P<0.001). LC is associated with the presence of emphysema and nonuse of immunosuppressive therapy, and contributes to increased mortality in patients with CTD-ILD.

  7. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  8. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with hepatitis B virus infection in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Luciana Nau

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that involves gluten intolerance and can be triggered by environmental factors including hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of celiac disease in individuals with HBV infection and to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of celiac disease associated with HBV. Methods This cross-sectional study included 50 hepatitis B patients tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies (EMAs and tissue anti-transglutaminase (TTG between August 2011 and September 2012. Results Fifty patients were included with a mean age of 46.0 ± 12.6 (46.0 years; 46% were female and 13% were HBeAg+. Six patients had positive serology for celiac disease, four were EMA+, and five were TTG+. When individuals with positive serology for celiac disease were compared to those with negative serology, they demonstrated a higher prevalence of abdominal pain (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.008, lower median creatinine (0.7mg/dL vs. 0.9mg/dL, p = 0.007 and lower mean albumin (3.6 ± 0.4g/L vs. 3.9 ± 0.3g/L, p = 0.022. All individuals with positive serology for celiac disease underwent upper digestive endoscopy, and three of the patients exhibited a macroscopic pattern suggestive of celiac disease. Histologically, five patients demonstrated an intra-epithelial lymphocytic infiltrate level > 30%, and four patients showed villous atrophy associated with crypt hyperplasia on duodenal biopsy. Conclusions An increased prevalence of celiac disease was observed among hepatitis B patients. These patients were symptomatic and had significant laboratory abnormalities. These results indicate that active screening for celiac disease among HBV-infected adults is warranted.

  9. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

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    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  10. Different binding motifs of the celiac disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 revealed by relative quantitative proteomics of endogenous peptide repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergseng, Elin; Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by intolerance to cereal gluten proteins, and HLA-DQ molecules are involved in the disease pathogenesis by presentation of gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. The α- or β-chain sharing HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 display different risks for the disease...... established binding motifs. The binding motif of DQ2.2 was strikingly different from that of DQ2.5 with position P3 being a major anchor having a preference for threonine and serine. This is notable as three recently identified epitopes of gluten recognized by T cells of DQ2.2 celiac patients harbor serine...... at position P3. This study demonstrates that relative quantitative comparison of endogenous peptides sampled from our protein metabolism by HLA molecules provides clues to understand HLA association with disease....

  11. Doença celíaca associada à tireoidite de Hashimoto e síndrome de Noonan Celiac disease associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ortega Perez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso clínico de uma criança portadora de doença celíaca, tireoidite de Hashimoto e síndrome de Noonan. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: Menina de dez anos e seis meses, branca, apresentando história de diarreia líquida há cinco meses e "aumento da barriga". Ao exame, mostrava peso de 20.580g (pOBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical case of a child with celiac disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Noonan syndrome. CASE DESCRIPTION: A Caucasian girl aged ten years and six months had liquid diarrhea for five months, and a "distended belly". At the physical exam: weight of 20,580g (p<3, length of 114cm (p<3, hydrated, anemic 2+/4+ and conscious. The patient presented triangular facies, apparent ocular hypertelorism, antimongoloid position of the palpebral fissures, ears with low implantation, micrognathia, short neck and pectus excavatum. The abdomen was globular, flaccid and painless; the liver was 2cm below the right costal margin. Lymphedema in right upper limb and lower limb edema was also noted. Laboratory exams showed microcytic and hypochromic anemia, deficit of total proteins, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and a 5-year delay in bone age. Abdominal ultrasonography showed the bowel slightly dilated. Due to lymphedema and chronic diarrhea, the initial hypothesis was intestinal lymphangiectasis, which was confirmed by a jejunal biopsy, which also showed celiac disease. The genetic evaluation revealed a 46XX karyotype and a clinical diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. COMMENTS: Different autoimmune diseases can be associated. In this case, the celiac disease and the Hashimoto's thyroiditis are possibly related to the presence of HLA system antigens. However, the association of the celiac disease with the Noonan syndrome is very rare, and this is the third report in the literature.

  12. Atypical presentations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa Adriana Luminita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the association of celiac disease in 81 children with autoimmune disease and genetic syndromes over a two years periods (January 2014 to July 2016 in Pediatric Clinic in Constanta. Because the extraintestinal symptoms are an atypical presentation of celiac disease we determined in these children the presence of celiac disease antibodies: Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgA and IgA total serum level as a screening method followeds in selective cases by Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody IgG, anti-endomysial antibodies, deamidated gliadin antibodies IgA and IgG and intestinal biopsia. In our study 8 patients had been diagnosed with celiac disease with extraintestinal symptoms, of which 4 with type 1 diabetes, 1 patient with ataxia, 2 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and 1 patient with Down syndrome that associate also autoimmune thyroiditis, alopecia areata, enamel hypoplasia.

  13. Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study,...

  14. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  15. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  16. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  17. Celiac disease and celiac crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Masud Iqbal; Ahmad, Irfan; Rao, Muhammad Suleman; Iqbal, Raghib; Asghar, Shakeel; Saleem, Mazhar

    2011-08-01

    To determine the frequency of clinical features of Celiac disease (CD) and Celiac crisis in children. Case series. Paediatrics Unit, Sheikh Zayed Medical College and Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan, from September 2009 to September 2010. Forty children aged between 4 to 13 years of either gender, presenting with complaints of recurrent diarrhea, abdominal distention, severe emaciation and dehydration were included. The information about breast feeding, weaning diets, age of introduction of wheat diets, onset of diarrhea, characteristics and frequency of stools, growth, vaccination status, symptoms in 1st degree relatives, restriction of Gluten diet in the past and anthropometric measures were recorded. Serological tests against anti-Tissue Transglultaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies were obtained in all cases. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed and multiple biopsies were taken from distal parts of duodenum. Among the forty children, twenty four (60%) were females and 16 were males (40%). The mean age was 6.35 ± 2.83 years. Thirty five (87.5%) parents were cousins. Breast feeding was not exclusively given and the Gluten containing weaning diets were given as early as 3.5 months of age. Thirty (75%) children presented with typical sign and symptoms of CD. Celiac crisis presented with profuse diarrhea, severe dehydration; abdominal distention; pedal edema, carpopedal spasm due to tetany; wasted muscles; head drop and inability to stand. The serum TtG antibodies in thirty-eight cases (95%) were above the cut off level of 7 u/ml ranging from 35-99 u/ml. The histopathology of specimens from distal duodenum revealed lesions of M3 type in thirteen (32.5%) and M2 type in eighteen cases (45%). All cases recovered and improved on follow-up after strict adherence to gluten-free diet (GFD). Majority of children with Celiac disease presented with typical symptom, while Celiac crisis was characterized by severe dehydration, weakness and calcium deficiency signs. Most were

  18. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  19. [CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISPLASIA AT CHILDREN LIVING IN EAST REGION OF KAZAKHSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiyeva, M; Rymbayeva, T

    2017-11-01

    The frequency of the combination of congenital heart defects (CHD) and connective tissue dysplasia remains poorly understood. And connective tissue dysplasia enhance severity the clinical of CHD. The aim of the study was to conduct a clinical and laboratory analysis of combinations of congenital heart defects and connective tissue dysplasia in children of Semey and to determine the risk for the development of these pathologies. The object of the study is the children of Semey (East Kazakhstan) aged 1-14 with congenital heart defects (CHD), with connective tissue dysplasia, healthy children and their mothers. Definition complex clinical and laboratory studies in children with CHD and connective tissue dysplasia, and their mothers. In children with CHD, the frequency of external and visceral signs of dysplasia was high. In 88.1% of cases in children with CHD was diagnosed 2-3 degrees of dysplasia. Was found difference in the microelement composition of blood serum and of hemostasis in children with CHD were expressed by hypofibrinogenemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia. Excess of the frequency of signs of dysplasia in mothers over the control group to consider dysplasia as a factor that influences the clinical of CHD.

  20. Quadriplegia due to celiac crisis with hypokalemia as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Malobika; Kapoor, Seema

    2012-02-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare, life-threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by worsening of clinical symptoms, multiple metabolic derangements and shock. We report an 8-year-old girl with previously undiagnosed celiac disease who presented with flaccid quadriparesis secondary to severe hypokalemia associated with celiac crisis. Diagnosis was expedited by an elevated anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody titer. The patient improved with correction of hypokalemia, corticosteroids and gluten-free diet. In tropical countries such as India, where both acute flaccid paresis and diarrhea are usually of infective etiologies, this rare clinical condition should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of both.

  1. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  2. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  3. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljević, Nemanja; Cvetković, Mirjana; Nikolić, Goran; Filipović, Branka; Milinić, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  4. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not feel ... skin rash with blisters slowed growth Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Researchers are studying the reasons celiac ...

  5. Prevalence of celiac disease among first-degree relatives of Indian celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asha; Prakash, Shyam; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Ahuja, Vineet; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Makharia, Govind K

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease, once thought to be uncommon in Asia, is now recognized in Asian nations as well. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients followed in our centre. First-degree relatives were screened prospectively for celiac disease using questionnaire-based interview and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Serology positive first-degree relatives underwent duodenal biopsies. Diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on positive serology and villous abnormality Marsh grade 2 or higher. Human leucocyte antigen DQ2/-DQ8 was also assessed in 127 first-degree relatives. 434 first-degree relatives of 176 celiac disease patients were prospectively recruited; 282 were symptomatic (64.9%), 58 were positive for serology (13.3%). Seroprevalence was higher in female than in males (19% vs 8.5%; p=0.001) and highest in siblings (16.9%) than parents (13.6%) and children (5.9%) of celiac patients (p=0.055); 87.4% first-degree relatives were human leucocyte antigen-DQ2/-DQ8 positive. Overall prevalence of celiac disease was 10.9% amongst first-degree relatives. The prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients was 10.9% in our cohort, and 87% had human leucocyte antigen-DQ2 or -DQ8 haplotype. All first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients should be screen for celiac disease even if asymptomatic or with atypical manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  7. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  8. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomeili, Bashir; Aminzadeh, Majid; Hardani, Amir Kamal; Fathizadeh, Payam; Chomeili, Pooya; Azaran, Azarakhsh

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G) were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years) with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16) all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases) were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated) in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Chomeili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. METHODS: Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. RESULTS: A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16 all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  10. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  11. Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Celiac Disease Foundation Read More "Celiac Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten- ...

  12. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms & Causes of Celiac Disease What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Most people with celiac disease have one or ... the rash and no other symptoms. Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Symptoms of celiac disease vary from ...

  13. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children With Migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Oya; Yılmaz, Deniz; Sezer, Taner; Hızlı, Şamil

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with migraine, the authors investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody immunoglobulin A and total immunoglobulin A from 81 children with migraine and in a healthy control group of 176 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibodies underwent a duodenal biopsy. Two patients in the migraine group (2.5%) and 1 in the control group (0.57%) tested positive for serum tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibodies (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy did not confirm celiac disease in both groups, and these patients were considered "potential celiac" cases. In the present study, children with migraine did not exhibit a higher prevalence rate of celiac disease compared with healthy controls. Therefore, the screening test for celiac disease is not a necessary part of the management of migraine in children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Searching for Celiac Disease Screening-detected celiac disease in an HLA-genotyped birth cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Björck, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease is a common immune mediated enteropathy strongly associated with HLA-DQB1*02 (DQ2), *0302 (DQ8), or both and the presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Prevalence studies have revealed that most affected individuals go undetected because of subclinical signs or being asymptomatic rendering screening a method for identification. However, less is known about subclinical manifestations of screening-detected celiac disease during childhood and if the...

  15. Celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mıhçı, Ercan; Nur, Banu Güzel; Berker-Karaüzüm, Sibel; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by intolerance to the dietary grain protein gluten. An increased prevalence of celiac disease has been reported in Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, but there has been only few previous reports with respect to the association of celiac disease in Williams-Beuren syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in our 24 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients. Gastrointestinal problems and celiac disease symptoms of patients were noted. All patients were analyzed by the titer of tissue transglutaminases IgA and IgG. HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy was performed to the patients with positive serology. We also performed gluten free diet in the presence of compatible symptoms, serology, HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy. In our study, two patients had positive tTG antibodies, but only one had positive biopsy finding for celiac disease. The frequency of celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome was estimated as 1/24 (4.1%). Though the number of participants in this study was limited, the results show that the frequency of celiac disease is higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome compared to the general population. We suggest that a high suspicion and testing for celiac disease should be recommended at certain intervals in all cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome to detect the cause of growth retardation and gastrointestinal problems.

  16. Celiac disease associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Mariana Ortega; Ciambelli, Giuliano Serafino; Nigri, Alcinda Aranha; Vieira, Marta Wey; Costa, Clóvis Duarte

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso clínico de uma criança portadora de doença celíaca, tireoidite de Hashimoto e síndrome de Noonan. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: Menina de dez anos e seis meses, branca, apresentando história de diarreia líquida há cinco meses e "aumento da barriga". Ao exame, mostrava peso de 20.580g (p

  17. Initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil in connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH): subgroup analysis from the AMBITION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, John Gerry; Galiè, Nazzareno; Barberà, Joan Albert; Frost, Adaani E; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Hoeper, Marius M; Kuwana, Masataka; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Peacock, Andrew J; Simonneau, Gérald; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Blair, Christiana; Gillies, Hunter; Miller, Karen L; Harris, Julia H N; Langley, Jonathan; Rubin, Lewis J

    2017-07-01

    Patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH), in particular systemic sclerosis (SSc), had an attenuated response compared with idiopathic PAH in most trials. Thus, there is uncertainty regarding the benefit of PAH-targeted therapy in some forms of CTD-PAH. To explore the safety and efficacy of initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil versus ambrisentan or tadalafil monotherapy in patients with CTD-PAH and SSc-PAH enrolled in the AMBITION trial. This was a post hoc analysis of patients with CTD-PAH and SSc-PAH from AMBITION, an event-driven, double-blind trial in patients with WHO functional class II/III PAH. Treatment-naive patients were randomised 2:1:1 to once-daily initial combination therapy with ambrisentan plus tadalafil or monotherapy with ambrisentan or tadalafil, respectively. The primary endpoint was time to the first clinical failure event (first occurrence of death, hospitalisation for worsening PAH, disease progression or unsatisfactory long-term clinical response). In the primary analysis set (N=500), 187 patients had CTD-PAH, of whom 118 had SSc-PAH. Initial combination therapy reduced the risk of clinical failure versus pooled monotherapy in each subgroup: CTD-PAH (HR 0.43 (95% CI 0.24 to 0.77)) and SSc-PAH (0.44 (0.22 to 0.89)). The most common AE was peripheral oedema, which was reported more frequently with initial combination therapy than monotherapy in the two PAH subgroups. The relative frequency of adverse events between those on combination therapy versus monotherapy was similar across subgroups. This post hoc subgroup analysis provides evidence that CTD-PAH and SSc-PAH patients benefit from initial ambrisentan and tadalafil combination therapy. NCT01178073, post results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no or minimal symptoms. Learn about the Common Symptoms of Celiac Disease CDF offers a Symptoms Checklist to help you ... should be tested for celiac disease. Complete the Symptoms Checklist Who Should Be Screened for Celiac Disease? According the the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia ...

  19. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II β-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this β-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP β-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP β-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP α-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DPα-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP α- and β-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion

  20. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  1. The production of the oral mucosa of antiendomysial and anti-tissue-transglutaminase antibodies in patients with celiac disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compilato, Domenico; Campisi, Giuseppina; Pastore, Luca; Carroccio, Antonio

    2010-12-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is a lifelong, T cell-mediated enteropathy, triggered by the ingestion of gluten and related prolamins in genetically susceptible subjects, resulting in minor intestinal mucosal injury, including villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and subsequent nutrient malabsorption. Although serological tests for antiendomysial (EMA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) autoantibodies are used to screen and follow up on patients with CD, diagnostic confirmation is still based on the histological examination of the small intestinal mucosa. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut involved in CD, other mucosal surfaces (such as gastric, rectal, ileal, and esophageal) belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) can also be involved. A site that could be studied less invasively is the mouth, as it is the first part of the gastrointestinal system and a part of the GALT. Indeed, not only have various oral ailments been reported as possible atypical aspects of CD, but it has been also demonstrated that inflammatory changes occur after oral supramucosal application and a submucosal injection of gliadin into the oral mucosa of CD patients. However, to date, only two studies have assessed the capacity of the oral mucosa of untreated CD patients to EMA and anti-tTG antibodies. In this paper, we will review studies that evaluate the capacity of the oral mucosa to produce specific CD autoantibodies. Discrepancies in sensitivity from the two studies have revealed that biopsy is still not an adequate procedure for the routine diagnostic purposes of CD patients, and a more in-depth evaluation on a larger sample size with standardized collection and analysis methods is merited. However, the demonstration of immunological reactivity to the gluten ingestion of the oral mucosa of CD, in terms of IgA EMA and anti-tTG production, needs to be further evaluated in order to

  2. The Production of the Oral Mucosa of Antiendomysial and Anti—Tissue-Transglutaminase Antibodies in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Compilato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a lifelong, T cell—mediated enteropathy, triggered by the ingestion of gluten and related prolamins in genetically susceptible subjects, resulting in minor intestinal mucosal injury, including villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and subsequent nutrient malabsorption. Although serological tests for antiendomysial (EMA and anti—tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG autoantibodies are used to screen and follow up on patients with CD, diagnostic confirmation is still based on the histological examination of the small intestinal mucosa. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut involved in CD, other mucosal surfaces (such as gastric, rectal, ileal, and esophageal belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT can also be involved. A site that could be studied less invasively is the mouth, as it is the first part of the gastrointestinal system and a part of the GALT. Indeed, not only have various oral ailments been reported as possible atypical aspects of CD, but it has been also demonstrated that inflammatory changes occur after oral supramucosal application and a submucosal injection of gliadin into the oral mucosa of CD patients. However, to date, only two studies have assessed the capacity of the oral mucosa of untreated CD patients to EMA and anti-tTG antibodies. In this paper, we will review studies that evaluate the capacity of the oral mucosa to produce specific CD autoantibodies. Discrepancies in sensitivity from the two studies have revealed that biopsy is still not an adequate procedure for the routine diagnostic purposes of CD patients, and a more in-depth evaluation on a larger sample size with standardized collection and analysis methods is merited. However, the demonstration of immunological reactivity to the gluten ingestion of the oral mucosa of CD, in terms of IgA EMA and anti-tTG production, needs to be further

  3. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  4. Celiac disease in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malekzadeh R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until a few decades ago, celiac disease was considered to be essentially a disease of European people and to be very rare in Middle Eastern countries. During the last two decades, having met the criteria for the WHO general screening, the advent and application of novel serological assays used to screen for celiac disease and the use of endoscopic small bowel biopsy have led to increasing numbers of diagnoses of celiac disease in western countries. With this new data, our knowledge on both the clinical pattern and epidemiology of celiac disease has increased, and is now known to be a relatively common autoimmune disorder. Studies performed in different parts of the developing world have shown that the prevalence of celiac disease in this area is similar to or even higher than that in western countries. In fact, celiac disease is known to be the most common form of chronic diarrhea in Iran. However, contrary to common belief, celiac disease is more than a pure digestive alteration. It is a protean systemic disease, and, with a 95 percent genetic predisposition, has a myriad of symptoms including gastrointestinal, dermatological, dental, neurological and behavioral that can occur at a variety of ages. Monosymptomatic, oligosymptomatic, atypical (without gastrointestinal symptoms, silent and latent forms of celiac disease have been identified. In this study we review the epidemiology of celiac disease based on the studies performed in Iran and discuss its pathogenesis, the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the importance of its diagnosis and treatment in Iran.

  5. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request A Second Opinion Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1- ... Request A Second Opinion Visit the Celiac Support Group Facebook page Navigation Celiac Disease Program Meet Our ...

  6. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  7. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprue; Nontropical sprue; Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... intestines will heal if you follow a lifelong gluten-free diet . Do not eat foods, drink beverages, or take ...

  8. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Nemanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. Case report. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Conclusion. Complicated interactions between celiac disease and bulimia can make them difficult to diagnose and treat. It is important to consider the presence of celiac disease in patients with bulimia and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  9. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  10. Some Immunological Parameters in Women With Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abbas Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is one of an autoimmune diseasein the world and  genetically linked . This disease may be cause many problems for pregnant women and their children . Tthere are many markers specific for celiac disease like anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-gliadin antibodies which associated with development of celiac disease.In this study, we wished to determine whether there are relationship between  celiac disease and fertility , effect on newborn and to identify the possible implications of these factors to disease course.Thirty female patients with a celiac disease  with ages ranged between (15- 46 years were taken from (Al-Hussein Medical  City/Kerbala.Control group consisted of 20 healthy people who were free from signs and symptoms of celiac disease who matched in age and gender with patients, and had no history for any celiac disease  problem. TTG  IgA & IgG ,AGA EASIA Kit, Generic assay and  was studied using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. T-test and ANOVA and Pearson correlation used to analyze results by using SPSS version 24. P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant.TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with the control group .TTG and AGA levels were increased significantly (p< 0.05 in patients compared with  the control group. Also, there were  significant abnormality and complication when compared with control groups. So there was significant correlation between celiac disease and infertility and there is some effect on baby of women with celiac disease

  11. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytometric pattern is more accurate than subepithelial deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA for the diagnosis of celiac disease in lymphocytic enteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández-Bañares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increase in CD3+TCRγδ+ and a decrease in CD3- intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL is a characteristic flow cytometric pattern of celiac disease (CD with atrophy. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of both CD IEL cytometric pattern and anti-TG2 IgA subepithelial deposit analysis (CD IF pattern for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to CD. METHODS: Two-hundred and five patients (144 females who underwent duodenal biopsy for clinical suspicion of CD and positive celiac genetics were prospectively included. Fifty had villous atrophy, 70 lymphocytic enteritis, and 85 normal histology. Eight patients with non-celiac atrophy and 15 with lymphocytic enteritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori acted as control group. Duodenal biopsies were obtained to assess both CD IEL flow cytometric (complete or incomplete and IF patterns. RESULTS: Sensitivity of IF, and complete and incomplete cytometric patterns for CD diagnosis in patients with positive serology (Marsh 1+3 was 92%, 85 and 97% respectively, but only the complete cytometric pattern had 100% specificity. Twelve seropositive and 8 seronegative Marsh 1 patients had a CD diagnosis at inclusion or after gluten free-diet, respectively. CD cytometric pattern showed a better diagnostic performance than both IF pattern and serology for CD diagnosis in lymphocytic enteritis at baseline (95% vs 60% vs 60%, p = 0.039. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the IEL flow cytometric pattern is a fast, accurate method for identifying CD in the initial diagnostic biopsy of patients presenting with lymphocytic enteritis, even in seronegative patients, and seems to be better than anti-TG2 intestinal deposits.

  12. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O

    2000-01-01

    The great majority of patients that are intolerant of wheat gluten protein due to celiac disease (CD) are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2(+), and the remaining few normally express HLA-DQ8. These two class II molecules are chiefly responsible for the presentation of gluten...... for T cell recognition. Gluten-specific T cell lines from 16 different adult patients all responded to one or both of these deamidated peptides, indicating that these epitopes are highly relevant to disease pathology. Binding studies showed that the deamidated peptides displayed an increased affinity...

  13. Endogenous proteolytic cleavage of disease-associated prion protein to produce C2 fragments is strongly cell- and tissue-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-04-02

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrP(Sc) N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrP(Sc) accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrP(Sc) proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrP(Sc) fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrP(Sc) and cell pathogenesis of prion infection.

  14. Endogenous Proteolytic Cleavage of Disease-associated Prion Protein to Produce C2 Fragments Is Strongly Cell- and Tissue-dependent*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrPSc) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrPSc N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrPSc accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrPSc proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrPSc fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrPSc and cell pathogenesis of prion infection. PMID:20154089

  15. Celiac Disease: Diagnostic Standards and Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Veeraraghavan, Gopal; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) affects at least 1% of the population and evidence suggests that prevalence is increasing. The diagnosis of CD depends on providers being alert to both typical and atypical presentations and those situations in which patients are at high risk for the disease. Because of variable presentation, physicians need to have a low threshold for celiac testing. Robust knowledge of the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Highly sensitive and specific serological assays including Endomysial Antibody (EMA), tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) have greatly simplified testing for CD and serve as the foundation for celiac diagnosis. In addition, genetic testing for HLA DQ2 and DQ8 has become more widely available and there has been refinement of the gluten challenge for use in diagnostic algorithms. While diagnosis is usually straightforward, in special conditions including IgA deficiency, very young children, discrepant histology and serology, and adoption of a gluten free diet prior to testing, CD can be difficult to diagnose. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and current state of celiac disease diagnosis and provide guidance for evaluation of CD in difficult diagnostic circumstances. PMID:28943611

  16. Prevalence and Morbidity of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease From a Community-based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, Rok Seon; Larson, Scott A.; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; King, Katherine S.; Larson, Joseph J.; Lahr, Brian D.; Poland, Gregory A.; Camilleri, Michael J.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Little is known about the prevalence and burden of undiagnosed celiac disease in individuals younger than 50 years old. We determined the prevalence and morbidity of undiagnosed celiac disease in individuals younger than 50 years in a community. Methods We tested sera from 31,255 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (younger than 50 years old) without a prior diagnosis of celiac disease assay using an assay for immunoglobulin A (IgA) against tissue transglutaminase (tTG); in subjects with positive test results, celiac disease was confirmed using an assay for endomysial IgA. We performed a nested case–control study to compare the proportion of comorbidities between undiagnosed cases of celiac disease and age- and sex-matched seronegative controls (1:2). Medical records were abstracted to identify potential comorbidities. Results We identified 338 of 30,425 adults with positive results from both serologic tests. Based on this finding, we estimated the prevalence of celiac disease to be 1.1% (95% CI, 1.0%–1.2%); 8 of 830 children tested positive for IgA against tTG (1.0%, 95% CI, 0.4%–1.9%). No typical symptoms or classic consequences of diagnosed celiac disease (diarrhea, anemia, or fracture) were associated with undiagnosed celiac disease. Undiagnosed celiac disease was associated with increased rates of hypothyroidism (odds ratio, 2.2; Pceliac disease at 5 years after testing was 10.8% in persons with undiagnosed celiac disease vs 0.1% in seronegative persons (PCeliac disease status was not associated with overall survival. Conclusions Based on serologic tests of a community population for celiac disease, we estimated the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease to be 1%. Undiagnosed celiac disease appeared to be clinically silent and remained undetected, but long-term outcomes have not been determined. PMID:27916669

  17. Celiac Disease Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders but as the case of Ms. J illustrates, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Based on serology studies, the prevalence of celiac disease in many populations is estimated to be approximately 1% and has been increasing steadily over the last 50 years. Evaluation for celiac disease is generally straightforward, and uses commonly available serologic tests, however the signs and symptoms of celiac disease are nonspecific and highly heterogeneous making diagnosis difficult. While celiac disease is often considered a mild disorder treatable with simple dietary changes, in reality celiac disease imparts considerable risks including reduced bone mineral density, impaired quality of life, and increased overall mortality. In addition, the gluten free diet is highly burdensome and can profoundly affect patients and their families. For these reasons, care of individuals with celiac disease requires prompt diagnosis and ongoing multidisciplinary management. PMID:21990301

  18. Celiac ganglia block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Akhan, Okan

    2005-01-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation

  19. Positive Celiac Disease Serology and Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Adult Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low bone density and osteoporosis have been demonstrated in celiac disease populations in Europe, South America and the United States. Serological testing with tissue transglutaminase (TTG and immunoglobulin A endomysial (EMA antibodies is highly specific for celiac disease, while antigliadin antibody (AGA testing is less specific.

  20. Rituximab versus cyclophosphamide for the treatment of connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (RECITAL): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Peter; Tsipouri, Vicky; Keir, Gregory J; Ashby, Deborah; Flather, Marcus D; Parfrey, Helen; Babalis, Daphne; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Denton, Christopher P; Wells, Athol U; Maher, Toby M

    2017-06-15

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) frequently complicates systemic autoimmune disorders resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. The connective tissue diseases (CTDs) most frequently resulting in ILD include: systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myositis (including dermatomyositis, polymyositis and anti-synthetase syndrome) and mixed connective tissue disease. Despite the development, over the last two decades, of a range of biological therapies which have resulted in significant improvements in the treatment of the systemic manifestations of CTD, the management of CTD-associated ILD has changed little. At present there are no approved therapies for CTD-ILD. Following trials in scleroderma-ILD, cyclophosphamide is the accepted standard of care for individuals with severe or progressive CTD-related ILD. Observational studies have suggested that the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, is an effective rescue therapy in the treatment of refractory CTD-ILD. However, before now, there have been no randomised controlled trials assessing the efficacy of rituximab in this treatment population. RECITAL is a UK, multicentre, prospective, randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, controlled trial funded by the Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme of the Medical Research Council and National Institute for Health Research. The trial will compare rituximab 1 g given intravenously, twice at an interval of 2 weeks, with intravenously administered cyclophosphamide given monthly at a dose of 600 mg/m 2 body surface area in individuals with ILD due to systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myositis (including anti-synthetase syndrome) or mixed connective tissue disease. A total of 116 individuals will be randomised 1:1 to each of the two treatment arms, with stratification based on underlying CTD, and will be followed for a total of 48 weeks from first dose. The primary endpoint for the study will be change in forced vital capacity (FVC) at 24

  1. Illumina MiSeq 16S amplicon sequence analysis of bovine respiratory disease associated bacteria in lung and mediastinal lymph node tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Dayle; Earley, Bernadette; Cormican, Paul; Murray, Gerard; Kenny, David Anthony; Waters, Sinead Mary; McGee, Mark; Kelly, Alan Kieran; McCabe, Matthew Sean

    2017-05-02

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is caused by growth of single or multiple species of pathogenic bacteria in lung tissue following stress and/or viral infection. Next generation sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR amplicons (NGS 16S amplicon analysis) is a powerful culture-independent open reference method that has recently been used to increase understanding of BRD-associated bacteria in the upper respiratory tract of BRD cattle. However, it has not yet been used to examine the microbiome of the bovine lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to use NGS 16S amplicon analysis to identify bacteria in post-mortem lung and lymph node tissue samples harvested from fatal BRD cases and clinically healthy animals. Cranial lobe and corresponding mediastinal lymph node post-mortem tissue samples were collected from calves diagnosed as BRD cases by veterinary laboratory pathologists and from clinically healthy calves. NGS 16S amplicon libraries, targeting the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were prepared and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq. Quantitative insights into microbial ecology (QIIME) was used to determine operational taxonomic units (OTUs) which corresponded to the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Leptotrichiaceae, Mycoplasma, Pasteurellaceae, and Fusobacterium were the most abundant OTUs identified in the lungs and lymph nodes of the calves which died from BRD. Leptotrichiaceae, Fusobacterium, Mycoplasma, Trueperella and Bacteroides had greater relative abundances in post-mortem lung samples collected from fatal cases of BRD in dairy calves, compared with clinically healthy calves without lung lesions. Leptotrichiaceae, Mycoplasma and Pasteurellaceae showed higher relative abundances in post-mortem lymph node samples collected from fatal cases of BRD in dairy calves, compared with clinically healthy calves without lung lesions. Two Leptotrichiaceae sequence contigs were subsequently assembled from bacterial DNA-enriched shotgun sequences

  2. Celiac Disease: Four Inches and Seven Pounds...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  3. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Pay Your Bill MyChildren's Patient Portal Celiac Disease Program Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617- ... Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you ...

  4. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking ... What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten- ...

  5. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At ... Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a ...

  6. Celiac Disease in Oman: A Tertiary Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfiq Taki Al-Lawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of encounter of celiac disease in Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Methods: Retrospective study of records of all adult and pediatric patients in Royal Hospital from the period of 1/4/2006 to 31/3/2012. Data regarding symptoms, anthropometry of the patients, haemoglobuin levels, liver and thyroid functions were retrieved. Diagnosis of celiac disease was established based on combination of serological detection of anti tissues transglutaminase (tTG or anti endomysial antibodies (EMA with duodenal biopsy.Results: Only 9 children were identified in the hospital during the period of study. Two children were identified by screening protocol for Insulin Dependent Diabetes Melitus (IDDM and one child from short stature workup. Six children presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea. Four children were severely wasted and stunted. No adult patients were identified with celiac disease. Anaemia was noted in 3 children and none had deranged thyroid functions.Conclusion: Celiac disease is infrequently encountered in Royal Hospital and might be under diagnosed. The low rate of celiac disease in children with IDDM might indicate a different genetic composition. Awareness about celiac disease and family screening should be implemented in Oman.

  7. Enteroscopy in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Saladino, Valeria; de Franchis, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with 3 to 6 biopsies in the descending duodenum is the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease. At the time of the first diagnosis of celiac disease, an extensive evaluation of the small bowel is not recommended. However, video capsule endoscopy, because of its good sensitivity and specificity in recognizing the Endoscopic features of celiac disease, can be considered a valid alternative to EGD in patients unable or unwilling to undergo EGD with biopsies. Capsule endoscopy is also a possible option in selected cases with strong suspicion of celiac disease but negative first-line tests. In evaluating patients with refractory or complicated celiac disease, in whom a complete evaluation of the small bowel is mandatory (at least in refractory celiac disease type II patients) because of the possible presence of complications beyond the reach of conventional endoscopes, both capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy have been found to be helpful. In these patients, capsule endoscopy offers several advantages: it is well tolerated, it allows inspection of the entire small bowel, and it is able to recognize subtle mucosal changes. However, in this setting, capsule endoscopy should ideally be coupled with imaging techniques that provide important information about the thickness of the wall of the intestine and about extraluminal abnormalities. Although deep enteroscopy (such as balloon enteroscopy) is expensive, time-consuming, and potentially risky in these frail patients, they may have a key role, because they make it possible to take tissue samples from deep in the small intestine.

  8. Small bowel carcinomas in celiac or Crohn's disease: distinctive histophenotypic, molecular and histogenetic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Martino, Michele; Klersy, Catherine; Grillo, Federica; Mescoli, Claudia; Nesi, Gabriella; Volta, Umberto; Fornino, Daniele; Luinetti, Ombretta; Fociani, Paolo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Cannizzaro, Renato; Latella, Giovanni; Ciacci, Carolina; Biancone, Livia; Paulli, Marco; Sessa, Fausto; Rugge, Massimo; Fiocca, Roberto; Corazza, Gino R; Solcia, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    Non-familial small bowel carcinomas are relatively rare and have a poor prognosis. Two small bowel carcinoma subsets may arise in distinct immune-inflammatory diseases (celiac disease and Crohn's disease) and have been recently suggested to differ in prognosis, celiac disease-associated carcinoma cases showing a better outcome, possibly due to their higher DNA microsatellite instability and tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated the histological structure (glandular vs diffuse/poorly cohesive, mixed or solid), cell phenotype (intestinal vs gastric/pancreatobiliary duct type) and Wnt signaling activation (β-catenin and/or SOX-9 nuclear expression) in a series of 26 celiac disease-associated small bowel carcinoma, 25 Crohn's disease-associated small bowel carcinoma and 25 sporadic small bowel carcinoma cases, searching for new prognostic parameters. In addition, non-tumor mucosa of celiac and Crohn's disease patients was investigated for epithelial precursor changes (hyperplastic, metaplastic or dysplastic) to help clarify carcinoma histogenesis. When compared with non-glandular structure and non-intestinal phenotype, both glandular structure and intestinal phenotype were associated with a more favorable outcome at univariable or stage- and microsatellite instability/tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte-inclusive multivariable analysis. The prognostic power of histological structure was independent of the clinical groups while the non-intestinal phenotype, associated with poor outcome, was dominant among Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma. Both nuclear β-catenin and SOX-9 were preferably expressed among celiac disease-associated carcinomas; however, they were devoid, per se, of prognostic value. We obtained findings supporting an origin of celiac disease-associated carcinoma in SOX-9-positive immature hyperplastic crypts, partly through flat β-catenin-positive dysplasia, and of Crohn's disease-associated carcinoma in a metaplastic (gastric and

  9. Genetics of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier

    New insights into the underlying molecular pathophysiology of celiac disease (CeD) over the last few years have been guided by major advances in the fields of genetics and genomics. The development and use of the Immunochip genotyping platform paved the way for the discovery of 39 non-HLA loci

  10. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tested for celiac disease and if negative the test should be repeated on a periodic basis. These conditions include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (requiring insulin therapy), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Turner’s syndrome, Williams syndrome, Graves disease and Sjogren’s disease. what turns ...

  11. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying candidates ...

  12. Celiac Disease in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM): A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Neetu; Ameta, Gaurav; Chahar, Chandra Kumar

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of Celiac disease among children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This prospective observational study was conducted in PBM Children Hospital, Bikaner from July 2012 through December 2013. All consecutively admitted children with SAM were recruited. All subjects were screened for Celiac disease by serological test for IgA-anti tissue Transglutaminase (IgA tTG) antibodies. All seropositive children underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for small bowel biopsy for the confirmation. Clinical features of patients with and without celiac disease were compared. The sero-prevalence (IgA tTg positivity) of Celiac disease was found to be 15.38% while prevalence of biopsy confirmed Celiac disease was 14.42% among SAM children. Abdominal distension, diarrhea, anorexia, constipation, pain in abdomen, vitamin deficiencies, edema, clubbing and mouth ulcers were more common in patients of Celiac disease compared to patients without Celiac disease but the difference was statistically significant only for abdominal distension and pain abdomen. There is a high prevalence of Celiac disease in SAM. Screening for Celiac disease (especially in presence of pain abdomen and abdominal distension) should be an essential part of work-up in all children with SAM.

  13. The role of nailfold capillaroscopy in interstitial lung diseases - can it differentiate idiopathic cases from collagen tissue disease associated interstitial lung diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakmakçı Karadoğan, Dilek; Balkarlı, Ayşe; Önal, Özgür; Altınışık, Göksel; Çobankara, Veli

    2015-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) is a non-invasive diagnostic test that is mostly used for early diagnosis of collagen tissue diseases (CTDs). We aimed to evaluate whether NFC findings could be a clue for discriminating idiopathic interstitial lung diseases (ILD) from CTD associated ILDs (CTD-ILD). Additionally it was aimed to determine whether NFC could be helpful in discriminating usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern from non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pattern. We grouped patients into three main groups: 15 CTD-ILD, 18 idiopathic ILD, and 17 patients in the control group. The CTD-ILD group was split into two subgroups: 8 patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SJS)-associated ILD and 7 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ILD. The idiopathic-ILD group consisted of 10 idiopathic NSIP and 8 IPF patients. The control group consisted of 10 SJS and 7 RA patients without lung disease. None of the patients were on acute exacerbation at the time of examination, and none had Reynaud's phenomenon. Mean capillary density was significantly reduced only in the CTD-ILD group as compared to the control group (p= 0.006). In subgroup analysis, it was determined that RA-ILD, IPF, and SJS-ILD subgroups had more severe capillaroscopic abnormalities. Mean capillary density in patients with the UIP pattern was reduced compared to patients with the NSIP pattern and those in the control group; p values were 0.008 and nailfold capillaroscopic findings of patients with NSIP and UIP patterns. NFC findings can be helpful in discriminating UIP patterns from NSIP patterns. But to show its role in differentiating idiopathic disease, more studies with more patients are needed.

  14. Cesarean section and disease associated with immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Henriksen, Lonny

    2016-01-01

    colitis and celiac disease, whereas children delivered by elective CS had an increased risk of lower respiratory tract infection and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The effect of elective CS was higher than the effect of acute CS on the risk of asthma. CONCLUSION: Children delivered by CS are at increased......BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have shown that delivery by cesarean section (CS) is associated with an increased risk of disease associated with immune function in the offspring, but these studies have generally not discriminated between the effect of acute and elective CS. OBJECTIVE: We sought...... to further explore these associations using discrimination between the effects of acute versus elective CS. METHODS: We performed a population- and national register-based cohort study including all children born in Denmark from January 1997 through December 2012. Hazard ratios for diseases associated...

  15. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  16. Barriers impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in clinically high-prevalence populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is present in ~1% of the general population in the United States and Europe. Despite the availability of inexpensive serologic screening tests, ~85% of individuals with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and there is an average delay in diagnosis of symptomatic individuals with celiac disease that ranges from ~5.8-11 years. This delay is often attributed to the use of a case-based approach for detection rather than general population screening for celiac disease, and deficiencies at the level of health care professionals. This study aimed to assess if patient-centered barriers have a role in impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in individuals from populations that are clinically at an increased risk for celiac disease. Methods 119 adults meeting study inclusion criteria for being at a higher risk for celiac disease were recruited from the general population. Participants completed a survey/questionnaire at the William K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease that addressed demographic information, celiac disease related symptoms (gastrointestinal and extraintestinal), family history, co-morbid diseases and conditions associated with celiac disease, and patient-centered barriers to screening for celiac disease. All participants underwent serologic screening for celiac disease using the IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA tTG) and, if positive, testing for IgA anti-endomysial antibody (IgA EMA) as a confirmatory test. Results Two barriers to serologic testing were significant across the participant pool. These were participants not knowing they were at risk for celiac disease before learning of the study, and participants not knowing where to get tested for celiac disease. Among participants with incomes less than $25,000/year and those less than the median age, not having a doctor to order the test was a significant barrier, and this strongly correlated with not having health insurance. Symptoms and co

  17. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  18. Celiac disease : towards new therapeutic modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in

  19. Neutrophil recruitment and barrier impairment in celiac disease : A genomic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosdado, Begona; Van Bakel, Harm; Strengman, Eric; Franke, Lude; Van Oort, Erica; Mulder, Chris J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wapenaar, Martin C.

    Background & Aims: Celiac disease is an enteropathy featuring villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and lymphocytosis. Tissue remodeling is driven by an inflammatory reaction to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The adaptive pathway is considered the major immune response but recent

  20. Giant true celiac artery aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljabri, Badr

    2009-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic. The management of these aneurysms is challenging, especially when they are large and involve the confluence of the trifurcation. We present here a case of a large celiac artery aneurysm involving its branches in a young woman. Preoperative investigations, intraoperative findings, and the operative procedure are also presented and discussed. (author

  1. A Case with Acute Celiac Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Taner Özgür; Fatih Kılıçbay; Zeliha Yeğin

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms and signs. Some patients may be asymptomatic though some may present with acute celiac crisis, which is a rare and serious complication of celiac disease. Here we present a patient who presented with a physically ill appearance, hypokalemia, hypoalbuminemia and was treated successfully with gluten-free diet, steroids and electrolyte replacement therapy. Acute celiac crisis, which is a rare complication of celiac disease w...

  2. Decrease by 50% of plasma IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody concentrations within 2 months after start of gluten-free diet in children with celiac disease used as a confirming diagnostic test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Hermansen, Mette N; Pedersen, Merete F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histological examination of small bowel biopsies is normally the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). The objective of this study was to investigate whether the rate of decreases in elevated plasma IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and/or IgG deamidated...... gliadin peptides antibody (IgG - DGP) concentrations could be used as a confirming test for CD in children on a gluten-free diet (GFD) when biopsy was omitted in the diagnostic process. METHODS: In this retrospective study we compared children (≤18 years old) with a CD-confirming biopsy (n = 16......) to children without a biopsy (n = 18). After initiation of GFD the antibody half-life (the time (T½) when the antibody concentration is 50% decreased) was determined in all children. RESULTS: Children with a biopsy (IgA-tTG, T½ = 1.9 months; IgG - DGP, T½ = 2.2 months) and children without a biopsy (Ig...

  3. Global Prevalence of Celiac Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Arora, Ananya; Strand, Tor A; Leffler, Daniel A; Catassi, Carlo; Green, Peter H; Kelly, Ciaran P; Ahuja, Vineet; Makharia, Govind K

    2018-06-01

    Celiac disease is a major public health problem worldwide. Although initially it was reported from countries with predominant Caucasian populations, it now has been reported from other parts of the world. The exact global prevalence of celiac disease is not known. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. We searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords celiac disease, celiac, celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase antibody, anti-endomysium antibody, endomysial antibody, and prevalence for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. Each article was cross-referenced with the words Asia, Europe, Africa, South America, North America, and Australia. The diagnosis of celiac disease was based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. Of 3843 articles, 96 articles were included in the final analysis. The pooled global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.1%-1.7%) in 275,818 individuals, based on positive results from tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies (called seroprevalence). The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5%-0.9%) in 138,792 individuals. The prevalence values for celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was higher in female vs male individuals (0.6% vs 0.4%; P celiac disease was significantly greater in children than adults (0.9% vs 0.5%; P celiac disease to be reported worldwide. The prevalence of celiac disease based on serologic test results is 1.4% and based on biopsy results is 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. There is a need for population-based prevalence studies in many countries. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A biopsy is not always necessary to diagnose celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M.; Gerritsen, Susan A. M.; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H. J.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal histology is the criterion standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). However, results of serological tests such as anti-endomysium antibodies and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) are becoming increasingly reliable. This raises the question of whether a small

  5. Positive predictive value of serological diagnostic measures in celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftedal, Peter; Nielsen, Christian; Madsen, Jonas Trolle

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) antibodies, immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA) are first-line diagnostic tools used in selecting patients for duodenal biopsy. The goal of this study was to evaluate...

  6. Celiac disease and its histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is gluten induced enteropathy and is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine characterized by malabsorption. It is a common immune mediated disorder which is triggered by consumption of wheat (gluten. It occurs in genetically predisposed individuals (carriers of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes. It is characterized by inflammation of the small-intestinal mucosa and myriad gastrointestinal and systemic manifestations. A duodenal biopsy with positive serology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Celiac disease. As there are changing presentation for Celiac disease, communication of pathologist and gastroenterologists is essential for appropriate interpretation of duodenal biopsy.

  7. Celiac disease diagnosis: impact of guidelines on medical prescription in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bach Nga; Musset, Lucile; Chyderiotis, Georges; Olsson, Nils Olivier; Fabien, Nicole

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease is a complex autoimmune disease affecting patients of any age, who may present a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Different guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease have been recently published. The aim of this study was to determine whether the recommendations issued in these guidelines have been adopted by physicians in France when celiac disease was suspected. A total of 5521 physicians were asked to fill in a detailed questionnaire on diagnosing celiac disease to evaluate their medical practice, as to the type of symptoms leading to the suspicion of celiac disease, the prescription of duodenal biopsy or serological tests, the type of serological tests (anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-endomysium, anti-gliadin and anti-reticulin antibodies, total immunoglobulin A measurement) prescribed to diagnose celiac disease. The analysis of the responses of 256 general practitioners (GPs), 221 gastroenterologists and 227 pediatricians showed that the protean clinical presentations of celiac disease might be better recognized by gastroenterologists and pediatricians than by GPs. Gastroenterologists asked for duodenal biopsy much more often than GPs and pediatricians when celiac disease was suspected. Serological testing and knowledge of critical markers, prescribed to diagnose celiac disease, differed among GPs, gastroenterologists and pediatricians. Analysis of medical prescriptions showed that the recommendations for celiac disease diagnosis are not necessarily followed by physicians, emphasizing the fact that the impact of national or international guidelines on medical behavior should be evaluated. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Celiac disease in children from Madeira island and its prevalence in first degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana Raquel Henriques; Cabral, António Jorge; Ferreira, Elena; Capelinha, Filipa; Spínola, Hélder; Gonçalves, Rute

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that celiac disease is an immune-mediated systemic disorder highly prevalent among relatives of celiac patients. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of first degree relatives of celiac children, and to access the frequency of human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 in celiac disease patients and their affected relatives. A survey was conducted of 39 children with celiac disease with follow-up in the Pediatric outpatient's clinic of Dr. Nélio Mendonça Hospital, in Madeira Island, Portugal. Were invited 110 first degree relatives to undergo serological screen for celiac disease with IgA antibody to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGG) quantification. In all seropositive relatives, small intestinal biopsy and HLA typing was recommended. HLA- typing was performed in 38 celiac patients, 28/74% DQ2 positive, 1/2% DQ8 positive and 9/24% incomplete DQ2. Positive IgA-TGG was found in five out of the 95 relatives, and CD was diagnosed in three of them. Three relatives had the presence of HLA-DQ2, two were DQ2 incomplete (DQB1*02). The prevalence of celiac disease among first degree celiac patients´ relatives was 3.1%, 4.5 times higher than the general Portuguese population (0,7%) witch reinforces the need of extensive diagnostic screening in this specific group. HLA-DQ2 typing may be a tool in the diagnostic approach.

  9. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  10. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  11. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  12. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Størdal, Ketil; Plato Hansen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  13. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; OEmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease. The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient. The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults.

  14. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss ? A Celiac Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain ? chronic diarrhea ? lightheadedness ? weakness ? weight loss Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease ? a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-...

  15. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  16. Global epidemiology of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bykova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the data on the prevalence of celiac disease in various world regions. The numbers of patients with celiac disease continues to rise every year. According to some authors, this is to be related not only to improvement in diagnosis, but to other extrinsic factors, as well, that require additional studies. In the 1980s the prevalence of this disease was 1.05%, and by the beginning of 2000s, it amounted to 1.99%. In particular, from 1993 to 2002 in Britain its incidence increased from 6 to 13.3 per 100,000. Both raised awareness of doctors and conduction of epidemiological studies play a decisive role in the improvement of the diagnosis of celiac disease. The information cumulated up to now makes it possible to conclude that the highest diagnostic rates of celiac disease can be found in the risk groups. They include 1st and 2nd degree relatives of patients with celiac disease, patients with autoimmune disorders (type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis; those with clinical signs of an intestinal disorder, such as chronic diarrhea, as well as patients with anemia, osteoporosis and high transaminase levels of unknown origin. According to the Finnish epidemiological study, the prevalence of celiac disease, depending on the risk group, may vary from 6.6 to 16.3%. The guidelines by the American College of Gastroenterology, British Society of Gastroenterology, North-American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, and the Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Adults and Children all recommend thorough examination of patients from the risk groups. Active diagnosis of celiac disease (screening has been recognized as one of the approaches to primary prevention to autoimmune disorders and cancer.

  17. Celiac disease in non-clinical populations of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mai; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukuyama, Chika; Izumi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Araki, Asuka; Oka, Akihiko; Mishiro, Tomoko; Ishihara, Shunji; Maruyama, Riruke; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-02-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten ingestion. While its prevalence in Western countries is reported to be as high as 1%, the prevalence has not been evaluated in a large-scale study of a Japanese population. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible presence of celiac disease in a Japanese non-clinical population as well as in patients showing symptoms suggestive of the disease. Serum samples were collected from 2008 non-clinical adults and 47 patients with chronic unexplained abdominal symptoms between April 2014 and June 2016. The anti-tissue transglutaminase (TTG) immunoglobulin A antibody titer was determined as a screening test for celiac disease in all subjects, and individuals with a value of >2 U/mL subsequently underwent testing for the presence of serum endomysial IgA antibody (EMA) as confirmation. Those testing positive for EMA or with a high concentration (>10 U/mL) of TTG were further investigated by histopathological examinations of duodenal mucosal biopsy specimens and HLA typing tests. Of the 2008 non-clinical adults from whom serum samples were collected, 161 tested positive for TTG, and all tested negative for EMA. Four subjects who had a high TTG titer were invited to undergo confirmatory testing, and the histopathological results confirmed the presence of celiac disease in only a single case (0.05%). Of the 47 symptomatic patients, one (2.1%) was found to have a high TTG titer and was diagnosed with celiac disease based on duodenal histopathological findings. The presence of celiac disease in a non-clinical Japanese population was low at 0.05% and was rarely found in patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms.

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  19. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition for Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Section Navigation Celiac Disease Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Celiac Disease What should I avoid eating if I have ...

  20. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Group Patient Resources Gluten Free Cookbooks Gluten Free Recipes Videos Experiencing Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From ...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease ... Support Group : Resources and support for families. XII. Kids Speak : What kids with celiac disease have to ...

  3. Screening for celiac disease in a North American population: sequential serology and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Kent D; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Lahr, Brian D; Melton, L Joseph; Krause, Patricia K; Maggi, Kristine; Talley, Nicholas J; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease is celiac disease and the utility of screening in the general adult population of a geographically isolated area. Serum tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-IgA) were measured in volunteer health-care participants aged ≥ 18 years at the annual Casper, Wyoming, Blue Envelope Health Fair blood draw. Subjects with positive tTG-IgA tests had their endomysial IgA antibodies checked. Double positives were offered endoscopy with small bowel biopsy. All subjects completed a short gastrointestinal (GI) symptom questionnaire. A total of 3,850 residents of the Natrona County had serologic evaluation for celiac disease, 34 of whom tested positive for both tTG and endomysial antibody (EMA) IgA. Excluding three individuals with previous diagnosis of celiac disease, the overall prevalence of positive celiac serology in this community sample was 0.8%. All 31 subjects were offered a small bowel biopsy. Of the 18 biopsied subjects, 17 (94%) had at least partial villous atrophy. Symptoms that were reported by the fair attendees did not predict positivity. Screening for celiac disease was widely accepted in this preventative health-care setting. Undiagnosed celiac disease affects 1 in 126 individuals in this Wyoming community. Most were asymptomatic or had atypical presentations. Serologic testing can readily detect this disease in a general population.

  4. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8% were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5 years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  5. Risk of Pediatric Celiac Disease According to HLA Haplotype and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Edwin; Lee, Hye-Seung; Aronsson, Carin A.; Hagopian, William A.; Koletzko, Sibylle; Rewers, Marian J.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Bingley, Polly J.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Simell, Ville; Agardh, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The presence of HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. In addition, nearly all children with celiac disease have serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG). METHODS We studied 6403 children with HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 prospectively from birth in the United States, Finland, Germany, and Sweden. The primary end point was the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, which was defined as the presence of tTG antibodies on two consecutive tests at least 3 months apart. The secondary end point was the development of celiac disease, which was defined for the purpose of this study as either a diagnosis on biopsy or persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. RESULTS The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 46 to 77). Celiac disease autoimmunity developed in 786 children (12%). Of the 350 children who underwent biopsy, 291 had confirmed celiac disease; an additional 21 children who did not undergo biopsy had persistently high levels of tTG antibodies. The risks of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 11% and 3%, respectively, among children with a single DR3–DQ2 haplotype, and 26% and 11%, respectively, among those with two copies (DR3–DQ2 homozygosity). In the adjusted model, the hazard ratios for celiac disease autoimmunity were 2.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70 to 2.56) among heterozygotes and 5.70 (95% CI, 4.66 to 6.97) among homozygotes, as compared with children who had the lowest-risk genotypes (DR4–DQ8 heterozygotes or homozygotes). Residence in Sweden was also independently associated with an increased risk of celiac disease autoimmunity (hazard ratio, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.25). CONCLUSIONS Children with the HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2, especially homozygotes, were found to be at high risk for celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease early in childhood. The higher risk in Sweden than in other countries

  6. Quality of patients life with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bičíková, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with the quality of life of patients with celiac disease. In the theoretical part, I am presenting the characteristics of celiac disease and I am describing its history briefly. For better orientation in the issue, I also joined a description of the anatomy of the small intestine and pathophysiology of celiac disease. In this thesis I am also dealing with incidence of disease, etiology and risk factors participating in the development of celiac disease, symptoms and the...

  7. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I. Introduction : Experiencing Celiac Disease II. What is Celiac Disease? : Diagnosis and treatment III. Diet Information : How to start and maintain a gluten-free diet. IV. A Gluten-Free Home : How to keep your kitchen ... to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order ...

  8. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Donate Pay Your Bill MyChildren's Patient Portal Celiac Disease Program Contact the Celiac Disease Program 1-617- ... Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you ...

  9. Celiac disease : how complicated can it get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common inflammatory disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by ingested gluten proteins. Previous studies identified crucial steps in the development of celiac disease and based on this knowledge, we propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease

  10. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   1-The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not- performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be awared about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests 2-The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3- The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing  for DQ8 and  DQ2 should be done. 4-The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN , positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5-In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6-In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7-Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  

  11. The molecular basis for oat intolerance in patients with celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Arentz-Hansen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a small intestinal inflammatory disorder characterized by malabsorption, nutrient deficiency, and a range of clinical manifestations. It is caused by an inappropriate immune response to dietary gluten and is treated with a gluten-free diet. Recent feeding studies have indicated oats to be safe for celiac disease patients, and oats are now often included in the celiac disease diet. This study aimed to investigate whether oat intolerance exists in celiac disease and to characterize the cells and processes underlying this intolerance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected for study nine adults with celiac disease who had a history of oats exposure. Four of the patients had clinical symptoms on an oats-containing diet, and three of these four patients had intestinal inflammation typical of celiac disease at the time of oats exposure. We established oats-avenin-specific and -reactive intestinal T-cell lines from these three patients, as well as from two other patients who appeared to tolerate oats. The avenin-reactive T-cell lines recognized avenin peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2. These peptides have sequences rich in proline and glutamine residues closely resembling wheat gluten epitopes. Deamidation (glutamine-->glutamic acid conversion by tissue transglutaminase was involved in the avenin epitope formation. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that some celiac disease patients have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells that can cause mucosal inflammation. Oat intolerance may be a reason for villous atrophy and inflammation in patients with celiac disease who are eating oats but otherwise are adhering to a strict gluten-free diet. Clinical follow-up of celiac disease patients eating oats is advisable.

  12. [Histological diagnosis and complications of celiac disease. Update according to the new S2k guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, D E; Bläker, H

    2015-03-01

    Celiac disease is a relatively common immunological systemic disease triggered by the protein gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Classical symptoms like chronic diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss and growth retardation are nowadays relatively uncommon. Diagnostic workup includes serological tests for IgA antibodies against tissue transglutaminase 2 (anti-TG2-IgA) and total IgA and histology of duodenal biopsies. Histomorphological classification should be done according to the modified Marsh-Oberhuber classification. Diagnosis of celiac disease should be based on serological, clinical, and histological findings. The only treatment is a life-long gluten-free diet. Unchanged or recurrent symptoms under gluten-free diet may indicate refractory celiac disease. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine are known complications of celiac disease.

  13. Increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease in elderly people: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilppula, Anitta; Kaukinen, Katri; Luostarinen, Liisa; Krekelä, Ilkka; Patrikainen, Heikki; Valve, Raisa; Mäki, Markku; Collin, Pekka

    2009-06-29

    Celiac disease may emerge at any age, but little is known of its appearance in elderly people. We evaluated the prevalence of the condition in individuals over 55 years of age, and determined the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb) and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s). The study based on prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002. A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. Positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies were confirmed with small bowel biopsy. Within three years the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. Five new cases were found among patients previously seronegative; two had minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. The incidence of celiac disease in 2002-2005 was 0.23%, giving an annual incidence of 0.08% in this population. The prevalence of celiac disease was high in elderly people, but the symptoms were subtle. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may develop even in the elderly. Increased alertness to the disorder is therefore warranted.

  14. Increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease in elderly people: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilppula Anitta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease may emerge at any age, but little is known of its appearance in elderly people. We evaluated the prevalence of the condition in individuals over 55 years of age, and determined the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s. Methods The study based on prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002. A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. Positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies were confirmed with small bowel biopsy. Results Within three years the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. Five new cases were found among patients previously seronegative; two had minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. The incidence of celiac disease in 2002–2005 was 0.23%, giving an annual incidence of 0.08% in this population. Conclusion The prevalence of celiac disease was high in elderly people, but the symptoms were subtle. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may develop even in the elderly. Increased alertness to the disorder is therefore warranted.

  15. Possible association between celiac disease and bacterial transglutaminase in food processing: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of celiac disease is increasing worldwide, and human tissue transglutaminase has long been considered the autoantigen of celiac disease. Concomitantly, the food industry has introduced ingredients such as microbial transglutaminase, which acts as a food glue, thereby revolutionizing food qualities. Several observations have led to the hypothesis that microbial transglutaminase is a new environmental enhancer of celiac disease. First, microbial transglutaminase deamidates/transamidates glutens such as the endogenous human tissue transglutaminase. It is capable of crosslinking proteins and other macromolecules, thereby changing their antigenicity and resulting in an increased antigenic load presented to the immune system. Second, it increases the stability of protein against proteinases, thus diminishing foreign protein elimination. Infections and the crosslinked nutritional constituent gluten and microbial transglutaminase increase the permeability of the intestine, where microbial transglutaminases are necessary for bacterial survival. The resulting intestinal leakage allows more immunogenic foreign molecules to induce celiac disease. The increased use of microbial transglutaminase in food processing may promote celiac pathogenesis ex vivo, where deamidation/transamidation starts, possibly explaining the surge in incidence of celiac disease. If future research substantiates this hypothesis, the findings will affect food product labeling, food additive policies of the food industry, and consumer health education. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  16. Utility of testing patients, on presentation, for serologic features of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Melpakkam; Basumani, Pandurangan; Podmore, Geoff; Shrimpton, Anna; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2014-06-01

    Celiac disease shares features of other disorders. It can be diagnosed conclusively only based on duodenal histology analysis, which is not practical for screening purposes. Serologic analysis might be used to identify candidates for biopsy analysis. We aimed to develop a simple diagnostic approach that all clinicians could follow to increase the percentage of patients accurately diagnosed with celiac disease at initial presentation. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 752 patients (88 with celiac disease, none were IgA deficient) who attended a UK district general hospital from January 2007 through December 2008 and underwent biopsy analysis and serologic tests to measure endomyseal antibodies and IgA antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG). Patients avoiding gluten in their diet were excluded. Patients were assigned to 1 of 4 groups: high-risk (based on presence of anemia, chronic diarrhea, unintentional weight loss, or dermatitis herpetiformis), low-risk (based on such factors as dyspepsia, abnormal liver function, ataxia, or chronic cough), nutrient deficiency (based on levels of iron, vitamins B12 and D, or folate), or screening (because they had type 1 diabetes or a family history of celiac disease). Patients with celiac disease were identified using the modified Marsh criteria (grades 1-3) for interpreting duodenal histology. We compared clinical category, serology profiles, and biopsy results between patients with and without celiac disease. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 64 of 565 patients in the high-risk group (11%), 14 of 156 patients in the low-risk group (9%; P = .47 compared with high-risk group), 7 of 28 patients in the nutrient-deficiency group, and 3 of 3 patients in the screening group. Among 71 patients who tested positive for both antibodies (tTG and endomyseal antibodies), the positive predictive value for celiac disease was 97%; a negative test result for tTG had a negative predictive value of 98%. Among 708 patients

  17. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Borrelia infection and risk of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaedini, Armin; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wormser, Gary P; Green, Peter H; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-09-15

    Environmental factors, including infectious agents, are speculated to play a role in the rising prevalence and the geographic distribution of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder. In the USA and Sweden where the regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease has been studied, a similarity with the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, has been found, thus raising the possibility of a link. We aimed to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease. Biopsy reports from all of Sweden's pathology departments were used to identify 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. Through linkage to the nationwide Patient Register, we compared the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, we also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Twenty-five individuals (0.16%) with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease, whereas 79 (0.5%) had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease. A modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before (odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-2.47) and after the diagnosis of celiac disease (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.35), with the risk of disease being highest in the first year of follow-up. Only a minor fraction of the celiac disease patient population had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease. The similar association between Lyme disease and celiac disease both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease is strongly suggestive of surveillance bias as a likely contributor. Taken together, the data indicate that Borrelia infection is not a substantive risk factor in the development of celiac disease.

  19. Communicable diseases associated with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dil, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The diseases associated with contaminated water remain among the most serious public health problems for much of the world's population living in developing countries. Most of the disease agents that contaminated water and food are biological and come from animal or human faeces. They include bacteria, viruses, protozoa and helminths and multiply in the alimentary tract and are excreted with the faeces. Without proper sanitation they find their way into other water bodies from where they can infect other people. Most of the diseases associated with water are communicable. According to Bradley the diseases associated with water can be classified in four categories: waterborne water-washed, water-based and water related and a fifth category emerging in developed countries could be called water-dispersed. The experiences of these diseases in various in various parts of Pakistan and the role played by National Institute of Health (NIH) in investigation will be discussed: some of them being hepatitis E epidemic in Islamabad (1993,94,95), experience at Nawabshah and some others will be discussed in detail along with their preventive and control measures. (author)

  20. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the activ...

  1. Tooth Wear Is Frequent in Adult Patients with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Celiac disease (CD patients can be affected by mouth and tooth disorders, which are influenced by their gluten-free diet. The aim of our research was to evaluate the pathological conditions of the stomatognathic system observed in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. (2 Methods: we consecutively recruited celiac patients on a gluten-free diet at our celiac center, as well as healthy volunteers. Two dentists examined all patients/controls and checked them for any mouth disorder. (3 Results: Forty-nine patients affected by celiac disease (age at test 31.8 ± 11.58, time on GFD 8.73 ± 7.7 and 51 healthy volunteers (age at test 30.5 ± 8.7 were included. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis was reported in 26 patients (53.0% and in 13 (25.5% controls (p = 0.005. Dental enamel disorders were reported in 7 patients (14.3% and in 0 controls (p = 0.002, with none having geographic tongue. We found non-specific tooth wear, characterized by loss of the mineralized tissue of the teeth, in 9 patients (18.3% and in 3 (5.9% controls (p = 0.05. (4 Conclusion: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and enamel hypoplasia are “risk indicators” that may suggest that an individual has CD. We detected a high prevalence of non-specific tooth wear that can be caused by several factors such as malocclusion, sleep bruxism, parafunctional activity, and age.

  2. Celiac Disease in Children with Moderate-to-Severe Iron-deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Natarajan, Ravikumar; Shah, Dheeraj; Puri, Amarender Singh; Manchanda, Vikas; Kotru, Mrinalini

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate the proportion of children with moderate to severe iron-deficiency anemia who have associated celiac disease. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted among children aged 1 to 12 years of age with moderate-to-severe iron deficiency anemia and control children without anemia. Serum IgA-tissue trans-glutaminase levels were assessed in both cases and controls. All children with positive celiac serology underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy; biopsy finding of Marsh grade 3 was considered positive for celiac disease. There were 152 anemic children and 152 controls with mean (SD) hemoglobinof 7.7 (1.8) and 12.2 (0.74) g/dL, respectively. 16 (10.5%) cases and 3 (2%) control patients had positive serology for celiac disease [OR (95% CI) 5.33 (1.52-18.67), P=0.007]. Six (3.9%) children with iron-deficiency anemia and none of the controls had biopsy features diagnostic of celiac disease. In the Northern Indian tertiary-care hospital outpatient setting, Celiac disease was associated with 4% of children presenting with moderate-to-severe anemia.

  3. The immunopathogenesis of celiac disease reveals possible therapies beyond the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Christopher S; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2012-07-01

    Celiac disease is a T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine that is activated by gluten. The diagnosis of celiac disease is challenging as patients display a wide range of symptoms and some are asymptomatic. A lifelong gluten-free diet is the only currently approved treatment of celiac disease. Although the diet is safe and effective, the compliance rates and patient acceptance vary. Furthermore, many patients treated with a gluten-free diet continue to be mildly to severely symptomatic with persistent histological abnormalities, and a small number of patients develop refractory celiac disease. New therapeutic adjuncts and potential alternatives to the gluten-free diet could improve the treatment options for these patients. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of celiac disease have suggested several types of therapeutic strategies that may augment or supplant the gluten-free diet. Some of these strategies attempt to decrease the immunogenicity of gluten-containing grains by manipulating the grain itself or by using oral enzymes to break down immunogenic peptides that normally remain intact during digestion. Other strategies focus on preventing the absorption of these peptides, preventing tissue transglutaminase from rendering gluten peptides more immunogenic, or inhibiting their binding to celiac disease-specific antigen-presenting molecules. Strategies that limit T cell migration to the small intestine or that reestablish mucosal homeostasis and tolerance to gluten antigens are also being explored. Additionally, it is vital to develop new therapeutic options for refractory celiac disease patients. This review highlights therapeutic strategies that may ultimately improve the health and well-being of individuals with celiac disease.

  4. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H.; Meier, R.

    2015-01-01

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [de

  5. Is Celiac Disease an Etiological Factor in Children with Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Taner; Balcı, Oya; Özçay, Figen; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Alehan, Füsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, we investigated serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA from 232 children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and in a healthy control group of 239 children. Study participants who were positive for tissue transglutaminase antibody underwent a duodenal biopsy. A total of 3 patients in the nonsyndromic intellectual disability group (5.45%) and 1 in the control group (0.41%) had positive serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (P > .05). Duodenal biopsy confirmed celiac disease in only 1 patient who had nonsyndromic intellectual disability. In this present study, children with nonsyndromic intellectual disability did not exhibit a higher celiac disease prevalence rate compared with healthy controls. Therefore, we suggest that screening test for celiac disease should not be necessary as a part of the management of mild and moderate nonsyndromic intellectual disability. However, cases of severe nonsyndromic intellectual disability could be examined for celiac disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Validation of Antibody-Based Strategies for Diagnosis of Pediatric Celiac Disease Without Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Petroff, David; Richter, Thomas; Auth, Marcus K H; Uhlig, Holm H; Laass, Martin W; Lauenstein, Peter; Krahl, Andreas; Händel, Norman; de Laffolie, Jan; Hauer, Almuthe C; Kehler, Thomas; Flemming, Gunter; Schmidt, Frank; Rodrigues, Astor; Hasenclever, Dirk; Mothes, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    A diagnosis of celiac disease is made based on clinical, genetic, serologic, and duodenal morphology features. Recent pediatric guidelines, based largely on retrospective data, propose omitting biopsy analysis for patients with concentrations of IgA against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG) >10-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) and if further criteria are met. A retrospective study concluded that measurements of IgA-TTG and total IgA, or IgA-TTG and IgG against deamidated gliadin (IgG-DGL) could identify patients with and without celiac disease. Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease, celiac disease, or biopsy required, based entirely on antibody assays. We aimed to validate the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of these diagnostic procedures. We performed a prospective study of 898 children undergoing duodenal biopsy analysis to confirm or rule out celiac disease at 13 centers in Europe. We compared findings from serologic analysis with findings from biopsy analyses, follow-up data, and diagnoses made by the pediatric gastroenterologists (celiac disease, no celiac disease, or no final diagnosis). Assays to measure IgA-TTG, IgG-DGL, and endomysium antibodies were performed by blinded researchers, and tissue sections were analyzed by local and blinded reference pathologists. We validated 2 procedures for diagnosis: total-IgA and IgA-TTG (the TTG-IgA procedure), as well as IgG-DGL with IgA-TTG (TTG-DGL procedure). Patients were assigned to categories of no celiac disease if all assays found antibody concentrations celiac disease if at least 1 assay measured antibody concentrations >10-fold the ULN. All other cases were considered to require biopsy analysis. ULN values were calculated using the cutoff levels suggested by the test kit manufacturers. HLA typing was performed for 449 participants. We used models that considered how specificity values change with prevalence to extrapolate the PPV and NPV to populations with lower

  7. Daily Intake of Milk Powder and Risk of Celiac Disease in Early Childhood: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hård Af Segerstad, Elin M; Lee, Hye-Seung; Andrén Aronsson, Carin; Yang, Jimin; Uusitalo, Ulla; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Rayner, Marilyn; Kurppa, Kalle; Virtanen, Suvi M; Norris, Jill M; Agardh, Daniel

    2018-04-28

    Milk powder and gluten are common components in Swedish infants' diets. Whereas large intakes of gluten early in life increases the risk of celiac disease in genetically at-risk Swedish children, no study has yet evaluated if intake of milk powder by 2 years of age is associated with celiac disease. A 1-to-3 nested case-control study, comprised of 207 celiac disease children and 621 controls matched for sex, birth year, and HLA genotype, was performed on a birth cohort of HLA-DR3-DQ2 and/or DR4-DQ8-positive children. Subjects were screened annually for celiac disease using tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). Three-day food records estimated the mean intake of milk powder at ages 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months. Conditional logistic regression calculated odds ratios (OR) at last intake prior to seroconversion of tTGA positivity, and for each time-point respectively and adjusted for having a first-degree relative with celiac disease and gluten intake. Intake of milk powder prior to seroconversion of tTGA positivity was not associated with celiac disease (OR = 1.00; 95% CI = 0.99, 1.03; p = 0.763). In conclusion, intake of milk powder in early childhood is not associated with celiac disease in genetically susceptible children.

  8. Health-related quality of life is not impaired in children with undetected as well as diagnosed celiac disease: a large population based cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with celiac disease remains limited and inconclusive. We investigated the HRQoL of three groups of 12-year-olds with: i) undetected celiac disease ii) clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and iii) without celiac disease. Methods A school-based cross-sectional multicenter screening study invited 18 325 children, whereof 68% consented to participate. Participants provided a blood sample, which was later analyzed for anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies, and alongside filled in a questionnaire. When anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies were elevated, a small intestinal biopsy verified the screening-detected celiac disease diagnosis. Self-reported HRQoL was measured using Kidscreen, a generic 52 items instrument with proven reliability and validity. Scores were linearly transformed into a 0–100 scale with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Mean values with standard deviations (mean ± SD) were compared, and uni- and multivariate logistic regression models tested the odds of a low HRQoL among children with undetected or diagnosed celiac disease, respectively. Results Children with undetected celiac disease (n = 238) reported similar HRQoL as children without celiac disease (n = 12 037) (83.0 ± 11.0 vs. 82.5 ± 11.3, P = 0.51), and also similar HRQoL (82.2 ± 12.2, P = 0.28) to that of children with diagnosed celiac disease (n = 90), of whom 92% were adherent to treatment. Having undetected celiac disease did not increase the odds of low overall HRQoL, independent of sex, area of residence, study year and occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.54-1.10). Comparable results were seen for diagnosed celiac disease cases (adjusted odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.85). Conclusion Children with undetected celiac disease reported comparable HRQoL as their peers with diagnosed celiac disease, and those without celiac disease

  9. A rare association of celiac disease and aplastic anemia: case report of a child and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyal, Rama Kumari; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Varma, Neelam; Thapa, Babu Ram

    2014-01-01

    An association between severe aplastic anemia and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and thyroid disorders. Herein we report a patient with celiac disease who was not strictly following a gluten-free diet and presented with progressive pallor, fever, and weakness of 1 month's duration. On investigation, he had pancytopenia, which on subsequent evaluation revealed aplastic anemia. An association between aplastic anemia and celiac disease has rarely been reported. To the best of author's knowledge, only 1 pediatric case of celiac disease associated with aplastic anemia has been published. This is the second report to suggest such an association in children.

  10. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Steffen; Murray, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    used double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) for the diagnosis of NCGS, and none in children. Innate immune reactivity to amylase trypsin inhibitors has been suggested as the pathogenic principle in NCGS, but confirmatory evidence is lacking. Also, further clinical studies including...... transglutaminase 2, characteristic histological abnormalities of the small intestine, and an almost obligatory genetic haplotype (HLA-DQ2 or DQ8). The diagnosis of NCGS is based largely on the clinical suspicion of hyper-reactivity to gluten and the absence of the characteristics of CD. Few published studies have......Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been introduced recently as a potentially common disease on the basis of studies of patients with claimed reactivity to gluten but without the characteristics of celiac disease (CD). CD is characterized by antibody reactivity toward the autoantigen...

  11. Autoantibody frequency in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Caglar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: In our study, we investigated the levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (anti-GAD, islet cell antibody (ICA, thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO, thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG, antinuclear antibodies (FANA, antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-ds DNA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome A antigen (anti-SSA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome B antigen (anti-SSB, Smith antibody (anti-Sm, smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA, and antimitochondrial antibody liver-kidney microsome (AMA-LKM in patients with celiac disease as compared to healthy controls and autoimmune hypothyroid patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 31 patients with celiac disease, 34 patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism and 29 healthy subjects were included in this study. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, anti-GAD, anti-TPO and anti-TG were studied by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, and AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were studied by immunofluorescence. Clinical data and the results of free thyroxine-thyroid stimulating hormone (FT4-TSH were collected from the patients' files by retrospective analysis. SPSS ver 13.0 was used for data analysis, and the χ2 method was used for comparisons within groups. RESULTS: The frequency of anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-GAD, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were not significantly different between the groups. Levels of anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies were found to be significantly higher (<0.001 in autoimmune hypothyroid patients when compared with other groups. CONCLUSION: In previous studies, an increased frequency of autoimmune diseases of other systems has been reported in patients with celiac disease. We found that the frequency of autoimmune antibodies specific for other autoimmune diseases was not higher in celiac disease.

  12. Prevalence of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Among Adolescents and Young Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Juanli; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Jinyan; Li, Jingjing; Yu, Fenglian; Lu, Jun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaozhong; Tong, Ping; Wu, Zhihua; Yang, Anshu; Yao, Yonghong; Nadif, Sarah; Shu, Heng; Jiang, Xu; Wu, Yujie; Gilissen, Luud; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-10-01

    In China, epidemiologic information on celiac disease autoimmunity is scarce and fragmented. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the general Chinese population. In a cross-sectional prospective study, 19,778 undiagnosed Chinese adolescents and young adults (age, 16-25 y) were recruited from consecutive new students who underwent routine physical examinations at 2 universities in Jiangxi, China, from September 2010 through October 2013; the students were from 27 geographic regions in China. All subjects were tested for serum IgG, IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides (IgG anti-DGP), and IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA anti-tTG). We also analyzed HLA genotypes in subgroups of participants with different results from tests for serum markers of celiac disease. A total of 434 students (2.19%) tested positive for serum markers for celiac disease (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.99%-2.41%), 0.36% of the students tested positive for anti-tTG IgA (95% CI, 0.28%-0.46%), and 1.88% tested positive for anti-DGP IgG (95% CI, 1.70%-2.09%). The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity (positive results in assays for anti-tTG IgA and anti-DGP-IgG) was 0.06% (95% CI, 0.03%-0.10%). Celiac disease autoimmunity was associated with the consumption of wheat and female sex. The prevalence in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76% (95% CI, 0.21%-1.95%). The frequencies of the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 genotypes associated with celiac disease were higher in subjects with celiac disease autoimmunity, based on detection of both serum markers, than in subjects with positive results from a single test (P celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in the Shandong province in north China, where wheat is a staple in the diet, was 0.76%. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol; Mulak, Agata; Jasińska, Maria; Paradowski, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease in adults is currently based on serologic tests in combination with histopathological assessment of small intestinal biopsy specimens. High titers of celiac-specific antibodies in immunocompetent patients with villous atrophy in a good quality biopsy sample allow us to state a confident diagnosis. The relief of symptoms and histological improvement after embarking on a gluten free diet further support the initial diagnosis. However, in some cases, these conditions are not fulfilled, which requires a critical evaluation of laboratory and histopathology results and a consideration of other potential causes for the observed pathologies. To avoid diagnostic uncertainty, both biopsy and laboratory testing should be performed on a diet containing gluten. Immune deficiency, cross reaction of antibodies and possibilities of seronegative or latent celiac disease should be considered while evaluating serology results. Uneven distribution and variable intensity of histopathological changes in the small intestine along with multiple disorders presenting a similar specimen image may lead to invalid biopsy results. Additional laboratory testing and careful examination of a patient's history may deliver important data for a differential diagnosis and a more specific biopsy evaluation. Persistence or recurrence of symptoms, despite the ongoing treatment, requires a revision of the initial diagnosis, an evaluation of the gluten free diet and a search for concurrent disorders or complications.

  14. Diagnosis and classification of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a complex disorder, the development of which is controlled by a combination of genetic (HLA alleles) and environmental (gluten ingestion) factors. New diagnostic guidelines developed by ESPGHAN emphasize the crucial role of serological tests in the diagnostic process of symptomatic subjects, and of the detection of HLA DQ2/DQ8 alleles in defining a diagnosis in asymptomatic subjects belonging to at-risk groups. The serological diagnosis of CD is based on the detection of class IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) and anti-endomysial antibodies. In patients with IgA deficiency, anti-tTG or anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays of the IgG class are used. When anti-tTG antibody levels are very high, antibody specificity is absolute and CD can be diagnosed without performing a duodenum biopsy. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a gluten reaction in which both allergic and autoimmune mechanisms have been ruled out. Diagnostic criteria include the presence of symptoms similar to those of celiac or allergic patients; negative allergological tests and absence of anti-tTG and EMA antibodies; normal duodenal histology; evidence of disappearance of the symptoms with a gluten-free diet; relapse of the symptoms when gluten is reintroduced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P; Bai, Julio C; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that is induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of approximately 1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, owing to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsy specimens. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without a biopsy in certain circumstances, especially in children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy each can be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, because the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing nondietary therapies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  20. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ease and allow children with celiac disease to live happy and productive lives. Each of our video segments ... I. Introduction : Experiencing ...

  3. Celiac disease in Saudi children. Evaluation of clinical features and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Assiri, Hebah; Ullah, Anhar; Rashid, Mohsin

    2017-09-01

     Objectives: To characterize the clinical presentations and diagnosis including serological tests and histopathological findings in children with celiac disease. Methods: All children (less than 18 years) with confirmed celiac disease diagnosed over a 6 year period at a private tertiary care health care center in Riyadh,  Saudi Arabia were studied retrospectively. Information collected included demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities with serology and small intestinal histology reported by Marsh grading. Results: A total of 59 children had confirmed celiac disease. Thirty (50.8%) were male. Median age was 8 years (range 1 to 16 years). The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 2.3 (±1.5) years. Classical disease was present only in 30.5%, whereas 69.5% had either non-classical presentations or belonged to high risk groups for celiac disease such as those with type-1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, Down syndrome and siblings. Failure to thrive was the most common presentation followed by short stature, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 91.5%, and titers were no different between those with classical and non-classical disease. All had Marsh-graded biopsy findings consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with celiac disease usually present with non-classical features. A high index of suspicion needs to be maintained to consider this disorder in the diagnostic workup of pediatric patients. High risk group should be screened early to avoid complications associated with untreated celiac disease.

  4. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  5. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children

  6. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  7. Birth outcomes of women with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine birthweight, low birthweight (celiac disease in relation to their first hospitalization for the disease. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on The Danish Medical Birth Registry...... data of celiac women discharged from Danish hospitals from 1977-1992. The study included 211 newborns to 127 mothers with celiac disease, and 1260 control deliveries. RESULTS: Before celiac women were first hospitalized the mean birthweight of their newborns was 238 g (95% confidence interval [95% CI......] = 150, 325 g) lower than that of the control women, after adjustment for potential confounders. After the first hospitalization the mean birthweight for newborns of diseased women was higher than that of controls, by 67 g (95% CI = -88, 223 g) after adjustment for potential confounders. Before celiac...

  8. Isolated short stature as a presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaad Mohamed Assiri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of isolated short stature as a clinical presentation of celiac disease in Saudi Arab children and whether some of the routine labora-tory tests performed to determine the cause of short stature could suggest the diagnosis of celiac disease. A total of 91 children with short stature were included in the study. Extensive endocrine and biochemical assessments, including total protein, serum albumin, calcium phosphate and alkaline phosphatase assays; renal function tests; coagulation profile; anti-endomysial antibodies and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody, growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free-thyroxin (FT4 assays; stool tests for giardiasis; bone age; and endoscopic intestinal biopsies, were done for all children. Ten of the 91 children had positive intestinal biopsies in the form of total villous atrophy, an increase in crypt height, and an increase in intra-epithelial lymphocyte (IEL numbers up to >40 IEL/100 EC (Type 3C according to the Oberhuber classification, confirming the diagnosis of celiac disease. Five children had mild villous atrophy according to this classification (Type 3A, and they were considered to have potential celiac disease. Seventy-six children had normal intestinal biopsies. Therefore, the prevalence of celiac disease among Saudi children with short stature was 10.9%, and 4.3% of the children were diagnosed as having potential celiac disease. After confirming the diagnosis of celiac disease, all children were kept on a gluten-free diet and all of them showed improvement in their growth rate. We concluded that celiac disease is a very important cause of short stature in children without gastrointestinal complaints in Saudi Arabia. We highly recommend anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody screening tests, and a small bowel biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease irrespective of the results of the antibody assays, in children with

  9. Yield of diagnostic tests for celiac disease in individuals with symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alexander C; Chey, William D; Talley, Nicholas J; Malhotra, Ashish; Spiegel, Brennan M R; Moayyedi, Paul

    2009-04-13

    Individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea, symptoms similar to those in celiac disease. Studies suggest that the prevalence of celiac disease is increased in individuals with IBS; however, evidence is conflicting, and current guidelines do not always recommend screening for celiac disease in these individuals. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate prevalence of celiac disease in unselected adults who met diagnostic criteria for IBS. MEDLINE (1950 to May 31, 2008) and EMBASE (1980 to May 31, 2008) were searched. Case series and case-control studies that used serologic tests for celiac disease were eligible for inclusion. Prevalence of positive serologic indications of celiac disease and biopsy-proved celiac disease were extracted and pooled for all studies and were compared between cases and controls using an odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. Fourteen studies were identified comprising 4204 individuals, of whom 2278 (54%) met diagnostic criteria for IBS. Pooled prevalence of positive IgA-class antigliadin antibodies, either positive endomysial antibodies or tissue transglutaminase, and biopsy-proved celiac disease were 4.0% (95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.2), 1.63% (0.7-3.0), and 4.1% (1.9-7.0), respectively. Pooled odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for positive IgA-class antigliadin antibodies, either positive endomysial antibodies or tissue transglutaminase, and biopsy-proved celiac disease in cases meeting diagnostic criteria for IBS compared with controls without IBS were 3.40 (1.62-7.13), 2.94 (1.36-6.35), and 4.34 (1.78-10.6). Prevalence of biopsy-proved celiac disease in cases meeting diagnostic criteria for IBS was more than 4-fold that in controls without IBS.

  10. Effect of clinical and laboratory parameters on quality of life in celiac patients using celiac disease-specific quality of life scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungmin; Clarke, Kofi

    2017-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in patients with celiac disease is reduced compared to the general population. We investigated the association between HR-QOL and clinical, laboratory findings using the previously validated CD-QOL (celiac disease-specific quality of life) instrument in patients with celiac disease. To our knowledge, no study has previously explored the relationship between HR-QOL and clinical, laboratory parameters in celiac patients. Patients who received care at the Allegheny Health Network Celiac Center, Pittsburgh, PA were asked to complete the CD-QOL questionnaire. A cross sectional study with predetermined clinical and laboratory parameters was performed. Data collected included IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody titers, iron studies, calcium, vitamin A, B12, 25 OH vitamin D, and E levels. Correlation between clinical findings and CD-QOL was also assessed. Seventy-eight out of 124 patients who completed the questionnaire was included in the analysis. Patients with concomitant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had significantly reduced HR-QOL with CD-QOL score of 52.4 ± 11.3 vs. 44.6 ± 12.9 in those without IBS (p = .009). There was no difference in HR-QOL in relation to IgA tTG titers or vitamin D levels. Of note, there was a trend towards correlation between higher level of vitamin E and better QOL (r = -0.236, p = .074). Celiac patients with concomitant IBS have reduced HR-QOL. There was no statistically significant association between HR-QOL and laboratory parameters or levels of micronutrients.

  11. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune

  12. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  13. Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Celiac Disease and Type II Diabetes Mellitus Associated: Improvement with a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a genetic disease, with a connective tissue alteration, consisting in the presence of multiple spontaneous fractures or after minimal traumatism. Its association with other metabolic processes is rarely described. We present the clinical case of a female adult patient of 43 years. From her infancy, she has had multiple fractures, needing several surgical interventions, and she was diagnosed of OI type 2 at adolescence age. Due mainly to difficulties in walking remaining in wheel-chair in the last three years, she was overweight with morbid obesity (BMI=45.4 and had a type-II DM associated. She suffered from recurrent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea and was diagnosed of celiac disease (CD with increased intraepithelial duodenal infiltration, being classified as lymphocytic enteritis, Marsh I type. She was put on a gluten-free diet (GFD, having lost 6 kg of weight after 6 months, with a good control of DM-II and presenting a significant clinical improvement. It is rewarding to search the presence of two coincidental metabolic diseases associated to OI, specially CD, because of the dramatic clinical benefit in the general found after putting on a GFD.

  14. Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Celiac Disease and Type II Diabetes Mellitus Associated: Improvement with a Gluten-Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Luis; Pérez-Martinez, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disease, with a connective tissue alteration, consisting in the presence of multiple spontaneous fractures or after minimal traumatism. Its association with other metabolic processes is rarely described. We present the clinical case of a female adult patient of 43 years. From her infancy, she has had multiple fractures, needing several surgical interventions, and she was diagnosed of OI type 2 at adolescence age. Due mainly to difficulties in walking remaining in wheel-chair in the last three years, she was overweight with morbid obesity (BMI = 45.4) and had a type-II DM associated. She suffered from recurrent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea and was diagnosed of celiac disease (CD) with increased intraepithelial duodenal infiltration, being classified as lymphocytic enteritis, Marsh I type. She was put on a gluten-free diet (GFD), having lost 6 kg of weight after 6 months, with a good control of DM-II and presenting a significant clinical improvement. It is rewarding to search the presence of two coincidental metabolic diseases associated to OI, specially CD, because of the dramatic clinical benefit in the general found after putting on a GFD. PMID:22481956

  15. Carpal spasm in a girl as initial presentation of celiac disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramosaj-Morina, Atifete; Keka-Sylaj, A; Hasbahta, V; Baloku-Zejnullahu, A; Azemi, M; Zunec, R

    2017-09-04

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder elicited by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. This disorder is characterized by specific histological changes of the small intestine mucosa resulting in malabsorption. This case was written up as it was an unusual and dramatic presentation of celiac disease. We report the case of a 3-year-old Albanian girl who presented at our clinic with carpal spasms and hand paresthesia. A physical examination at admission revealed a relatively good general condition and body weight of 10.5 kg (10 percentile). Carpal spasms and paresthesias of her extremities were present. Neuromuscular irritability was demonstrated by positive Chvostek and Trousseau signs. Blood tests showed severe hypocalcemia with a total serum calcium of 1.2 mmol/L (normal range 2.12 to 2.55 mmol/L), ionized calcium of 0.87 (normal range 1.11 to 1.30 mmol/L), and 24-hour urine calcium excretion of 9.16 mmol (normal range female celiac disease was performed: antigliadin immunoglobulin A, anti-tissue transglutaminase, and anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A antibodies were positive. A duodenal biopsy revealed lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy compatible with celiac disease grade IIIb according to the Marsh classification. Following the diagnosis of celiac disease, human leukocyte antigen typing was performed, giving a definite diagnosis of celiac disease. She was started on a gluten-free diet. Due to failure to follow a gluten-free diet, episodes of carpal spasms appeared again. Unfortunately, at the age of 7 years she presents with delayed psychophysical development. Although hypocalcemia is a common finding in celiac disease, hypocalcemic carpal spasm is a rare initial manifestation of the disease. Therefore, the possibility of celiac disease should be considered in patients with repeated carpal spasms that seem unduly difficult to treat. This should be evaluated even in the absence of gastrointestinal

  16. CT and fluoroscopy guided celiac ganglion block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sun Kyung; Kwon, Dae Ik; Ahn, Hyup; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Byung Young; Lee, Jong Gil

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effects and usefulness of fluoroscopy guided celiac ganglion block after marking of needle path with CT scan. Celiac ganglion block with 100% ethyl alcohol was performed in 50 cancer patients who were inoperable and had intractable abdominal pain. Duration and degree of pain relief after the procedure and its complication were analyzed. Early pain relief was observed in 98% and long term relief in 68% without serious complication. Fluoroscopy guided celiac ganglion block after marking of needle path with CT scan was a safe and valuable procedure in relieving intractable pain in terminal cancer patients and reduced the time in the CT room

  17. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease: evaluation of a population-based screening program in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Jüri J; Linneberg, Allan

    2016-11-01

    To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. This cross-sectional population-based study was based on the 5-year follow-up of the Health2006 cohort, where 2297 individuals were screened for celiac disease; 56 were antibody positive and thus invited to clinical evaluation. Eight were diagnosed with biopsy-verified celiac disease. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to antibody-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms, but had significantly lower total cholesterol. Tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies with a cut-off of 10 U/ml had a positive predictive value of 88%. The majority of participants were satisfied with their participation in the screening program. Individuals with celiac disease were generally satisfied with having been diagnosed and 71% felt better on a gluten-free diet. There were no differences in the prevalence of symptoms between participants with and without screening-detected celiac disease, confirming that risk stratification in a general population by symptoms is difficult. The majority of participants diagnosed with celiac disease felt better on a gluten-free diet despite not reporting abdominal symptoms before diagnosis and participants in the clinical evaluation were generally satisfied with participation in the screening program.

  18. Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity is Modified by Non-HLA Genetic Markers During the First Year of Clinical Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H.; Hansen, Dorthe; Mortensen, Henrik B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study plotted the prevalence of celiac disease associated antibodies in relation to demographic patterns, genetic and metabolic markers during the first year after diagnosis in a multinational cohort of children with T1D. Material and Methods: Sera from a total of 261 children (128 males...... measuring IgG-tTG. Children positive in both assays in two consecutive samples were defined as having celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). Associations between CDA and genotypes of HLA, IL18 rap, CCR 5, PTPN2 and correlations with islet autoantibodies (ICA, GADA, IA2 and IA) and HbA1C and C-peptide were...

  19. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos ...

  1. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ease ... We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best ...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away ... to keep your kitchen organized and safe. V. Shopping : How to shop for gluten-free food. VI. ...

  3. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Juri J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. METHODS: This cross-sectional population......-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. RESULTS: Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms...... with having been diagnosed and 71% felt better on a gluten-free diet. CONCLUSION: There were no differences in the prevalence of symptoms between participants with and without screening-detected celiac disease, confirming that risk stratification in a general population by symptoms is difficult. The majority...

  4. Auxo-Endocrinological Approach to Celiac Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bozzola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent genetically determined intolerance to gluten that generally presents with gastrointestinal symptoms in young children and extraintestinal manifestations (endocrinological, dermatological, neurological, etc. later. Furthermore, many studies demonstrate the close association between celiac and endocrine diseases, including growth and pubertal disorders, type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid diseases, probably due to the presence of a common genetic predisposition. Follow-up for celiac children after the start of gluten-free diet is mandatory to avoid complications such as growth hormone deficiency. The present review deals with the problem of the diagnosis of endocrine-associated diseases in celiac children and gives suggestions for correct management and follow-up of these patients.

  5. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzanese, Ilaria; Qehajaj, Dorina; Patrinicola, Federica; Aralica, Merica; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Stifter, Sanja; Elli, Luca; Grizzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as “celiac sprue”, is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, produced by the ingestion of dietary gluten products in susceptible people. It is a multifactorial disease, including genetic and environmental factors. Environmental trigger is represented by gluten while the genetic predisposition has been identified in the major histocompatibility complex region. Celiac disease is not a rare disorder like previously thought, with a global prevalence around 1%. The reason of its under-recognition is mainly referable to the fact that about half of affected people do not have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms, but they present nonspecific manifestations of nutritional deficiency or have no symptoms at all. Here we review the most recent data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, available diagnostic tests and therapeutic management of celiac disease. PMID:28573065

  6. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Careers Donate Donate Patient Resources Patient Story Two life-threatening conditions. One remarkable wish. Read more Second ... provides practical information about celiac disease from real-life families, as well as health professionals. I. Introduction : ...

  7. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... kids with celiac disease have to say about life with the condition. We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in ...

  8. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids ... to cook and bake gluten-free foods. VII. School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease ...

  9. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact Us Celiac Disease Program | Videos ...

  10. Diagnosis and Updates in Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Sarah; Leffler, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It can result in intraintestinal and extraintestinal manifestations of disease including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, osteoporosis, or lymphoma. Diagnosis of celiac disease is made through initial serologic testing and then confirmed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. Generally celiac disease is a benign disorder with a good prognosis in those who adhere to a gluten-free diet. However, in refractory disease, complications may develop that warrant additional testing with more advanced radiologic and endoscopic methods. This article reviews the current strategy to diagnose celiac disease and the newer modalities to assess for associated complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From ... How to shop for gluten-free food. VI. Cooking : How to cook and bake gluten-free foods. ...

  12. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation

  13. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  14. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking ... Boston Children's Hospital will teach you and your family about a healthful celiac lifestyle. Education is key in making parents feel more at ...

  15. Hedgehog Signalling is Downregulated in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Animal studies have suggested that the hedgehog (Hh signalling pathway is involved in gut inflammation, injury and repair.

  16. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  17. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak ... your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at ...

  18. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Disease What is Celiac Disease Diet Information At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research and Innovation Contact ...

  19. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Talk to your healthcare provider about getting your child immunized today . Conditions Inguinal Hernia ACL Tear Hypoplastic ... free foods. VII. School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : ...

  20. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... At Home Shopping Cooking Gluten Free Baking School Eating Out Away From Home Emotional Adjustment Kids Speak Research ... your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. ...

  1. Screening Detected Celiac Disease in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) is estimated to be around 1%, but most CD cases are undiagnosed. Sweden experienced an epidemic of clinically detected celiac disease in children younger than 2 years of age, partly due to changes in infant feeding practices, were the amount of gluten and age at introduction was changed. However, it was not clear if the increase in clinically detected children was due to more CD cases being detected due to symptoms and thus previously undia...

  2. Lack of serologic evidence to link IgA nephropathy with celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Moeller

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99, unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96, and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30. All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2. Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy.

  3. Lack of serologic evidence to link IgA nephropathy with celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Sina; Canetta, Pietro A; Taylor, Annette K; Arguelles-Grande, Carolina; Snyder, Holly; Green, Peter H; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Alaedini, Armin

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99), unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96), and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30). All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy.

  4. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Yuksel, Mahmut; Ozderin Ozin, Yasemin; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease and to examine the associate with celiac autoantibodies and gluten-free diet. METHODS Seventy three patients with celiac disease and 73 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In both groups, thiol/disulphide homeostasis was examined with a new colorimetric method recently developed by Erel and Neselioglu. RESULTS In patients with celiac disease, native thiol (P = 0.027) and total thiol (P = 0.031) levels were lower, while disulphide (P < 0.001) level, disulphide/native thiol (P < 0.001) and disulphide/total thiol (P < 0.001) ratios were higher compared to the control group. In patients who do not comply with a gluten-free diet, disulphide/native thiol ratio was found higher compared to the patients who comply with the diet (P < 0.001). In patients with any autoantibody-positive, disulphide/native thiol ratio was observed higher compared to the patients with autoantibody-negative (P < 0.05). It is found that there is a negative correlation between celiac autoantibodies, and native thiol, total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratio, while a positive correlation is observed between disulphide, disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol levels. CONCLUSION This study is first in the literature which found that the patients with celiac disease the dynamic thiol/disulphide balance shifts through disulphide form compared to the control group. PMID:28533921

  5. Celiac Disease in The Netherlands: Demographic Data of Members of the Dutch Celiac Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Tom; Rootsaert, Bianca; Bouma, Gerd; Mulder, Chris J J

    2016-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease induced by the intake of gluten with a female to male ratio of 2-4:1. Female predominance has not been recognized in serological mass screening studies. Limited data are available on gender and age distribution in the daily clinical practice of celiac disease. The aim of this study is to describe differences in gender and age at the time of celiac disease diagnosis in the Netherlands. Data was obtained from a prospectively maintained database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society in whom celiac disease was diagnosed between 1980 and August 2015. retrospective database study; Setting: database of members of the Dutch Celiac Society; Participants: out of the total number of 26,986 current and ex-members, the data of 7,886 members could be used for analysis. Age at celiac disease diagnosis ranged between 0 and 88 years; the minority (36%) were diagnosed in childhood. In children, the majority (52%) were diagnosed before the age of 4 years. Median age did not differ in children when compared for gender (3 years). In adults, median age differed between males (52 years, IQR 41-61) and females (44 years, IQR 32-56), pceliac disease patients are diagnosed during adulthood, with males diagnosed at an older age. Only one-third of the patients were diagnosed at childhood. Celiac disease is less frequently diagnosed in young adult males.

  6. Accuracy in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Without Biopsies in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkstetter, Katharina Julia; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma Rita; Popp, Alina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Heilig, Gabriele; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Thomas, Adrian; Troncone, Riccardo; Filipiak, Birgit; Mäki, Markku; Gyimesi, Judit; Najafi, Mehri; Dolinšek, Jernej; Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Auricchio, Renata; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Vécsei, Andreas; Szitanyi, Peter; Donat, Ester; Nenna, Rafaella; Alliet, Philippe; Penagini, Francesca; Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Castillejo, Gemma; Kurppa, Kalle; Shamir, Raanan; Hauer, Almuthe Christine; Smets, Françoise; Corujeira, Susana; van Winckel, Myriam; Buderus, Stefan; Chong, Sonny; Husby, Steffen; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2017-10-01

    The guidelines of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition allow for diagnosis of celiac disease without biopsies in children with symptoms and levels of immunoglobulin A against tissue-transglutaminase (TGA-IgA) 10-fold or more the upper limit of normal (ULN), confirmed by detection of endomysium antibodies (EMA) and positivity for HLA-DQ2/DQ8. We performed a large, international prospective study to validate this approach. We collected data from consecutive pediatric patients (18 years or younger) on a gluten-containing diet who tested positive for TGA-IgA from November 2011 through May 2014, seen at 33 pediatric gastroenterology units in 21 countries. Local centers recorded symptoms; measurements of total IgA, TGA, and EMA; and histopathology findings from duodenal biopsies. Children were considered to have malabsorption if they had chronic diarrhea, weight loss (or insufficient gain), growth failure, or anemia. We directly compared central findings from 16 antibody tests (8 for TGA-IgA, 1 for TGA-IgG, 6 for IgG against deamidated gliadin peptides, and 1 for EMA, from 5 different manufacturers), 2 HLA-DQ2/DQ8 tests from 2 manufacturers, and histopathology findings from the reference pathologist. Final diagnoses were based on local and central results. If all local and central results were concordant for celiac disease, cases were classified as proven celiac disease. Patients with only a low level of TGA-IgA (threefold or less the ULN) but no other results indicating celiac disease were classified as no celiac disease. Central histo-morphometry analyses were performed on all other biopsies and cases were carefully reviewed in a blinded manner. Inconclusive cases were regarded as not having celiac disease for calculation of diagnostic accuracy. The primary aim was to determine whether the nonbiopsy approach identifies children with celiac disease with a positive predictive value (PPV) above 99% in clinical practice. Secondary

  7. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  8. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  9. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, E. K.; Mearin, M. L.; Bouquet, J.; von Blomberg, B. M.; Stapel, S. O.; van Elburg, R. M.; de Graaf, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  10. Celiac Disease Diet: How Do I Get Enough Grains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiac disease diet: How do I get enough grains? I have celiac disease, and I find it difficult to get enough ... Michael F. Picco, M.D. Because people with celiac disease must avoid gluten — a protein found in foods ...

  11. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; Mearin, ML; Bouquet, J; vonBlomberg, ME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; deGraaf, EAB

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all

  12. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sandro; El Asmar, Ramzi; Di Pierro, Mariarosaria; Grazia Clemente, Maria; Tripathi, Amit; Sapone, Anna; Thakar, Manjusha; Iacono, Giuseppe; Carroccio, Antonio; D'Agate, Cinzia; Not, Tarcisio; Zampini, Lucia; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein-protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

  13. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-08-05

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN).

  14. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  15. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind’s history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient’s clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  16. Sera of patients with celiac disease and neurologic disorders evoke a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervio, Elisabetta; Volta, Umberto; Verri, Manuela; Boschi, Federica; Pastoris, Ornella; Granito, Alessandro; Barbara, Giovanni; Parisi, Claudia; Felicani, Cristina; Tonini, Marcello; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying neurologic impairment in celiac disease remain unknown. We tested whether antineuronal antibody-positive sera of patients with celiac disease evoke neurodegeneration via apoptosis in vitro. SH-Sy5Y cells were exposed to crude sera, isolated immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgG-depleted sera of patients with and without celiac disease with and without neurologic disorders, and antineuronal antibodies. Adsorption studies with gliadin and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) were performed in celiac disease sera. Apoptosis activated caspase-3, apaf-1, Bax, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-8 and caspase-9 and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes were evaluated with different methods. SH-Sy5Y cells exposed to antineuronal antibody-positive sera and isolated IgG from the same sera exhibited a greater percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei than that of antineuronal antibody-negative sera. Neuroblasts exposed to antineuronal antibody-negative celiac disease sera also showed greater TUNEL positivity and apaf-1 immunolabeled cells than controls. Antigliadin- and anti-tTG-depleted celiac disease sera had an apoptotic effect similar to controls. Anti-caspase-3 immunostained cells were greater than controls when exposed to positive sera. The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex was reduced by positive sera. Western blot demonstrated only caspase-9 cleavage in positive sera. Cytochrome c and Bax showed reciprocal translocation (from mitochondria to cytoplasm and vice versa) after treatment with positive sera. Antineuronal antibodies and, to a lower extent, combined antigliadin and anti-tTG antibodies in celiac disease sera contribute to neurologic impairment via apoptosis. Apaf-1 activation with Bax and cytochrome c translocation suggest a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis.

  17. Looking for Celiac Disease in Italian Women with Endometriosis: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Santoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, a potential link between endometriosis and celiac disease has been hypothesized since these disorders share some similarities, specifically concerning a potential role of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immunological dysfunctions. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among Italian women with endometriosis with respect to general population. Consecutive women with a laparoscopic and histological confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis were enrolled; female nurses of our institution, without a known history of endometriosis, were enrolled as controls. IgA endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies measurement and serum total IgA dosage were performed in both groups. An upper digestive endoscopy with an intestinal biopsy was performed in case of antibodies positivity. Presence of infertility, miscarriage, coexistence of other autoimmune diseases, and family history of autoimmune diseases was also investigated in all subjects. Celiac disease was diagnosed in 5 of 223 women with endometriosis and in 2 of 246 controls (2.2% versus 0.8%; P=0.265. Patients with endometriosis showed a largely higher rate of infertility compared to control group (27.4% versus 2.4%; P<0.001. Our results confirm that also in Italian population an increased prevalence of celiac disease among patients with endometriosis is found, although this trend does not reach the statistical significance.

  18. Similarities and differences between older and young adult patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Karakaya, Fatih; Soykan, Irfan

    2017-11-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy with variable clinical symptoms. Elderly patients can have different manifestations from those of young patients. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether any differences or similarities exist between older and young patients with celiac disease with a special emphasis on concurrent autoimmune diseases. Celiac disease patients were stratified as older and younger patients. These two groups were then compared by means of clinical symptoms, laboratory parameters and concurrent autoimmune diseases. Factors associated with the presence of an autoimmune disease were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. There were 66 older patients (mean age 67.7 ± 3.2 years, 50 women), and 277 younger patients (mean age 35.9 ± 11.7 years, 207 women). Of the 66 older patients, eight patients had gastrointestinal symptoms and 58 patients had extradigestive symptoms. In the younger group, the number of patients referred due to gastrointestinal symptoms was higher (8 [12.2%] vs 200 (72.2%), P celiac disease clinically, histologically and by means of laboratory parameters is different in older and young patients. Polyautoimmunity and multiple autoimmune syndrome are more common in older patients compared with younger patients. A biopsy score of Marsh score type, antinuclear antibody positivity, high serum anti-tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A level and low hemoglobin level were risk factors for having an autoimmune disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2060-2067. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in children with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry David D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to prospectively determine the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease among children presenting with fibromyalgia. The secondary objective was to investigate if their symptoms resolved on a gluten free diet. Findings All children seen in the Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain clinic between the ages of 12 and 17 years of age who fulfilled the 1990 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were invited to participate. A total immunoglobulin A (IgA level, IgA antiendomysial (EMA and IgA anti-TTG antibodies was obtained on all study subjects. A visual analog scale for pain and a functional disability inventory were obtained on all patients. If a patient had elevated EMA or TTG a small bowel biopsy was done. Patients with celiac disease were placed on a gluten-free diet and observed to see if their symptoms resolved. 50 patients, 45 females, completed the study. Only one patient was found to have celiac disease. On a gluten-free diet her tissue transglutaminase antibody level returned to normal but her visual analog scale scores increased and her functional disability inventory was 40 initially and 21 at follow up. Conclusions In this pilot, single center study at a tertiary children's hospital patients with fibromyalgia do not seem to have occult celiac disease at an increased rate over the population as a whole.

  20. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  1. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işikay, Sedat; Kocamaz, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Several neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature. This prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed. In neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5%) of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations. It is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  2. Usefulness of antibodies to deamidated gliadin peptides in celiac disease diagnosis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Granito, Alessandro; Fiorini, Erica; Parisi, Claudia; Piscaglia, Maria; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Paolo; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-06-01

    The prevalence of the recently described deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies was compared with that of the routinely used antigliadin, antiendomysial, and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in the sera of 128 untreated celiac patients and 134 controls. Sensitivity and specificity for celiac disease were 83.6 and 90.3% for IgA and 84.4 and 98.5% for IgG antibodies to deamidated gliadin peptides. The new test displayed higher diagnostic accuracy than antigliadin antibodies and, although less sensitive than antiendomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies, showed significantly higher specificity than tissue transglutaminase antibodies (P < 0.001). Persistence of peptide antibodies after gluten withdrawal was an expression of low compliance with the diet and of the lack of improvement of the intestinal mucosa. The combined use of tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies seems to be a very useful tool for celiac disease diagnosis. Moreover, antibodies to deamidated gliadin peptides can be helpful in disease follow-up.

  3. Diarrheal Versus Non-diarrheal Presentations Of Paediatric Celiac Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.A.; Hussain, T.; Masood, N.; Asghar, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequencies and clinical features of diarrheal versus non-diarrheal presentation of celiac disease (CD). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Department, Benazir Bhutto Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January to December 2013. Methodology: Children with celiac disease, newly diagnosed on the basis of tissue transglutaminasel (TTG) and intestinal histopathology, were included in the study by consecutive non-probability sampling. Patients were divided into diarrheal and non-diarrheal groups on the basis of presence or absence of chronic or recurrent diarrhea. Comparison between two groups was done and a p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Total patients were 54 (26 males, 28 females) with mean age of 6.67 ±3.35 years. Chronic diarrhea was present in 31 (57.4 percent) and absent in 23 (42.6 percent). Patients in non-diarrheal group were diagnosed at a significantly later age (p=0.038) and had a greater frequency of severe malnutrition (p=0.02). Short stature, anemia, rickets, clubbing and abdominal distension were equally prevalent. There was no significant difference in TTG value and intestinal histopathology among two groups. Conclusion: Children with atypical presentation of CD had significant severe malnutrition and higher age at diagnosis than at diarrheal presentation. (author)

  4. Avoidance of Cow's Milk-Based Formula for At-Risk Infants Does Not Reduce Development of Celiac Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytinen, Mila; Savilahti, Erkki; Virtanen, Suvi M; Härkönen, Taina; Ilonen, Jorma; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Uibo, Raivo; Vaarala, Outi; Åkerblom, Hans K; Knip, Mikael

    2017-10-01

    Feeding during the first months of life might affect risk for celiac disease. Individuals with celiac disease or type 1 diabetes have been reported to have high titers of antibodies against cow's milk proteins. Avoidance of cow's milk-based formula for infants with genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes reduced the cumulative incidence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. We performed a randomized controlled trial in the same population to study whether weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed formula reduced the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity or celiac disease. We performed a double-blind controlled trial of 230 infants with HLA-defined predisposition to type 1 diabetes and at least 1 family member with type 1 diabetes. The infants were randomly assigned to groups fed a casein hydrolysate formula (n = 113) or a conventional formula (control, n = 117) whenever breast milk was not available during the first 6-8 months of life. Serum samples were collected over a median time period of 10 years and analyzed for antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (anti-TG2A) using a radiobinding assay, to endomysium using an immunofluorescence assay, and antibodies to a deamidated gliadine peptide using an immunofluorometry assay. Duodenal biopsies were collected if levels of anti-TG2A exceeded 20 relative units. Cow's milk antibodies were measured during the first 2 years of life. Of the 189 participants analyzed for anti-TG2A, 25 (13.2%) tested positive. Of the 230 study participants observed, 10 (4.3%) were diagnosed with celiac disease. We did not find any significant differences at the cumulative incidence of anti-TG2A positivity (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-2.54) or celiac disease (hazard ratio, 4.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-21.02) between the casein hydrolysate and cow's milk groups. Children who developed celiac disease had increased titers of cow's milk antibodies before the appearance of anti-TG2A or celiac disease. In a randomized

  5. [Symptoms of Celiac disease in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, O; Dumant, C; Mallet, E

    2013-06-01

    The knowledge regarding celiac disease has increased dramatically in recent years, due to the availability of accurate serologic markers. Mass screening studies have shown that the prevalence of sensitization can be as high as 1/80. The range of symptoms is wide, from the classic growth failure, denutrition and diarrhea in infancy to clinically and histologically asymptomatic sensitized subjects. The interest of a routine mass screening is debated. The classical celiac disease in infancy is well known. Atypical symptoms and potentially associated disease are more frequent and potentially confounding. Physicians should be aware of any clue for celiac disease in atypical cases in order to improve the diagnostic yield, and therefore avoiding short or long term consequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cappello

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population.

  7. Celiac disease: implications for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Megan; Grossman, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that is known specifically for causing inflammation of the mucosa in the small intestine. Through multiple diagnostic and screening tools such as small intestinal biopsy sample, serological testing, and human leukocyte antigen testing, healthcare providers can diagnose this disease that contains components related to genetic predisposition and intake of gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. There are some who believe that having an autoimmune disease may predispose one to acquiring another disease. With patients experiencing mostly diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss, the implementation of a gluten-free diet is the treatment that healthcare providers recommend. Through monitoring gluten intake and providing nutritional supplementation, those diagnosed with celiac disease can lead a relatively normal life without complications. With celiac disease affecting all age ranges in the population, and with a documented higher frequency, there is a growing awareness in society that can be easily seen in grocery stores, restaurants, and food manufacturers.

  8. Intergenic disease-associated regions are abundant in novel transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonicek, N; Clark, M B; Quek, X C; Torpy, J R; Pritchard, A L; Maag, J L V; Gloss, B S; Crawford, J; Taft, R J; Hayward, N K; Montgomery, G W; Mattick, J S; Mercer, T R; Dinger, M E

    2017-12-28

    Genotyping of large populations through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has successfully identified many genomic variants associated with traits or disease risk. Unexpectedly, a large proportion of GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated haplotype blocks are in intronic and intergenic regions, hindering their functional evaluation. While some of these risk-susceptibility regions encompass cis-regulatory sites, their transcriptional potential has never been systematically explored. To detect rare tissue-specific expression, we employed the transcript-enrichment method CaptureSeq on 21 human tissues to identify 1775 multi-exonic transcripts from 561 intronic and intergenic haploblocks associated with 392 traits and diseases, covering 73.9 Mb (2.2%) of the human genome. We show that a large proportion (85%) of disease-associated haploblocks express novel multi-exonic non-coding transcripts that are tissue-specific and enriched for GWAS SNPs as well as epigenetic markers of active transcription and enhancer activity. Similarly, we captured transcriptomes from 13 melanomas, targeting nine melanoma-associated haploblocks, and characterized 31 novel melanoma-specific transcripts that include fusion proteins, novel exons and non-coding RNAs, one-third of which showed allelically imbalanced expression. This resource of previously unreported transcripts in disease-associated regions ( http://gwas-captureseq.dingerlab.org ) should provide an important starting point for the translational community in search of novel biomarkers, disease mechanisms, and drug targets.

  9. No allelic variation in genes with high gliadin homology in patients with celiac disease and type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Hansen, Dorte; Husby, Steffen

    2004-01-01

    recognize gluten-derived peptides in which specific glutamine residues are deamidated to glutamic acid by tissue transglutaminase. Recently, intestinally expressed human genes with high homology to DQ2-gliadin celiac T-cell epitopes have been identified. Single or double point mutations which would increase...... the celiac T-cell epitope homology, and mutation in these genes, leading to the expression of glutamic acid at particular positions, could hypothetically be involved in the initiation of CD in HLA-DQ2-positive children. Six gene regions with high celiac T-cell epitope homology were investigated for single......-nucleotide polymorphisms using direct sequencing of DNA from 20 CD patients, 27 type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients with associated CD, 24 patients with T1DM without CD and 110 healthy controls, all of Caucasian origin. No variants in any of these genes in any of the investigated groups were found. We conclude...

  10. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  11. New Insights in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Branski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible subjects. The incidence of CD is around 1%, and it is much more common in first-degree relatives of CD patients, 10%–18%. However, the pattern of the genetic inheritance is still obscure. Environmental factors are undoubtedly affecting the disease’s clinical presentation, time at presentation, and may have an effect on the characteristics of the disease. The clinical presentation of CD has shifted during the previous decades from the classical presentation in which the toddler suffers from diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, failure to thrive, abdominal distension, etc., to the child with a monosymptomatic presentation, such as anemia, as well as an enlarged list of extra-intestinal disorders. The diagnosis of CD is being established by symptoms consistent with CD and positive serology. The ultimate diagnosis should be made upon histological evaluation of the small bowel mucosa. The treatment of CD is a lifelong, strict gluten-free diet (GFD. Compliance with a GFD is quite difficult. Therefore, new strategies for prevention and treatment modalities other than GFD are greatly needed. Recently several promising therapeutic modalities have been developed; these include resuming traditional baking techniques. Another methodology is using probiotic-driven prolylendopeptidase. Another pathway to tackle the therapeutic option in CD is by down-regulation of the activity of zonulin—the active pump enabling gluten to enter the enterocytes. We are facing an era where other modalities beyond a GFD might allow CD patients to be able to tolerate occasionally a small amount of gluten in their diet.

  12. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. IX. Away From Home : How to plan for activities and travel. X. Emotional ... have to say about life with the condition. ...

  13. Influenza and risk of later celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line Lund; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Influenza has been linked to autoimmune conditions, but its relationship to subsequent celiac disease (CD) is unknown. Our primary aim was to determine the risk of CD after influenza. A secondary analysis examined the risk of CD following pandemic influenza vaccination. METHODS...

  14. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cooking : How to cook and bake gluten-free foods. VII. School : How to prepare your child with celiac disease for school. VIII. Eating Out : How to order and eat out at restaurants. IX. Away From Home : How to plan for activities and travel. X. Emotional Adjustments: How to adjust & cope. XI. ...

  15. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Kårhus, Line Lund

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population...

  16. Celiac Disease Presenting with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immunological disorder. Clinical manifestations occur as a result of intestinal mucosa damage and malabsorption. CD is also associated with extraintestinal manifestations and autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of CD and autoimmune diseases has been described before. In this article, a patient with CD presenting with thrombocytopenia is discussed.

  17. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dydensborg Sander S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stine Dydensborg Sander,1-3 Ketil Størdal,4,5 Tine Plato Hansen,6 Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen,7 Joseph A Murray,8 Søren Thue Lillevang,9 Steffen Husby1,2 1Hans Christian Andersen Children’s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, 2Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, 3Odense Patient Data Explorative Network (OPEN, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; 4Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, 5Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway; 6Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital, 7Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 8Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 9Department of Clinical Immunology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank and information on celiac disease-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotypes obtained from patient medical records.Patients and methods: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG and HLA genotypes.Results: We identified 2,247 children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies for 1,555 of the children (69% were registered in the Patobank; 1,127 (50% had a biopsy that was compatible with celiac disease (ie, Marsh 2–3. We accessed the medical

  18. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Re, Valli; Magris, Raffaella; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune and multisystem gluten-related disorder that causes symptoms involving the gastrointestinal tract and other organs. Pathogenesis of CD is only partially known. It had been established that ingestion of gluten proteins present in wheat and other cereals are necessary for the disease and develops in individuals genetically predisposed carrying the DQ2 or DQ8 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes. In this review, we had pay specific attention on the last discoveries regarding the three cellular components mainly involved in the development and maintenance of CD: T-cells, B-cells, and microbioma. All of them had been showed critical for the interaction between inflammatory immune response and gluten peptides. Although the mechanisms of interaction among overall these components are not yet fully understood, recent proteomics and molecular studies had shed some lights in the pathogenic role of tissue transglutaminase 2 in CD and in the alteration of the intestinal barrier function induced by host microbiota.

  19. Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok; Liu, Xiang; Hadley, David; Hagopian, William; Liu, Edwin; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Simell, Ville; Rewers, Marian; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Lernmark, Åke; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Akolkar, Beena; Rich, Stephen S.; Agardh, Daniel; She, Jin-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study. Methods A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9) in time to celiac disease analyses (10−4>P>5.8x10−6). The hazard ratios (HR) for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (Pceliac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10−6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10−5, HR = .80) and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously associated with celiac disease (Pceliac disease development with 5 non-HLA regions previously associated with the disease and 8 regions not previously associated with celiac disease. We identified 5 regions associated with development of tTGA. Two loci associated with celiac disease progression

  20. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Leonardo da Vinci meets celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Chiara; Ventura, Giovanna; Di Leo, Grazia; Orzes, Nicoletta; Ronfani, Luca; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Leonardo da Vinci's face symmetry derives from 3 equal craniofacial segments: trichion-nasion (tn), which represents the superior third of the face, nasion-subnasal (ns) that is the medium third of the face, and subnasal-gnathion (sg) that is the length of the lower third of the face. It has been reported that adult subjects with celiac disease (CD) can be identified on the basis of a greater extension of the forehead in comparison to the medium third of the face, with a high tn/ns ratio. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between facial asymmetry and CD in childhood and adulthood. We studied 126 biopsy-proven patients with CD (76 children and 50 adults) and 102 healthy controls (43 children and 59 adults). Their faces were photographed; the pictures were edited using a software program to calculate the facial segments. The tn length was significantly different between adult celiac and adult controls (7.43 ± 1.46 cm vs 6.38 ± 1.73 cm, P = 0.001). The cutoff of 6.5 cm tn, derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, identified 43 of 50 patients (sensitivity 86%), but 34 of 59 controls were positive (specificity 54.2%). The positive predictive value was 56%; however, the tn/ns ratio was not significantly different between celiacs and controls. Neither the tn length nor the tn/ns ratio in celiacs correlated to the time of gluten exposure. Adults, but not children, with celiac disease show a forehead extension significantly greater than controls, but this test's specificity appears too low to be used in the screening of CD.

  2. Diagnosis and management of refractory celiac disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Asma; Serghini, Meriem; Karoui, Sami; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-01-01

    Refractory celiac disease is defined by persisting malabsorptive symptoms in spite of a strict gluten free diet for at least 6 to 12 months. Alternatives to gluten free diet seem to be still controversial. To describe the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of refractory celiac disease, and to identify therapeutic options in this condition. Systematic review and critical analysis of observational studies, clinical trials and case reports that focused on diagnosis and management of refractory celiac disease. Refractory celiac disease can be classified as type 1 or type 2 according to the phenotype of intraepithelial lymphocytes. Great complications such as enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma may occur in a subgroup of these patients mainly in refractory celiac disease type 2. Curative therapies are still lacking. Refractory celiac disease remains a diagnosis of exclusion. Its prognosis remains still dismal by the absence yet of curative therapies. However, some new treatments seem to hold promise during few cohort-studies.

  3. Mode of delivery is not associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Størdal, Ketil

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mode of delivery and the risk of celiac disease in two large population-based birth cohorts with different prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease. Patients and methods: This is an observational register-based cohort study...... were born in Norway from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2012. Results: We included 1,051,028 children from Denmark. Cesarean sections were registered for 196,512 children (18.9%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,395 children (0.13%). We included 537,457 children from Norway. Cesarean...... sections were registered for 90,128 children (16.8%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,919 children (0.35%). We found no association between the mode of delivery and the risk of diagnosed celiac disease. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by any type of cesarean...

  4. Osteoarticular manifestations of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Stéphanie; Lioté, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune enteropathy based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The global prevalence of 1% to 2% represents only the tip of the iceberg. The diagnosis is confirmed by positive specific antibody, anti-transglutaminase or anti-endomysium, specific lesions of the small intestine and a response to strict gluten-free diet. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because the clinical variability is very large, ranging from digestive clinical presentation "classic" to "atypical" symptoms, often extra-intestinal, that are sometimes attributed to a concomitant disease or a complication. Among them, there are frequent musculoskeletal manifestations such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia. In the absence of risk factor, osteoporosis, in a premenopausal women or in a man less than 55 years, more is if it is severe and refractory to medications, need to rheumatologists on the track of celiac disease in the absence of digestive symptoms. Osteomalacia is related to secondary hypovitaminosis D malabsorption. Supplementation by calcifediol, water-soluble vitamin D, may be indicated. Celiac disease is associated with an autoimmune disease in almost 1/3 of the cases. Knowing these potential associations allows earlier diagnosis in patients whose only manifestation, a concomitant disease. Anemia, chronic fatigue or unexplained polyarthralgia are symptoms associated with celiac disease to look for specific antibodies. The aim of early diagnosis is to prevent the emergence of other systemic disorders and avoid complications such as bone fractures and cancer, especially intestinal lymphoma. Non-celiac gluten intolerance is a new entity defined by symptomatology similar to that of celiac disease induced by the ingestion of gluten and disappearing after crowding-out, among patients without specific antibodies and without intestinal lesion of celiac disease. This entity is a cause, at

  5. Serological Testing in Screening for Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Rachel Gillett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Assays for celiac-related antibodies are becoming widely available, and the present review aims to clarify the use of these investigations in the diagnosis of, management of and screening for adult celiac disease. The sensitivities and specificities of various antibody tests are discussed, along with their clinical use as an adjunct to small bowel biopsy, and as a first-line investigation for patients with atypical symptoms of celiac disease or patients at high risk of developing sprue.

  6. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Hugh J FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of t...

  7. Link Between Celiac Disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ayesha; Walker, Marjorie; Burger, Daniel; Martin, Neal; von Wulffen, Moritz; Koloski, Natasha; Jones, Mike; Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald J

    2018-05-14

    The aim of this analysis was to assess in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) the risk of celiac disease and in celiac disease patients the risk of IBD. Previous studies report a possible association between IBD and celiac disease; however, this link is controversial. Using the search terms "inflammatory bowel disease" and "celiac disease," we identified initially 1525 publications. In total 27 studies met inclusion criteria. Proportions and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of IBD in celiac disease and vice versa were compared with published prevalence rates for the respective geographic regions. We included 41,482 adult IBD patients (20,357 with Crohn's disease; 19,791 with ulcerative colitis; and 459 patients with celiac disease). Overall, in IBD patients the prevalence of celiac disease was 1110/100,000 (95% CI, 1010-1210/100,000) as compared with a prevalence of 620/100,000 (95% CI, 610-630/100,000) in the respective populations (odds ratio, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.99-2.50). In contrast, in patients with celiac disease, 2130/100,000 had IBD (95% CI, 1590-2670/100,000) as compared with 260/100,000 (95% CI, 250/100,000-270/100,000) in the respective populations (odds ratio, 11.10; 95% CI, 8.55-14.40). This effect was not different for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Although there was no evidence for publication bias for celiac disease in IBD, the funnel plot suggested that the association between IBD in celiac disease might be influenced by publication bias. The data are consistent with the notion that celiac disease is a risk factor for IBD and to lesser degree patients with IBD have an increased risk of celiac disease.

  8. Study of relation between the onset age of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease in children andadole scents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    robabe Ghergherehchi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic enteropathy caused by hypersensitivity to gluten. Most studies have showed more prevalence of CD in the patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Both diseases are autoimmune and their incidence is related to inheritance and environmental factors. The aim of this research is the study of relation between CD prevalence and diabetic age onset. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 135 children with diabetes mellitus type 1 referring to Tabriz children hospital endocrine department and clinic between 2006-2008 were selected. After filling individual identity of the patients and the measurement of weight and height, the serumic level of anti-tissue Trans glutaminase IgA antibody (A-tTG-A-IgA, anti endomisial IgA antibody (AEA-IgA and anti-gliadin IgG antibody (AGA-IgG were measured. In the case that A-tTG-A either AEA alone or with AGA was high, small intestinal biopsy was preformed. The data was analysed using SPSS ver 16 software. Results: 28 of 135 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1, were serologically positive for celiac. Confirmed celiac prevalence based on biopsy was 6. 8%. From diabetic age onset and celiac incidence point of view there was not any significant relation (P=0. 996. Conclusion: Celiac disease in type1 diabetic patients dose not have correlation with the onset age of type 1 diabetes and diabetic patients should be followed up from celiac point of view during treatment and prevention.

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult Chinese patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: A prospective, controlled, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Guan Jun; Guo, Jing; Zuo, Xiu Li; Li, Chang Qing; Liu, Chao; Ji, Rui; Liu, Han; Wang, Xiao; Li, Yan Qing

    2018-03-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory enteropathy with a symptom spectrum similar to that of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is a common but largely undiagnosed condition in the Western countries. However, it is extremely rare among Chinese individuals, and few studies have investigated its prevalence in China. The aim was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with IBS who were diagnosed using the Rome III criteria in a single center of northern China. This was a single-center, prospective, controlled cohort study performed in Qilu Hospital involving 246 patients with IBS and 246 healthy controls. Blood samples were drawn to assess serum tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A (tTg-IgA). Patients with a positive or equivocal tTg-IgA (≥15 U/mL) were subjected to probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and duodenal biopsy to confirm celiac disease. Altogether 12 (4.9%) patients with IBS and two (0.8%) healthy controls were positive or equivocal for serum tTg-IgA. Of these, five patients with IBS underwent pCLE and a targeted biopsy; all were histopathologically found to have celiac disease, although one was eventually diagnosed with lymphoma. After implementation of a gluten-free diet, seven patients serologically positive for IBS showed clinical improvement, thus our study illustrated a minimum prevalence of 2.85% of celiac disease among patients with IBS in our center. Celiac disease is not rare in Chinese individuals, particularly among those with IBS. Therefore, it should receive higher attention in clinical practice in China. © 2018 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. A possible mechanism behind autoimmune disorders discovered by genome-wide linkage and association analysis in celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Östensson

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an intestinal inflammation triggered by gluten, a storage protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Similar to other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease is the result of an immune response to self-antigens leading to tissue destruction and production of autoantibodies. Common diseases like celiac disease have a complex pattern of inheritance with inputs from both environmental as well as additive and non-additive genetic factors. In the past few years, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS have been successful in finding genetic risk variants behind many common diseases and traits. To complement and add to the previous findings, we performed a GWAS including 206 trios from 97 nuclear Swedish and Norwegian families affected with celiac disease. By stratifying for HLA-DQ, we identified a new genome-wide significant risk locus covering the DUSP10 gene. To further investigate the associations from the GWAS we performed pathway analyses and two-locus interaction analyses. These analyses showed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and identified a set of candidate mechanisms and genes of which some were selected for mRNA expression analysis using small intestinal biopsies from 98 patients. Several genes were expressed differently in the small intestinal mucosa from patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to intestinal mucosa from control patients. From top-scoring regions we identified susceptibility genes in several categories: 1 polarity and epithelial cell functionality; 2 intestinal smooth muscle; 3 growth and energy homeostasis, including proline and glutamine metabolism; and finally 4 innate and adaptive immune system. These genes and pathways, including specific functions of DUSP10, together reveal a new potential biological mechanism that could influence the genesis of celiac disease, and possibly

  11. Prevalence of celiac disease among blood donors in São Paulo: the most populated city in Brazil

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    Marília Lage Alencar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is a permanent enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten, which leads to an immunemediated inflammation of the small intestine mucosa. The prevalence of celiac disease varies among different nations and ethnic backgrounds, and its diversity is determined by genetic and environmental factors. São Paulo city is one of the largest cities in the world, with a vast population and an important history of internal migratory flow from other Brazilian regions, as well as immigration from other, primarily European, countries, resulting in significant miscegenation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of adults with undiagnosed celiac disease among blood donors of São Paulo by collecting information on the ancestry of the population studied. METHODS: The prevalence of celiac disease was assessed by screening for positive IgA transglutaminase and IgA endomysium antibodies in 4,000 donors (volunteers in the Fundação Pró-Sangue Blood Center of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. The antibody-positive subjects were asked to undergo a small bowel biopsy. RESULTS: Of the 4,000 subjects, twenty-four had positive tests, although both antibody tests were not always concordant. For example, ten subjects were positive for IgA tissue transglutaminase only. In twenty-one positive patients, duodenal biopsies were performed, and the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in fourteen patients (Marsh criteria modified by Oberhuber. In this group, 67% claimed to have European ancestry, mainly from Italy, Portugal and Spain. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease is at least 1:286 among supposedly healthy blood bank volunteers in São Paulo, Brazil.

  12. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  13. Celiac disease presenting as rickets in Saudi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Asaad; Saeed, Anjum; AlSarkhy, Ahmed; El Mouzan, Mohammed Issa; El Matary, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Rickets is commonly seen as a sign of malabsorption like celiac disease if it is not treated appropriately with vitamin D and calcium supplements. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of diagnosis of celiac disease among children with unexplained rickets in Saudi children at a tertiary hospital setting. Retrospective review of records of patients referred over 10 years to a pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology unit. The study included all patients referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and osteomalacia and screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of rickets was made on the basis of history, physical examination, biochemical and radiological investigations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on the ESPGHAN (European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) criteria. Twenty-six children with a mean (SD) age of 9.5 (4.6) years (5 males, range 1-15 years) were referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and were screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease based on small bowel biopsy findings was confirmed in 10 (38.4%) patients with rickets. Serological markers for celiac disease including antiendomyseal antibodies and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in all ten children. Rickets is not an uncommon presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children and pediatricians should consider celiac disease as an underlying cause for rickets.

  14. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Neurolytic celiac plexus block, Cytokine, Nuclear translocation, Partial hepatectomy, Stress, ... International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index ... inflammatory reactions, leading to over-activation.

  15. Psychotropic medication use among patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Haley M; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2018-03-27

    Celiac disease is a multi-system disorder with manifestations that may result in psychiatric disorders. We assessed the prevalence of medication use to treat psychiatric disorders in celiac disease patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy over 9-years at a celiac disease referral center. We compared the prevalence of psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients (n = 1293) to a control group (n = 1401) with abdominal pain or reflux. Among all patients the mean age was 48.4 years, most were female (69.5%), and 22.7% used any psychotropic medication. There was no difference between overall psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients and controls (23.9% vs 21.8%, OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.39, p = 0.12). However, those with celiac disease were more likely to use antidepressants on univariate (16.4% vs 13.4%, p = 0.03) and multivariate analysis (OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.59; p = 0.03). Use of psychotropic medications was not associated with disease duration or mode of presentation of celiac disease. Celiac disease patients use psychotropic medications at similar rates as those with other gastrointestinal diseases, though subgroup analysis suggests they may use more antidepressants. Future studies should investigate whether celiac disease is associated with mood disorders that are not treated with medications.

  16. Celiac disease in children and adolescents with Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhan, Hale; Işık, Sakine; Abacı, Ayhan; Şimşek, Erdem; Anık, Ahmet; Anal, Özden; Böber, Ece

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory findings and determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The data of a total of 80 patients with positive anti-thyroid antibodies who were aged between 6 and 17.9 years were retrospectively studied. Age, gender, complaints at the time of presentation, family history of thyroid disorders, clinical and laboratory findings were recorded. The levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxin, thyroid autoantibodies (thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies), immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG), and thyroid ultrasonography findings were enrolled. Eighty patients (65 females (81.2%) and 15 males (18,8%)) were included in the study. Family history of thyroid disease was present in 38 (47.5%) patients. The most common complaints at the time of presentation were goiter (%30) and weight gain (%25). Forty three (53.8%), 23 (28.7%), and 14 (17.5%) patients presented with euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and obvious hypothyroidism. Thirty seven (46.2%) patients had goiter. IgA-tTG was found to be positive after a diagnosis of HT was made in only one patient (1.25%) and the diagnosis of CD was confirmed when intestinal biopsy of this patient revealed villus atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and increase in the intraepithelial lymphocyte count. In our study, it was found that the most common complaints at presentation in patients with a diagnosis of hashimoto thyroiditis included goiter, weakness and weight gain and the prevalence of celiac diseases was found to be 1.25% (1/80). This study shows that the prevalence of CD in patients with a diagnosis of HT is higher compared to the prevalence in the healthy pediatric population.

  17. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

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    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  18. A simple phenotypic classification for celiac disease

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    Ajit Sood

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims : Celiac disease is a global health problem. The presentation of celiac disease has unfolded over years and it is now known that it can manifest at different ages, has varied presentations, and is prone to develop complications, if not managed properly. Although the Oslo definitions provide consensus on the various terminologies used in literature, there is no phenotypic classification providing a composite diagnosis for the disease. Methods : Various variables identified for phenotypic classification included age at diagnosis, age at onset of symptoms, clinical presentation, family history and complications. These were applied to the existing registry of 1,664 patients at Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. In addition, age was evaluated as below 15 and below 18 years. Cross tabulations were used for the verification of the classification using the existing data. Expert opinion was sought from both international and national experts of varying fields. Results : After empirical verification, age at diagnosis was considered appropriate in between A1 (<18 and A2 (≧18. The disease presentation has been classified into 3 types–P1 (classical, P2 (non-classical and P3 (asymptomatic. Complications were considered as absent (C0 or present (C1. A single phenotypic classification based on these 3 characteristics, namely age at the diagnosis, clinical presentation, and intestinal complications (APC classification was derived. Conclusions : APC classification (age at diagnosis, presentation, complications is a simple disease explanatory classification for patients with celiac disease aimed at providing a composite diagnosis.

  19. Serological prevalence of celiac disease in Brazilian population of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Pérola; de Carvalho, Daniel Rocha; Brandi, Ivar Viana; Pratesi, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    Comorbidity of celiac disease with demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system has been reported since the 1960s. The objective of this study was to determine the serological prevalence of celiac disease in the largest series of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, or myelitis. A prevalence study was conducted with patients evaluated at Sarah Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals between March 2012 and September 2013. They were previously diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, or idiopathic myelitis. The serum levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and endomysium were assessed. Of the 379 patients evaluated, 249 (65.70%) were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, 37 (9.56%) with neuromyelitis optica, and 96 (24.54%) with idiopathic myelitis. Two patients (0.53%), one with multiple sclerosis and other with myelitis, tested positive for both antibodies. Our study do not confirm the relationship between celiac serological antibodies with multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and inflammatory myelitis of an unknown etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. What People with Celiac Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common symptoms among children. In some cases, a diagnosis of celiac disease is missed because the symptoms are so varied and may only flare up occasionally. Children and adults with untreated celiac disease may become malnourished, meaning they do not get ...

  1. Going Gluten-Free: Life with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnose it. Diagnosis can often be difficult, as celiac disease symptoms are often similar to those of other conditions. ... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Celiac Disease or Gluten Sensitivity? Some of the symptoms of gluten sensitivity (also known as gluten intolerance) ...

  2. Celiac Disease and Wheat Allergy: A Growing Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micozzi, Sarah; Infante, Sonsoles; Fuentes-Aparicio, Victoria; Álvarez-Perea, Alberto; Zapatero, Lydia

    2018-05-30

    Celiac disease and wheat allergy (WA) are infrequent diseases in the general population, and a combination of the 2 is particularly rare. Celiac disease occurs in around 1% of the general population and WA in around 1% of all children. We report 2 patients with celiac disease and a gluten-free diet who developed WA consistent in anaphylaxis and an eyelid angioedema, respectively, through accidental wheat exposure. A serum study and an intestinal biopsy confirmed celiac disease. Both patients were studied with a skin prick test and serum-specific IgE, with a diagnosis of WA. In patients with celiac disease, the trace amounts of cereals present in gluten-free food could act as a sensitization factor, and probably patients with persistent symptoms (despite a gluten-free diet) are experiencing WA symptoms rather than celiac disease symptoms. The number of patients diagnosed with celiac disease has increased in the recent decades: the association between celiac disease and WA, exceedingly rare to date, could increase as well, prompting special attention to the possibility of inadvertent intake of cereals. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  4. Diagnostic value of serologic tests in celiac screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Saneian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: According to our study results, there is no correlation between gastrointestinal symptoms such as vomiting diarrhea, anorexia, bulimia, and failure to thrive (FFT with celiac. TTG was the best screening test method to diagnose celiac disease and other tests such as AGA and EMA do not have high diagnostic value.

  5. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease : lost in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Frederike

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of coeliac disease. Whereas celiac disease can successfully be treated by the strict avoidance of gluten, refractory celiac patients show no remission despite a gluten-free diet. The pathology of RCDII is only partially understood,

  6. Characterization of intestinal microbiota in celiac children | Lahcene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of intestinal microbiota in celiac children. F Lahcene, A Tir Touil Meddah, K Bouziane-Nedjadi, B Meddah, A Leke. Abstract. Celiac disease (CD) is enteropathy autoimmune induced by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed subjects. The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of CD, ...

  7. Exome sequencing in a family segregating for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szperl, A M; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Li, J K; Deelen, P; Kanterakis, A; Plagnol, V; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, H J; Trynka, G; Mulder, C. J.; Swertz, M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zheng, H C H

    Celiac disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by an unknown number of genetic factors interacting with an environmental factor. Hence, most patients are singletons and large families segregating with celiac disease are rare. We report on a three-generation family with six patients in which the

  8. ACG clinical guidelines: diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-05-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley, and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g., abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient's original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Features and Extraintestinal Manifestations of Celiac Disease in Adults

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    Mete Akın

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease an autoimmune disorder resulting from an immune response to the gluten in genetically predisposed patients. Although, diarrhea is the most common finding at presentation in adults, disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, elevated transaminase levels and growth retardation. In this article, symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of adult patients with celiac disease were evaluated. Material and Method: 22 patients whose followed with the diagnosis of celiac disease in Suleyman Demirel University Department of Gastroenterology, between January 2007 and Semptember 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. Symptoms, extraintestinal manifestations and coexistence with other autoimmune disorders of patients at presentation were investigated. Results: 13 (59% of all cases were female and 9 (41% were male. Mean age at presentation was 38,5 years. Most common complaints were diarrhea and weakness . Tissue transglutaminase and/or antiendomysium antibody were positive, and diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination in all patients. Iron deficiency, vitamine B12 deficiency and folic acid deficiency were detected in 17 (77%, 8 (36% and 6 (27% patients, respectively. There were elevated transaminase levels in 8 (36% patients. Osteoporosis was detected in 4 female and 1 male patients. Sensorimotor polineuropathy was detected in 2 patients. There was growth retardation in 2 patients. Autoimmune hypothyroidism and Type 1 diabetes mellitus were detected in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Coexistence with Crohn%u2019s disease was detected in a patient. Discussion: Celiac disease may present with extraintestinal manifestations in adults. It should be remembered, especially in patients with iron deficiency and mild to moderate transaminase elevations with unexplained etiology. It should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and

  10. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zini, Chiara, E-mail: zini.chiara@gmail.com; Corona, Mario, E-mail: mario.corona@uniroma.it; Boatta, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.boatta@yahoo.it; Wlderk, Andrea, E-mail: a.wlderk@virgilio.it; Salvatori, Filippo Maria, E-mail: filippomaria.salvatori@uniroma1.it; Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [' Sapienza,' -University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology, Oncology and Pathology Department (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  11. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

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    Marco Astegiano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease.

  12. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Osamu; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  13. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  14. Continuous celiac plexus block and spread of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tatsushi; Kawabata, Masahiro; Suda, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    A continuous celiac plexus block has been developed and is available for use. With this method, the drug can be repeatedly applied and the reproducibility of imaged findings is secured. It is possible to accurately judge the effect by the use of a local anesthetics before the injection of the neurolytics. Imaged findings at the celiac plexus block were classified into 4 types according to the pattern of CT images. Paticularly interesting is a finding that the contrast media injected in the retrocrural space for retrocrural splanchnic nerve block (RSB) permeates through the aortic hiatus as far as the area surrounding the celiac plexus and so-called transcrural celiac plexus block (TCB) takes place. Thus, it was found that the celiac plexus block so far used was a complex of RSB and TCB. (author)

  15. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zini, Chiara; Corona, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Wlderk, Andrea; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Fanelli, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient’s clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months’ follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  16. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  17. Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Maureen M; Sapone, Anna; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2017-08-15

    The prevalence of gluten-related disorders is rising, and increasing numbers of individuals are empirically trying a gluten-free diet for a variety of signs and symptoms. This review aims to present current evidence regarding screening, diagnosis, and treatment for celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is a gluten-induced immune-mediated enteropathy characterized by a specific genetic genotype (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 genes) and autoantibodies (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial). Although the inflammatory process specifically targets the intestinal mucosa, patients may present with gastrointestinal signs or symptoms, extraintestinal signs or symptoms, or both, suggesting that celiac disease is a systemic disease. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is diagnosed in individuals who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy but who have intestinal symptoms, extraintestinal symptoms, or both, related to ingestion of gluten-containing grains, with symptomatic improvement on their withdrawal. The clinical variability and the lack of validated biomarkers for nonceliac gluten sensitivity make establishing the prevalence, reaching a diagnosis, and further study of this condition difficult. Nevertheless, it is possible to differentiate specific gluten-related disorders from other conditions, based on currently available investigations and algorithms. Clinicians cannot distinguish between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity by symptoms, as they are similar in both. Therefore, screening for celiac disease must occur before a gluten-free diet is implemented, since once a patient initiates a gluten-free diet, testing for celiac disease is no longer accurate. Celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity are common. Although both conditions are treated with a gluten-free diet, distinguishing between celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity is important for long-term therapy. Patients with celiac disease should be followed up

  18. The microbiota as a component of the celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Nylund

    2016-04-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of microbiota to the pathogenesis and/or onset of celiac disease. In addition, a brief overview of the possible role of the microbiota components on the NCGS is presented.

  19. Elevated serum antiphospholipid antibodies in adults with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Outi; Pitkänen, Katariina; Lindfors, Katri; Huhtala, Heini; Niemelä, Onni; Collin, Pekka; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri

    2018-05-01

    An increased incidence of thrombosis is suggested in celiac disease. We explored serum levels of antiphospholipid antibodies in untreated and treated adult celiac disease patients. A cohort of 179 biopsy-proven celiac disease patients (89 untreated, 90 on long-term gluten-free diet) and 91 non-celiac controls underwent clinical examination, assessment of celiac serology and enzyme immunoassay testing for anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, prothrombin IgG, and phosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG and IgM. The level of antiphospholipid antibodies was higher in celiac disease patients compared with controls: anticardiolipin IgG 4.9 (0.7-33.8) vs 2.2 (0.4-9.6) U/ml, antiprothrombin IgG 2.9 (0.3-87.8) vs 2.1 (0.5-187.0) U/ml, antiphosphatidylserine-prothrombin IgG 6.9 (0.0-54.1) vs 2.3 (0.5-15.1) U/ml; p celiac disease at presentation (gastrointestinal symptoms, malabsorption or anemia, and extraintestinal symptoms or screen-detected disease) had no effect on the level of serum antiphospholipid antibodies. The serum level of antiphospholipid antibodies is increased in adults with celiac disease. The higher level of antibodies in treated patients suggests that the increase is not gluten-dependent. The prothrombotic role of antiphospholipid antibodies in celiac disease warrants further studies. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort.

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    Ashok Sharma

    Full Text Available There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study.A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses.We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9 in time to celiac disease analyses (10-4>P>5.8x10-6. The hazard ratios (HR for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (P<10-4. A SNP near PKIA (rs117128341, P = 6.5x10-8, HR = 2.8 and a SNP near PFKFB3 (rs117139146, P<2.8x10-7, HR = 4.9 reached the genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden. Analyses of time to detection of tTGA identified 29 SNPs in 2 regions previously associated with celiac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10-6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10-5, HR = .80 and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously associated with celiac disease (P<10

  1. Refeeding syndrome in adults with celiac crisis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Sonia; Aref, Houda Lazreg; Khalfa, Messouda; Kochtalli, Ines; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-01-31

    Refeeding syndrome is a rare and life-threatening pathology with polyvisceral manifestations occurring in severely malnourished patients. It is rarely described in adults with celiac disease. We report the case of a 28-year-old Tunisian woman followed up for celiac disease, who did not adhere to the gluten-free diet. She presented to our hospital with celiac crisis manifested by severe diarrhea, and metabolic and electrolyte disturbances. The treatment of electrolyte abnormalities, hydration, and nutritional support was marked by the occurrence on the fifth day of refeeding syndrome with psychomotor agitation followed by respiratory distress and a state of cardiogenic shock. Refeeding syndrome is still under-recognized. It should be systematically prevented for high-risk patients. Nutritional support in patients with celiac crisis should be monitored carefully since the risk of refeeding syndrome is very high with a poor prognosis.

  2. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  3. Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Celiac Disease: A Coincidental Finding

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    Umberto Volta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD can be associated with a variety of extraintestinal manifestations, including neurological diseases. A new neurological correlation has been found between CD and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL.

  4. Celiac disease and new diseases related to gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; Martínez García, Rosa María; Quiles Blanco, María José; Majid Abu Naji, Jamil Abdel; González Iglesias, María José

    2016-07-12

    Celiac disease is the most common chronic intestinal disease. Nowadays it´s known that this is a multisistemic pathology of immune mechanism, triggered by gluten, which occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. It affects approximately 1% of the world population, which is a very high prevalence, affects all age groups and has symptoms both digestive and extra-digestive. Since it is a disease that requires maintaining a gluten-free diet and medical monitoring for life, it is important to know it and establish its diagnosis properly. Along with celiac disease a number of new diseases related to gluten are diagnosed increasingly, including the non celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. The suffering of celiac disease, or other related diseases, by conditioning diet changes of the affected individual, it may be associated with nutritional imbalances that need to monitor and try to solve. Therefore patients with this problem need special nutritional advice.

  5. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease

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    Valli De Re

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune and multisystem gluten-related disorder that causes symptoms involving the gastrointestinal tract and other organs. Pathogenesis of CD is only partially known. It had been established that ingestion of gluten proteins present in wheat and other cereals are necessary for the disease and develops in individuals genetically predisposed carrying the DQ2 or DQ8 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes. In this review, we had pay specific attention on the last discoveries regarding the three cellular components mainly involved in the development and maintenance of CD: T-cells, B-cells, and microbioma. All of them had been showed critical for the interaction between inflammatory immune response and gluten peptides. Although the mechanisms of interaction among overall these components are not yet fully understood, recent proteomics and molecular studies had shed some lights in the pathogenic role of tissue transglutaminase 2 in CD and in the alteration of the intestinal barrier function induced by host microbiota.

  6. Celiac disease: Serologic prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

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    Zobeiri Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS in the community is 10%-20% and have symptom based diagnostic criteria. Many symptoms of celiac disease (CD with 1% prevalence in some communities can mimic IBS. Sensitive and specific serologic tests of CD can detect asymptomatic cases. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of anti-tissue-transglutaminase (tTG IgA in IBS patients and controls group. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed at a University hospital in which 107 patients with IBS who met the Rome II criteria for their diagnosis were compared with 126 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Both groups were investigated for CD by analysis of their serum tTG IgA antibody with human recombinant antigen. Titers were positive containing over 10u/ml and borderline if they were between 4 and 10 u/ml. Result: 86 percent of IBS patients were female. The mean antibody level was 0.837 u/ml in IBS group and 0.933 u/ml in control group without any significant difference. Discussion and Conclusion: Results of this study may intensify disagreement on the situation of CD in IBS patients.

  7. Periodontal disease associated to systemic genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart Grollmus, Zacy Carola; Morales Chávez, Mariana Carolina; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier

    2007-05-01

    A number of systemic disorders increase patient susceptibility to periodontal disease, which moreover evolves more rapidly and more aggressively. The underlying factors are mainly related to alterations in immune, endocrine and connective tissue status. These alterations are associated with different pathologies and syndromes that generate periodontal disease either as a primary manifestation or by aggravating a pre-existing condition attributable to local factors. This is where the role of bacterial plaque is subject to debate. In the presence of qualitative or quantitative cellular immune alterations, periodontal disease may manifest early on a severe localized or generalized basis--in some cases related to the presence of plaque and/or specific bacteria (severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, Down syndrome and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome). In the presence of humoral immune alterations, periodontal damage may result indirectly as a consequence of alterations in other systems. In connective tissue disorders, bacterial plaque and alterations of the periodontal tissues increase patient susceptibility to gingival inflammation and alveolar resorption (Marfan syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome). The management of periodontal disease focuses on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by means of mechanical and chemical methods. Periodontal surgery and even extraction of the most seriously affected teeth have also been suggested. There are variable degrees of consensus regarding the background systemic disorder, as in the case of Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, where antibiotic treatment proves ineffective; in severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, where antibiotic prophylaxis is suggested; and in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, where an established treatment protocol is available.

  8. Mode of delivery is not associated with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Størdal, Ketil; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Murray, Joseph A; Husby, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mode of delivery and the risk of celiac disease in two large population-based birth cohorts with different prevalence of diagnosed celiac disease. This is an observational register-based cohort study using two independent population cohorts. We used data from administrative registers and health administrative registers from Denmark and Norway and linked the data at the individual level. We included all children who were born in Denmark from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2010 and all children who were born in Norway from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2012. We included 1,051,028 children from Denmark. Cesarean sections were registered for 196,512 children (18.9%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,395 children (0.13%). We included 537,457 children from Norway. Cesarean sections were registered for 90,128 children (16.8%). Diagnosed celiac disease was registered for 1,919 children (0.35%). We found no association between the mode of delivery and the risk of diagnosed celiac disease. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by any type of cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.96-1.29) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.84-1.09) in the Norwegian cohort. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by elective cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.00-1.43) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.79-1.17) in the Norwegian cohort. In this large registry-based study, mode of delivery was not associated with an increased risk of diagnosed celiac disease.

  9. Novel Insights to Celiac Disease: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pourtalebi-Firoozabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, systemic and autoimmune disorder of gastrointestinal track that involves approximately 1% of individuals of all ages throughout the world. The collaboration of environmental factor such as gluten proteins and genetic factors, notably HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 trigger the disease. Gluten-free diet is the simply and merely safe and proficient existing treatment. This article summarizes the latest trends in celiac disease.

  10. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, Young Hwan [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  11. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  12. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

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    Camilo VIEIRA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Neurological symptoms have been well-documented in patients with celiac disease, nevertheless, the presumption of a greater prevalence of epilepsy in celiac patients remains controversial. Objectives To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children and adolescents with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. Methods A cross-sectional study. One hundred pediatric patients with non-symptomatic epilepsy were followed-up at two public pediatric neurology clinics in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Screening for celiac disease was performed by serial measurements of IgA anti-transglutaminase and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, followed by bowel biopsy in positive cases. HLA DQ02 and DQ08 were investigated in seropositive individuals, assessing the type of seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs used and the presence gastrointestinal symptoms. Results Three (3.0% patients tested anti-tTG-positive, two with normal duodenal mucosa (Marsh 0 and one with intraepithelial infiltrate (Marsh I. No villous atrophy of the duodenal mucosa (Marsh III celiac disease was found. Two patients tested positive for HLA DQ02; none were DQ08 positive. Conclusion The present study failed to prove the association between celiac disease and epilepsy.

  13. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  14. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, D.; Valek, V.; Husty, J.; Uteseny, J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease

  15. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  16. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

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    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  17. Celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity? An approach to clinical differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Toufic A; Vanga, Rohini R; Leffler, Daniel A; Villafuerte-Galvez, Javier; Pallav, Kumar; Hansen, Joshua; Mukherjee, Rupa; Dennis, Melinda; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2014-05-01

    Differentiating between celiac disease (CD) and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is important for appropriate management but is often challenging. We retrospectively reviewed records from 238 patients who presented for the evaluation of symptoms responsive to gluten restriction without prior diagnosis or exclusion of CD. Demographics, presenting symptoms, serologic, genetic, and histologic data, nutrient deficiencies, personal history of autoimmune diseases, and family history of CD were recorded. NCGS was defined as symptoms responsive to a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the setting of negative celiac serology and duodenal biopsies while on a gluten-containing diet or negative human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/DQ8 testing. Of the 238 study subjects, 101 had CD, 125 had NCGS, 9 had non-celiac enteropathy, and 3 had indeterminate diagnosis. CD subjects presented with symptoms of malabsorption 67.3% of the time compared with 24.8% of the NCGS subjects (Pdiseases (P=0.002), or nutrient deficiencies (P2× upper limit of normal IgA trans-glutaminase antibody (tTG) or IgA/IgG deaminated gliadan peptide antibody (DGP) with clinical response to GFD was 130 (confidence interval (CI): 18.5-918.3). The positive likelihood ratio of the combination of gluten-responsive symptoms and negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP on a regular diet for NCGS was 9.6 (CI: 5.5-16.9). When individuals with negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP also lacked symptoms of malabsorption (weight loss, diarrhea, and nutrient deficiencies) and CD risk factors (personal history of autoimmune diseases and family history of CD), the positive likelihood ratio for NCGS increased to 80.9. On the basis of our findings, we have developed a diagnostic algorithm to differentiate CD from NCGS. Subjects with negative celiac serologies (IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP) on a regular diet are unlikely to have CD. Those with negative serology who also lack clinical evidence of malabsorption and CD risk factors are highly likely to have

  18. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

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    Bharat Rakeshkumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA. Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase. Those with a positive titer (but < 10 times the upper limit of normal underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6% turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%, 15 (8.24% females and 9 (9.18% males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD.

  19. Is tremor related to celiac disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameghino, Lucia; Rossi, Malco Damian; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2017-06-14

    Neurological features in celiac disease (CD) are not rare (5%-36%), but tremor is scarcely described. Subjects with CD and healthy controls completed an online survey using WHIGET tremor rating scale. One thousand five hundred and twelve subjects completed the survey, finally 674 CD patients and 290 healthy subjects were included. A higher prevalence of tremor in CD patients was observed in comparison to controls (28% vs 14%, P tremor in CD patients with and without tremor was 25% and 20% ( P = 0.2), while in the control group it was 41% and 10% ( P tremor showed a higher frequency of family history of tremor when compared to CD patients with tremor (41.5% vs 24.6%, P = 0.03). The results suggested that tremor in CD might be more frequent and possibly related to the disease itself and not due to associated essential tremor.

  20. Barriers impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in clinically high-prevalence populations

    OpenAIRE

    Barbero, Erika M; McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is present in ~1% of the general population in the United States and Europe. Despite the availability of inexpensive serologic screening tests, ~85% of individuals with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and there is an average delay in diagnosis of symptomatic individuals with celiac disease that ranges from ~5.8-11 years. This delay is often attributed to the use of a case-based approach for detection rather than general population screening for celiac disease, and ...

  1. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, ...

  2. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  3. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  4. Celiac disease: management of persistent symptoms in patients on a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, David H; Donnelly, Suzanne C; McLaughlin, Simon D; Johnson, Matthew W; Ellis, H Julia; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2012-03-28

    To investigate all patients referred to our center with non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD), to establish a cause for their continued symptoms. We assessed all patients referred to our center with non-responsive celiac disease over an 18-mo period. These individuals were investigated to establish the eitiology of their continued symptoms. The patients were first seen in clinic where a thorough history and examination were performed with routine blood work including tissue transglutaminase antibody measurement. They were also referred to a specialist gastroenterology dietician to try to identift any lapses in the diet and sources of hidden gluten ingestion. A repeat small intestinal biopsy was also performed and compared to biopsies from the referring hospital where possible. Colonoscopy, lactulose hydrogen breath testing, pancreolauryl testing and computed tomography scan of the abdomen were undertaken if the symptoms persisted. Their clinical progress was followed over a minimum of 2 years. One hundred and twelve consecutive patients were referred with NRCD. Twelve were found not to have celiac disease (CD). Of the remaining 100 patients, 45% were not adequately adhering to a strict gluten-free diet, with 24 (53%) found to be inadvertently ingesting gluten, and 21 (47%) admitting non-compliance. Microscopic colitis was diagnosed in 12% and small bowel bacterial overgrowth in 9%. Refractory CD was diagnosed in 9%. Three of these were diagnosed with intestinal lymphoma. After 2 years, 78 patients remained well, eight had continuing symptoms, and four had died. In individuals with NRCD, a remediable cause can be found in 90%: with continued gluten ingestion as the leading cause. We propose an algorithm for investigation.

  5. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

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    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  6. Anorexia nervosa of the restrictive type and celiac disease in adolescence

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    Nacinovich R

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Renata Nacinovich,1 Lucio Tremolizzo,2 Fabiola Corbetta,1 Elisa Conti,2 Francesca Neri,1 Monica Bomba1 1Child and Adolescent Mental Health Department, 2Neurology Unit and Lab of Neurobiology, San Gerardo Hospital, School of Medicine and Surgery and Milan Center for Neuroscience (Neuro-MI, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN is usually present in adolescence with symptoms partially overlapping celiac disease (CD, but the relationship between these two conditions has received little attention in the literature. The aim of this work was to explore this relationship, considering if CD could be associated with specific baseline AN-related clinical features. Methods: In this retrospective study, 82 adolescent female out- and inpatients with AN of the restrictive type (ANr, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria, were recruited. CD diagnosis and related serology were recorded, including tissue transglutaminase type-2 antibodies, endomysial antibodies, and antibodies against deamidated forms of gliadin peptides. Eating disorder inventory-3, Children’s Depression Inventory, body mass index, age, and disease duration data recorded at the time of blood withdrawal were also obtained from each patient. Results: Five (6.1% subjects presented a CD disorder associated with AN: none of the collected psychometric measures was significantly correlated with any CD-related parameter or characterized as a specific subgroup. Conclusion: CD diagnosis or serology does not relate to ANr clinical or demographic characteristics. However, a slight increase in prevalence with respect to the general population might be hypothesized and possibly elucidated by further studies with an appropriate design. Keywords: anorexia nervosa, celiac disease, adolescence, celiac disease antibody, gluten

  7. Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

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    Butwicka, Agnieszka; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisén, Louise; Almqvist, Catarina; Larsson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-05-01

    To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands. This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged celiac disease and 12 710 of their siblings. We assessed the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and intellectual disability). HRs of future psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease and their siblings was estimated by Cox regression. The association between previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and current celiac disease was assessed using logistic regression. Compared with the general population, children with celiac disease had a 1.4-fold greater risk of future psychiatric disorders. Childhood celiac disease was identified as a risk factor for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. In addition, a previous diagnosis of a mood, eating, or behavioral disorder was more common before the diagnosis of celiac disease. In contrast, siblings of celiac disease probands were at no increased risk of any of the investigated psychiatric disorders. Children with celiac disease are at increased risk for most psychiatric disorders, apparently owing to the biological and/or psychological effects of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  9. Accuracy in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Without Biopsies in Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werkstetter, K J; Korponay-Szabó, I R; Popp, A

    2017-01-01

    the ULN) but no other results indicating celiac disease were classified as no celiac disease. Central histo-morphometry analyses were performed on all other biopsies and cases were carefully reviewed in a blinded manner. Inconclusive cases were regarded as not having celiac disease for calculation...

  10. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.N.; Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 μg fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 μg fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients

  11. Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial: Gluten versus Placebo Rechallenge in Patients with Lymphocytic Enteritis and Suspected Celiac Disease.

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    Mercè Rosinach

    Full Text Available The role of gluten as a trigger of symptoms in non-coeliac gluten sensitivity has been questioned.To demonstrate that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS, which presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac serology.Double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo rechallenge.>18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative coeliac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion. Eighteen patients were randomised: 11 gluten (20 g/day and 7 placebo. Clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI, and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits were evaluated.91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge versus 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01. Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten but not after placebo (p<0.01. The presence of coeliac tissue markers at baseline biopsy on a gluten-free diet allowed classifying 9 out of the 18 (50% patients as having probable 'coeliac lite' disease.This proof-of-concept study indicates that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for NCGS. They were characterized by positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission after a gluten-free diet.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02472704.

  12. Celiac disease: the situation on the Slovak market

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    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, non‐tropical sprue, idiopathic sprue, idiopathic steatorrhoea and gluten‐sensitive enteropathy, is a serious genetic autoimmune disease, which damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. The latest researches show that while in the 1970s the prevalence of celiac disease in the world was 0.03%, in the present years the estimated prevalence is 1%. In average, the prevalence of celiac disease in the Western countries is close to 1:100. The celiac disease occurs more often in the case of women than of men, at a ratio of 2.8:1. The aim of the present paper was to bring few information about the celiac disease, highlight the increasing number of celiacs, as well as to determine the Slovak celiacs opinion about the situation on Slovak market and their consumer behaviour on the market of gluten free products. As research methods, there have been used the methods of survey and structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. The total number of respondents was 130 randomly selected celiacs from all over the Slovak republic. For a deeper analysis of the obtained results, there have been set out four assumptions and ten hypotheses, which have been tested with the use of Pearson´s chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Cramer´s contingency coefficient. The results of the present paper show, that despite the fact that few of our findings are pleasing - almost 52% of our respondents stay that the labelling of gluten free products is sufficient, over 74% of respondents think that they have enough information about the availability of gluten free products and more than 89% of respondents think that the present scope of range of gluten free products is better as before; there are still some shortcomings, which has to be reduced or eliminated - only less than 7% of respondents think that the price of gluten free products is adequate, over 45% of respondents

  13. [Reproductive disorders in women with celiac disease. Effect of the etiotropic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, S V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Parfenov, A I; Gudkova, R B; Krums, L M; Chikunova, B Z

    2011-01-01

    Violation of reproductive function in patients with celiac disease can manifest as delayed puberty, infertility, amenorrhea, premature menopause, spontaneous abortion, low birth weight. The aim of the study was to establish the frequency and nature of reproductive function violation in patients with CD in the Russian Federation. The study included 132 women (average age 38,5 +/- 1,17 years) with CD observed in CSRIG in the period from 2000 to 2010. Comparison group consisted 105 women (average age 38,7 +/- 1,6 years) with predominantly functional bowel disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, functional constipation, functional bloating, inert colon). Were took into account information regarding obstetric history, physical and laboratory signs of malabsorption syndrome (MS) study of antibodies to alpha-gliadin immunoglobulin (IG) A class (AGA) and tissue transglutaminase (AtTG). The average age of onset of menses was 14,3 +/- 1,4 years, and in the control group - 13,0 +/- 1,3 years (p > 0.05), half of patients with C (43.9%) had menstruation begun at age 15 years and older, while 7.6% of the women--aged 17 and older. In the comparison group menses beginning after 15 years was only at 13.3% of women. In 61.3% of patients with CD was irregular menstrual cycle while in the comparison group such violations were noted in 13.3% (p 0.05). The frequency of reproductive disorders increased with the growth of the severity of MS. In 43% of women after 6-8 months of strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) had disappeared amenorrhea and there were regular menses. Three women of childbearing age, strictly abided the GFD and had a history of repeated spontaneous abortion during the year managed to get pregnant and give birth to healthy full-term baby. Reproductive disorders in women with celiac disease are significantly more likely than at women with functional bowel disease. One of the reasons of reproductive disorders in patients with CD can be malabsorption of necessary

  14. [Celiac crisis with quadriplegia due to potassium depletion as presenting feature of celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atikou, A; Rabhi, M; Hidani, H; El Alaoui Faris, M; Toloune, F

    2009-06-01

    Adult coeliac disease revealed by coeliac crisis and quadriplegia due to potassium depletion is an extremely rare situation. A 26-year-old woman presented with a suddenly developed weakness of all four limbs and a severe diarrhea. Authors emphasize coeliac crisis, which is a presenting feature of coeliac disease, characterized by acute diarrhea with life-threatening acid base and electrolyte abnormalities. The patient improved with correction of hypokalemia and gluten-free diet. A severe acute diarrhea with metabolic and systemic complications, the so-called coeliac crisis, is a possible presenting clinical feature of a previously undiagnosed adult celiac disease.

  15. Description of the celiac artery in domestic pigeons (Columba livia

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    Cibele Geeverghese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to define the origin and distribution of the celiac artery and its collateral branches in 15 fowls from the Columba livia species, which were obtained from the Zoonosis Control Center of Brasilia, Brazil. In order to mark the arterial system of the specimens, the left brachiocephalic trunk was canullated and a colored water-latex solution was injected there. Afterwards, fowls were fixed in a 10% v/v formaldehyde solution and dissected with appropriate equipment, presenting the results described in this paper. The celiac artery originated from the ventral face of the descendent aorta. The first collateral branch arose from the celiac artery itself, forming the esophageal artery. Then, the celiac artery has bifurcated into two branches, named left and right branches of the celiac artery. The left branch emitted the proventricular ventral artery, followed by the splenic arteries, proventricular dorsal artery, and the left hepatic artery. The left branch has bifurcated into two branches, known as ventral and left gastric arteries. The right branch emitted the right hepatic artery, followed by the ileal artery and the right gastric artery. Finally, the right branch turned into the pancreaticoduodenal artery. Our findings showed a great similarity with the avian lineages of the Gallus gallus species, except for the lack of ileocecal artery, cystic branches, and dorsal gastric artery.

  16. Factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Valma; Kurppa, Kalle; Huhtala, Heini; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2014-11-01

    Here, we investigated the factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease and the impact of the national Current Care Guidelines in reducing the delay. This population-based study involved 825 adult celiac disease patients. The diagnosis was considered delayed when the interval between first symptoms and diagnosis was >10 years. The patients were asked about the duration and type of symptoms before diagnosis, time and site (tertiary, secondary, or primary care) of the diagnosis, family history of the disease, and presence of significant comorbidities. Analysis was performed by binary logistic regression. Altogether, 261 (32%) out of 825 participants reported a diagnostic delay of >10 years. Female gender, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders and presence of diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption were associated with prolonged delay. Male gender, diagnosis after the introduction of the first Current Care Guidelines in 1997, and being detected by serological screening, and family history of celiac disease were associated with a lower risk of delayed diagnosis. Factors not associated with the delay were site of diagnosis, age, and presence of dermatitis herpetiformis, type 1 diabetes, or thyroidal disease. The number of long diagnostic delays in celiac disease has decreased over the past decades. The shift of diagnostics from secondary and tertiary care to primary care has not been detrimental. National guidelines together with increased awareness and active screening in at-risk groups of celiac disease are important in these circumstances.

  17. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SCREENING IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

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    Şedat IŞIKAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The involvement of the peripheral nervous system in children with celiac disease is particularly rare. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the need for neurophysiological testing in celiac disease patients without neurological symptoms in order to detect early subclinical neuropathy and its possible correlations with clinical and demographic characteristics. Methods Two hundred and twenty consecutive children with celiac disease were screened for neurological symptoms and signs, and those without symptoms or signs were included. Also, patients with comorbidities associated with peripheral neuropathy or a history of neurological disease were excluded. The remaining 167 asymptomatic patients as well as 100 control cases were tested electro-physiologically for peripheral nervous system diseases. Motor nerve conduction studies, including F-waves, were performed for the median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial nerves, and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed for the median, ulnar, and sural nerves with H reflex of the soleus muscle unilaterally. All studies were carried out using surface recording electrodes. Normative values established in our laboratory were used. Results Evidence for subclinical neuropathy was not determined with electrophysiological studies in any of the participants. Conclusion In this highly selective celiac disease group without any signs, symptoms as well as the predisposing factors for polyneuropathy, we did not determine any cases with neuropathy. With these results we can conclude that in asymptomatic cases with celiac disease electrophysiological studies are not necessary. However, larger studies with the electrophysiological studies performed at different stages of disease at follow-ups are warranted.

  18. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

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    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  19. Celiac Disease and Concomitant Conditions: A Case-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad Uzair; Stammann, Tracy; Kuzel, Aaron R; Syed, Intekhab Askari; Ishtiaq, Rizwan; Rahim, Mustafa

    2018-02-02

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease with genetic predisposition, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has a wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic forms to classic presentation of malabsorption with diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Celiac disease can also present with several other concomitant disorders (at the time of diagnosis or during the course of celiac disease) such as: type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disorders, nutritional deficiencies, and gram-negative sepsis. We present a 57-year-old female with past medical history of rheumatoid arthritis, who presented to the emergency department with a complaint of chronic diarrhea, complicated by gram-negative sepsis. The family history of the patient was significant for celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. The patient was closely monitored and treated appropriately. In this case-based review, we explore different associated conditions of celiac disease in the literature, as well as the patient's risk of developing malignancy.

  20. Review Article: Celiac Disease, New Approaches to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shahrooz; Murray, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    STRUCTURED SUMMARY Background Celiac disease is managed by life-long gluten withdrawal from the diet. However strict adherence to a gluten-free diet is difficult and is not always effective. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to supplement or even replace the dietary treatment. Aims To review recent advances in new therapeutic options for celiac disease. Methods A literature search was performed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, DDW.org and ClinicalTrial.gov for English articles and abstracts. The search terms used include but not limited to “Celiac disease”, “new”, “novel”, Advances”, “alternatives” and “Drug therapy”. The cited articles were selected based on the relevancy to the review objective. Results Several new therapeutic approaches for celiac disease are currently under development by targeting its underlying pathogenesis. Alternative therapies range from reproduction of harmless wheat strains to immunomodulatory approaches. Some of these therapies such as enzymatic cleavage of gluten and permeability inhibitors have shown promise in clinical studies. Conclusion Gluten-free diet is still the only practical treatment for patients with celiac disease. Novel strategies provide promise of alternative adjunctive approaches to diet restriction alone for patients with this disorder. PMID:22324389

  1. Celiac artery compression syndrome with bilateral Bochdalek hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, K.; Verim, S.; Bozkurt, Y.; Tasar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Celiac artery compression syndrome or median arcuate ligament syndrome is rare and controversial condition. The definition of the syndrome relies on a combination of both clinical and radiographic features. It typically occurs in young patients, who may present with epigastric pain and weight loss. Bochdalek hernia is the most common congenital diaphragmatic hernia in adults. Bilaterality of this pathology is rare. There are not many reports about the associated pathologies to Bochdalek hernia. Objectives and tasks: We aimed to demonstrate the computed tomography (CT) angiography findings of celiac artery compression syndrome with Bochdalek hernia that has detected incidentally. Materials and methods: A CT angiography was performed to 32-year-old patient having postphelebitic syndrome for the possible diagnosis as pulmonary embolus. Results: At the imaging pulmonary arteries and the branches were normal. Celiac artery compression syndrome with Bochdalek Hernia was detected incidentally. A %75 stenosis at the origin of celiac artery and post stenotic dilatation after the stenosis was seen due to the compression. A poster medial defect at the diaphragm was seen as an additional finding for the cause of Bochdalek hernia. Conclusion: Many incidental finding can be detected at vascular and non vascular area in the routine CT angiography imaging. The pathologies like celiac artery compression syndrome and congenital diaphragm pathologies can be detected easily at CT angiography method

  2. Total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin levels in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Ersin; Özdem, Sebahat; Uzun, Gülbahar; İşlek, Ali; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    In our study, we aimed to investigate ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an oxidative stress marker, as well as other oxidant and antioxidant markers that have not been evaluated in children with celiac disease. A total of 37 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) and 29 healthy children were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the IMA, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, and advanced oxidation protein products in all of the subjects. We also compared the levels at the time of the diagnosis, and following a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the children with CD. While the IMA and the other oxidant marker levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group, the antioxidant marker levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group, compared to the control group. We also determined that the tissue transglutaminase IgA showed a highly positive correlation, and that the IMA showed a moderately positive correlation with the Marsh-Oberhuber histopathological stage. Additionally, the IMA and other oxidant marker levels were significantly lower, while the antioxidant marker levels were significantly higher after the GFD, compared to the pre-diet period. We detected that oxidative stress played a role in the pathogenesis of CD, and that this could be evaluated using oxidative stress markers, which would regress after the GFD. We also detected that IMA is a marker that shows a correlation with the histopathological stage, and may be used in the diagnosis.

  3. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori in Patients Referred to Endoscopy Section of Taleghani Hospital

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    P Mohammadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to previous studies celiac disease(CD is frequently associated with chronic gastritis. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CD and Helicobacter pylori in patients with dyspepsia. Methods: 325 patients were studied from April 2008 to April 2009 who underwent endoscopic procedures for dyspepsia. Gastric antrum, duodenal biopsies, serology with tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies(tTGA and total IgA were performed for detection of H. pylori and CD. Results: Out of 325 patients 312(96% had a positive H. pylori. Heart burn and bloating were the most prevalent symptoms in this study. Twenty one of 25 patients with positive histology for CD who had gastric biopsies were positive for H. pylori(84%. Duodenal biopsy specimens results have shown normal histology in 213(65.5%, hyperplastic polyps in 1(0.4%, duodenitis in 79(24.3% and abnormality in small bowel (Marsh I-IIIc in 25(10%. In term of the serological analysis, 9 of 26 tTGA positive patients had abnormal histology (Marsh I-IIIc(2.7%. Conclusion: Similar to previous reports, we found a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and celiac disease in dyspeptic patients. Therefore, further studies for screening occult CD in dyspeptic patients is seems necessary.

  4. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of small intestinal biopsies in adults suspected of celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, R.; Jamal, S.; Zafar, A.; Saadia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis of small intestinal biopsies in adults suspected of celiac disease. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from November 2014 to December 2015. Methodology: Fifty cases of small intestinal mucosal biopsies (duodenal and jejunal) were analysed in adult patients aged above 14 years suspected of celiac disease. Their histomorphological data was recorded using Modified Marsh Criteria. Type of intraepithelial lymphocytes was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were counted both by H and E stain and immunostain CD3 and CD20. Results: Thirty-four percent patients were aged between 21 - 30 years and 22% patients aged between 41 - 50 years. There were 84% (n=42) males. Thirteen (26%) cases showed focal villous atrophy, 32 (64%) cases showed partial villous atrophy and 5 (10%) cases showed complete villous atrophy. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was positive in 21 (42%) cases. CD3 immunomarker was positive for intraepithelial lymphocytes in all 50 cases while CD20 immunomarker showed focal positivity in areas with lymphoid follicle formation. The count of intraepithelial lymphocytes was found to be almost equal (with a difference of 3 - 4 lymphocytes) on both H and E stain and immunostain CD3 and CD20. Conclusion: Males aged 21 - 30 years were the most commonly affected group. The most frequent change in histology was partial villous atrophy along with lymphocytic enteritis. All the intraepithelial lymphocytes were present in crescendo-pattern of distribution. (author)

  5. Subacute copper-deficiency myelopathy in a patient with occult celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallieri, Francesco; Fini, Nicola; Contardi, Sara; Fiorini, Massimo; Corradini, Elena; Valzania, Franco

    2017-07-01

    Acquired copper deficiency represents a rare cause of progressive myelopathy presenting with sensory ataxia and spastic gait. The time interval from neurological symptoms onset to diagnosis of myelopathy ranges from 2 months to several years in almost all cases, mimicking the clinical course of subacute combined degeneration due to vitamin B12 deficiency. A 60-year-old man, without any gastrointestinal symptoms, developed over the course of one week rapidly progressive gait imbalance, tingling and numbness in his feet and ascending lower limb weakness. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintensity involving cervical and dorsal posterior columns of spinal cord. Blood analysis revealed undetectable serum copper levels, low serum ceruloplasmin and positive serum Immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed revealing duodenal villous atrophy consistent with a malabsorption pattern. A gluten-free diet in association with intravenous then oral copper supplementation prompted sustained normalization of serum copper levels and progressive clinical improvement. We report a rare case of myelopathy induced by copper deficiency secondary to undiagnosed celiac disease, peculiarly presenting with a subacute onset. This case expands the neurological presentation and clinical course of myelopathy due to acquired copper deficiency. We suggest investigation of copper deficiency in patients presenting with subacute or even acute sensory ataxia and spastic gait. Detection of hypocupremia in patients without a previous history of gastric surgery should lead to diagnostic testing for celiac disease even in the absence of any obvious gastrointestinal symptoms.

  6. Histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac patients

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    Elena Bardellini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible subjects. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut's involvement in CD, other mucosal surfaces belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to be affected. Aim: Assuming that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological inflammatory alterations of the intestine in CD patients, this study wishes to assess the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with CD. Methods: A group of 37 patients (age range 20-38 years; female: male ratio 28:9 with CD were enrolled. Out of 37 patients, 19 patients (group A followed a gluten free diet (GFD -2 patients from less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years- while 18 patients (group B were still untreated. Fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, female: Male ratio 11:4 served as controls for the CD patients. Ethical approval for the research was granted by the Ethics Committee. Biopsy specimens were taken from normal looking oral mucosa. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and γδ-chains T cell receptor (TCR. Results: The T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate was significantly (p < 0.0001 increased in group B (both compared with group A and with the control group. Conclusion: This study confirms the oral cavity to be a site of involvement of CD and its possible diagnostic potentiality in this disease.

  7. Frequency of celiac disease in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Serdal; Celiloğlu, Ozgü Suna; Ozcan, Ozlem Ozel; Raif, Sabiha Güngör; Selimoğlu, Mukadder Ayşe

    2013-02-01

    Although it is well known that celiac disease (CD) is associated with neurologic disorders, association with psychiatric problems is not well defined. In this report, we aimed to detect CD prevalence in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 362 patients between the ages 5 and 15 years with the diagnosis of ADHD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria and 390 sex- and age-matched healthy children were included in the present study. Serum levels of tissue transglutaminase (tTg) immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG were studied in both groups. Serum IgA levels were also studied in patients with positive tTG IgG for the exclusion of selective IgA deficiency. Endoscopic duodenal biopsy was provided in seropositive patients, whose parents approved the procedure. Biopsy samples were evaluated according to Marsh-Oberhuber classification. tTg IgA was positive in 4 patients with ADHD (1.1%). Endoscopic duodenal biopsy was suggestive of CD in one of them (0.27%). tTg IgA was positive in 3 of control group patients (0.8%). Duodenal biopsy of the only patient from control group, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, revealed normal intestinal mucosa. The seropositivity rates for CD were found similar in ADHD and control groups. Thus, neither routine screening for CD nor empirical recommendation of gluten-free diet seems necessary in children with ADHD.

  8. Possible cause underlying gastric necrosis and perforation: Celiac artery thrombosis

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    Ahmet Peker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we are sharing a case of a 76-year-old woman with known hypertension, atrial fibrillation,diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, who is presenting with stomach necrosis and perforation possibly due to celiac artery thrombosis after newly developed abdominal pain and bloody vomiting. In our case, emergency surgery was planned and the patient refused the operation and was lost at 48 hours of clinical follow-up. We aimed to discuss the etiology of celiac artery thrombosis, briefly. We believe that necrosis and perforation of the stomach due to celiac artery thrombosis deserves to be shared because it is a rare and difficult case to manage.

  9. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  10. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  11. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  12. Celiac Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study

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    Giuseppe Mazzarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD is mandatory for celiac disease (CD but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12 or transamidated (35 flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (=0.04 whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, =0.06. On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (=0.63, Marsh-Oberhuber grading (=0.08, or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (>0.05. Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (=0.46. In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function.

  13. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-04

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. HLA Typing and Celiac Disease in Moroccans

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    Daniela Piancatelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and haplotypes could be clinically relevant. Celiac disease (CD has been fast increasing in prevalence in North Africa; but few immunogenetic data are available for this area, in which a high prevalence of the disease has been described. In this report, we assess and discuss results of HLA class II (HLA-DQA1/DQB1/DRB1 typing in Moroccan patients with CD and compare them with a control population from Morocco—genetically well characterized—and with other North African, Mediterranean, and European populations. The classical HLA-DQ associations were confirmed in Moroccans with CD. The high frequency of DQ2.5 homozygosity (45.2% found in Moroccans with CD was noteworthy as compared with other populations (23%–32%. The genetic risk gradient for CD, identified by previous studies, has been confirmed in Moroccans with some differences, mainly concerning DQ8 genotypes. This study provides the immunogenetic framework of CD in Moroccans and confirms the need to learn more about associations with additional HLA and non-HLA genetic factors.

  15. A Comprehensive Review of Celiac Disease/Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Brian P; Williams, Emmanuelle; Clarke, Kofi

    2018-06-02

    Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated gluten-sensitive enteropathy with protean clinical manifestations. It is manifest in genetically predisposed individuals who ingest gluten in varying amounts. In broad terms, it is thought to affect 1% of the population in the USA. More specifically, the prevalence increases drastically from 1:133 in patients not-at-risk, to 1:56 in symptomatic patients, to 1:39 in patients with a second-degree relative with the diagnosis, and to 1:22 in patients with a first-degree relative with the diagnosis. It may be associated with several immune-mediated phenomena, autoimmune diseases, and complicated by vitamin and other trace element deficiencies, bone disease, and malignancy. Our understanding of celiac disease has evolved rapidly over the past two decades. This has led to several lines of enquiry on the condition and potential treatment options. More recently, several entities including gluten intolerance, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and seronegative celiac disease have been described. These conditions are distinct from allergies or intolerance to wheat or wheat products. There are challenges in defining some of these entities since a large number of patients self-report these conditions. The absence of confirmatory diagnostic tests poses an added dilemma in distinguishing these entities. The differences in spectrum of symptoms and highlights of the variability between the pediatric and adult populations have been studied in some detail. The role of screening for celiac disease is examined in both the general population and "at risk" populations. Diagnostic strategies including the best available serologic testing, utility of HLA haplotypes DQ2 and DQ8 which are seen in over 90% of patients with celiac disease as compared with approximately 40% of the general population, and endoscopic evaluation are also reviewed. Comprehensive nutritional management after diagnosis is key to sustained health in patients with celiac disease

  16. Erythema Nodosum in a Child with Celiac Disease

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    Andrew Fretzayas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum is an acute, nodular, erythematous eruption usually limited to the extensor aspects of the lower legs. It could be idiopathic or associated with other systemic diseases. We, herein, report a phenotypically healthy, ten-year-old boy who presented with erythema nodosum in whom serological tests of autoimmunity and intestinal histological examination were compatible with celiac disease. The eruption resolved within 2 months following a gluten-free diet. Therefore, the possibility that erythema nodosum represents an extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease should be kept in mind accordingly in cases where other common causes of this rash are ruled out.

  17. Anatomic study of celiac ganglia using CT in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qionghui; Zhang Xiaoming; Zeng Nanlin; Cai Changping; Xie Xingguo; Li Chengjun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify the celiac ganglia in cadavers by using current CT techniques, and to facilitate its identification in vivo by CT. Methods: Fifty cadavers were dissected, moving peritoneal organs such as liver and stomach to expose the celiac ganglia. The location, morphology, and dimensions of celiac ganglia, and their relationship to abutting structures, were noted. The celiac ganglia in 6 of the 50 cadavers without peripancreatic diseases and with clear anatomy were isolated and marked with yellow dye and Iohexol injection. In these 6 cadavers, the moved organs were relocated, the abdomen was closed, and CT was performed. CT derived measurements of celiac ganglia were compared with those from cadavers study. Results: The celiac ganglia of 47 of 50 cadavers (94%) were located between T12-L1, and those of 3 cadavers (6%) were located between T11-12. The superior-inferior diameter of the right ganglia was (25.01 ±6.09) mm, long (left-right) diameter was (13.18 ± 3.62) mm, and short (thickness) diameter was (1.40 ± 0.55) mm. In the left ganglia, these three diameters were (22.74 ± 5.70) mm, (15.07 ± 4.35) mm, and (2.00 ± 0.71 ) mm, respectively. On the CT images of 6 cadavers, the right and left ganglia were all identified and were hyperdense relative to viscus, such as liver and spleen. The long and short diameters on CT images were (15.20 ± 1.64) mm and (1.53 ± 0.52) mm for the right ganglia and (16.25 ± 1.73 ) mm and (2.20 ± 0.73) mm for the left ganglia. There was no significant difference between the diameters of the ganglia measured on CT images and by dissection (P>0.05). Conclusion: Current CT techniques can demonstrate accurately the celiac ganglia in cadavers. This can be a reference for identifying the celiac plexus in vivo. (authors)

  18. Refeeding syndrome in children in developing countries who have celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jaya; Poddar, Ujjal; Yachha, Surender K; Srivastava, Anshu

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentations of celiac crisis and refeeding syndrome in celiac disease are almost similar, but information about refeeding syndrome is scarce. We are reporting for the first time 5 cases of refeeding syndrome in children with celiac disease that could have otherwise been labeled as celiac crisis. From January to December 2010, a chart review of hospital records of all celiac disease cases was performed, and refeeding syndrome was ascribed in those celiac patients who deteriorated clinically after initiation of a gluten-free diet and had biochemical parameters suggestive of refeeding syndrome such as hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Of the total 35 celiac disease patients, 5 (median age 6.5 [range 2.2-10] years, 3 boys) were identified as having refeeding syndrome. All 5 children were severely malnourished (body mass index refeeding syndrome. At the same time, their clinical features fulfilled the criteria for celiac crisis except that their symptoms have worsened after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Nevertheless, instead of using steroids, they were managed as refeeding syndrome in terms of correction of electrolytes and gradual feeding, and that led to a successful outcome in all of them. Severely malnourished patients with celiac disease are at risk of developing potentially life-threatening refeeding syndrome, which may mimic celiac crisis, especially in developing countries. Early recognition and appropriate treatment are the keys to a successful outcome.

  19. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

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    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  20. Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients With Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Nobel, Yael R; Green, Peter H R; Blaser, Martin J; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-12-01

    Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for infections such as tuberculosis, influenza, and pneumococcal pneumonia. However, little is known about the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with celiac disease. We identified patients with celiac disease based on intestinal biopsies submitted to all pathology departments in Sweden over a 39-year period (from July 1969 through February 2008). We compared risk of CDI (based on stratified Cox proportional hazards models) among patients with celiac disease vs. without celiac disease (controls) matched by age, sex, and calendar period. We identified 28,339 patients with celiac disease and 141,588 controls; neither group had a history of CDI. The incidence of CDI was 56/100,000 person-years among patients with celiac disease and 26/100,000 person-years among controls, yielding an overall hazard ratio (HR) of 2.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.64-2.47; Pceliac disease (HR, 5.20; 95% CI, 2.81-9.62; Pceliac disease and controls. In a large population-based cohort study, patients with celiac disease had significantly higher incidence of CDI than controls. This finding is consistent with prior findings of higher rates of other infections in patients with celiac disease, and suggests the possibility of altered gut immunity and/or microbial composition in patients with celiac disease.

  1. Factors associated with number of duodenal samples obtained in suspected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamban, Leonid; Sorser, Serge; Naydin, Stan; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Shukr, Mousa; Wiemann, Charlotte; Yevsyukov, Daniel; Piper, Michael H; Warren, Bradley; Green, Peter H R

    2017-12-01

     Many people with celiac disease are undiagnosed and there is evidence that insufficient duodenal samples may contribute to underdiagnosis. The aims of this study were to investigate whether more samples leads to a greater likelihood of a diagnosis of celiac disease and to elucidate factors that influence the number of samples collected.  We identified patients from two community hospitals who were undergoing duodenal biopsy for indications (as identified by International Classification of Diseases code) compatible with possible celiac disease. Three cohorts were evaluated: no celiac disease (NCD, normal villi), celiac disease (villous atrophy, Marsh score 3), and possible celiac disease (PCD, Marsh score celiac disease had a median of 4 specimens collected. The percentage of patients diagnosed with celiac disease with one sample was 0.3 % compared with 12.8 % of those with six samples ( P  = 0.001). Patient factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were endoscopic features, demographic details, and indication ( P  = 0.001). Endoscopist factors that positively correlated with the number of samples collected were absence of a trainee, pediatric gastroenterologist, and outpatient setting ( P  celiac disease significantly increased with six samples. Multiple factors influenced whether adequate biopsies were taken. Adherence to guidelines may increase the diagnosis rate of celiac disease.

  2. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Arya; Xiao Lianchun; Allen, Pamela K.; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne; Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Welsh, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1–56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic

  3. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  4. Bleeding aneurysms of the celiac trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziviello, M.; D'Isa, L.; Siani, A.; Maglione, F.; Cataldo, B.; Ziviello, R.; Capalbogiliberti, R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience in the study of bleeding aneurysms of the celiac arteries. Eleven patients were examined with US,CT, and angiography (8 hepatic artery aneurysms and 3 splenic artery aneurysms). Clinical findings included digestive bleeding, upper abdominal pain, palpable pulsating masses, and jaundice. Patient history included blunt abdominal trauma, penetrating trauma due to gunshot, acute pancreatitis, recent hepatic biospy. In all cases US showed an abdominal mass ranging in size from 2 to 10 cm. US findings included cyst-like lesions (8 cases), anobulated solid-like lesion, and complex lesion (2 cases). Continuity of the lesion with adjancent arterial vessels was noted in 5/11 cases, and pulsing activity in 3/11 cases. US patterns, although not specific, play an important role in the diagnosis when associated to other elements such as arterial continuity, mass pulsatility, patient history, and gastrointestinal bleeding. They suggest the need for more specific imaging exams, i.e. CT and angiography, and help avoid dangerous diagnostic biopsies. CT was performed to confirm US findings in 5 cases, and detected either hypodense cystic masses, or inhomogeneous masses with arterial enhancement after bolus injection of cm. CT was used to better demonstrate the lumen, patency of the vessel, the walls of the vessel, and the parietal thrombotic component. The typical arterial enhancement was the decisive finding for the diagnosis, even though a total continuity with arterial vessels was never observed. Angiography was the method of choice for the preoperative demonstration of hepatic artery aneurysms (10 cases) and for occlusive treatment with Gianturco coils (3 cases)

  5. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, M.C.; Monsuur, A.J.; Poell, J.; Slot, R. van 't; Meijer, J.W.R.; Meijer, G.A.; Mulder, C.J.; Mearin, M.L.; Wijmenga, C.

    2007-01-01

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  6. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  7. [Growth rate and bone maturation in celiac disease (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Sopena, M J; Calvo Romero, M C; Bedate Calderón, P; Alonso Franch, M; Sánchez Villares, E

    1978-05-01

    The growth and bone maturation of 43 celiac patients were analyzed. A significant correlation between gluten intake and growth rate was found. The authors suggest this is a good parameter to advise the best moment to make the control biopsie and the provocation test.

  8. Prevalence, incidence, and autoimmune comorbidities of celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grode, Louise; Bech, Bodil H; Jensen, Thomas Møller

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe and identify potential trends with respect to prevalence, incidence, age, sex, and autoimmune comorbidity of celiac disease (CD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Danish nationwide cohort study of CD using data from The National Patient Register. Patients...

  9. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...

  10. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyse, J.M. (Jonathan M.); Battat, R. (Robert); Sun, S. (Siyu); A. Saftoiu (Adrian); Siddiqui, A.A. (Ali A.); Leong, A.T. (Ang Tiing); Arias, B.L.A. (Brenda Lucia Arturo); Fabbri, C. (Carlo); Adler, D.G. (Douglas G.); Santo, E. (Erwin); Kalaitzakis, E. (Evangelos); Artifon, E. (Everson); Mishra, G. (Girish); Okasha, H.H. (Hussein Hassan); J.-W. Poley (Jan-Werner); Guo, J. (Jintao); Vila, J.J. (Juan J.); Lee, L.S. (Linda S.); Sharma, M. (Malay); Bhutani, M.S. (Manoop S.); M. Giovannini (Marcello); Kitano, M. (Masayuki); Eloubeidi, M.A. (Mohamad Ali); Khashab, M.A. (Mouen A.); Nguyen, N.Q. (Nam Q.); Saxena, P. (Payal); Vilmann, P. (Peter); Fusaroli, P. (Pietro); Garg, P.K. (Pramod Kumar); Ho, S. (Sammy); Mukai, S. (Shuntaro); Carrara, S. (Silvia); Sridhar, S. (Subbaramiah); S. Lakhtakia (S.); Rana, S.S. (Surinder S.); Dhir, V. (Vinay); Sahai, A.V. (Anand V.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). Methods: Six important

  11. Quinoa Well Tolerated in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Maryland (January 21, 2014) – Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease is well-tolerated, ... grain, is traditionally recommended as part of a gluten-free diet. However, in-vitro data suggests that quinoa storage ...

  12. Why Oats Are Safe and Healthy for Celiac Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The water-insoluble storage proteins of cereals (prolamins) are called “gluten” in wheat, barley, and rye, and “avenins” in oat. Gluten can provoke celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals (those with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 serotypes). Avenins are present at a

  13. Duodenal microbiota composition and mucosal homeostasis in pediatric celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.C.; Kalliomäki, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Palva, A.; Lähteenoja, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Salojärvi, J.; Satokari, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed (HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive) individuals. Only a fraction of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive individuals develop CD indicating that other factors have a role in the

  14. The intestinal microflora of childhood patients with indicated celiac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Frühauf, P.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2008), s. 214-216 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * intestinal microflora Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  15. Celiac Disease Genetics : Past, Present and Future Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez Achury, Javier

    In the past few years there has been enormous progress in unraveling the genetic basis of celiac disease (CD). Apart from the well-known association to HLA, there are currently 40 genomic loci associated to CD. Most of these loci show pleiotropic effects across many autoimmune diseases and highlight

  16. Celiac disease : from basic insight to therapy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stępniak, Dariusz Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to gluten, proteins found in wheat and related cereals. In this study two major questions were addressed: i) which specific properties of gluten contribute to its disease-inducing characteristics ii) how can gluten

  17. Gluten: a two-edged sword. Immunopathogenesis of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Wijmenga, C.

    2005-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small intestinal disorder caused by adaptive and innate immune responses triggered by the gluten proteins present in wheat. In the intestine, gluten is partially degraded and modified, which results in gluten peptides that bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 and

  18. Management of celiac disease: from evidence to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana M. Attardo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a complex polygenic disorder, which involves genetic factors human leukocyte complex (HLA and non-HLA genes, environmental factors, innate and adoptive immunity, and a robust chronic T-mediated autoimmune component. The main goal of the present monograph is to define a methodological approach for the disease, characterized by frequent late diagnosis, in order for the physician to become aware of the disease management, the diversity of the clinical presentation itself and in different patients. A unique attention is payed to the specific diagnostic tests to define a correct and accurate application of them, and in addition, to disease follow-up and possible complications. Moreover, a dedicated space is assigned to refractory CD, to potential CD and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Legislative aspects of the celiac disease in Italy are addressed, too. The celiac disease guidelines and their evaluation by means of Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument allow us to classify the different recommendations and to apply them according to the stakeholders’ involvement, pertinence, methodological accuracy, clarity and publishing independence. Finally, the most current scientific evidence is taken into account to create a complete updated monograph.

  19. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on stress and inflammation in rats with partial hepatectomy (PH). Methods: A model of PH rat was established, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP); corticosterone (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); noradrenaline (NA); adrenalin (AD); aspartate ...

  20. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  1. Duodenal versus jejunal biopsies in suspected celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, WJ; van Baarlen, J; Kleibeuker, JH; Kolkman, JJ

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In the past, small-bowel biopsies for diagnosis of celiac disease were taken from the jejunum with a suction capsule, but nowadays most physicians take endoscopic biopsies from the distal duodenum. To validate that practice we compared the diagnostic yield of endoscopic

  2. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  3. Anemia: monosymptomatic celiac disease. A report of 3 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Mulder, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with monosymptomatic celiac disease (CD) can escape diagnosis for a long period. Anemia is a common finding in CD, although anemia as the sole symptom is relatively unknown. We report on three patients who presented with iron deficiency anemia and no other symptom, in whom CD was considered

  4. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of an Aneurysm of the Pancreatico-duodenal Artery with Occluded Celiac Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.H.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Tato, F.; Reiser, M.; Rieger, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a case of a wide-necked aneurysm of the pancreatico-duodenal artery with occlusion of the celiac trunk in an asymptomatic patient. The aneurysm was considered to be at high risk of rupture. Successful embolization after interdisciplinary consultation was followed with color-coded duplex ultrasound (CCDS) demonstrating significant flow reduction. Three weeks later CCDS and angiography demonstrated exclusion of the aneurysm and a patent arterial supply of the liver and spleen fed by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) collaterals. The patient has done well so far, without major adverse clinical events or evidence for tissue necrosis of the liver, pancreas or spleen. Discussion of the case and review of the literature indicate that transcatheter embolization is the therapy of choice even in complicated cases

  5. REVIEW OF CELIAC DISEASE PRESENTATION IN A PEDIATRIC TERTIARY CENTRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gracinda Nogueira; Mohan, Rajiv; Fagbemi, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder with a multiform presentation and therefore a challenging diagnosis. Our purpose is to identify the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and histologic characteristics of children with celiac disease at diagnosis and on follow-up. Children with previously established or newly diagnosed celiac disease, admitted in a tertiary centre in a two-year period (2014-2016) were recruited. Data was collected retrospectively from electronic medical records and clinical notes, and subsequently analysed with SPSS version 20.0. A total of 159 patients, out of 312, were included. Age ranged from 1 to 17 years (mean ± SD: 8.5±4.5 years, 69% girls). Disease presentation was classical in 60%, non-classical in 25%, subclinical in 10% and 5% classified as potential celiac disease. Non-classical and subclinical profiles had a higher mean age at presentation but not statistically significant (P-value 0.24). The most frequent gastrointestinal features at presentation were abdominal pain (58%), diarrhea (43%) and bloating (27%). A positive family history for celiac disease was present in 24% (n=35). We found anaemia in 23%, low ferritin in 63% and a moderate to severe deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 62%. celiac disease -specific serologic testing and esophagogastroduodenoscopy were performed in 99%. Histology revealed modified Marsh 2 or 3 enteropathy in 94%, the remaining had normal histology but positive human leukocyte antigen typing. Clinical improvement at 12 months of gluten-free diet was complete in 51% and partial in 49%. IgA tTG normalized after 12-30 months of gluten-free diet in 45%. On growth assessment at diagnosis and after 12-28 months of gluten-free diet, 100% had height increase (mean ±SD: 7.11±4.43 cm) and 96% weight gain (mean ±SD: 5.60±4.91 kg). Our findings outline the diverse clinical presentations of pediatric celiac disease that should be considered irrespective of age. Increased clinician's awareness will

  6. Celiac crisis: a rare or rarely recognized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, N.; Cheema, H.A.; Suleman, H.; Fayyaz, Z.; Mushtaq, I.

    2017-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a serious life threatening complication of celiac disease characterized by profuse diarrhoea, severe dehydration and metabolic disturbances leading to neuromuscular weakness, cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. It has been described as rare condition and not well documented in the literature. To improve awareness and facilitate diagnosis of this condition, we studied risk factors, pattern of presentation and management plans of celiac crisis. Methods: It was a descriptive cross sectional study. Patients presenting in emergency room(ER) with profuse diarrhoea leading to severe dehydration, neuromuscular weakness, and metabolic acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities enrolled in the studies after positive serology and small bowel biopsy suggestive of celiac disease. Results: Total 126 patients out of 350 fulfilled the criteria including 54 (42.8 percent) male and 71 (56.3 percent) female. The mean age at presentation was 5.25+-1.18 years. Risk factors were poor social status (97.60 percent), consanguinity (96.77 percent), early weaning with gluten contained diet (93.54 percent), and Presenting complaints were loose motion (100 percent), loss of neck holding (96.77 percent), dehydration (96.77 percent), polyuria (95.96 percent), inability to walk (67.74 percent), abdominal distension (85.86 percent). Electrolytes imbalances were hypokalaemia (2.4+-0.55), hypocalcaemia (7.29+-0.66), hypomagnesaemia (1.89+-0.50), hypophosphatemia (2.8+-0.68), hypoalbuminemia (3.05+-0.48) and metabolic acidosis (96 percent). One hundred and twenty patients were stabilized with GFD and correction of dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte imbalance. Six patients needed parenteral steroids ant total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Recovery time from crisis was mean 5.4+-2.73 days (range 3-20 days). Conclusion: Celiac crisis is a common but under recognized problem in developing countries. Commonest presenting feature is neuromuscular paralysis and biochemical abnormality is

  7. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  8. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviewed are the history and organization, purpose and programs, and public services of the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, an organization geared toward eradicating Tay-Sachs disease (a hereditary disorder affecting primarily Jewish infants which generally leads to deterioration and death by the child's fifth year). (SBH)

  9. Protein-driven inference of miRNA-disease associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Palleja, Albert

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly abundant class of non-coding RNA genes involved in cellular regulation and thus also diseases. Despite miRNAs being important disease factors, miRNA-disease associations remain low in number and of variable reliability. Furthermore, existing databases and prediction...

  10. Serological screening for celiac disease in symptomatic 12 to 36 month-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cristina Modelli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The correct diagnosis of celiac disease in environmentally deprived children is frequently hindered by the common presence of other causes for the classical celiac disease symptoms: malnutrition, failure to thrive and frequent diarrheas. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of 12 to 36 month-old children using immunoglobulin antibodies against gliadin (IgG and IgA-AGA, against endomysium (IgA-EMA, and against human tissue transglutaminase (IgA-tTG as screening method. METHODS: A total of 214 children (114 boys, aged 12 to 36 months, on gluten-containing diet, were admitted to the study. IgG and IgA-AGA, IgA-tTG and IgA-EMA tests were performed in all sera. Biopsy was obtained from all children showing positive result in one or more of the serologic tests, excluding those in which IgG-AGA had been the only positive result. In those cases, polymerase chain reaction (PCR HLA genotyping for the identification of celiac disease predisposing alleles was applied. HLA genotyping was also performed to confirm the diagnosis in children identified as celiac by means of positive serologic testing and compatible biopsy results. RESULTS: Normal results were obtained in 131 children. Ten children out of 68 identified as positive exclusively on the IgG-AGA test disclosed the presence of celiac disease predisposing alleles on PCR and underwent jejunal biopsy with normal results. All serologic tests were positive in four children. A fifth child showed positive IgG and IgA-AGA and IgA-tTG results but disclosed a negative IgA-EMA test. Jejunal biopsy of these five children revealed characteristic lesions of celiac disease. CONCLUSION: A prevalence of 2.3% was found among symptomatic 12- to 36-month-old children that had not been previously diagnosed as celiac.CONTEXTO: O diagnóstico correto da doença celíaca em crianças ambientalmente carentes é frequentemente dificultado pela presença usual de causas outras para os cl

  11. Correlation between antibodies and histology in celiac disease: Incidence of celiac disease is higher than expected in the pediatric population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makovický, P.; Rimárová, K.; Boor, A.; Makovický, P.; Vodička, Pavel; Samasca, G.; Kruzliak, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 1079-1083 ISSN 1791-2997 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13424 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : celiac disease * autoimmune disease * enterobiopsy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.484, year: 2013

  12. ALLERGIC PATHOLOGY AND CELIAC DISEASE — MECHANISM OF COMMUNITY AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Revnova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the differentiation of allergic diseases and celiac in children. It covers in detail the mechanisms of the pathogenesis of immune inflammation in celiac disease, clinical picture with the main and additional symptoms and markers of this pathology. In the article the author shares data of her own experience and provides the own diagnostic algorithm.Key words: allergic pathology, celiac disease, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:76-80

  13. An Alternative Technique in the Treatment of Celiac Axis Stenosis Diagnosed During Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel C. C. Machado

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac compression is usually a benign condition, but when surgery necessitates division of collaterals from the superior mesenteric artery, it may cause life-threatening celiac organ ischemia. Celiac axis obstruction is found in 12.5% to 49.7% of patients during abdominal angiography. In such patients, the arterial blood supply to the stomach, spleen, and liver is sustained through extraordinarily welldeveloped pathways in the pancreas.

  14. Psychosis and Silent Celiac Disease in a Down Syndrome Adolescent: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Morant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. It presents gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal manifestations as well as associated conditions. We report a 16-year-old Down syndrome girl who presented psychosis symptomatology, and she was diagnosed as having silent celiac disease. Olanzapine treatment and gluten-free diet were satisfactory. It is necessary to consider celiac disease in Down syndrome patients with psychiatric symptoms, mainly psychotic symptomatology.

  15. Unusual aneurysm of the pancreas arcade by occlusion of the celiac axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrazidlo, W.; Jonas, J.; Wittek, M.

    1987-01-01

    This is a report about a rare aneurysm of the pancreas arcade - the angiography showing an occlusion of the celiac axis. Using a diagram of the arterial phase of the angiography, the morphology of the collateral circulation between the celiac axis and the superior mesenteric artery is described. The reason of the occlusion of the celiac axis formed collateral circulation and the origin of the aneurysm and the therapeutic steps to be taken are discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection Associated with a Celiac Crisis: A Preceding or Precipitating Event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Qamar, Khola; Sharma, Himani; Almadani, Sameh Bashar

    2017-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare life-threatening presentation of celiac disease that manifests as profuse diarrhea, hypoproteinemia, and severe metabolic disturbances. It may be precipitated by a general immune stimulus such as surgery, infection, or pregnancy. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with a celiac crisis, potentially triggered by a preceding urinary tract infection. Metabolic derangement is caused by malabsorption and profuse diarrhea, which can be unremitting unless the celiac crisis is recognized, and treatment with gluten restriction is initiated.

  18. Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chung Sang; Deepak, Parakkal; De La Fuente, Jaime; Bledsoe, Adam C; Larson, Joseph J; Murray, Joseph A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2018-05-07

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, principally Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are among the most common immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We aim to elucidate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, a unique population that remains scarcely studied to date. A retrospective matched case-control study of adults with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease was performed at a tertiary referral institution in North America. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier curves compared disease characteristics and clinical outcomes of the two groups. A total of 342 inflammatory bowel disease patients were included in this study, of which 114 had coexistent celiac disease and 228 did not. Patients with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease had higher rates of primary sclerosing cholangitis (19.3% vs 5.7%; odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-9.4; pceliac disease (10.5% vs 3.5%; odds ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.2; p=0.01), compared to patients without concomitant celiac disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease with concomitant celiac disease have unique phenotypic features compared to non-celiac inflammatory bowel disease, with higher risks for colitis-related hospitalizations, extensive colitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Increased recognition of coexistent IBD and celiac disease can prompt clinicians to investigate for concomitant disease sooner, particularly in patients with seemingly refractory disease.

  19. Value of IgA tTG in Predicting Mucosal Recovery in Children with Celiac Disease on a Gluten Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Maureen M.; Weir, Dascha C.; DeGroote, Maya; Mitchell, Paul D.; Singh, Prashant; Silvester, Jocelyn A.; Leichtner, Alan M.; Fasano, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the rate of mucosal recovery in pediatric patients with celiac disease on a gluten free diet. We also sought to determine whether IgA tissue transglutaminase (tTG) correlates with mucosal damage at the time of a repeat endoscopy with duodenal biopsy in these patients. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of one-hundred and three pediatric patients, under 21 years of age, with a diagnosis of celiac disease defined as Marsh 3 histology, and who underwent a repeat endoscopy with duodenal biopsy at least twelve months after initiating a gluten free diet. Results We found that 19% of pediatric patients treated with a gluten free diet had persistent enteropathy. At the time of the repeat biopsy, tTG was elevated in 43% of cases with persistent enteropathy and 32% of cases in which there was mucosal recovery. Overall the positive predictive value of the autoantibody tissue transglutaminase was 25% and the negative predictive value was 83% in patients on a gluten free diet for a median of 2.4 years. Conclusions Nearly one in five children with celiac disease in our population had persistent enteropathy despite maintaining a gluten free diet and IgA tTG was not an accurate marker of mucosal recovery. Neither the presence of symptoms nor positive serology were predictive of a patient’s histology at the time of repeat biopsy. These findings suggest a revisitation of monitoring and management criteria of celiac disease in childhood. PMID:28112686

  20. Celiac crisis in adults: a case report and review of the literature focusing in the prevention of refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Menezes, Marcela; Cabral, Vírginia; Silva Lorena, Sônia Letícia

    2017-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening complication of celiac disease that is rarely described in adults. We report the case of a 31-year-old man with celiac crisis as a first manifestation of celiac disease. The patient presented with severe diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, and electrolyte disturbances accompanied by electrocardiographic alterations. A satisfactory clinical response was obtained after the correction of electrolyte abnormalities, hydration, and nutritional support with a gluten-free diet according to recommendations for patients at high risk of refeeding syndrome. Celiac crisis generally occurs in patients with no previous diagnosis of celiac disease. The physician should therefore be aware of this diagnosis and consider celiac crisis in cases of unexplained intense secretory diarrhea, metabolic acidosis and severe electrolyte alterations in adults. The risk of refeeding syndrome should be assessed when a gluten-free diet is introduced and treatment of celiac crisis should include prevention and management of this possible complication.

  1. Clinical Features and Symptom Recovery on a Gluten-Free Diet in Canadian Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pulido

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease can present with mild or nongastrointestinal symptoms, and may escape timely recognition. The treatment of celiac disease involves a gluten-free diet, which is complex and challenging.

  2. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  3. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  4. No Difference Between Latiglutenase and Placebo in Reducing Villous Atrophy or Improving Symptoms in Patients With Symptomatic Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Green, Peter H R; Marcantonio, Annette; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Mäki, Markku; Adelman, Daniel C

    2017-03-01

    Gluten ingestion leads to symptoms and small intestinal mucosal injury in patients with celiac disease. The only option is the strict lifelong exclusion of dietary gluten, which is difficult to accomplish. Many patients following a gluten-free diet continue to have symptoms and have small intestinal mucosal injury. Nondietary therapies are needed. We performed a phase 2 study of the ability of latiglutenase, an orally administered mixture of 2 recombinant gluten-targeting proteases, to reduce mucosal morphometric measures in biopsy specimens from patients with celiac disease. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study to assess the efficacy and safety of latiglutenase in 494 patients with celiac disease (with moderate or severe symptoms) in North America and Europe, from August 2013 until December 2014. Participants reported following a gluten-free diet for at least 1 year before the study began. Patients with documented moderate or severe symptoms and villous atrophy (villous height:crypt depth ratio of ≤2.0) were assigned randomly to groups given placebo or 100, 300, 450, 600, or 900 mg latiglutenase daily for 12 or 24 weeks. Subjects completed the Celiac Disease Symptom Diary each day for 28 days and underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy of the distal duodenum at baseline and at weeks 12 and 24. The primary end point was a change in the villous height:crypt depth ratio. Secondary end points included numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes, serology test results (for levels of antibodies against tissue transglutaminase-2 and deamidated gliadin peptide), symptom frequencies, and safety. In a modified intent-to-treat population, there were no differences between latiglutenase and placebo groups in change from baseline in villous height:crypt depth ratio, numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes, or serologic markers of celiac disease. All groups had significant improvements in histologic and symptom scores. In a

  5. The role of soluble tumor necrosis factor like weak inducer of apoptosis and interleukin-17A in the etiopathogenesis of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Mahmut; Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Kilic, Zeki Mesut Yalın; Kilic, Hasan; Suna, Nuretdin; Ates, Hale; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our aim in this study was to determine soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) levels in celiac disease, and their association with the gluten diet and autoantibodies. Eighty patients with celiac diagnosis and 80 healthy control individuals with similar age, gender and body mass index to the patient group were included in the study. Serum sTWEAK and IL-17A levels were measured by the serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The median IL-17A (117.5 pg/mL vs. 56.7 pg/mL; P = 0.001) level in celiac patients was higher than in the control group, while the median sTWEAK (543 pg/mL vs. 643 pg/mL; P = 0.016) level in patients was determined to be lower. In the patient group, patients who complied with the gluten diet had a lower level of median IL-17A (98.1 pg/mL vs. 197.5 pg/mL; P = 0.034) and a higher level of sTWEAK (606 pg/mL vs. 522.8 pg/mL; P = 0.031) than those who did not adhere. Furthermore, the IL-17A level was higher and the sTWEAK level was lower in celiac patients with positive antibody than those with negative antibody. A positive correlation was determined among anti-gliadin antibody IgA, anti-gliadin antibody IgG, anti-tissue transglutaminase IgG levels and the IL-17A level, and a negative correlation was determined with the sTWEAK level. In celiac disease, the sTWEAK and IL-17A levels differ between patients who cannot adapt to the gluten diet and who are autoantibody positive, and patients who adapt to the diet and are autoantibody negative. We believe that sTWEAK and IL-17A are associated with the inflammation in celiac pathogenesis. PMID:27367991

  6. MR enterography in nonresponsive adult celiac disease: Correlation with endoscopic, pathologic, serologic, and genetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmard, Amir Reza; Hashemi Taheri, Amir Pejman; Salehian Nik, Elham; Kooraki, Soheil; Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Mirminachi, Babak; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Ekhlasi, Golnaz; Malekzadeh, Reza; Shahbazkhani, Bijan

    2017-10-01

    To assess small bowel abnormalities on magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) in adult patients with nonresponsive celiac disease (CD) and investigate their associations with endoscopic, histopathologic, serologic, and genetic features. This prospective study was carried out between September 2012 and August 2013. After approval by the Ethics Committee of our institution, informed consent was acquired from all participants. Forty consecutive patients with nonresponsive CD, aged 17-76 years, underwent MRE using a 1.5T unit. Sequences included T 2 -HASTE, True-FISP, pre- and postcontrast VIBE to assess the quantitative (number of ileal and jejunal folds) and qualitative (fold pattern abnormalities, mural thickening, increased enhancement, bowel dilatation, or intussusception) measures. Endoscopic manifestations were categorized as normal/mild vs. severe. Histopathological results were divided into mild and severe. Genotyping of HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 was performed. Serum levels of tissue-transglutaminase, endomysial, and gliadin antibodies were also determined. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used. Twenty-nine (72.5%) cases showed abnormal MRE. Reversed jejunoileal fold pattern had significant association with severe endoscopic (odds ratio [OR] = 8.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-40.5) and pathologic features (OR = 7.36, 95% CI 1.33-40.54). An increased number of ileal folds/inch was significantly associated with severe MARSH score and positive HLA-DQ8. (P reversal on MRE is highly associated with endoscopic and pathologic features of refractory celiac disease (RCD). Increased ileal folds showed higher correlation with endoscopic-pathologic features, HLA-DQ8, and anti-transglutaminase level. MRE might be more sensitive for detection of increased ileal folds in CD rather than reduction of duodenal and jejunal folds due to better distension of ileal loops. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017

  7. Seronegative Celiac Disease and Immunoglobulin Deficiency: Where to Look in the Submerged Iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Giorgio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present narrative review, we analyzed the relationship between seronegative celiac disease (SNCD and immunoglobulin deficiencies. For this purpose, we conducted a literature search on the main medical databases. SNCD poses a diagnostic dilemma. Villous blunting, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs count and gluten “challenge” are the most reliable markers. Immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence tissue transglutaminase (tTG-targeted mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA immune complexes in the intestinal mucosa of SNCD patients may be useful. In our experience, tTG-mRNA was similarly increased in seropositive celiac disease (CD and suspected SNCD, and strongly correlated with the IELs count. This increase is found even in the IELs’ range of 15–25/100 enterocytes, suggesting that there may be a “grey zone” of gluten-related disorders. An immune deregulation (severely lacking B-cell differentiation underlies the association of SNCD with immunoglobulin deficiencies. Therefore, CD may be linked to autoimmune disorders and immune deficits (common variable immunodeficiency (CVID/IgA selective deficiency. CVID is a heterogeneous group of antibodies dysfunction, whose association with CD is demonstrated only by the response to a gluten-free diet (GFD. We hypothesized a familial inheritance between CD and CVID. Selective IgA deficiency, commonly associated with CD, accounts for IgA-tTG seronegativity. Selective IgM deficiency (sIgMD is rare (<300 cases and associated to CD in 5% of cases. We diagnosed SNCD in a patient affected by sIgMD using the tTG-mRNA assay. One-year GFD induced IgM restoration. This evidence, supporting a link between SNCD and immunoglobulin deficiencies, suggests that we should take a closer look at this association.

  8. Variable activation of immune response by quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) prolamins in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Victor F; Ellis, H Julia; Suligoj, Tanja; Herencia, L Irene; Ciclitira, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten found in wheat, barley, and rye. The current treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. Quinoa is a highly nutritive plant from the Andes, with low concentrations of prolamins, that has been recommended as part of a gluten-free diet; however, few experimental data support this recommendation. We aimed to determine the amount of celiac-toxic prolamin epitopes in quinoa cultivars from different regions of the Andes and the ability of these epitopes to activate immune responses in patients with celiac disease. The concentration of celiac-toxic epitopes was measured by using murine monoclonal antibodies against gliadin and high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits. Immune response was assessed by proliferation assays of celiac small intestinal T cells/interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and production of IFN-γ/IL-15 after organ culture of celiac duodenal biopsy samples. Fifteen quinoa cultivars were tested: 4 cultivars had quantifiable concentrations of celiac-toxic epitopes, but they were below the maximum permitted for a gluten-free food. Cultivars Ayacuchana and Pasankalla stimulated T cell lines at levels similar to those for gliadin and caused secretion of cytokines from cultured biopsy samples at levels comparable with those for gliadin. Most quinoa cultivars do not possess quantifiable amounts of celiac-toxic epitopes. However, 2 cultivars had celiac-toxic epitopes that could activate the adaptive and innate immune responses in some patients with celiac disease. These findings require further investigation in the form of in vivo studies, because quinoa is an important source of nutrients for patients with celiac disease.

  9. Comparative study of histopathological Marsh grading with clinical and serological parameters in celiac iceberg of north India

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    Shivani Kalhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by the ingestion of wheat gluten and related proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG antibodies. Duodenal biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis. Correlation of clinical, serologic, and histological features is essential for a definitive diagnosis. The ratio of diagnosed versus undiagnosed cases is quite high. Aims: This study aimed to correlate the degree of mucosal damage with anti-tTG levels, mean baseline hemoglobin and endoscopic findings. Setting and Design: Two hundred twenty six adults suspected to have celiac disease were studied. Marsh grades were compared with anti-tTG levels, hemoglobin, endoscopy, and clinical presentations. Materials and Methods: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, serum levels of anti-tTG, complete hematologic work-up, and duodenal biopsy were performed in all 226 cases (including three siblings of confirmed patients with well-defined symptom groups. Histopathological grading was done as per modified Marsh system. Correlation of all the parameters was performed with Marsh grades. Statistical Analysis : Performed on SPSS version 15.0. Tests applied include one way ANOVA, Chi-square test, repeated measure analysis, and Bonferroni′s method for comparison. Results were considered significant when P<0.05. Results and Conclusions: Anti-tTG levels, mean baseline hemoglobin, and endoscopic findings were found to correlate with increasing severity of mucosal damage with P<0.001 for all. Anti-tTG levels of grades 1+2 and those of grade 3a were significantly different from levels of grades 3b and 3c+4 with P<0.001 for each. Varied clinical presentations of celiac disease were seen in the adult wheat eaters of North India.

  10. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain; Celiac Truncus Aneurysm

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    Zulfu Birkan

    2016-01-01

    In this case we presented a patient who were admitted to surgery department with complaints of abdominal pain and nausea. There were no pathological findings on physical examination, direct abdominal x-ray, chest radiograph and biochemical parameters. At proximal of the celiac trunk, it was shown approximately 3x2 cm in size fusiform aneurysmal dilatation on the patient%u2019s abdominal ultrasonography and turbulence, arterial flow on the patient%u2019s abdominal doppler ultrasonography subsequently. In abdominal computed tomography we detected dense calcifications, dilatation and hypodensities that may belong to a thrombus in the lumen superior mesenteric vein (SMV. At the same time, approximately 3.5 cm segment of trunk celiak we observed aneurysm dilatation which reaching 2 cm at the widest point. Celiac trunk aneurysm is a rare cause of abdominal pain and often noticed after the complicated, thus it must always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  11. Understanding Celiac Disease From Genetics to the Future Diagnostic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Salazar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the permanent inflammation of the small bowel, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It is associated with a number of symptoms, the most common being gastrointestinal. The prevalence of this illness worldwide is 1%. One of the main problems of CD is its difficulty to be diagnosed due to the various presentations of the disease. Besides, in many cases, CD is asymptomatic. Celiac disease is a multifactorial disease, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 haplotypes are predisposition factors. Nowadays, molecular markers are being studied as diagnostic tools. In this review, we explore CD from its basic concept, manifestations, types, current and future methods of diagnosis, and associated disorders. Before addressing the therapeutic approaches, we also provide a brief overview of CD genetics and treatment.

  12. Esophageal stents, percutaneous gastrostomy, gastrojejunostomy and celiac ganglion block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Indications, contraindications, procedure and complications will be discussed along with the technical aspects. Interesting cases will be demonstrated. Fluoroscopic guided placement of a metallic (bare or covered) stent is increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal strictures. Percutaneously placed feeding catheters (e.g. gastrostomy) offer the best option for the patients who require long term nutrition. These procedures are generally simpler, have higher technical success rates and considered to be safer than endoscopic or surgical placement techniques. Celiac ganglia block is effective in relieving chronic abdominal pain, especially originating from the malignancies of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and alimentary tract from the stomach to the transverse portion of the large colon. The relevant anatomy, indications, contraindications, different application techniques and results of celiac blockade will be reviewed.

  13. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

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    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  14. Adult-onset celiac disease for the primary care physician

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    Kamil Naidoo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a common autoimmune condition with a prevalence of 1%–2%. In recent years there has been a paradigm shift in management from tertiary care into the community. With a wide array of manifestations, including nonspecific and extraintestinal symptoms, this disorder can be difficult to diagnose, prolonging morbidity for patients. This review article aims to augment the primary physician’s knowledge of the common presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of this disease.

  15. Celiac artery trunk thrombosis presenting as acute liver failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarian, M.A.; Kahrom, M.; Kahrom, H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is a life-threatening vascular emergency that requires early diagnosis and intervention to adequately restore mesenteric blood flow and to prevent bowel necrosis and patient death. While, almost always superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are involved, we report a 57-year-old male with an unusual celiac artery trunk thrombosis leading to gastero-duodenal and hepato-splenic infarction, and presenting an acute liver failure. (author)

  16. Effect of celiac disease on growth and bone density.

    OpenAIRE

    Ondráčková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune disease of the small intestine caused by intolerance to gluten. The disease is characterized by impairment of intestinal mucosa, it is associated with malabsorption and maldigestion. The main symptoms are stomach pain, diarrhea, anemia, failure to thrive. Recently, the number of patients with atypical symptoms and a completely asymptomatic form of the disease increases. Prevalence of the disease in Europe is 1 %. The aim of this paper is to describe how ...

  17. Pseudo aneurysm of the celiac trunk - radiological findings report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes Junior, Mauricio R. de; Henrique, Katia; Teixeira, Sonia Marcelino; Cardenas, Gloria Pamela Galdames; Marchiori, Edson; Acceta, Pietro

    1997-01-01

    The authors report a case of a celiac trunk pseudoneurysm, diagnosed by ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography, in a 54-year-old man, alcoholic, with gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain and an epigastric pulsatile mass. After the diagnostic, he was operated and it was showed a fistula from the pseudoaneurysm to the choledoch and the gall bladder fill with blood. The patient has a good clinic development. (author)

  18. Influence of intestinal microbiota in celiac disease pathogenesis and risk

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVARES SEVILLA, MARTA

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by cereal gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. The etiology is strongly associated with the genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) encoding the DQ2/DQ8 molecules. Most CD patients carry this genotype but this is also present in the 40% of the general population and only a small percentage develops the disease. Thus, the HLA-DQ genotype is necessary but not solely responsible for the disease development. Gluten ...

  19. Celiac disease: understanding the gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuñán, Karla A; Vespa, María Catalina; Araya, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    The only effective and safe treatment of celiac disease (CD) continues being strict exclusion of gluten for life, the so-called gluten-free diet (GFD). Although this treatment is highly successful, following strict GFD poses difficulties to patients in family, social and working contexts, deteriorating his/her quality of life. We aimed to review main characteristics of GFD with special emphasis on factors that may interfere with adherence to it. We conducted a search of various databases, such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scielo, with focus on key words such as "gluten-free diet", "celiac disease", "gluten" and "gluten-free diet adherence". Available literature has not reached definitive conclusions on the exact amount of gluten that is harmless to celiac patients, although international agreements establish cutoff points for gluten-free products and advise the use of clinical assessment to tailor the diet according to individual needs. Following GFD must include eliminating gluten as ingredient as well as hidden component and potential cross contamination in foods. There are numerous grains to substitute wheat but composition of most gluten-free products tends to include only a small number of them, especially rice. The diet must be not only free of gluten but also healthy to avoid nutrient, vitamins and minerals deficiencies or excess. Overweight/obesity frequency has increased among celiac patients so weight gain deserves attention during follow up. Nutritional education by a trained nutritionist is of great relevance to achieve long-term satisfactory health status and good compliance. A balanced GFD should be based on a combination of naturally gluten-free foods and certified processed gluten-free products. How to measure and improve adherence to GFD is still controversial and deserves further study.

  20. Celiac Disease: Role of the Epithelial BarrierSummary

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    Michael Schumann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD a T-cell–mediated response to gluten is mounted in genetically predisposed individuals, resulting in a malabsorptive enteropathy histologically highlighted by villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. Recent data point to the epithelial layer as an under-rated hot spot in celiac pathophysiology to date. This overview summarizes current functional and genetic evidence on the role of the epithelial barrier in CD, consisting of the cell membranes and the apical junctional complex comprising sealing as well as ion and water channel-forming tight junction proteins and the adherens junction. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms are discussed, including apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, biology of intestinal stem cells, alterations in the apical junctional complex, transcytotic uptake of gluten peptides, and possible implications of a defective epithelial polarity. Current research is directed toward new treatment options for CD that are alternatives or complementary therapeutics to a gluten-free diet. Thus, strategies to target an altered epithelial barrier therapeutically also are discussed. Keywords: Celiac Sprue, Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy, Tight Junction, Epithelial Polarity, Partitioning-Defective Proteins, α-Gliadin 33mer

  1. Treatment of celiac artery stenosis with interventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Wang Zhijun; Liu Fengyong; Wang Zhongpu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To present two cases of celiac artery (CA) stenosis treated successfully by interventional technique. Methods: Two patients characterised by chronic upper abdominal pain after eating, associated with weight loss and an epigastric bruit were treated with interventional procedure. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler imaging of the celiac axis and confirmed by aortography. One patient possessed the classic triad of median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS). Arteriosclerosis was found to be responsible for the CA stenosis in another one. The interventional technique consisted of conventional PTA and stent placement in the CA. Results: Abdominal arteriograms in both patients showed severe stenosis (>90%) of CA. The stenotic segments were dilated and stented during the same session. One patient with balloon expandable Palmaz stent placed in the proximal celiac artery, another with 2 wallstents deployed in the CA trunk. The post procedural arteriograms showed good dilation of the lesions with immediate improvement of CA blood flow. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound scans showed normal flow patterns in the CA. Three months after the procedures, their upper gastrointestinal symptoms had resolved and regained body weights. They remained well and free of symptoms, at 16 months and 26 months follow-up, respectively, after the procedure. Conclusions: CA stenosis can successfully be treated with angioplasty and stenting. (authors)

  2. Neurological symptoms in patients with biopsy proven celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürk, Katrin; Farecki, Marie-Louise; Lamprecht, Georg; Roth, Guenter; Decker, Patrice; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Oertel, Wolfang

    2009-12-15

    In celiac disease (CD), the gut is the typical manifestation site but atypical neurological presentations are thought to occur in 6 to 10% with cerebellar ataxia being the most frequent symptom. Most studies in this field are focused on patients under primary neurological care. To exclude such an observation bias, patients with biopsy proven celiac disease were screened for neurological disease. A total of 72 patients with biopsy proven celiac disease (CD) (mean age 51 +/- 15 years, mean disease duration 8 +/- 11 years) were recruited through advertisements. All participants adhered to a gluten-free diet. Patients were interviewed following a standard questionnaire and examined clinically for neurological symptoms. Medical history revealed neurological disorders such as migraine (28%), carpal tunnel syndrome (20%), vestibular dysfunction (8%), seizures (6%), and myelitis (3%). Interestingly, 35% of patients with CD reported of a history of psychiatric disease including depression, personality changes, or even psychosis. Physical examination yielded stance and gait problems in about one third of patients that could be attributed to afferent ataxia in 26%, vestibular dysfunction in 6%, and cerebellar ataxia in 6%. Other motor features such as basal ganglia symptoms, pyramidal tract signs, tics, and myoclonus were infrequent. 35% of patients with CD showed deep sensory loss and reduced ankle reflexes in 14%. Gait disturbances in CD do not only result from cerebellar ataxia but also from proprioceptive or vestibular impairment. Neurological problems may even develop despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Time for sifting the grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a new nomenclature has been proposed for the disease induced by the ingestion of gluten, a protein present in wheat, rice, barley and oats. Besides celiac disease and wheat allergy, the most studied forms of gluten-related disorders characterized by an evident immune mechanism (autoimmune in celiac disease and IgE-mediated in wheat allergy), a new entity has been included, apparently not driven by an aberrant immune response: the non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). NCGS is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture with intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms arising after gluten ingestion and rapidly improving after its withdrawal from the diet. The pathogenesis of NCGS is largely unknown, but a mixture of factors such as the stimulation of the innate immune system, the direct cytotoxic effects of gluten, and probably the synergy with other wheat molecules, are clues for the complicated puzzle. In addition, the diagnostic procedures still remain problematic due to the absence of efficient diagnostic markers; thus, diagnosis is based upon the symptomatic response to a gluten-free diet and the recurrence of symptoms after gluten reintroduction with the possibility of an important involvement of a placebo effect. The temporary withdrawal of gluten seems a reasonable therapy, but the timing of gluten reintroduction and the correct patient management approach are have not yet been determined. PMID:26217073

  4. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Kruzliak, Peter; Cangemi, Giuseppina C.; Pohanka, Miroslav; Betti, Elena; Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2015-01-01

    An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition. PMID:26506381

  5. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: people without celiac disease avoiding gluten-is it due to histamine intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Lackner, Sonja; Enko, Dietmar; Schenk, Michael; Mangge, Harald; Holasek, Sandra J

    2018-04-01

    Food intolerance/malabsorption is caused by food ingredients, carbohydrates (mainly lactose and fructose), proteins (gluten), and biogenic amines (histamine) which cause nonspecific gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. Here we focus on possible etiologic factors of intolerance/malabsorption especially in people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or the so-called people without celiac disease avoiding gluten (PWCDAG) and histamine intolerance. Recognizing the recently described symptoms of NCGS (PWCDAG) we review correlations and parallels to histamine intolerance (HIT). We show that intestinal and extra-intestinal NCGS (PWCDAG) symptoms are very similar to those which can be found in histamine intolerance. After a detailed diagnostic workup for all possible etiologic factors in every patient, a targeted dietary intervention for single or possibly combined intolerance/malabsorption might be more effective than a short-term diet low in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) or the untargeted uncritical use of gluten-free diets.

  6. Assessing consumer expectations about pizza: A study on celiac and non-celiac individuals using the word association technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontual, I; Amaral, G V; Esmerino, E A; Pimentel, T C; Freitas, M Q; Fukuda, R K; Sant'Ana, I L; Silva, L G; Cruz, A G

    2017-04-01

    The word association (WA) technique was used to investigate the perception of two groups of consumers (72 celiac and 78 non-celiac individuals; 150 in total) to pizza dough (thick or thin) and the raw material used at the manufacture (cassava flour or rice flour). Different perceptions of the four stimuli were detected by Chi-square test (X 2 =314.393, ppizza dough made with cassava flour' was associated with the category "food/composition" and the stimuli 'pizza made with rice flour', 'pizza made with cassava flour' and 'thin dough' were associated with "positive feelings". The stimulus 'thick dough' was related only to the category "negative feelings". WA indicated that gluten-free pizza should have thin dough and us cassava flour or rice flour as the raw material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Celiac disease symptoms in a female collegiate tennis player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E; Gray, Kimberly A; Massie, John E; Rossi, Jennifer M

    2005-01-01

    To present the case of a collegiate tennis player with celiac disease symptoms. Celiac disease is a common intestinal disorder that is often confused with other conditions. It causes severe intestinal damage manifested by several uncomfortable signs and symptoms. Failure by the sports medicine staff to recognize symptoms consistent with celiac disease and treat them appropriately can have deleterious consequences for the athlete. Irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn disease, Addison disease, lupus erythematosus, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, lactose intolerance, herpes zoster, psychogenic disorder (depression), fibromyalgia, complex regional pain syndrome, hyperthyroidism, anemia, type I diabetes. The athlete underwent a series of blood and allergen tests to confirm or refute a diagnosis of celiac disease. When celiac disease was suspected, dietary modifications were made to eliminate all wheat-based and gluten-based products from the athlete's diet. The athlete was able to fully compete in a competitive National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I tennis program while experiencing the debilitating effects associated with celiac disease. The immediacy of symptom onset was notable because the athlete had no history of similar complaints. Celiac disease is a potentially life-threatening condition that affects more people than reported. A properly educated sports medicine staff can help to identify symptoms consistent with celiac disease early, so damage to the intestine is minimized. Prompt recognition and appropriate management allow the athlete to adjust the diet accordingly, compete at a high-caliber level, and enjoy a healthier quality of life.

  8. Reproductive life disorders in Italian celiac women. A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Domenico

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to explore the association between celiac disease and menstrual cycle, gestation and puerperal disorders. Methods The association between celiac disease and menstrual cycle, gestation and puerperal disorders in a sample of 62 childbearing age women (15-49 age was assessed within an age and town of residence matched case-control study conducted in 2008. Main outcome measures were the presence of one or more disorders in menstrual cycle and the presence of one or more complication during pregnancy. Results 62 celiac women (median age: 31.5, range: 17-49 and 186 healthy control (median age: 32.5, range: 15-49 were interviewed. A higher percentage of menstrual cycle disorders has been observed in celiac women. 19.4% frequency of amenorrhea was reported among celiac women versus 2.2% among healthy controls (OR = 33, 95% CI = 7.17-151.8;, p = 0.000. An association has been observed between celiac disease and oligomenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, dysmenorrhea and metrorrhagia (p Conclusions The occurrence of a significant correlation between celiac disease and reproductive disorders could suggest to consider celiac disease diagnostic procedures (serological screening in women affected by these disorders.

  9. Diagnostic testing for celiac disease among patients with abdominal symptoms a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Jellema, A.P.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Context: The symptoms and consequences of celiac disease usually resolve with a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, clinical presentation is variable and most patients presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care will not have celiac disease and unnecessary diagnostic testing should be

  10. Serum transglutaminase 3 antibodies correlate with age at celiac disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Teea T; Kurppa, Kalle; Hervonen, Kaisa; Laurila, Kaija; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Saavalainen, Päivi; Sievänen, Harri; Reunala, Timo; Kaukinen, Katri

    2016-06-01

    Transglutaminase (TG)2 is the autoantigen in celiac disease, but also TG3 antibodies have been detected in the serum of celiac disease patients. To investigate the correlations between serum TG3 antibodies and clinical and histological manifestations of celiac disease and to assess gluten-dependency of TG3 antibodies. Correlations between serum TG3 antibody levels measured from 119 adults and children with untreated coeliac disease and the demographic data, clinical symptoms, celiac antibodies, histological data and results of laboratory tests and bone mineral densities were tested. TG3 antibodies were reinvestigated in 97 celiac disease patients after 12 months on a gluten-free diet (GFD). TG3 antibody titers were shown to correlate with the age at celiac disease diagnosis. Further, negative correlation with TG3 antibodies and intestinal γδ+ cells at diagnosis and on GFD was detected. Correlations were not detected with the clinical manifestation of celiac disease, TG2 or endomysial autoantibodies, laboratory values, severity of mucosal villous atrophy, associated diseases or complications. TG3 antibody titers decreased on GFD in 56% of the TG3 antibody positive patients. Serum TG3 antibody positivity in celiac disease increases as the diagnostic age rises. TG3 antibodies did not show similar gluten-dependency as TG2 antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance.

  12. Diagnostic testing for celiac disease among patients with abdominal symptoms: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, Daniëlle A. W. M.; Jellema, Petra; Mulder, Chris J.; Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.

    2010-01-01

    The symptoms and consequences of celiac disease usually resolve with a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, clinical presentation is variable and most patients presenting with abdominal symptoms in primary care will not have celiac disease and unnecessary diagnostic testing should be avoided. To

  13. Is MYO9B the missing link between schizophrenia and celiac disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, Bart J.; Bakker, Steven C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Sinke, Richard J.; Kahn, Rene S.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2008-01-01

    There has long been discussion on the correlation between schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases (especially celiac disease), which makes the recently discovered celiac disease risk factor, MYO9B, an attractive functional and positional candidate gene for schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis we

  14. Comparison of Endoscopic and Histological Findings between Typical and Atypical Celiac Disease in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Pooja; Gupta, Raj Kumar; Sharma, Rahul; Garg, Kapil

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease is a common non-communicable disease with varied presentations. Purpose of this study was to find the duodeno-endoscopic features in celiac disease and to compare duodeno-endoscopic and histological findings between typical and atypical celiac disease in children. Hospital based observational study was conducted at Sir Padampat Mother and Child Health Institute, Jaipur from June 2015 to May 2016. Patients were selected and divided in two groups- typical and atypical celiac disease based upon the presenting symptoms. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy was performed for serology positive patients. Results were analysed using appropriate statistical test of significance. Out of 101 enrolled patients, 47.5% were male. Age ranged from 1 to 18 years. Study showed that 54.5% were typical and 45.5% were atypical. Patients presenting with atypical symptoms were predominantly of older age group. On endoscopy, scalloping, mosaic pattern, reduced fold height and absent fold height; and in histology, advanced Marsh stage were significantly higher in the typical group. Awareness of atypical presentations as well as duodeno-endoscopic features may have considerable practical importance for the diagnosis of celiac disease in children. Scalloping, mosaic pattern, reduced fold height and nodularity are main endoscopic markers of celiac disease in children. Endoscopic markers of duodenal mucosa may be important in early diagnosis of celiac disease, in children subjected to endoscopy for atypical presentations or indication other than suspected celiac disease.

  15. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K.; Kaider, A.; Vogelsang, H.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  16. Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Roizen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of asymptomatic celiac disease identified in children with Down syndrome after being screened at around twenty-four months of age.  These cases raise the question as to what age is screening for celiac disease indicated in a child with Down syndrome and no symptoms.

  17. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  18. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac

  19. The Relationship Between Child Mortality Rates and Prevalence of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Raiteri, Alberto; Schiepatti, Annalisa; Klersy, Catherine; Corazza, Gino R

    2018-02-01

    Some evidence suggests that prevalence of celiac disease in the general population is increasing over time. Because the prognosis of celiac disease was a dismal one before discovering the role of gluten, our aim was to investigate a possible relationship between children under-5 mortality rates and prevalence rates of celiac disease. Thanks to a literature review, we found 27 studies performed in 17 different countries describing the prevalence of celiac disease in schoolchildren; between 1995 and 2011, 4 studies were performed in Italy. A meta-analysis of prevalence rates was performed. Prevalence was compared between specific country under-5 mortality groups, publication year, and age. In the last decades, under-5 mortality rates have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction is paralleled by an increase of the prevalence of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient was -63%, 95% confidence interval -82% to -33% (P celiac disease in the general population. In the near future, the number of patients with celiac disease will increase, thanks to the better environmental conditions that nowadays allow a better survival of children with celiac disease.

  20. Flow cytometry of duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes improves diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Julio; Morgado, José Mario T; Ruiz-Martín, Juan; Guardiola, Antonio; Lopes-Nogueras, Miriam; García-Vela, Almudena; Martín-Sacristán, Beatriz; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is difficult when the combined results of serology and histology are inconclusive. Studies using flow cytometry of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have found that celiac patients have increased numbers of γδ IELs, along with a decrease in CD3-CD103 + IELs. The objective of this article is to assess the role of flow cytometric analysis of IELs in the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases. A total of 312 patients with suspicion of celiac disease were included in the study. Duodenal biopsy samples were used for histological assessment and for flow cytometric analysis of IELs. In 46 out of 312 cases (14.7%) the combination of serology and histology did not allow the confirmation or exclusion of celiac disease. HLA typing had been performed in 42 of these difficult cases. Taking into account HLA typing and the response to a gluten-free diet, celiac disease was excluded in 30 of these cases and confirmed in the remaining 12. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs allowed a correct diagnosis in 39 out of 42 difficult cases (92.8%) and had a sensitivity of 91.7% (95% CI: 61.5% to 99.8%) and a specificity of 93.3% (95% CI: 77.9% to 99.2%) for the diagnosis of celiac disease in this setting. Flow cytometric analysis of IELs is useful for the diagnosis of celiac disease in difficult cases.

  1. Celiac lesion T cells recognize epitopes that cluster in regions of gliadins rich in proline residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, Helene; McAdam, Stephen N; Molberg, Øyvind

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced enteropathy that shows a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8. Gluten-specific T cells, invariably restricted by DQ2 or DQ8, can be isolated from celiac lesions. Such gut-derived T cells have a preference for recognition of gluten that has...

  2. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF GASTROENTEROLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINE: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Hill, Ivor D; Kelly, Ciarán P; Calderwood, Audrey H; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with celiac disease. Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet. There has been a substantial increase in the prevalence of celiac disease over the last 50 years and an increase in the rate of diagnosis in the last 10 years. Celiac disease can present with many symptoms, including typical gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. diarrhea, steatorrhea, weight loss, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain) and also non-gastrointestinal abnormalities (e.g. abnormal liver function tests, iron deficiency anemia, bone disease, skin disorders, and many other protean manifestations). Indeed, many individuals with celiac disease may have no symptoms at all. Celiac disease is usually detected by serologic testing of celiac-specific antibodies. The diagnosis is confirmed by duodenal mucosal biopsies. Both serology and biopsy should be performed on a gluten-containing diet. The treatment for celiac disease is primarily a gluten-free diet (GFD), which requires significant patient education, motivation, and follow-up. Non-responsive celiac disease occurs frequently, particularly in those diagnosed in adulthood. Persistent or recurring symptoms should lead to a review of the patient’s original diagnosis to exclude alternative diagnoses, a review of the GFD to ensure there is no obvious gluten contamination, and serologic testing to confirm adherence with the GFD. In addition, evaluation for disorders associated with celiac disease that could cause persistent symptoms, such as microscopic colitis, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, and complications of celiac disease, such as enteropathy-associated lymphoma or refractory celiac disease, should be entertained. Newer therapeutic modalities are being studied in clinical

  3. A comparison of antibody testing, permeability testing, and zonulin levels with small-bowel biopsy in celiac disease patients on a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, D R; Wilhelm-Boyles, C; Veitch, R; Kryszak, D; Parry, D M

    2010-04-01

    Active celiac disease is associated with positive endomysial (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (TTG) antibodies, elevated zonulin levels, and increased intestinal permeability. There is little known about what happens to these immunologic and structural abnormalities in patients on a gluten-free diet and their correlation with small-bowel biopsy changes. Adult patients previously diagnosed with celiac disease and on a gluten-free diet for greater than 1 year were considered for the study. All patients underwent the following: measurement of EMA and TTG antibodies, serum zonulin levels, intestinal permeability (IP) testing with lactulose/mannitol ratios, food diary analysis for gluten ingestion and small- bowel biopsy. A total of 21 patients on a gluten-free diet for a mean of 9.7 years completed the study. There were ten patients who had normalization of intestinal biopsies, IP and TTG, and EM antibodies. Six patients had Marsh type 2 or 3 lesions and all had either abnormal IP (5/6) or TTG antibody (4/6). In patients with Marsh type 3 lesions, there was a correlation between IP and zonulin levels. A subgroup of patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet has complete normalization of intestinal biopsies, intestinal permeability defects, and antibody levels. Patients with Marsh type 3 lesions have abnormal TTG antibodies and intestinal permeability with zonulin levels that correlate with IP. These abnormalities may be due to continued gluten ingestion. Further study is needed to determine the clinical utility of TTG antibodies and IP testing in following patients with celiac disease.

  4. HAMDA: Hybrid Approach for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Niu, Ya-Wei; Wang, Guang-Hui; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2017-12-01

    For decades, enormous experimental researches have collectively indicated that microRNA (miRNA) could play indispensable roles in many critical biological processes and thus also the pathogenesis of human complex diseases. Whereas the resource and time cost required in traditional biology experiments are expensive, more and more attentions have been paid to the development of effective and feasible computational methods for predicting potential associations between disease and miRNA. In this study, we developed a computational model of Hybrid Approach for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (HAMDA), which involved the hybrid graph-based recommendation algorithm, to reveal novel miRNA-disease associations by integrating experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, disease semantic similarity, miRNA functional similarity, and Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity into a recommendation algorithm. HAMDA took not only network structure and information propagation but also node attribution into consideration, resulting in a satisfactory prediction performance. Specifically, HAMDA obtained AUCs of 0.9035 and 0.8395 in the frameworks of global and local leave-one-out cross validation, respectively. Meanwhile, HAMDA also achieved good performance with AUC of 0.8965 ± 0.0012 in 5-fold cross validation. Additionally, we conducted case studies about three important human cancers for performance evaluation of HAMDA. As a result, 90% (Lymphoma), 86% (Prostate Cancer) and 92% (Kidney Cancer) of top 50 predicted miRNAs were confirmed by recent experiment literature, which showed the reliable prediction ability of HAMDA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Skepticism Regarding Vaccine and Gluten-Free Food Safety Among Patients with Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Loren G; Zylberberg, Haley M; Levinovitz, Alan; Stockwell, Melissa S; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    There has been a marked increase in the adoption of the gluten-free (GF) diet. To query individuals with celiac disease (CD) and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) on their beliefs toward the health effects of gluten, and safety of vaccines and GF food products. We distributed a Web-based survey to individuals with CD and NCGS on a CD center e-mail list. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare responses of respondents with CD and NCGS. The overall response rate was 27% (NCGS n = 217, CD n = 1291). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to disagree with the statement that "vaccines are safe for people with celiac disease" (NCGS 41.3% vs. CD 26.4% (p diet improves energy and concentration (aOR 2.52; 95% CI 1.86-3.43). Subjects with NCGS were more likely than those with CD to have doubts about vaccine safety and believe in the value of non-GMO and organic foods. Our findings suggest that the lack of reliable information on gluten and its content in food and medications may reinforce beliefs that result in a detriment to public health.

  6. Immunoregulation by naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The role of naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs) in homeostasis and in disease manifestations is poorly understood. In the present chapter, we review how NAbs may interfere with the cytokine network and how NAbs, through formation of complement-activating immune complexes with soluble self......-antigens, may promote the uptake and presentation of self-molecules by antigen-presenting cells. Both naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies against a variety of cytokines have been reported, including NAbs against interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony...

  7. Dermatomyositis Associated with Celiac Disease: Response to a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Song

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between dermatomyositis and celiac disease in children has been well documented. In the adult population, however, the association has not been clearly established. A rare case of concomitant dermatomyositis and celiac disease in a 40-year-old woman is presented. After having been diagnosed with dermatomyositis and iron deficiency anemia, this patient was referred to the gastroenterology clinic to exclude a gastrointestinal malignancy. Blood tests revealed various vitamin deficiencies consistent with malabsorption. The results of gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy were consistent with celiac disease. After she was put on a strict gluten-free diet, both nutritional deficiencies and the dermatomyositis resolved. The patient’s human leukocyte antigen haplotype study was positive for DR3 and DQ2, which have been shown to be associated with both juvenile dermatomyositis and celiac disease. It is suggested that patients with newly diagnosed dermatomyositis be investigated for concomitant celiac disease even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  8. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma as a complication of silent celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Dantas Brito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which a genetic predisposition and the ingestion of wheat gluten triggers a deleterious immune response. This response is complex and may lead to manifestations other than enteropathyha: hepatitis, dermatitis and neuropathy. There is higher risk for neoplasia. We observed an atypical case, corresponding to a 69-year old female presenting with complicated celiac disease. The patient was referred following the histological examination of an enterectomy specimen, which unexpectedly revealed an enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma in a background of celiac disease. Patient’s previous medical history comprised several abdominal surgical procedures, without other prior symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. Indeed, the patient was obese and no signs of malabsortion were apparent. This case draws our attention to clinically silent celiac disease, which represents a diagnostic challenge. Thus, this should be kept in mind whenever a patient presents with abdominal relapsing complications, otherwise unexplained.

  9. Celiac Disease in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis-Related Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Putman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cystic fibrosis (CF and celiac disease can cause low bone mineral density (BMD and fractures. Celiac disease may occur at a higher frequency in patients with CF than the general population, and symptoms of these conditions may overlap. We report on two patients presenting with CF-related bone disease in the past year who were subsequently found to have concurrent celiac disease. Because adherence to a gluten-free diet may improve BMD in patients with celiac disease, this could have important implications for treatment. Clinicians should consider screening for celiac disease in patients with CF who have low BMD, worsening BMD in the absence of other risk factors, and/or difficult to treat vitamin D deficiency.

  10. TEVAR and covering the celiac artery. Is it safe or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Morten; Lönn, Lars Birger; Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2010-01-01

    artery. In the latter case, adequate collateral supply to the upper gastrointestinal tract is crucial. Collateral arteries joining the celiac and the superior mesenteric arteries are well characterized in patients with chronic celiac stenosis or occlusion. Are these collateral pathways sufficient also...... for sudden iatrogenic closure of the celiac artery? By performing a preoperative angiography of the superior mesenteric artery with temporary balloon occlusion of the celiac artery, collateral capacity between the two vessels can be tested in advance. Exact positioning of the distal end of a large thoracic...... together, in the large majority of patients, it appears that intentional celiac coverage can be done safely provided that sufficient collateral function have been demonstrated in advance....

  11. [Diabetes and autoimmune diseases: prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mont-Serrat, Camila; Hoineff, Claudio; Meirelles, Ricardo M R; Kupfer, Rosane

    2008-12-01

    Determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in attendance in Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione (IEDE). Blood samples were analyzed in 120 children and adolescents with DM1 from IEDE Diabetes Clinic for the IgA antitissue-transglutaminase antibody and dosage of the seric IgA. Those with positive serology were guided for upper endoscopy with small-bowel biopsy to confirm the celiac disease. The antibody was positive in 3 of the 120 patients. The small-bowel biopsy was confirmatory in all of the positive patients, leading to a prevalence of celiac disease of 2.5% in the studied group. The prevalence of celiac disease is increased in children and adolescents with DM1 when compared with normality. As most are asymptomatic, it is recommended periodical screening of celiac disease in children with DM1.

  12. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities.

  13. Role of T cell receptor delta gene in susceptibility to celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschmann, E; Wienker, T F; Volk, B A

    1996-02-01

    There is a strong genetic influence on the susceptibility to celiac disease. Although in the vast majority of patients with celiac disease, the HLA-DQ(alpha1*0501, beta1*0201) heterodimer encoded by the alleles HLA-DQA1*0501 and HLA-DQB1*0201 seems to confer the primary disease susceptibility, it cannot be excluded that other genes contribute to disease susceptibility, as indicated by the difference in concordance rates between monozygotic twins and HLA identical siblings (70% vs. 30%). Obviously other genes involved in the genetic control of T cell mediated immune response could potentially influence susceptibility to celiac disease. The density of T cells using the gammadelta T cell receptor (TCR) is considerably increased in the jejunal epithelium of patients with celiac disease, an abnormality considered to be specific for celiac disease. This suggests an involvement of gammadelta T cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. To ascertain whether the TCR delta (TCRD) gene contributes to celiac disease susceptibility we carried out an association study and genetic linkage analysis using a highly polymorphic microsatellite marker at the TCRD locus on chromosome 14q11.2. The association study demonstrated no significant difference in allele frequencies of the TCRD gene marker between celiac disease patients and controls; accordingly, the relative risk estimates did not reach the level of statistical significance. In the linkage analysis, performed in 23 families, the logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores calculated for celiac disease versus the TCRD gene marker excluded linkage, suggesting that there is no determinant contributing to celiac disease status at or 5 cM distant to the analyzed TCRD gene marker. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide no evidence that the analyzed TCRD gene contributes substantially to celiac disease susceptibility.

  14. The Interaction among Microbiota, Immunity, and Genetic and Dietary Factors Is the Condicio Sine Qua Non Celiac Disease Can Develop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pagliari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. This is a complex disorder involving both environmental and immune-genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is determined by HLA-DQ genes. Dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immune systems can conceivably cause impairment of mucosal barrier function and development of localized or systemic inflammatory and autoimmune processes. Exposure to gluten is the main environmental trigger responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Thus, both genetic determination and environmental exposure to gluten are necessary for the full manifestation of CD; neither of them is sufficient alone. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that other environmental factors, including infections, alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition, and early feeding practices, might also play a role in disease development. Thus, this interaction is the condicio sine qua non celiac disease can develop. The breakdown of the interaction among microbiota, innate immunity, and genetic and dietary factors leads to disruption of homeostasis and inflammation; and tissue damage occurs. Focusing attention on this interaction and its breakdown may allow a better understanding of the CD pathogenesis and lead to novel translational avenues for preventing and treating this widespread disease.

  15. Transcultural adaptation and validation of the Celiac Disease Quality of Life (CD-QOL survey, a specific questionnaire to measure quality of life in patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Casellas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: celiac disease is a chronic condition that requires continued treatment, with the resultant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL of people who suffer it. Most studies in this field have used generic questionnaires to measure HRQOL in celiac patients. It was therefore decided to conduct a study to translate into Spanish and validate a specific questionnaire for celiac disease, the Celiac Disease Quality Of Life Survey (CD-QOL. Objectives: to translate and validate in Spanish the specific celiac disease questionnaire CD-QOL. Methods: a multicenter, prospective, observational study was designed consisting of two phases: In the first phase, the questionnaire was translated and adapted into Spanish using the translation/back translation procedure and an understandability study. In the second phase, internal consistency of the translated questionnaire was analyzed. For this, results of the CD-QOL were compared to those of EuroQol and the Daily Fatigue Impact Scale (D-FIS. Understandability of the translated and adapted questionnaire was tested in six patients, and the validation study was done in 298 celiac patients (201 treated with a gluten-free diet and 97 at diagnosis. Results: in both celiac groups, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was high (0.90, feasibility was excellent (99.2 % of patients completed all questions, and there were no ceiling and floor effects. Spearman correlation to EuroQol and D-FIS was statistically significant (p < 0.05. CD-QOL score was different depending on whether state of health was good, fair, or poor based on the EuroQol score. Conclusion: the Spanish version of the CD-QOL is a valid tool for measuring HRQOL in celiac patients.

  16. Linking disease associations with regulatory information in the human genome

    KAUST Repository

    Schaub, M. A.; Boyle, A. P.; Kundaje, A.; Batzoglou, S.; Snyder, M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a large number of phenotypes. However, an associated SNP is likely part of a larger region of linkage disequilibrium. This makes it difficult to precisely identify the SNPs that have a biological link with the phenotype. We have systematically investigated the association of multiple types of ENCODE data with disease-associated SNPs and show that there is significant enrichment for functional SNPs among the currently identified associations. This enrichment is strongest when integrating multiple sources of functional information and when highest confidence disease-associated SNPs are used. We propose an approach that integrates multiple types of functional data generated by the ENCODE Consortium to help identify "functional SNPs" that may be associated with the disease phenotype. Our approach generates putative functional annotations for up to 80% of all previously reported associations. We show that for most associations, the functional SNP most strongly supported by experimental evidence is a SNP in linkage disequilibrium with the reported association rather than the reported SNP itself. Our results show that the experimental data sets generated by the ENCODE Consortium can be successfully used to suggest functional hypotheses for variants associated with diseases and other phenotypes.

  17. Linking disease associations with regulatory information in the human genome

    KAUST Repository

    Schaub, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a large number of phenotypes. However, an associated SNP is likely part of a larger region of linkage disequilibrium. This makes it difficult to precisely identify the SNPs that have a biological link with the phenotype. We have systematically investigated the association of multiple types of ENCODE data with disease-associated SNPs and show that there is significant enrichment for functional SNPs among the currently identified associations. This enrichment is strongest when integrating multiple sources of functional information and when highest confidence disease-associated SNPs are used. We propose an approach that integrates multiple types of functional data generated by the ENCODE Consortium to help identify "functional SNPs" that may be associated with the disease phenotype. Our approach generates putative functional annotations for up to 80% of all previously reported associations. We show that for most associations, the functional SNP most strongly supported by experimental evidence is a SNP in linkage disequilibrium with the reported association rather than the reported SNP itself. Our results show that the experimental data sets generated by the ENCODE Consortium can be successfully used to suggest functional hypotheses for variants associated with diseases and other phenotypes.

  18. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed serologic screening for celiac disease in 188 infertile women (ages 25–39). While we did not demonstrate an increased prevalence of celiac disease in our overall infertile female population, we were able to detect a significantly increased prevalence (5.9%) of undiagnosed celiac disease among women presenting with unexplained infertility (n=51). Our findings suggest the importance of screening infertile female patients, particularly those with unexplained infertility, for celiac disease. PMID:21682114

  19. Nutritional status variation and intestinal and extra intestinal symptomatology in patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity given specialized dietary advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vaz de Melo RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the nutritional status variation and symptomatology of patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity after specialized dietary advice Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Clinical, metabolic, and nutritional variables were collected from medical records, and the symptomatology was investigated by the Metabolic Screening Questionnaire. The variables were assessed on two occasions (T1 - before dietary advice and T2 - after dietary advice with an interval of three months between T1 and T2 Results: The median age was 42 years. The prevalences of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity were 66.2% and 33.8%, respectively. Normal weight prevailed at T1 (58.8% and T2 (56.3%, but 30.0% of the patients at T1 and 34.9% of the patients at T2 had excess weight. The two conditions had similar symptomatology. The most frequent signs and symptoms on both occasions involved the gastrointestinal tract, followed by energy/activity and emotions. All symptoms decreased significantly after the introduction of a proper diet Conclusion: The patients were normal weight on both study occasions (T1 and T2, and the symptoms improved after dietary advice. Thus, we reinforce the importance of proper dietary management in both clinical conditions to make dietary adjustments that improve these individuals' symptomatology.

  20. Increased Risk of Esophageal Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients With Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elizabeth T; Eluri, Swathi; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-08-01

    The possible association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease is controversial because prior results have been contradictory. We aimed to determine the relationship between EoE and celiac disease among patients with concomitant esophageal and duodenal biopsies. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a U.S. national pathology database by using data from January 2009 through June 2012. Our primary case definition was defined by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia with ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field. The crude and adjusted (for age and sex) odds of esophageal eosinophilia for patients with active celiac disease were compared with those without celiac disease. Sensitivity analyses were performed by using more stringent case definitions and by estimating the associations between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis and celiac disease and Barrett's esophagus. Of 292,621 patients in the source population, 88,517 with both esophageal and duodenal biopsies were studied. Four thousand one hundred one (4.6%) met criteria for EoE, and 1203 (1.4%) met criteria for celiac disease. Odds of EoE were 26% higher in patients with celiac disease than in patients without celiac disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.60). The magnitude of association varied according to EoE case definition, but all definitions showed a weak positive association between the 2 conditions. There was no association between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis (aOR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.85-1.07) or Barrett's esophagus (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.14) and celiac disease. There is a weak increase in EoE in patients with celiac disease. This association strengthened with increasingly stringent definitions of EoE and was not observed for other esophageal conditions. In patients with celiac disease, concomitant EoE should be considered in the correct clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. [Celiac disease in a group of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Katia G; Silva, Giselia A P; Antunes, Margarida M C

    2004-12-01

    To know the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) in a group of children and adolescents with type I diabetes mellitus. A cross sectional study was conducted at the Instituto Materno Infantil de Pernambuco (IMIP) in March 2000. The sample consisted of 19 children and adolescents with type I diabetes mellitus that had the human anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies assessed using kits from the Eurospital Laboratory. In case of positive results it was realized small intestine biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. For the calculation of the prevalence of CD it was considered the number of patients with serum positive histological alterations of the mucous membrane of the small intestine compatible with CD. Four patients presented serum positivity for human anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies with a serum prevalence of 21% (4/19). Out of these four subjects, three who accomplished small intestine biopsy presented histological alterations compatible with CD. The prevalence of CD in this group was 15.8% (3/19). The prevalence of CD in this study group was high, suggesting that those with type I diabetes mellitus should be led as a group of high risk to develop this disease.

  2. Prevalence of IgA Antibodies to Endomysium and Tissue Transglutaminase in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

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    Helen R Gillett

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis has been described in several case reports and small screening studies, with varying prevalence rates. Stored sera from 378 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were tested for immunoglobulin (Ig A endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Ten patients were positive for both antibodies (2.6%; five of these patients had had small bowel biopsies confirming celiac disease. A further 44 patients (11.6% had raised titres of IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody but were negative for IgA endomysium antibody. The increased prevalence of celiac-related antibodies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis suggests that the two conditions are associated, although the reason for the association remains unclear. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis should be considered to be at high risk for celiac disease. Although liver biochemistry does not improve when these patients are fed a gluten-free diet, the complications of untreated celiac disease warrant the identification and treatment of the condition in this population.

  3. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene-disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S

    2014-06-15

    Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies-for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies-for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene-disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better-it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has bigdata.ices.utexas.edu/project/gene-disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in screen-detected celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Aku; Kurppa, Kalle; Ukkola, Anniina; Collin, Pekka; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2012-10-01

    Active serological screening has proved an effective means of increasing the diagnostic rate in celiac disease. The effects of a long-term gluten-free diet on possible gastrointestinal symptoms and psychological well-being in screen-detected patients have nevertheless remained obscure. Abdominal symptoms and quality of life were measured in a large cohort of treated screen-detected celiac adults. Comparisons were made with corresponding symptom-detected patients and with non-celiac controls. Dietary adherence was assessed both by structured interview and by serological testing. In both screen- and symptom-detected celiac groups, 88% of the patients were adherent. On a diet, both screen- and symptom-detected patients reported significantly more gastrointestinal symptoms than non-celiac controls. Those screen-detected patients who reported having no symptoms at the time of diagnosis, also remained asymptomatic during the diet. Despite persistent symptoms, psychological well-being in screen-detected patients was comparable with that in non-celiac controls, whereas the symptom-detected patients showed lower quality of life. Long-term treated screen-detected celiac patients, especially women, suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms on a gluten free diet similarly to symptom-detected patients. However, despite a similar frequency of persistent symptoms, the quality of life was unimpaired in the screen found, but remained low in the symptom-detected group. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-limiting Spontaneous Isolated Celiac Artery Dissection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Morzycki

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Isolated dissection of the celiac artery is rare, with less then 100 cases reported to date. Although some patients present with epigastric pain and tenderness, many cases are asymptomatic and found incidentally on CT. The appropriate management of isolated celiac artery dissections is unclear. This report illustrates an observational approach to a symptomatic case of isolated celiac artery dissection. Report: A 55-year-old Caucassian male presented to the emergency department with epigastric pain. His Initial CT revealed possible celiac artery dissection with associated intramural hematoma. Due to continued pain, a subsequent CTA was ordered. This scan showed progression of the intramural hematoma to near occlusion of the hepatic artery. Despite this, there were no signs of ischemic hepatitis as indicated by normal levels of liver transaminases. There was also no evidence to suggest propagation of the dissection or pseudo-aneurysm formation. We therefore choose a conservative and observational approach to this isolated celiac artery dissection. His dissection was managed with ASA and metoprolol, and he was discharged after 1 week of observation. 3 week follow-up CTA showed spontaneous resolution of the intramural hematoma and improved patency of the hepatic artery. There was no change at 3 months follow-up. Conclusion: This case highlights that an observational approach to cases of isolated celiac artery dissection may be indicated if there is no evident end organ disease or malperfusion. Keywords: Celiac artery, Dissection, Management

  6. From menarche to menopause: the fertile life span of celiac women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonicola, Antonella; Iovino, Paola; Cappello, Carmelina; Capone, Pietro; Andreozzi, Paolo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated menopause-associated disorders and fertile life span in women with celiac disease (CD) under untreated conditions and after long-term treatment with a gluten-free diet. The participants were 33 women with CD after menopause (untreated CD group), 25 celiac women consuming a gluten-free diet at least 10 years before menopause (treated CD group), and 45 healthy volunteers (control group). The Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire was used to gather information on menopause-associated disorders. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to acquire information on physical activity. Untreated celiac women had a shorter duration of fertile life span than did the control women because of an older age of menarche and a younger age of menopause (P menopause causes a shorter fertile period in untreated celiac women compared with control women. A gluten-free diet that started at least 10 years before menopause prolongs the fertile life span of celiac women. The perception of intensity of hot flushes and irritability is more severe in untreated celiac women than in controls. Low physical exercise and/or poorer quality of life frequently reported by untreated celiac women might be the cause of reduced discomfort tolerance, thus increasing the subjective perception of menopausal symptoms.

  7. Celiac-Associated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Study of 16 Patients with Overt Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that autoimmune thyroid disorders (including Hashimoto’s or lymphocytic thyroiditis may occur in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the prevalence of thyroid disease was explored in a series of 96 consecutive patients seen with biopsy-defined adult celiac disease (average age 47.3 years. Sixteen celiac patients (average age 58.1 years were detected with hypothyroidism, including four treated with radio-iodine ablation or thyroidectomy for Grave’s disease. In addition to celiac disease, almost half had dermatitis herpetiformis, a small intestinal neoplasm (particularly lymphoma or both. Diagnosis of thyroid disease preceded diagnosis of celiac disease in 13 patients or was made concurrently in two patients. In only one patient was thyroid disease detected after celiac disease was diagnosed. This indicates that thyroid diseases occur more commonly in celiac disease than is currently appreciated, possibly due to shared embryological origins or common immunopathological features, and may be the presenting clinical manifestation in adults especially if there is coexistent dermatitis herpetiformis. Careful monitoring of this subgroup may be warranted because of the frequency of neoplastic intestinal diseases, particularly lymphoma.

  8. Isolated celiac trunk aneurysm dissection: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and isolated celiac artery dissection is a rare clinical disease. It is the fourth cause of abdominal aneurysms behind those that occur in the splenic, hepatic, and superior mesenteric arteries. It is important to suspect the diagnosis of this entity whose clinical symptoms are unspecific. We report the case of a 60 year-old male treated in our hospital because of this illness, and present a review of this pathology, specially focused on the diagnosis and the different treatments available.

  9. Celiac Disease Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune enteropathy that occurs, in affected individuals, with exposure to gluten in the diet and improves with removal of dietary gluten. Although CD is readily considered in patients with classical presentations of the disease, atypical manifestations may be the only presenting symptoms. We present a case of CD in a 16-year-old female presenting as fever of unknown origin, which has not been reported previously. The postulated mechanism for fever in CD and the importance of clinicians having a low threshold for considering CD in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and other enigmatic clinical presentations is discussed.

  10. Burden of celiac disease in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Luigi; Timpone, Laura; Abkari, Abdelhak; Abu-Zekry, Mona; Attard, Thomas; Bouguerrà, Faouzi; Cullufi, Paskal; Kansu, Aydan; Micetic-Turk, Dusanka; Mišak, Zrinjka; Roma, Eleftheria; Shamir, Raanan; Terzic, Selma

    2011-12-07

    To estimate the burden of undiagnosed celiac disease (CD) in the Mediterranean area in terms of morbidity, mortality and health cost. For statistics regarding the population of each country in the Mediterranean area, we accessed authoritative international sources (World Bank, World Health Organization and United Nations). The prevalence of CD was obtained for most countries from published reports. An overall prevalence rate of 1% cases/total population was finally estimated to represent the frequency of the disease in the area, since none of the available confidence intervals of the reported rates significantly excluded this rate. The distribution of symptoms and complications was obtained from reliable reports in the same cohort. A standardized mortality rate of 1.8 was obtained from recent reports. Crude health cost was estimated for the years between symptoms and diagnosis for adults and children, and was standardized for purchasing power parity to account for the different economic profiles amongst Mediterranean countries. In the next 10 years, the Mediterranean area will have about half a billion inhabitants, of which 120 million will be children. The projected number of CD diagnoses in 2020 is 5 million cases (1 million celiac children), with a relative increase of 11% compared to 2010. Based on the 2010 rate, there will be about 550,000 symptomatic adults and about 240,000 sick children: 85% of the symptomatic patients will suffer from gastrointestinal complaints, 40% are likely to have anemia, 30% will likely have osteopenia, 20% of children will have short stature, and 10% will have abnormal liver enzymes. The estimated standardized medical costs for symptomatic celiac patients during the delay between symptom onset and diagnosis (mean 6 years for adults, 2 years for children) will be about €4 billion (€387 million for children) over the next 10 years. A delay in diagnosis is expected to increase mortality: about 600,000 celiac patients will die in

  11. Anterior celiac plexus block for interventional biliary procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenati, J.F.; Widlus, D.M.; Venbrux, A.C.; Lynch-Nyhan, A.; Osterman, F.A.; Taylor, D.R.; Tewes, P.A.; Cassidy, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports temporary celiac ganglion block for pain relief during biliary procedures performed without complication in 65 patients. The block was given from an anterior approach, with 30 mL of bupivacaine injected over the right T-12 pedicle. Fluoroscopy was used to guide the needle 2 cm anterior to the spine. Patients were assigned to one of three groups based on degree of anesthesia. In group 1, there was no benefit (20%); in group 2, moderate regional anesthesia (22%); and in group 3, excellent anesthesia (58%). The procedure may be performed at the start of or any time during the examination and provides satisfactory regional anesthesia in 80% of patients

  12. Non‐celiac gluten sensitivity : a real disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Inês Cristina Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho Final do Curso de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, 2016 The past years have seen an increase in the use of a gluten-­‐free diet (GFD) outside a diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). This trend has led to the identification of a new clinical entity termed non-­‐celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), which has clinical features that overlap with those two previously mentioned. The onset of symptoms in patients with NCGS can...

  13. Celiac Disease and Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Malorie; Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Risech-Neyman, Yesenia; Moss, Steven F; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with hyposplenism, and multiple case reports link celiac disease and pneumococcal infections; however, increased risk of pneumococcal infection in celiac disease has not been confirmed. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the risk of pneumococcal infections in celiac disease. Relevant studies were identified using electronic bibliographic searches of PubMed, OVID, Medline, and EMBASE (1980 to February 2017) and reviewing abstracts from major conferences in gastroenterology. Using number of events in celiac patients and referent patients, we calculated a summary relative risk of pneumococcal infections. All analyses were conducted in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software using random-effects assumptions. Of a total of 156 articles, 3, representing 3 large databases (the Swedish National Inpatient Register; the Oxford Record Linkage Study; and the English National Hospital Episode Statistics) were included. Each compared patients with celiac disease and confirmed pneumococcal infection to a specific reference group: inpatients and/or the general population. Overall, the odds of pneumococcal infection were higher among hospitalized celiac patients compared with controls (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.92). There was no evidence of heterogeneity (Q[1] = 1.17, P = .56, I 2  = 0%). Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal infection. Preventive pneumococcal vaccination should be considered for those with celiac disease, with special attention to those aged 15-64 years who have not received the scheduled pneumococcal vaccination series as a child. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN. A HISTORY CASE WITH ONSET AT THE AGE OF 17 YEARS

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    M. O. Revnova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Being one of the most common representatives of malabsorbtion syndrome celiac disease has been diagnosed more and more often in Russia. Celiac disease is a hereditary condition with high prevalence and different symptoms called «Great Mimic». The article deals with diagnostics based on testing the antibodies to tTG, DPG, biopsies of the duodenum and gluten free diet. There is given an example of severe case of celiac disease in a 17-years-old boy with weight loss, delayed sexual development and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Gluten free diet and proper treatment led to permanent remission.

  15. CT guided celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis : the modified anterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee

    1997-01-01

    Since it was first described by Kappis, celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) has been performed under fluoroscopic guidance by anesthetists or surgeons for the relief of intractable pain caused by upper abdominal malignancy. Recently, however, several groups have reported a computed tomography (CT)-guided technique that increased the safety of the blocking procedure and improved its results. The authors present a new technique CT-guided celiac plexus and splanchic nerve block, to be used simultaneously with a modified anterior approach. Using CT to guide needle tip placement, an anterior approach that permitted direct neurolysis of the celiac ganglia and splanchnic nerve was developed

  16. Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Corres, J. M.; Del Villar, I.; Matias, I. R.; Arregui, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development and test of an anti-gliadin antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm anti-gliadin antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  17. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Celiac Trunk: From Early CT Sign to Rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafino, Gianpiero; Vroegindeweij, Dammis; Boks, Simone; Harst, Erwin van der

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of the rapid development and rupture of a mycotic celiac trunk aneurysm. Initiallyon multislice computed tomography (ms-CT) there was a normal celiac trunk with minimal haziness of the surrounding fat. Only 2 weeks later the patient went into hypovolemic shock due to a ruptured celiac aneurysm. Although aneurysms of the visceral arteries are rare, they are of major clinical importance as they carry a life-threatening risk of rupture. This case illustrates the use of ms-CT in detecting and evaluating visceral aneurysms, in order to prevent emergency operation

  18. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    OpenAIRE

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, Mar?a ?.; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 +/- 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrie...

  19. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Justin; Leonard Puppa, Elaine; Greenwald, Bruce; Goldberg, Eric; Guerrerio, Anthony; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD), celiac patients in remission (RCD), non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS) and non-celiac controls (NC). Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6), RCD (n = 6), GS (n = 6), and NC (n = 5)) demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity. PMID:25734566

  20. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  1. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  2. Socioeconomic Risk Factors for Celiac Disease Burden and Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Sveta S; Akbari, Mona; Kelly, Ciarán P; Hansen, Joshua; Theethira, Thimmaiah; Tariq, Sohaib; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A

    2016-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the population and negatively affects aspects of life including physical and social function. The relationship between socioeconomic (SE) factors, symptom severity, and perceived burden of living with CD is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between income, symptoms, and perceived burden of CD. In this survey study conducted at a tertiary care center, 773 patients 18 years of age or more with biopsy confirmed CD were eligible to participate. Patients completed a survey with information on SE data, the validated Celiac Symptom Index (CSI), and visual analog scales (VAS) assessing overall health, CD-related health, difficulty in following a gluten-free diet (GFD), and importance of following a GFD. Three hundred forty one patients completed the survey. Higher income predicted better overall health, better CD related health, and fewer symptoms. In the logistic regression model, low income was associated with greater CD symptoms (odds ratio=6.04, P=0.002). Other factors associated with greater symptoms were younger age, poor overall health state, and more physician visits. Factors associated with increased burden of CD included hospitalizations, more symptoms, poor overall health state, and burden of following a GFD. Patients with lower incomes have worse CD-related health and greater symptoms. Those with low income had 6 times the odds of greater symptoms compared with those with high income. Our data suggest that income is associated with perceived overall health, CD-related health, and CD symptoms.

  3. Celiac Disease: What Do We Know in 2017

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    Jorge Amil Dias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is one of the most prevalent digestive conditions. Diagnosis requires that strict criteria are used so that a life-long gluten-free diet may be correctly prescribed. Although genetic susceptibility has been known for a long time, there have been elusive environmental factors that lead to the occurrence of clinical disease. Many studies have addressed the identification of environmental modifiers, and different lines of research have been tried with variable success and even contradictory results. Infections and age of gluten introduction into the diet in the first few months of life have been evaluated, but a firm relationship could not be established. A recent paper addresses a fascinating hypothesis that could explain how some infectious agents might modulate the immune system and modify response to dietary antigens. Subsequently, animal models with genetic susceptibility were tested, and, indeed, there was abnormal response to gluten. These observations still do not provide final answers about the pathophysiology of celiac disease but certainly lead to progress in the knowledge of gluten sensitization and the role of some environmental factors.

  4. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

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    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  5. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and its Effects on Pregnancy

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    E Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the coeliac disease(CD symptoms is infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, we are not cognizant of any CD reports in pregnancy in Iran. Therefore, this study aims to prospectively estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed CD in a population of pregnant women as well as its complications in pregnancy. Methods: 796 pregnant women with mean age of 26 years(SD= 26 and mean pregnancy duration of 5.4 months participated in this descriptive study from 2007 to 2008. Total IgA test and antitissue transglutaminase(tTGA antibodies were measured. Those with positive TGA underwent histological biopsy specimens according to modified Marsh classification. Results: A positive CD serology for tTGA was obderved in 17(2.1% out of 796 pregnant women. Out of the 17 seropositive patients, 10 had abnormal histology compatible with CD(Marsh I-IIIc symptoms. Two pregnant women had already experienced miscarriage. Moreover, 3 patients had born low birth weight babies. Conclusion: In this study, there was no significant relationship between CD and high incidence of adverse outcomes. Overall, 1 out of 66 pregnant women(1.5% rate of prevalence suffered from CD. Celiac disease shows different severity in different individuals. In other words, not every celiac patient is at high risk for its complications. This may propose that gluten free diet could be avoided in the patients who have a normal pregnancy

  6. Salivary microbiota and metabolome associated with celiac disease.

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    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Ercolini, Danilo; Piccolo, Maria; Vannini, Lucia; Siragusa, Sonya; De Filippis, Francesca; De Pasquale, Ilaria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Di Toma, Michele; Gozzi, Giorgia; Serrazanetti, Diana I; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the salivary microbiota and metabolome of 13 children with celiac disease (CD) under a gluten-free diet (treated celiac disease [T-CD]). The same number of healthy children (HC) was used as controls. The salivary microbiota was analyzed by an integrated approach using culture-dependent and -independent methods. Metabolome analysis was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-solid-phase microextraction. Compared to HC, the number of some cultivable bacterial groups (e.g., total anaerobes) significantly (P endodontalis, and Prevotella nanceiensis), together with the smallest amount of Actinobacteria. T-CD children were also characterized by decreased levels of some Actinomyces species, Atopobium species, and Corynebacterium durum. Rothia mucilaginosa was the only Actinobacteria species found at the highest level in T-CD children. As shown by multivariate statistical analyses, the levels of organic volatile compounds markedly differentiated T-CD children. Some compounds (e.g., ethyl-acetate, nonanal, and 2-hexanone) were found to be associated with T-CD children. Correlations (false discovery rate [FDR], oral dysbiosis that could affect the oral metabolome.

  7. Economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition in China.

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    Linthicum, Mark T; Thornton Snider, Julia; Vaithianathan, Rhema; Wu, Yanyu; LaVallee, Chris; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Benner, Jennifer E; Philipson, Tomas J

    2015-05-01

    Disease-associated malnutrition (DAM) is a well-recognized problem in many countries, but the extent of its burden on the Chinese population is unclear. This article reports the results of a burden-of-illness study on DAM in 15 diseases in China. Using data from the World Health Organization (WHO), the China Health and Nutrition Survey, and the published literature, mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost because of DAM were calculated; a financial value of this burden was calculated following WHO guidelines. DALYs lost annually to DAM in China varied across diseases, from a low of 2248 in malaria to a high of 1 315 276 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The total burden was 6.1 million DALYs, for an economic burden of US$66 billion (Chinese ¥ 447 billion) annually. This burden is sufficiently large to warrant immediate attention from public health officials and medical providers, especially given that low-cost and effective interventions are available. © 2014 APJPH.

  8. Addition of a Short Course of Prednisolone to a Gluten-Free Diet vs. Gluten-Free Diet Alone in Recovery of Celiac Disease: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Abbas, Asad; Shahab, Tabassum; Sherwani, Rana K; Alam, Seema

    2018-01-28

    Background A gluten-free diet (GFD) is the standard of care in the management of patients with celiac disease, but clinical and histological recovery are often delayed. In newly diagnosed patients, strict compliance to GFD is difficult to achieve; this is especially true in developing countries where gluten-free food is often difficult to obtain. Steroids, when used alone, can be effective in inducing recovery in patients with celiac disease. We performed a randomized controlled trial to study the effect of a short course of prednisolone combined with a GFD on the recovery of celiac disease. Materials and methods This study was a single-center, randomised, open-label trial. This investigation was done in a pediatric gastroenterology unit of a tertiary teaching hospital in north India.Twenty-eight newly diagnosed celiac disease patients were enrolled in the study. Prednisolone was given at 1 mg/kg for four weeks; duodenal biopsies and IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTg) levels were assessed at eight weeks, six months, and 12 months from the start of the study. Outcome measures The primary outcome measures used to indicate clinical, histological, and immunological recovery of celiac disease were clinical improvement at eight weeks and the proportion of patients with improved histology by at least one grade and who were tissue transglutaminase (tTg) seronegative at eight weeks. The secondary measures were the proportion of patients showing normalization of histological features and the proportions of patients becoming seronegative at six months and one year of GFD. Results Patients were randomized into the GFD only (n = 14) or GFD with prednisolone (GFD+P) (n = 14) groups. No significant differences were detected in clinical recovery at eight weeks; none of the patients became seronegative at eight weeks, six months, or 12 months. The proportion of patients with improvement in histology by at least one grade was higher in the GFD+P group at eight weeks, and there

  9. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

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    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  10. First Identified Case in Literature: Association of Achalasia and Celiac Diseases

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    Ibrahim Bucak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has been shown to cause problems related to gastrointestinal system motility such as reduction of the esophageal sphincter pressure and prolongation of gastric emptying time. Achalasia disease is a motor disorder that is charac¬terized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and by incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Association of achalasia and celiac diseases has not been reported yet. Our patient with growth and developmental retardation had vomiting effects which lasted for 3 years. Celiac disease was diagnosed serologically and histopathologically in our patient; we determined achalasia disease with esophagoscopic examination, upper gastrointestinal system contrast study, and esophageal manometer. Esophageal balloon dilatation was applied. This case is presented because of the interesting association between celiac disease and achalasia disease.

  11. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

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    Natalia M. Bottasso Arias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs: intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs’ expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa.

  12. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

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    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  13. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

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    Scanlon SA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Samantha A Scanlon1, Joseph A Murray1,21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions.Keywords: immune-mediated enteropathy, gliadin, gluten, epidemiology, CD diagnosis, therapy

  14. Omitting duodenal biopsy in children with suspected celiac disease and extra-intestinal symptoms.

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    Bozzola, Mauro; Meazza, Cristina; Gertosio, Chiara; Pagani, Sara; Larizza, Daniela; Calcaterra, Valeria; Luinetti, Ombretta; Farello, Giovanni; Tinelli, Carmine; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2017-07-15

    The aim of our study is to evaluate if in children with highly positive serology and HLA-DQ2/DQ8 (triple test, TT) and only extra-intestinal symptoms, it is possible to omit performing an intestinal biopsy for celiac disease (CD) diagnosis, as suggested by the new European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition ESPGHAN guidelines. In this retrospective study a total of 105 patients, suspected of having CD because of extra-intestinal symptoms and showing serum tissue transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG) and anti-endomysial antibody (EMA) measurements and HLA genotyping, were considered for the final analysis (33 boys and 72 girls; age range 1.5-17.6 years). Histological findings confirmed diagnosis of CD in 97 (92.4%) patients. Forty-one patients (39%) showed anti-tTG >10 times normal values, positive EMA and positive HLA-DQ2/DQ8 (positive TT). All of them had a diagnosis of CD, therefore there were no false positive cases. Sixty-four patients were negative for the TT. In eight cases, CD was ruled out and these were considered true negative cases. In the remaining 56 negative TT patients, intestinal biopsy confirmed CD diagnosis and they were considered false negatives. Based on these results, specificity for the TT was 100% and sensitivity was 42.3%. On the basis of the present study, diagnosis of CD can be reliably performed without a duodenal biopsy in children with only extra-intestinal symptoms.

  15. Prevalence and clinical profile of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Rajesh Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM in follow-up in a Tertiary Care Referral Centre in Western India and to describe the clinical features indicative of CD in screened patients of TIDM. Study Design: In this single center observational cross-sectional study, 71 children who were diagnosed with TIDM were subjected to screening for CD with tissue transglutaminase antibody testing. Those who tested positive were offered intestinal biopsy for the confirmation of diagnosis. Clinical profiles of both groups of patients were compared and manifestations of CD were delineated. Results: The study revealed the prevalence of CD (based on serology in children with Type 1 diabetes as 15.49%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed CD was 7.04%. Of the diagnosed CD patients, one-third were symptomatic at the time of screening while the majority was asymptomatic. The major clinical features indicative of CD were intestinal symptoms, anemia, rickets, and short stature. Autoimmune thyroid disease was prevalent in 29.6% of the patients with TIDM followed by CD. Conclusions: The high prevalence of CD in children with Type 1 diabetes emphasizes the need for routine screening programs to be in place for these high-risk populations. The clinical profile of patients with CD further elaborates the indicators of CD and the need to screen for them.

  16. Prevalence of resistant occipital lobe epilepsy associated with celiac disease in children.

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    Dai, Alper I; Akcali, Aylin; Varan, Celal; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2014-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder caused by intolerance to ingested gluten. Increased frequency of CD has been reported in occipital lobe epilepsy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the frequency of CD among children followed up due to epilepsy and diagnosed with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe in at least one electroencephalography (EEG) test. For this research, 90 pediatric epilepsy patients with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe were enrolled in the study group, while the control group comprised of 100 healthy children. In addition to the EEG examination, tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody was determined on duodenal biopsy. None of the healthy children in the control group was positive in terms of the tTG antibody test used to scan CD. In the group with epileptic activity in the occipital lobe, two patients out of 90 were tTG antibody positive. The seroprevalence was 1/45 (2.22 %) in this group. These two patients were diagnosed with CD based on the endoscopic duodenal biopsy. In these patients, the seizures were uncontrollable through monotherapy. Our results showed that the prevalence of CD is observed to be higher than the normal population among the patients with occipital lobe epilepsy. This type of seizure disorder seems to be more resistant to monotherapy, compared with other types of occipital epilepsy. Therefore, screening for CD is recommended in children with resistant epileptic activity in the occipital lobe.

  17. Genetic disorder in carbohydrates metabolism: hereditary fructose intolerance associated with celiac disease.

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    Păcurar, Daniela; Leşanu, Gabriela; Dijmărescu, Irina; Ţincu, Iulia Florentina; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Orăşeanu, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been associated with several genetic and immune disorders, but association between CD and hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is extremely rare. HFI is an autosomal recessive disease caused by catalytic deficiency of aldolase B (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase). We report the case of a 5-year-old boy suffering from CD, admitted with an initial diagnosis of Reye's-like syndrome. He presented with episodic unconsciousness, seizures, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and abnormal liver function. The patient has been on an exclusion diet for three years, but he still had symptoms: stunting, hepatomegaly, high transaminases, but tissue transglutaminase antibodies were negative. Liver biopsy showed hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial damage. The dietary history showed an aversion to fruits, vegetables and sweet-tasting foods. The fructose tolerance test was positive, revealing the diagnostic of hereditary fructose intolerance. Appropriate dietary management and precautions were recommended. The patient has been symptom-free and exhibited normal growth and development until 10 years of age.

  18. Clinical Onset of Celiac Disease after an Episode of Campylobacter jejuni Enteritis

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    EF Verdu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a young woman with no previous gastrointestinal complaints who was initially diagnosed with postinfective irritable bowel syndrome (IBS after a confirmed case of Campylobacter jejuni enteritis. However, because of persistent diarrhea, new-onset bloating and the development of iron and vitamin deficiencies, serological markers for celiac disease (CD were evaluated. A positive tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A antibody test and repeat endoscopy with duodenal biopsy showing a Marsh IIIa lesion confirmed the diagnosis of CD. Infectious gastroenteritis is a well-established risk factor for the development of IBS, and there is recent evidence that it could play a role in the initiation and exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease. The present case suggests that the clinical expression of CD can be unmasked by an acute gastrointestinal infection and supports the hypothesis that environmental factors other than gliadin may play a role in the clinical onset of CD in a genetically susceptible host. The increasing availability of serological testing and upper endoscopy has led to increasingly frequent diagnoses of CD and recognition that it may mimic IBS. The present case findings suggest that CD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent IBS-like symptoms after an episode of infectious gastroenteritis.

  19. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  20. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

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    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  1. Treatment of celiac disease: from gluten-free diet to novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, R; Cristofori, F; Stella, M; Borrelli, G; Naspi, G; Castellaneta, S

    2014-10-01

    Gluten-free diet (GFD) is the cornerstone treatment for celiac disease (CD). This diet excludes the protein gluten a protein forum in in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. Gluten causes small intestines inflammation in patients with CD and eating a GFD helps these patients in controlling signs and symptoms and prevent complications. Following a GFD may be frustrating, however, it is important to know that plenty of foods are naturally gluten-free and nowadays is relatively easy to find substitutes for gluten-containing foods. Certain grains, such as oats, are generally safe but can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, it is generally recommended avoiding oats unless they are specifically labelled gluten-free. Other products that may contain gluten include food additives, such as malt flavouring, modified food starch and some supplement and/or vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent. Cross-contamination occurs when gluten-free foods come into contact with foods that contain gluten. It can happen during the manufacturing process or if the same equipment is used to make a variety of products. Cross-contamination can also occur at home if foods are prepared on common surfaces or with utensils that have not been cleaned after being used to prepare gluten-containing foods (using a toaster for gluten-free and regular bread). Although safe and effective, the GFD is not ideal: it is expensive, of limited nutritional value, and not readily available in many countries. Consequently, a need exists for novel, non-dietary therapies for celiac disease. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of CD have suggested several types of therapeutic strategies alternative to the GFD. Some of these strategies attempt to decrease the immunogenicity of gluten-containing grains by manipulating the grain itself or by using oral enzymes to break down immunogenic peptides that normally remain intact during

  2. Celiac Disease Presenting with Peripheral Neuropathy in Children: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacitto, Alessandra; Paglino, Alessandra; Di Genova, Lorenza; Leonardi, Alberto; Farinelli, Edoardo; Principi, Nicola; di Cara, Giuseppe; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-07-14

    Background: Clinically relevant neurological manifestations in children with celiac disease (CD) are unusual, especially when they are considered as signs of the onset of the disease. In this paper, a case of Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) as the first manifestation of CD in a 23-month-old child is reported. Case presentation: We describe a case of CD onset with peripheral neuropathy in a 23-month-old Bulgarian boy presenting with a sudden refusal to walk and absence of deep tendon reflexes in both lower limbs. Neurological symptoms were preceded by two months of gastrointestinal symptoms such as vomiting, abdominal distention, and clear signs of malnutrition and weight loss. When we evaluated the child six months after the onset of the symptoms, clinical and laboratory findings showed clear signs of peripheral neuropathy associated with malnutrition. Serum deamidated gliadin and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were therefore measured. The anti-gliadin levels were more than sixteen times higher than normal and the IgA anti-transglutaminase levels were four times higher than normal. Anti-endomysium antibodies were positive, and human leukocyte antigens (HLA) II typing confirmed a genetic predisposition to CD (DQ2 positive and DQ8 negative). Given the association between the clinical evidence of the disease and the results of the celiac screening tests, a diagnosis of CD was made without biopsy confirmation of the enteropathy. The child began a restricted gluten-free diet that led to complete recovery of the peripheral neuropathy, walking, reflexes, and overall improvement after three months on the diet. Conclusion: Our case underlines the rare but possible associations between CD and peripheral neuropathy in children as an onset symptom, even in the absence of gastrointestinal manifestations, thus suggesting that CD should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy in children. A good knowledge of the extra

  3. Risk of colorectal adenomas in patients with celiac disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J; Rausch, A; Zubiaurre, I

    2018-02-05

    Whether celiac disease increases the risk of presenting with colorectal adenoma or not, has not been extensively evaluated. This question becomes relevant when considering early screening methods in patients with the disease. The aim of our article was to determine the risk of colorectal adenomas in celiac disease patients. A computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases was carried out, encompassing the time frame of 1966 to December 2016. The search strategy consisted of the following MESH terms: 'celiac disease' OR 'celiac sprue' AND 'colorectal' OR 'colorectal neoplasia' OR 'colorectal adenoma'. A fixed-effect model was used for the analyses. The first analysis dealt with the prevalence of all presentations of colorectal adenoma in patients with celiac disease and the second was on the prevalence of advanced adenomas. The outcomes were described as odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence intervals. The search identified 480 bibliographic citations, 17 of which were chosen for evaluation. Fourteen of those studies were rejected, leaving a final total of three for the analysis. Those studies included 367 cases of celiac disease and 682 controls. No significant heterogeneity was observed (I 2 =26%). There was no increased prevalence of colorectal adenomas in the celiac disease patients, when compared with the controls (OR: 0.94 [0.65-1.38]), and no significant difference was observed when assessing the prevalence of advanced adenomas (OR: 0.97 [0.48-1.97]). Celiac disease was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas. However, due to the limited evidence available, more studies are necessary to determine whether there is an actual association. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

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    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.piffaretti@uninsubria.it; Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Circolo University Hospital (Italy); Castelli, Patrizio [University of Insubria School of Medicine, Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Circolo University Hospital (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  5. An Unusual Case of Stent Migration After Celiac Trunk Endovascular Revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, Silvia; Ferraro, Stefania; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Rivolta, Nicola; Bossi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent celiac trunk stenting to treat abdominal angina. Three months later, she was readmitted for recurrent symptoms. Computed tomography control revealed the migration of the stent into the splenic artery. No sign of vessel injury or end-organ ischemia was detected. Repeat stenting of the celiac trunk was performed; the postoperative course was uneventful. 12 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with the second stent in its correct position, and she was asymptomatic for mesenteric ischemia.

  6. Gastrointestinal symptoms in children with type 1 diabetes screened for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Priya; Porter, Lesley; Langton, Josephine; Rao, Veena; Davies, Paul; Cummins, Carole; Kirk, Jeremy; Barrett, Timothy; Protheroe, Susan

    2009-09-01

    The association between celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) is recognized. Most cases of CD in patients with DM are reported to be asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to (1) compare and audit our practice with the published standards for screening for CD in children with DM, (2) characterize the children with DM and biopsy-confirmed CD, in terms of growth and gastrointestinal symptoms, and compare them with children with DM and negative celiac serology, and (3) document the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) after 1 year of gastrointestinal symptoms, growth, and insulin requirement. We performed a retrospective case-note review of 22 children with DM, positive celiac serology +/- biopsy-confirmed CD, and 50 children with DM and negative celiac serology. Twenty-two children (3.9% of the total diabetic population) had positive celiac serology on screening, with 17 (3%) having biopsy-confirmed CD. Ninety-four percent of the children had standardized celiac serology testing. At diagnosis of CD, 13 of the 17 biopsy-positive children (76.4%) had > or =1 gastrointestinal symptom. The frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in negative celiac serology diabetic children was 6% (3 of 50) (P Symptoms resolved in all children after introduction of a GFD. A significant improvement in weight SD score (P = .008) and BMI SD score (P = .02) was noted in those compliant with a GFD after 1 year. Children with DM and CD have a higher frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms than their diabetic peers with negative celiac serology and are not truly asymptomatic. Institution of a GFD has a positive effect on nutritional status and symptom resolution in the short-term.

  7. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  8. CHRONIC DIARREHA: FREQUENCY OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDERNS AT TEATIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Ameer Ali Jamali, Bella Shaikh, Anwar Ali Jamali, Ghulam Mustafa Jamali, Iqrar Ali Kanhar, Bhojo Mal Tanwani

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease of chronic origin affecting children as well adults and characterized by an unusual response towards gluten present in diet particularly in subjects who are genetically vulnerable. This leads injury to small intestinal mucosa and may be capable of various systemic effects. Objective: To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children presenting in the course of chronic diarrhea by using serological markers. Study Design: This st...

  9. Reduced Bone Mineral Density in Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Sara; Brundin, Charlotte; Karlsson, Magnus; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether bone mass and metabolism are impaired in genetically at-risk children with screening-detected celiac disease. Included were 71 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 10.0 ± 0.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years and 142 matched controls and 30 children with screening-detected celiac disease diagnosed at 3.3 ± 0.4 years of age presently on a gluten-free diet for 6.9 ± 1.1 years and 60 matched controls. All participants were assessed for bone mineral density (BMD) of total body and spine by dual x-ray absorptiometry, serum 25(OH) vitamin D3, parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. At diagnosis, screening-detected celiac disease children as compared to controls had a mean -0.03 g/cm reduced BMD of both total body and spine (P = 0.009 and P = 0.005, respectively), a mean -11.4 nmol/L lower level of 25(OH) vitamin D3 (P celiac disease as compared to controls (P celiac disease have reduced BMD, lower levels of vitamin D3, higher levels of PTH, and signs of systemic inflammation compared with controls. These differences were not found in celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, indicating that children with screening-detected celiac disease benefit from an early diagnosis and treatment.

  10. ASSOCIATION OF POTENTIAL CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Honar, Naser; Yousefi, Ali; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy caused by dietary gluten. The combination of serologic, genetic and histologic data has led to description of other categories of this disease. There are a number of patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) that do not respond to iron treatment and may be repeated for many times, Therefore, we aimed to investigate celiac disease in this group. In this cross sectional transverse prospective study from August 2011 to February 2013, in a Pediatric care clinic affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 184 children including 92 IDA patients who responded to treatment using iron supplement, 45 non-responding iron deficient patients, and 47 healthy individuals, with the maximum age of 18 years, with written consent from their parents, participated in serologic screening (with Anti-TTG antibody and anti-Endomysial antibody) for celiac disease. Patients with at least one positive serology test underwent multiple mucosal biopsy from bulb and duodenum. Among 184 participants, 19 (10.3%) subjects had positive serologic test for celiac disease, including 13 (28.9%) patients in the group with refractory IDA, 5 (5.4%) patients in the group with treated IDA, and 1 patient in the healthy group. The frequency of positive serologic test in the group with IDA resistant to treatment was prominently higher than the other two groups (Pceliac test who underwent endoscopy and biopsy, no histologic evidence of celiac disease was seen. They were diagnosed as potential celiac disease. Frequency of potential celiac disease in patients with refractory IDA was higher than control the subjects. Therefore, we recommend serologic screening for early detection and minimizing the complications of celiac disease and repeated iron therapy for this group.

  11. Classification of videocapsule endoscopy image patterns: comparative analysis between patients with celiac disease and normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaccio Edward J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative disease markers were developed to assess videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients with villous atrophy, and from control patients. Method Capsule endoscopy videoclip images (576 × 576 pixels were acquired at 2/second frame rate (11 celiacs, 10 controls at regions: 1. bulb, 2. duodenum, 3. jejunum, 4. ileum and 5. distal ileum. Each of 200 images per videoclip (= 100s were subdivided into 10 × 10 pixel subimages for which mean grayscale brightness level and its standard deviation (texture were calculated. Pooled subimage values were grouped into low, intermediate, and high texture bands, and mean brightness, texture, and number of subimages in each band (nine features in all were used for quantifying regions 1-5, and to determine the three best features for threshold and incremental learning classification. Classifiers were developed using 6 celiac and 5 control patients' data as exemplars, and tested on 5 celiacs and 5 controls. Results Pooled from all regions, the threshold classifier had 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity and the incremental classifier had 88% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting celiac versus control videoclips in the test set. Trends of increasing texture from regions 1 to 5 occurred in the low and high texture bands in celiacs, and the number of subimages in the low texture band diminished (r2 > 0.5. No trends occurred in controls. Conclusions Celiac videocapsule images have textural properties that vary linearly along the small intestine. Quantitative markers can assist in screening for celiac disease and localize extent and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine.

  12. Radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy for adenocarcinomaof the body of the pancreas in a patient with portal annular pancreas, aberrant hepatic artery, and absence of the celiac trunk: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao; Wu, Pengfei; Chen, Jianmin; Lu, Zipeng; Chen, Lei; Wei, Jishu; Guo, Feng; Cai, Baobao; Yin, Jie; Xu, Dong; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare anatomic variation, where the uncinated process of the pancreas connects with the dorsal pancreas and the pancreas tissue encases the portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV) or splenic vein (SV). Malignancies are quite uncommon in the patients, who have an annular pancreas especially portal annular pancreas. Ectopic common hepatic artery and absence of the celiac trunk (CT) are the other infrequent abnormalities. A 74-year-old man suffered from upper abdominal and back pain. Contrast enhanced computed tomography indicated a low-density mass in the body of the pancreas. Pathological report showed adenocarcinoma of the body of pancreas after radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy (RAMPS). In the operation, we found the superior vein and portal vein was surrounded by the pancreatic tissue. The left gastric artery and splenic artery originated respectively from abdominal aorta, and celiac trunk was not viewed. In addition, the common hepatic artery was a branch from the superior mesenteric artery. In general, this is a novel clinical case of pancreatic carcinoma happening in the portal annular pancreas which was accompanied with aberrant hepatic artery and absence of the celiac trunk at the same time. Confronted with the pancreatic neoplasms, the possibility of coexistent annular pancreas and arterial variations should be considered.

  13. [Presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies and feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M G; Medina, M L; Martín, G T; Dikstein, B C; Picón, S O; Gorodner, J O; Merino, L A

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main etiologic agent of chronic gastritis and it is an important cause of gastric damage. The celiac disease can affect the morphology and the function of the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach to the colon and it is frequently associated with chronic gastritis. to assess the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies and in feces of pediatric patients with celiac disease and to relate it with the symptoms. Pediatric patients with celiac disease attending the Gastroenterology Service at the "Avelino Castelán" Hospital in Resistencia (Argentina) were included in the study. Gastric biopsies samples were obtained by endoscopy for histological studies, the symptoms and socio-epidemiological characteristics were recorded and the polimerase chain reaction(PCR) was applied in feces in order to detect the presence of H. pylori. Thirty one patients with celiac disease were studied (16 female and 15 male; age range:1-14 years; median 6.7 years); 14 (45.2%) were positive for H. pylori in gastric biopsy and among them, only 2 (14.2%) were positive for H. pylori in stool samples. There were not significant differences between symptoms between H. pylori positive and negative patients. 45.2% of the patients with celiac disease were infected by H. pylori. There was no correlation between the frequencies of bacterial detection in feces and in gastric biopsies. The clinical manifestations of celiac disease did not increase in children infected with H. pylori.

  14. Intraepithelial lymphocyte immunophenotype: a useful tool in the diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saborido, Rebeca; Martinón, Nazareth; Regueiro, Alexandra; Crujeiras, Vanesa; Eiras, Pablo; Leis, Rosaura

    2018-02-01

    According to new ESPGHAN guidelines, gluten challenge is considered necessary when there is doubt about the initial diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). The main aim of this study was to quantify intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) immunophenotype on celiac patients on gluten-containing diet (GCD) compared to those on gluten-free diet (GFD). Another aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of IELs in the CD diagnosis, especially in selected patients on GFD where diagnostic uncertainty remains. IEL immunophenotype (TCRγδ and NK-like IELs) were studied by flow cytometry in 111 children with CD (81 children with CD on GCD and 30 celiac patients on GFD) and a control group (10 children). Duration of GFD was 5.4 ± 1.6 years. TCRγδ IELs in celiac patients receiving a GCD or GFD were significantly higher (p celiac patients. Recognition of IELs changes in the intestinal mucosa on celiac patients after long-term establishment of a GFD could constitute a useful tool for CD diagnosis in various situations: in which there is doubt about the initial diagnosis and repeat biopsy is necessary (avoiding the need of gluten challenges), and in those patients with symptoms/signs suggestive of CD who maintain a low gluten diet.

  15. The present and the future in the diagnosis and management of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Natalia E.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac disease, adaptive and innate immune activation results in intestinal damage and a wide range of clinical manifestations. In the past, celiac disease was thought to result in signs and symptoms solely related to the gastrointestinal tract. Now, more than half of the adult population presents with extra-intestinal manifestations that can also be expected to improve on a gluten-free diet. For this reason, it is recommended that physicians have a low threshold of suspicion for celiac disease. Current knowledge of the immune pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Over the years, highly sensitive and specific serological assays, in addition to genetic markers, have been found to target specific steps in the cascade pathway of celiac disease. Also the advent of the gluten challenge has enabled experts to design diagnostic algorithms and monitor clinical responses in clinical trials. The gluten challenge has provided substantial benefit in the advance of novel therapeutics as an adjuvant treatment to the gluten free diet. Generally, a strict gluten-free diet is highly burdensome to patients and can be limited in its efficacy. Alternative therapies—including gluten modification, modulation of intestinal permeability and immune response—could be central to the future treatment of celiac disease. PMID:25326000

  16. Increased Mercury Levels in Patients with Celiac Disease following a Gluten-Free Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Elli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Although mercury is involved in several immunological diseases, nothing is known about its implication in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate blood and urinary levels of mercury in celiac patients. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 30 celiac patients (20 treated with normal duodenal mucosa and 10 untreated with duodenal atrophy and 20 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Blood and urinary mercury concentrations were measured by means of flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enrolled patients underwent dental chart for amalgam fillings and completed a food-frequency questionnaire to evaluate diet and fish intake. Results. Mercury blood/urinary levels were 2.4±2.3/1.0±1.4, 10.2±6.7/2.2±3.0 and 3.7±2.7/1.3±1.2 in untreated CD, treated CD, and healthy controls, respectively. Resulting mercury levels were significantly higher in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. No differences were found regarding fish intake and number of amalgam fillings. No demographic or clinical data were significantly associated with mercury levels in biologic samples. Conclusion. Data demonstrate a fourfold increase of mercury blood levels in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in celiac mechanism.

  17. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in children: Is there any Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Puri, Amarender Singh; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Singh, Jatinderpal; Kumar, Ajay; Saran, Ravindra K

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can influence the inflammatory and immune responses in the gut and may therefore play a role in the development of gluten-related enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals. Our objective was to assess the relationship between celiac disease and HP infection in children. Children (1-18 years) diagnosed as celiac disease (CD) (n = 324) with submission of gastric and duodenal biopsies and duodenal histology having Marsh grade III features were eligible for the study. Non-celiac patients referred for endoscopy were selected as controls. We studied proportion of HP prevalence in children with confirmed CD as compared with HP prevalence in reference group comprising non-celiac children referred for endoscopy. We also evaluated predictors of HP infection in children with celiac disease. Of the 324 participants with CD, gastric HP was seen in 37 (11.4%) patients. The prevalence of HP in patients without CD (50%, P Celiac disease and gastric HP infection have inverse relationship that raises the question whether development of HP infection confers protection against CD. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Celiac disease prevalence is not increased in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Juan; Spallone, Liliana; Gandara, Silvina; Chaar, Elsa; Berman, Saul; Zagalsky, David

    2017-01-01

    - Previous evidence trying to assess the risk of celiac disease among dyspeptic patients has been inconclusive, showing in some cases notorious discrepancies. - To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with dyspepsia compared to healthy controls without dyspepsia. - Adult patients under evaluation for dyspepsia were invited to participate. These patients were offered an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. On the other hand, asymptomatic adult volunteers who performed a preventive visit to their primary care physician were invited to participate and agreed to undertake an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies as well. Those patients with histologic signs of villous atrophy were furtherly evaluated and serological tests were performed in order to determine celiac disease diagnosis. Celiac disease prevalence was compared between groups. - Overall, 320 patients with dyspepsia and 320 healthy controls were recruited. There were no significant differences in terms of gender or age between groups. Celiac disease diagnosis was made in 1.25% (4/320) of patients in the dyspepsia group versus 0.62% (2/320) in the control group. - Patients with dyspepsia who underwent routine duodenal biopsies did not show an increased risk for celiac disease when compared to healthy individuals.

  20. Celiac disease prevalence is not increased in patients with functional dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Previous evidence trying to assess the risk of celiac disease among dyspeptic patients has been inconclusive, showing in some cases notorious discrepancies. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with dyspepsia compared to healthy controls without dyspepsia. METHODS Adult patients under evaluation for dyspepsia were invited to participate. These patients were offered an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. On the other hand, asymptomatic adult volunteers who performed a preventive visit to their primary care physician were invited to participate and agreed to undertake an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsies as well. Those patients with histologic signs of villous atrophy were furtherly evaluated and serological tests were performed in order to determine celiac disease diagnosis. Celiac disease prevalence was compared between groups. RESULTS Overall, 320 patients with dyspepsia and 320 healthy controls were recruited. There were no significant differences in terms of gender or age between groups. Celiac disease diagnosis was made in 1.25% (4/320 of patients in the dyspepsia group versus 0.62% (2/320 in the control group. CONCLUSION Patients with dyspepsia who underwent routine duodenal biopsies did not show an increased risk for celiac disease when compared to healthy individuals.