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Sample records for celiac disease-associated tissue

  1. Women and celiac disease: association with unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicano, R; Astegiano, M; Bruno, M; Fagoonee, S; Rizzetto, M

    2007-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to gluten characterized by destructions of the small intestinal villi and malabsorption. The gluten-free diet (GFD) results in healing of the mucosa, resolution of the malabsorpitive states, and reversal of great part of CD effects. Among the extradigestive complications associated with CD, unexplained infertility has been reported since the 70's. The prevalence of CD among women with unexplained infertility is 2.5-3.5%, higher, although not always significantly, than control population. To date, it is widely accepted that untreated CD represents a risk for abortion, low birth weight babies and short-breast feeding period. These features can be corrected by GFD. Some discrepancies could stem from the heterogeneity of the studies. Regarding a potential pathogenic mechanism, since CD causes malabsorption of folic acid and other nutrients, this pathway has been proposed to explain the unfavourable outcomes of pregnancy. However, this remains a speculation. In conclusion, each woman with unexplained infertility should be screened for CD. PMID:17592443

  2. Intestinal T-cell Responses in Celiac Disease – Impact of Celiac Disease Associated Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Veronika Sjöberg; Olof Sandström; Maria Hedberg; Sten Hammarström; Olle Hernell; Marie-Louise Hammarström

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD), an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequ...

  3. Mucosal tissue transglutaminase expression in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Not, Tarcisio; Sblattero, Daniele; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Chirdo, Fernando; Galletti, Anna; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) plays an important role in celiac disease pathogenesis and antibodies to tTG are a diagnostic marker of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of tTG in the duodenal mucosa in control tissues and in different histological stages of celiac disease by using a commercial and a novel set of anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies, to see whether this assessment can be useful for diagnostic purpose. The distribution of ...

  4. Intestinal T-cell responses in celiac disease - impact of celiac disease associated bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sjöberg

    Full Text Available A hallmark of active celiac disease (CD, an inflammatory small-bowel enteropathy caused by permanent intolerance to gluten, is cytokine production by intestinal T lymphocytes. Prerequisites for contracting CD are that the individual carries the MHC class II alleles HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 and is exposed to gluten in the diet. Dysbiosis in the resident microbiota has been suggested to be another risk factor for CD. In fact, rod shaped bacteria adhering to the small intestinal mucosa were frequently seen in patients with CD during the "Swedish CD epidemic" and bacterial candidates could later be isolated from patients born during the epidemic suggesting long-lasting changes in the gut microbiota. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A plays a role in both inflammation and anti-bacterial responses. In active CD IL-17A was produced by both CD8(+ T cells (Tc17 and CD4(+ T cells (Th17, with intraepithelial Tc17 cells being the dominant producers. Gluten peptides as well as CD associated bacteria induced IL-17A responses in ex vivo challenged biopsies from patients with inactive CD. The IL-17A response was suppressed in patients born during the epidemic when a mixture of CD associated bacteria was added to gluten, while the reverse was the case in patients born after the epidemic. Under these conditions Th17 cells were the dominant producers. Thus Tc17 and Th17 responses to gluten and bacteria seem to pave the way for the chronic disease with interferon-γ-production by intraepithelial Tc1 cells and lamina propria Th1 cells. The CD associated bacteria and the dysbiosis they might cause in the resident microbiota may be a risk factor for CD either by directly influencing the immune responses in the mucosa or by enhancing inflammatory responses to gluten.

  5. Celiac disease: Association with adult-onset Still′s disease: Apropos of a clinical case

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    Kumar Sachin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset Still′s disease (AOSD is a rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a triad of fever, polyarthritis and evanescent rash. We present a case report of a 28-year-old female who presented with complaints of fever, joint pains, rash, weakness for the past 4 years and diarrhea for the past 2 years. On investigation the patient was diagnosed to be a case of AOSD. Duodenal biopsy report was suggestive of celiac disease with a positive IgA tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody. The patient was started on weekly methotrexate and gluten-free diet, and her symptoms gradually improved. The patient remains in our follow-up and is doing well.

  6. Fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae Sepsis in a Patient With Celiac Disease-Associated Hyposplenism

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    Ouseph, Madhu M.; Simons, Malorie; Treaba, Diana O.; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with poorly controlled celiac disease (CD) and fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis, describe the morphologic findings, and stress the need for monitoring splenic function and pneumococcal vaccination in these patients. PMID:27761478

  7. Are xenogeneic anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies the holy grail for celiac patients?

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    Ivanovski, Petar Ilija; Ivanovski, Ivan P; Sedlarevic, Rade

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune mediated disorder, the only one with a well-established origin, resulting from a permanent gluten intolerance. Although a gluten-free diet is currently the "safe" and appropriate therapy for celiac disease, this is not always an easy and simple option as "harmful" gluten may contaminate food during the processing and preparation phases. There are also further social pressures, which might be more pressing for young celiac patients, in following a strict gluten-free diet. Therefore, a new therapeutic approaches are sought which would permit celiacs to "peacefully" coexist with gluten. Presently, the most promising looks search for genetically modified wheat lacking toxic gluten peptides and the use of oral endopeptidases in attempt to curb gluten toxicity. Recently discovered role of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in celiac pathogenesis has brought a prospect for a new hypothetical therapeutic approach, an oral immunization of celiacs with xenogeneic anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. PMID:17553630

  8. Biomarkers in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

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    Bonella, Francesco; Costabel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews major biomarkers in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) with respect to their diagnostic and prognostic value in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). In some CTD such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), the incidence of ILD is up to two-third of patients, and currently ILD represents the leading cause of death in SSc. Because of the extremely variable incidence and outcome of ILD in CTD, progress in the discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, patients' subtyping, response to treatment, or as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials is extremely important. In contrast to idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, autoantibodies play a crucial role as biomarkers in CTD-ILD because their presence is strictly linked to the pathogenesis and tissue damage. Patterns of autoantibodies, for instance, anticitrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARS) in polymyositis/dermatomyositis, have been found to correlate with the presence and occasionally with the course of ILD in CTD. Besides autoantibodies, an increase in serum or BALF of a biomarker of pulmonary origin may be able to predict or reflect the development of fibrosis, the impairment of lung function, and ideally also the prognosis. Promising biomarkers are lung epithelium-derived proteins such as KL-6 (Krebs von den Lungen-6), SP-D (surfactant protein-D), SP-A (surfactant protein-A), YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like protein 1 [CHI3L1] or cytokines such as CCL18 [chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 18]). In the future, genetic/epigenetic markers, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and micro-RNA, may help to identify subtypes of patients with different needs of management and treatment strategies. PMID:24668534

  9. Enfermedad celiaca asociada a síndrome antifosfolípido Celiac disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome

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    O. Jorge

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la enfermedad celiaca puede asociarse a patologías de etiología inmunológica. Presentamos su asociación con síndrome antifosfolípido. Caso 1: mujer, 26 años, diagnosticada de enfermedad celiaca. Seis meses después queda embarazada, presentando muerte fetal. Al año siguiente nuevo embarazo. Anticuerpos anticardiolipina IgG: 20 GPL U/ml (valor normal Introduction: celiac disease may be associated with pathologies of immune etiology. We present its association with antiphospholipid syndrome. Case 1: a 26-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Six months later she became pregnant, and experienced fetal death. The following year she became pregnant again. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 20 GPL U/ml (normal value < 11, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 9 MPL U/ml (n. v. < 10. Hematological tests were otherwise uneventful. Medicated with acetylsalicylic acid she had a normal pregnancy. Case 2: a 48-year-old female diagnosed with celiac disease presented with thrombosis in her left lower limb and renal infarction. Hematological tests showed no prothrombotic alterations (antiphospholipid antibodies were not measured. A year and a half later she had thrombosis in a finger of her hand. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies: 10 GPL (n. v. < 13, and IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 35 MPL (n. v. < 12. Case 3: a 38-year-old female was diagnosed with celiac disease. Some time later she experienced two spontaneous abortions and a transient ischemic cerebral attack. Nowadays, she is in her sixth month of pregnancy. IgM anticardiolipin antibodies: 75 MPL/ml (n. v. up to 20, and IgG anticardiolipin antibodies within normal values. Hematological tests revealed no other prothrombotic alterations. Discussion: antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, and spontaneous fetal death. Its association with celiac disease has been described in few cases. Celiac disease is associated with spontaneous fetal

  10. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with autoimmune hepatitis and thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomsic, M.; Ferlan-Marolt, V.; Kveder, T; Hojker, S; Rozman, B.

    1992-01-01

    The case is reported of a 27 year old woman who had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) associated with chronic active hepatitis and thyroiditis. Although hepatomegaly is sometimes observed in MCTD, only four cases of MCTD and chronic active hepatitis have been described. It is thought that this is the first report of an association between MCTD, chronic active hepatitis and thyroiditis.

  11. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with noted pulmonary CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT was performed in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Much more definitive pulmonary findings were obtained by CT than by the conventional chest x-ray examination and pulmonary function test. CT findings disclosed pulmonary lesions extremely similar to those in cases of progressive systemic sclerosis. Pulmonary CT was considered useful in examining pulmonary lesions for MCTD. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Markus; Rosen, Glenn D.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (...

  13. Celiac Disease

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    Hero Brokalaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA. The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12. The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.

  14. Correlation analysis of celiac sprue tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin IgG/IgA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric V Marietta; Shadi Rashtak; Joseph A Murray

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To indirectly determine if tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-specific T cells play a crucial role in the propagation of celiac disease.CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that the production of anti-tTG IgA is directly correlated to the production of anti-DGP IgG and IgA, whereas antitTG IgG is only weakly correlated. This result therefore supports the hapten-carrier theory that in wellestablished celiac patients anti-tTG IgA is produced by a set of B cells that are reacting against the complex of tTG-DGP in the absence of a tTG-specific T cell.

  15. Celiac disease

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    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  16. INCREASED TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE LEVELS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY IN ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY AMONG PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder in genetically predisposed individuals precipitated by gluten ingestion. Objective - In this study, we aimed to determine asymptomatic spike-and-wave findings on electroencephalography in children with celiac disease. Methods - A total of 175 children with the diagnosis of celiac disease (study group and 99 age- and sex-matched healthy children as controls (control group were included in the study. In order to determine the effects of gluten free diet on laboratory and electroencephalography findings, the celiac group is further subdivided into two as newly-diagnosed and formerly-diagnosed patients. Medical histories of all children and laboratory findings were all recorded and neurologic statuses were evaluated. All patients underwent a sleep and awake electroencephalography. Results - Among 175 celiac disease patients included in the study, 43 were newly diagnosed while 132 were formerly-diagnosed patients. In electroencephalography evaluation of patients the epileptiform activity was determined in 4 (9.3% of newly diagnosed and in 2 (1.5% of formerly diagnosed patients; on the other hand the epileptiform activity was present in only 1 (1.0% of control cases. There was a statistically significant difference between groups in regards to the presence of epileptiform activity in electroencephalography. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that epileptiform activity in both sleep and awake electroencephalography were positively correlated with tissue transglutaminase levels (P=0.014 and P=0.019, respectively. Conclusion - We have determined an increased epileptiform activity frequency among newly-diagnosed celiac disease patients compared with formerly-diagnosed celiac disease patients and control cases. Moreover the tissue transglutaminase levels were also correlated with the presence of epileptiform activity in electroencephalography. Among newly diagnosed celiac disease patients

  17. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

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    Robinson Nicola J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function.

  18. Biochemical Classification of Disease-associated Mutants of RAS-like Protein Expressed in Many Tissues (RIT1).

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    Fang, Zhenhao; Marshall, Christopher B; Yin, Jiani C; Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Smith, Matthew J; Nishikawa, Tadateru; Xu, Yang; Neel, Benjamin G; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-22

    RAS-like protein expressed in many tissues 1 (RIT1) is a disease-associated RAS subfamily small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase). Recent studies revealed that germ-line and somatic RIT1 mutations can cause Noonan syndrome (NS), and drive proliferation of lung adenocarcinomas, respectively, akin to RAS mutations in these diseases. However, the locations of these RIT1 mutations differ significantly from those found in RAS, and do not affect the three mutational "hot spots" of RAS. Moreover, few studies have characterized the GTPase cycle of RIT1 and its disease-associated mutants. Here we developed a real-time NMR-based GTPase assay for RIT1 and investigated the effect of disease-associated mutations on GTPase cycle. RIT1 exhibits an intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate similar to that of H-RAS, but its intrinsic nucleotide exchange rate is ∼4-fold faster, likely as a result of divergent residues near the nucleotide binding site. All of the disease-associated mutations investigated increased the GTP-loaded, activated state of RIT1 in vitro, but they could be classified into two groups with different intrinsic GTPase properties. The S35T, A57G, and Y89H mutants exhibited more rapid nucleotide exchange, whereas F82V and T83P impaired GTP hydrolysis. A RAS-binding domain pulldown assay indicated that RIT1 A57G and Y89H were highly activated in HEK293T cells, whereas T83P and F82V exhibited more modest activation. All five mutations are associated with NS, whereas two (A57G and F82V) have also been identified in urinary tract cancers and myeloid malignancies. Characterization of the effects on the GTPase cycle of RIT1 disease-associated mutations should enable better understanding of their role in disease processes. PMID:27226556

  19. Screening for celiac disease in Down's syndrome patients revealed cases of subtotal villous atrophy without typical for celiac disease HLA-DQ and tissue transglutaminase antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oivi Uibo; Kaupo Teesalu; Kaja Metsküla; Tiia Reimand; Riste Saat; Tarvo Sillat; Koit Reimand; Tiina Talvik; Raivo Uibo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as well as CD marker antibodies and susceptibility HLA-DQ haplotypes in 134 karyotyped Down's syndrome (DS) patients.METHODS: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and G (IgG)type anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), IgA type anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies (anti-tTG) with antigen of guinea pig and human source were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and endomysium antibodies (EMA) by indirect immunofluoresence test.HLA-DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 (DQ2) was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. Celiac disease was diagnosed by revised ESPGHAN criteria.RESULTS: 41% of DS patients had AGA, 6.0% IgAanti-tTG with guinea pig antigen, and 3.0 % IgA EMA (all positive for anti-tTG with human tTG). Subtotal villous atrophy was found in 5 out of 9 DS patients who had agreed to small bowel biopsy. One of them had DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and anti-tTG and EMA i.e. typical for CD markers (this case also fulfilled the ESPGHAN diagnostic criteria), but other four lacked these markers. Three non-biopsied DS patients had also most probably CD because DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and IgA anti-tTG (EMA) were detected. Thus, the prevalence of CD among our DS patients population is 3.0 % (95 %of confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-5.9 %).CONCLUSION: We confirm the increased frequency of CD among DS patients. In addition, we have revealed a subgroup of patients with subtotal villous atrophy but without characteristic for CD immunological and genetic markers. Whether these cases represent CD (with atypical immunopathogenesis) or some other immune enteropathy, requires further investigations.

  20. Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, E; Assiri, A; Guandalini, S

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease, with a prevalence around 1% of the general population, is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance in the world. Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, this enteropathy may appear at any age, and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms. Among them, gastrointestinal presentations include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss or failure to thrive in children; but extra-intestinal manifestations are also common, and actually appear to be on the rise. They include a large variety of ailments, such as dermatitis Herpetiformis, anemia, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminases, and even female infertility. For the clinician interested in oral diseases, celiac disease can lead to delayed tooth eruption, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae. Diagnosing celiac disease requires therefore a high degree of suspicion followed by a very sensitive screening test: serum levels of the autoantibody anti-tissue transglutaminase. A positive subject will then be confirmed by an intestinal biopsy, and will then be put on a strict gluten-free diet, that in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. Newer forms of treatment which in the future will probably be available to the non-responsive patients are currently being actively pursued. PMID:23496382

  1. Screening for Celiac Disease Using Anti Tissue Transglutaminase in Patients with Esophageal SCC between 2004 and 2009

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    Hasan Vosoughinia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Esophageal Squamous-Cell Carcinoma (SCC is one of the most common malignancies in Iran. To reduce the incidence of esophageal SCC, it is important to recognize the controllable risk factors and prevent them. Celiac disease is widely known as a possible risk factor for esophageal SCC.  Thus, we decided to assess the frequency of celiac disease in esophageal SCC patients in North east of Iran in order to suggest correlation between two diseases. Materials and Methods: In a Cross-sectional study one hundred and forty-three cases of esophageal SCC were examined for anti tissue transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG between the years 2004 and 2009 in Ghaem and Omid Hospitals of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was the test of choice in this study since it provides the sensitivity and specificity needed for the diagnosis and screening of celiac disease. The results of this test were compared with those of the control group which were compatible in terms of sex and age. Data were analyzed through SPSS software and statistical analysis such as x2, exact x2 and T-test. Results: 19.6% patients (SCC had positive anti-tTG (>20 which was significantly different to 7.9% in control group (p -value=0.005. Comparing age groups of patients for positive anti_tTG using exact x square test showed significant difference in patients with Conclusion: There seems to be a correlation between positive anti_tTG and esophageal SCC; that is to say, celiac disease might play a role in the earlier manifestations of esophageal SCC.

  2. Dilated cardiomiopathy associated with celiac disease: Case report and literature review

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    Milisavljević Nemanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestinal mucosa induced by gluten consumption in genetically susceptible individuals, leading to a spectrum of gastrointestinal presentation. A number of autoimmune and other disorders are highly associated with celiac disease. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease has been rarely reported in the literature. Case Outline. We present a case of a 27-year-old male with one month history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue, dyspeptic symptoms, peripheral edema, and cardiac palpitations. After positive serological screening with immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody test, the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with histopathology examination of duodenal biopsy specimen. Echocardiographic findings were consistent with acute myocarditis. After common causes of myocarditis had been excluded, probable celiac disease-associated autoimmune myocarditis was diagnosed. The patient was recommended to undergo a strict life-long gluten-free diet. IgA anti-transglutaminase antibodies, and anti-gliadin antibodies, were both significantly elevated during the 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up. Low compliance to gluten-free diet in our patient led to progressive worsening of the left ventricular ejective fraction and other serious cardiac complications which warranted invasive cardiac interventions. Conclusion. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is a serious condition which requires multidisciplinary approach involving gastroenterologist and cardiologist. Compliance with gluten-free diet is mandatory if patients are to avoid progression of cardiomyopathy. Screening of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for celiac disease is advisable.

  3. Serum B cell–activating factor (BAFF) level in connective tissue disease associated interstitial lung disease

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    Hamada, Tsutomu; Samukawa, Takuya; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Tsukuya, Go; Yamamoto, Masuki; Machida, Kentaro; Watanabe, Masaki; Mizuno, Keiko; Higashimoto, Ikkou; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are common in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Although the diagnosis of an underlying CTD in ILD (CTD-ILD) affects both prognosis and treatment, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish CTD-ILD from chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia (CFIP). B cell–activating factor belonging to the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF) plays a crucial role in B cell development, survival, and antibody production. Methods We examined serum lev...

  4. Nutrition and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Celiac disease affects about 1% of the European and North American population. The classical clinical presentation is with symptoms of malabsorption. Serologic studies demonstrate that most celiac patients present with oligosymptomatic (silent), latent, potential, and extraintestinal forms. The disease is defined as an immune-mediated systemic disorder of genetically disposed individuals (HLA-DQ2/8) induced by the alcohol-soluble fractions of cereals and characterized by gluten-dependent symptoms, celiac-specific antibodies (against tissue transglutaminase 2), and a Marsh 2-3 enteropathy. In the last 60 years, a strict and lifelong gluten-free diet has been demonstrated to be effective and safe, preventing most potential complications of the disease, including autoimmune disease, osteoporosis, infertility, prematurity, and malignancy. Among patients with celiac disease, the toxicity of oats seems to be less than wheat, barley, and rye. The introduction of oats into the diet of patients with celiac disease should increase taste, fiber content, diversity, compliance with the diet, and quality of life. The clinical studies provide limited results in favor of a general harmlessness of oats for celiac disease patients. Patients with celiac disease who consume oats (20-25 g/d for children, 50-70 g/d for adults) need proper follow-up. PMID:21939908

  5. Diagnosis of celiac sprue.

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    Farrell, R J; Kelly, C P

    2001-12-01

    Celiac sprue is a common lifelong disorder affecting 0.3-1% of the Western world and causing considerable ill health and increased mortality, particularly from lymphoma and other malignancies. Although high prevalence rates have been reported in Western Europe, celiac sprue remains a rare diagnosis in North America. Whether celiac sprue is truly rare among North Americans or is simply underdiagnosed is unclear, although serological screening of healthy American blood donors suggests that a large number of American celiacs go undiagnosed. Celiac sprue is an elusive diagnosis, and often its only clue is the presence of iron or folate deficiency anemia or extraintestinal manifestations, such as osteoporosis, infertility, and neurological disturbances. The challenge for gastroenterologists and other physicians is to identify the large population of undiagnosed patients that probably exists in the community and offer them treatment with a gluten-free diet that will restore the great majority to full health and prevent the development of complications. The advent of highly sensitive and specific antiendomysium and tissue transglutaminase serological tests has modified our current approach to diagnosis and made fecal fat and D-xylose absorption testing obsolete. A single small bowel biopsy that demonstrates histological findings compatible with celiac sprue followed by a favorable clinical and serological response to gluten-free diet is now considered sufficient to definitely confirm the diagnosis. We review the wide spectrum of celiac sprue, its variable clinical manifestations, and the current approach to diagnosis. PMID:11774931

  6. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease: changes in lung function.

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    Kinder, Brent W; Shariat, Cyrus; Collard, Harold R; Koth, Laura L; Wolters, Paul J; Golden, Jeffrey A; Panos, Ralph J; King, Talmadge E

    2010-04-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a distinct clinical entity that may be accompanied by interstitial lung disease (ILD). The natural history of UCTD-ILD is unknown. We hypothesized that patients with UCTD-ILD would be more likely to have improvement in lung function than those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) during longitudinal follow-up. We identified subjects enrolled in the UCSF ILD cohort study with a diagnosis of IPF or UCTD. The primary outcome compared the presence or absence of a > or = 5% increase in percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) in IPF and UCTD. Regression models were used to account for potential confounding variables. Ninety subjects were identified; 59 subjects (30 IPF, 29 UCTD) had longitudinal pulmonary function data for inclusion in the analysis. After accounting for baseline pulmonary function tests, treatment, and duration between studies, UCTD was associated with substantial improvement in FVC (odds ratio = 8.23, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-53.2; p = 0.03) during follow-up (median, 8 months) compared with IPF. Patients with UCTD-ILD are more likely to have improved pulmonary function during follow-up than those with IPF. These findings demonstrate the clinical importance of identifying UCTD in patients presenting with an "idiopathic" interstitial pneumonia.

  7. Tissue transglutaminase levels above 100 U/mL and celiac disease: A prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amani Mubarak; Victorien M Wolters; Frits HJ Gmelig-Meyling; Fiebo JW ten Kate; Roderick HJ Houwen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether a tissue-transglutaminase antibody (tTGA) level ≥ 100 U/mL is sufficient for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD).METHODS:Children suspected of having CD were prospectively included in our study between March 2009 and September 2011.All patients with immune globulin A deficiency and all patients on a gluten-free diet were excluded from the study.Anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA) were detected by means of immunofluorescence using sections of distal monkey esophagus (EUROIMMUN,Luebeck,Germany).Serum anti-tTGA were measured by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (ELiA Celikey IgA kit Phadia AB,Uppsala,Sweden).The histological slides were graded by a single experienced pathologist using the Marsh classification as modified by Oberhuber.Marsh Ⅱ and Ⅲ lesions were considered to be diagnostic for the disease.The positive predictive values (PPVs),negative predictive values (NPVs),sensitivity and specificity of EMA and tTGA along with their 95% CI (for the cut off values > 10 and ≥ 100 U/mL) were calculated using histology as the gold standard for CD.RESULTS:A total of 183 children were included in the study.A total of 70 (38.3%) were male,while 113 (61.7%) were female.The age range was between 1.0 and 17.6 years,and the mean age was 6.2 years.One hundred twenty (65.6%) patients had a small intestinal biopsy diagnostic for the disease; 3 patients had a Marsh Ⅱ lesion,and 117 patients had a Marsh Ⅲ lesion.Of the patients without CD,only 4 patients had a Marsh Ⅰ lesion.Of the 183 patients,136 patients were positive for EMA,of whom 20 did not have CD,yielding a PPV for EMA of 85% (95% CI:78%-90%) and a corresponding specificity of 68% (95% CI:55%-79%).The NPV and specificity for EMA were 91% (95% CI:79%-97%) and 97% (95% CI:91%-99%),respectively.Increased levels of tTGA were found in 130 patients,although only 116 patients truly had

  8. Anti-Endomysial and Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Serological Test Compared with Small Bowel Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman, M. (MSc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Celiac is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by an immune-system-related damage in the intestinal tissue after consumption of gluten. There is not any general agreement for gold standard. The Purpose of this study was the evaluation of specificity and sensitivity of anti-endomysial (EMA and anti-tissue transglutaminase (TTG serological test compared to small-bowel biopsy. Material and Methods: In the cross sectional study, we took blood specimen from 1825 patients with gastrointestinal disease. All the samples were tested by TTG and EMA kits using ELISA. The patients were studied in two groups. First, the individuals whom their serologic test was positive but their tissue condition was normal and second, those with positive serologic test with pathologic tissue results that show they have celiac disorder. Results: The mean of EMA and TTG shows that the level of antibodies in group 2 is significantly higher than that of the first group (P ≤0.001. There is positive correlation between modified marsh criteria of small-bowel biopsy and the two tests. The Sensitivity of EMA and TTG tests for celiac diagnosis is 92%. The specificity of EMA, TTG tests are 100% and 98.5%, respectively. Conclusion: EMA-IgA serology with cut-off point of more than 66 together with TTG-IgA serology with cut-off point of above 30 can be helpful to distinguish a wide range of patients who need small-bowel biopsy. Keywords: Celiac; Anti-tissue Transglutaminase (TTG; Anti-endomysial (EMAKeywords: Celiac; Anti-tissue Transglutaminase (TTG; Anti-endomysial (EMA,

  9. Binding of peptides from the N-terminal region of alpha-gliadin to the celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 molecule assessed in biochemical and T cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Gjertsen, H A; Vartdal, F;

    1996-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is most probably an immunological disease, precipitated in susceptible individuals by ingestion of wheat gliadin and related proteins from other cereals. The disease shows a strong HLA association predominantly to the cis- or trans-encoded HLA-DQ(alpha1*0501, beta1*02) (i.e., DQ...

  10. Different binding motifs of the celiac disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 revealed by relative quantitative proteomics of endogenous peptide repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergseng, Elin; Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by intolerance to cereal gluten proteins, and HLA-DQ molecules are involved in the disease pathogenesis by presentation of gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. The α- or β-chain sharing HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 display different risks for the disease...... established binding motifs. The binding motif of DQ2.2 was strikingly different from that of DQ2.5 with position P3 being a major anchor having a preference for threonine and serine. This is notable as three recently identified epitopes of gluten recognized by T cells of DQ2.2 celiac patients harbor serine...... at position P3. This study demonstrates that relative quantitative comparison of endogenous peptides sampled from our protein metabolism by HLA molecules provides clues to understand HLA association with disease....

  11. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  12. Doença celíaca associada à tireoidite de Hashimoto e síndrome de Noonan Celiac disease associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ortega Perez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso clínico de uma criança portadora de doença celíaca, tireoidite de Hashimoto e síndrome de Noonan. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: Menina de dez anos e seis meses, branca, apresentando história de diarreia líquida há cinco meses e "aumento da barriga". Ao exame, mostrava peso de 20.580g (pOBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical case of a child with celiac disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Noonan syndrome. CASE DESCRIPTION: A Caucasian girl aged ten years and six months had liquid diarrhea for five months, and a "distended belly". At the physical exam: weight of 20,580g (p<3, length of 114cm (p<3, hydrated, anemic 2+/4+ and conscious. The patient presented triangular facies, apparent ocular hypertelorism, antimongoloid position of the palpebral fissures, ears with low implantation, micrognathia, short neck and pectus excavatum. The abdomen was globular, flaccid and painless; the liver was 2cm below the right costal margin. Lymphedema in right upper limb and lower limb edema was also noted. Laboratory exams showed microcytic and hypochromic anemia, deficit of total proteins, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and a 5-year delay in bone age. Abdominal ultrasonography showed the bowel slightly dilated. Due to lymphedema and chronic diarrhea, the initial hypothesis was intestinal lymphangiectasis, which was confirmed by a jejunal biopsy, which also showed celiac disease. The genetic evaluation revealed a 46XX karyotype and a clinical diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. COMMENTS: Different autoimmune diseases can be associated. In this case, the celiac disease and the Hashimoto's thyroiditis are possibly related to the presence of HLA system antigens. However, the association of the celiac disease with the Noonan syndrome is very rare, and this is the third report in the literature.

  13. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease › Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease It is estimated that up to 20% of ... continuing to ingest gluten. Causes of Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease Continuing Gluten Ingestion The most common reason for ...

  14. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with hepatitis B virus infection in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Luciana Nau

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that involves gluten intolerance and can be triggered by environmental factors including hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of celiac disease in individuals with HBV infection and to describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of celiac disease associated with HBV. Methods This cross-sectional study included 50 hepatitis B patients tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibodies (EMAs and tissue anti-transglutaminase (TTG between August 2011 and September 2012. Results Fifty patients were included with a mean age of 46.0 ± 12.6 (46.0 years; 46% were female and 13% were HBeAg+. Six patients had positive serology for celiac disease, four were EMA+, and five were TTG+. When individuals with positive serology for celiac disease were compared to those with negative serology, they demonstrated a higher prevalence of abdominal pain (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.008, lower median creatinine (0.7mg/dL vs. 0.9mg/dL, p = 0.007 and lower mean albumin (3.6 ± 0.4g/L vs. 3.9 ± 0.3g/L, p = 0.022. All individuals with positive serology for celiac disease underwent upper digestive endoscopy, and three of the patients exhibited a macroscopic pattern suggestive of celiac disease. Histologically, five patients demonstrated an intra-epithelial lymphocytic infiltrate level > 30%, and four patients showed villous atrophy associated with crypt hyperplasia on duodenal biopsy. Conclusions An increased prevalence of celiac disease was observed among hepatitis B patients. These patients were symptomatic and had significant laboratory abnormalities. These results indicate that active screening for celiac disease among HBV-infected adults is warranted.

  15. Celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder,induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief,this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-Ⅱ antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2(tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis,several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin,various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders.Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals,although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  16. Anesthesia experience along with familial Mediterranean fever and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sargın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Anesthetic management in patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac Disease Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease which often seen at Mediterranean origin society and it goes by deterioration at inflammation control. Celiac disease is a proximal small intestine disease which develops gluten intolerance by autoimmune mechanism in sensitive people. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease is a rare situation. In this article we present our anesthesia experience on a bilateral septic arthritis case who also have Familial Mediterranean Fever and Celiac disease association.

  17. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, and ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming gluten ...

  18. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  19. Coexistence of two forms of disease-associated prion protein in extracerebral tissues of cattle infected with H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in aged cattle. H-BSE is characterized by the presence of two proteinase K-resistant forms of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)), identified as PrP(Sc) #1 and PrP(Sc) #2, in the brain. To investigate the coexistence of different PrP(Sc) forms in the extracerebral tissues of cattle experimentally infected with H-BSE, immunohistochemical and molecular analyses were performed by using N-terminal-, core-region- and C-terminal-specific anti-prion protein antibodies. Our results demonstrated that two distinct forms of PrP(Sc) coexisted in the various extracerebral tissues. PMID:27010466

  20. Celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Caspary, Wolfgang F

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for cli...

  1. Celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Holtmeier Wolfgang; Caspary Wolfgang F

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalenc...

  2. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  3. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...

  4. Pericardial effusion in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affected 1% of all population in United State. Classic manifestations of disease consist of early childhood diarrhea, malabsorption, steatorrhea and growth retardation but disease can affects adult at any age. In adult anemia is a more frequent finding. This patient was a 40-year-old lady with progressive fatigue and lower extremities pitting edema. Iron deficiency anemia and celiac disease were diagnosed on the basis of low serum ferritin, elevated serum level of IgA endomysial and tissue transglutaminase anti-bodies and histologic findings in small bowel biopsies. Pericardial effusion in her evaluation was detected incidentally. Asymptomatic pericardial effusion in this patient was only detectable with imaging. After starting of gluten free diet and iron supplement fatigue, peripheral edema and pericardial effusion on echocardiography decreased. It should be noted that asymptomatic pericardial effusion may be seen in adults with celiac disease.

  5. [Adult Celiac Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, Natalie; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy in genetically predisposed individuals, triggered by gluten ingestion. Clinical manifestations include intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms. Affected individuals may also be completely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, an early diagnosis is essential in order to prevent long-term complications. Diagnostic approach involves serologic testing for tissue transglutaminase antibodies followed by duodenal biopsy in case of seropositivity. Until now, the only available treatment consists of a strict glute-free diet. Newer therapeutic strategies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:27381303

  6. Exo-celiac liver in Glyptosternum maculatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A unique structure in the fish of Glyptosternum maculatum (Regan) (Siluriformes: Sisoridae) is reported. It was identified as a part of the liver named "exo-celiac liver". This new organ is located between skin and muscle and connected with the celiac liver by a funiform tissue, "joint belt". It has similar histological features and isozyme electrophoretogramic bands of lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, malate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase as in the celiac liver. This unique organ has biological research value and could serve as an important tool for studying organogenesis and evolution.

  7. Celiac disease diagnosed after uncomplicated pregnancy in a patient with history of bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Milisavljević Nemanja; Cvetković Mirjana; Nikolić Goran; Filipović Branka; Milinić Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The association between celiac disease and eating disorders has been very rarely reported. This is the first report on celiac disease associated with bulimia in this part of Europe. Case report. An adult female patient with history of bulimia and one uncomplicated pregnancy was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, due to long lasting dyspeptic symptoms, constipation, major weight loss and fatigue. After positive serological screening, the diagnosis of celiac diseas...

  8. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins, w......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  9. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and EEG pattern in celiac patients on prolonged gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Authors investigate the relationship between serum anti-tTG antibodies and EEG pattern in 12 celiac patients of various age on gluten-free diet for 1-10 years. In a group of 6 patients with good compliance with the diet, anti-tTG antibodies were normal in all and EEG in 5; in another group of 6 patients with poor compliance with the diet, serum anti-tTG antibodies were raised in all; EEG abnormalities of various gravity were reported in 5 patients. The concomitance of raised anti-tTG antibodies and EEG abnormalities is stressed, as possible expression of an immune-inflammatory reaction persistent in Central Nervous System.

  10. What Is Celiac Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needs. Over time, celiac disease can cause anemia, infertility, weak and brittle bones, an itchy skin rash, and other health problems. Fast Facts Celiac disease is an immune disorder in which people can't eat gluten or use items with gluten in them. Celiac ...

  11. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  12. Prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of Iranian patients with celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Chomeili

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease, one of the best-known autoimmune human leukocyte antigen-dependent disorders, has a relatively increased prevalence in first-degree relatives. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease. METHODS: Siblings of confirmed celiac disease patients in our center were identified and enrolled in this study. Their serum immunoglobulin A and tissue transglutaminase antibody-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G were measured and multiple endoscopic duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained with parental consensus. Celiac disease was confirmed by observation of characteristic histological changes. RESULTS: A total of 49 children (male, 29; female, 20; age, 2-16 years with confirmed celiac disease in a pediatric gastroenterology ward were studied from 1999 to 2006. We found 30 siblings (female, 16 all shared in both parents. The only measurement available was for immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase antibody. A duodenal biopsy was performed in all 30 siblings. Clinical findings such as abdominal pain, fatigue, growth retardation and diarrhea were found in 53.3% of the completely studied siblings, and positive serology without histological changes was identified in four cases. Both serology and biopsy (confirmed new cases were positive in 2 of the 30 siblings. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of celiac disease among siblings of patients with confirmed celiac disease necessitates serologic screening (and confirmatory biopsy if indicated in families having celiac disease. It is advantageous to diagnose the disease as soon as possible because early diagnosis and diet intervention may prevent serious complications such as growth retardation, short stature, chronic diarrhea, and malignancy.

  13. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  14. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  15. Wilson's Disease Association International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treated before serious illness from copper poisoning develops. Wilson disease affects approximately one in 30,000 people worldwide. The genetic defect causes excessive copper accumulation in the liver or brain. Read More Membership Wilson Disease Association Membership As a member, you have ...

  16. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  17. The Production of the Oral Mucosa of Antiendomysial and Anti—Tissue-Transglutaminase Antibodies in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Compilato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a lifelong, T cell—mediated enteropathy, triggered by the ingestion of gluten and related prolamins in genetically susceptible subjects, resulting in minor intestinal mucosal injury, including villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and subsequent nutrient malabsorption. Although serological tests for antiendomysial (EMA and anti—tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG autoantibodies are used to screen and follow up on patients with CD, diagnostic confirmation is still based on the histological examination of the small intestinal mucosa. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut involved in CD, other mucosal surfaces (such as gastric, rectal, ileal, and esophageal belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT can also be involved. A site that could be studied less invasively is the mouth, as it is the first part of the gastrointestinal system and a part of the GALT. Indeed, not only have various oral ailments been reported as possible atypical aspects of CD, but it has been also demonstrated that inflammatory changes occur after oral supramucosal application and a submucosal injection of gliadin into the oral mucosa of CD patients. However, to date, only two studies have assessed the capacity of the oral mucosa of untreated CD patients to EMA and anti-tTG antibodies. In this paper, we will review studies that evaluate the capacity of the oral mucosa to produce specific CD autoantibodies. Discrepancies in sensitivity from the two studies have revealed that biopsy is still not an adequate procedure for the routine diagnostic purposes of CD patients, and a more in-depth evaluation on a larger sample size with standardized collection and analysis methods is merited. However, the demonstration of immunological reactivity to the gluten ingestion of the oral mucosa of CD, in terms of IgA EMA and anti-tTG production, needs to be further

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx in a patient with history of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Akhavan; A Seifadini

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-related malabsorption in small intestine occurring in genetically susceptible patients. In this disease the risk of many malignancies is increased the most important of which being non-Hodgkin lymphoma of small intestine. Other malignancies include adenocarcinoma of small intestine and squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and melanoma. As to our knowledge so far only one case of celiac disease associated with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has been reported. In this article we presented a patient suffering from celiac disease with squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx. She underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy, unfortunately however she died because of progress of disease. So, in patients with celiac disease we should pay attention to various malignancies and when cases of cancers are accompanied by malabsorption we must think of celiac disease involvement.

  19. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  20. Celiac disease - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojković Gradimir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Celiac disease (nontropical sprue, gluten-sensitive enteropathy, chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder is caused by gluten intolerance. This hereditary disorder is caused by sensitivity to gliadin. Because the body's own immune system causes the damage, celiac disease is considered to be an autoimmune disorder. However, it is also classified as a disease of malabsorption because nutrients are not absorbed. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Specifically, tiny finger-like protrusions, called villi, on the lining of the small intestine are lost. The diagnosis is suspected on the basis of symptoms and signs, enhanced by laboratory and x-ray studies, and confirmed by biopsy revealing flat mucosa and subsequent clinical and histologic improvement on a gluten-free diet. Gluten must be excluded from diet. Supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics may be given depending on deficiency. Case report This is a case report of a 23-year old female patient with a mineralization defect (osteomalacia and secondary osteoporosis caused by long-time unrecognized celiac disease. The patient had many symptoms: short stature, steatorrhea, anemia, weight loss and chronic bone pain. Laboratory and x-ray studies and jejunal biopsy revealed a chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder caused by gluten intolerance. Gluten-free diet and supplementary vitamins, minerals and hematinics were included with apparent clinical remission. Discussion and Conclusion Some people with celiac disease may not have symptoms. The undamaged part of their small intestine is able to absorb enough nutrients to prevent symptoms. However, people without symptoms are still at risk for complications of celiac disease. Biopsy of the small intestine is the best way to diagnose celiac disease. Decreased bone density (osteoporosis and osteomalacia is a serious problem for celiacs. If calcium

  1. 关注结缔组织病相关问质性肺疾病%Focus on connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙耕耘

    2012-01-01

    @@ 结缔组织病(connective tissues disease,CTD)是风湿性疾病中的一大类,常累及全身多个系统,表现为慢性炎症性自身免疫病,当侵犯呼吸系统时,可出现间质性肺疾病(interstitial lung disease,ILD)、胸膜炎和肺动脉高压等,见表l.CTD与ILD同时存在时,常称为结缔组织病相关间质性肺疾病(connective tissues disease-interstitial lung disease,CTD-ILD).

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IDIOPATHIC EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveEpilepsy occurs with a yearly incidence of 40 per 100,000 children, of which more than 25% are resistant to drug therapy. Epilepsy may occur in autoimmunediseases like lupus, celiac disease and myasthenia gravis. In this study, therelationship between celiac disease and refractory epilepsy was evaluated inchildren with idiopathic epilepsy.Material & MethodsHundred-fifty-five children (mean age, 6.7±3.3 years with idiopathic andcryptogenic epilepsy referred to the neurology clinic were studied in two groups;drug controlled epilepsy (control, 82 patients and refractory epilepsy groups(case, 73 patients. Both groups underwent serological tissue transglutaminaseantibody measurement by ELISA. In seropositive cases, small intestine biopsywas conducted. Data analysis was performed using student's t test and 2 test.ResultsSeven (0.04% patients had celiac disease based on a positive tissuetransglutaminase antibody and three patients (0.01% based on a positive biopsy.Three patients (2.4% with drug controlled epilepsy (control group and fivewith refractory epilepsy (case group had seropositive celiac disease (p=0.255.In the biopsy survey of six seropositive patients, one patient (1.2% in the drugcontrolled epilepsy and two patients (2.7% in the refractory epilepsy group hadpositive biopsy for celiac disease (p = 0.604. One seropositive patient did notcooperate for biopsy.ConclusionIf the relationship between celiac disease and epilepsy, especially in casesof symptomatic or oligosymptomatic celiac is proved, using gluten freediet increases the ability to control epilepsy particularly in refractory cases.We suggest celiac disease survey is not required in patients with idiopathicepilepsy.Keywords: Epilepsy, Celiac disease, Children.

  3. Celiac Disease: Diagnostic Standards and Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh H. Kaswala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD affects at least 1% of the population and evidence suggests that prevalence is increasing. The diagnosis of CD depends on providers being alert to both typical and atypical presentations and those situations in which patients are at high risk for the disease. Because of variable presentation, physicians need to have a low threshold for celiac testing. Robust knowledge of the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease has served as a catalyst for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Highly sensitive and specific serological assays including Endomysial Antibody (EMA, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP have greatly simplified testing for CD and serve as the foundation for celiac diagnosis. In addition, genetic testing for HLA DQ2 and DQ8 has become more widely available and there has been refinement of the gluten challenge for use in diagnostic algorithms. While diagnosis is usually straightforward, in special conditions including IgA deficiency, very young children, discrepant histology and serology, and adoption of a gluten free diet prior to testing, CD can be difficult to diagnose. In this review, we provide an overview of the history and current state of celiac disease diagnosis and provide guidance for evaluation of CD in difficult diagnostic circumstances.

  4. [Update on celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso J, Felipe; Quera P, Rodrigo

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of Celiac disease in the general population is approximately 1% and remains undiagnosed in a significant proportion of individuals. Its clinical presentation includes the classical malabsorption syndrome, unspecific and extra-intestinal manifestations, and silent celiac disease. The serologic diagnosis has an elevated sensitivity and specificity and, at least in adult population, it must be confirmed by biopsy in every case. Diagnosis in subjects already on gluten free diet includes HLA typing and gluten challenge with posterior serologic and histologic evaluation. The core of the treatment is the gluten free diet, which must be supervised by an expert nutritionist. Monitoring must be performed with serology beginning at 3-6 months, and with histology two years after the diagnosis, unless the clinical response is poor. Poor disease control is associated with complications such as lymphoma and small bowel adenocarcinoma. In the future, it is likely that new pharmacologic therapies will be available for the management of celiac disease. PMID:27092676

  5. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Dermatitis Herpetiformis Defined Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Celiac Disease Research Celiac DDW 2015 Development of Therapies for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & ...

  6. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytometric pattern is more accurate than subepithelial deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA for the diagnosis of celiac disease in lymphocytic enteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández-Bañares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increase in CD3+TCRγδ+ and a decrease in CD3- intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL is a characteristic flow cytometric pattern of celiac disease (CD with atrophy. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of both CD IEL cytometric pattern and anti-TG2 IgA subepithelial deposit analysis (CD IF pattern for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to CD. METHODS: Two-hundred and five patients (144 females who underwent duodenal biopsy for clinical suspicion of CD and positive celiac genetics were prospectively included. Fifty had villous atrophy, 70 lymphocytic enteritis, and 85 normal histology. Eight patients with non-celiac atrophy and 15 with lymphocytic enteritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori acted as control group. Duodenal biopsies were obtained to assess both CD IEL flow cytometric (complete or incomplete and IF patterns. RESULTS: Sensitivity of IF, and complete and incomplete cytometric patterns for CD diagnosis in patients with positive serology (Marsh 1+3 was 92%, 85 and 97% respectively, but only the complete cytometric pattern had 100% specificity. Twelve seropositive and 8 seronegative Marsh 1 patients had a CD diagnosis at inclusion or after gluten free-diet, respectively. CD cytometric pattern showed a better diagnostic performance than both IF pattern and serology for CD diagnosis in lymphocytic enteritis at baseline (95% vs 60% vs 60%, p = 0.039. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the IEL flow cytometric pattern is a fast, accurate method for identifying CD in the initial diagnostic biopsy of patients presenting with lymphocytic enteritis, even in seronegative patients, and seems to be better than anti-TG2 intestinal deposits.

  7. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O;

    2000-01-01

    The great majority of patients that are intolerant of wheat gluten protein due to celiac disease (CD) are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2(+), and the remaining few normally express HLA-DQ8. These two class II molecules are chiefly responsible for the presentation of gluten...... for T cell recognition. Gluten-specific T cell lines from 16 different adult patients all responded to one or both of these deamidated peptides, indicating that these epitopes are highly relevant to disease pathology. Binding studies showed that the deamidated peptides displayed an increased affinity...

  8. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  9. Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease Past Issues / ... Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten- ...

  10. Genetics of celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier

    2015-01-01

    New insights into the underlying molecular pathophysiology of celiac disease (CeD) over the last few years have been guided by major advances in the fields of genetics and genomics. The development and use of the Immunochip genotyping platform paved the way for the discovery of 39 non-HLA loci assoc

  11. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical featu...

  12. Malignancy in adult celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that the incidence of some neoplastic disorders, particularly malignantlymphoma and small intestinal adenocarcinoma, are increased in celiac disease. Earlier studies from the United Kingdom have also suggested a link between celiac disease and esophageal carcinoma, although this has not been confirmed in North America. The risk of other gastrointestinal cancers seems to be limited. Gastric cancer does not appear to be detected more frequently, although direct endoscopic visualization of the upper gastrointestinal tract is now very common in patients with celiac disease. Colon cancer also appears to be limited in celiac disease, even in patients first diagnosed with celiac disease late in life. This has led to the hypothesis that untreated celiac disease may be protective, possibly owing to impaired absorption of fat or fat-soluble agents, including hydrocarbons and putative co-carcinogens implicated in the pathogenesis of colon cancer, which may be poorly absorbed and rapidly excreted.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CELIAC DISEASE AND REFRACTORY IDIOPATHIC EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Karimzadeh MD

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy occurs with a yearly incidence of 40 per 100,000 children, of which more than 25% are resistant to drug therapy. Epilepsy may occur in autoimmune diseases like lupus, celiac disease and myasthenia gravis. In this study, the relationship between celiac disease and refractory epilepsy was evaluated in children with idiopathic epilepsy.Material & MethodsHundred-fifty-five children (mean age, 6.7±3.3 years with idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy referred to the neurology clinic were studied in two groups;drug controlled epilepsy (control, 82 patients and refractory epilepsy groups (case, 73 patients. Both groups underwent serological tissue transglutaminase antibody measurement by ELISA. In seropositive cases, small intestine biopsywas conducted. Data analysis was performed using student's t test and 2 test.ResultsSeven (0.04% patients had celiac disease based on a positive tissuetransglutaminase antibody and three patients (0.01% based on a positive biopsy.Three patients (2.4% with drug controlled epilepsy (control group and five with refractory epilepsy (case group had seropositive celiac disease (p=0.255.In the biopsy survey of six seropositive patients, one patient (1.2% in the drug controlled epilepsy and two patients (2.7% in the refractory epilepsy group had positive biopsy for celiac disease (p = 0.604. One seropositive patient did not cooperate for biopsy.ConclusionIf the relationship between celiac disease and epilepsy, especially in cases of symptomatic or oligosymptomatic celiac is proved, using gluten free diet increases the ability to control epilepsy particularly in refractory cases.We suggest celiac disease survey is not required in patients with idiopathic epilepsy.

  14. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma.Keywords: celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, fatty liver, gluten-free diet

  15. [Adult celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellier, C; Grosdidier, E

    2001-05-15

    Celiac disease is much common than previously thought with a prevalence of 1/300, but most of cases are poorly symptomatic or silent. Fewer of half of patients report diarrhoea as a presenting symptom. In adults, the diagnosis should be considered, in case of isolated iron deficiency anaemia, neurological symptoms (ataxia, epilepsy), osteoporosis and arthralgia, infertility, dermatitis herpetiformis and abnormalities in liver tests. Characteristic histological features are total or subtotal villous atrophy associated with an increased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes. The most sensitive and specific circulating antibodies for the diagnosis are endomysial and transglutaminase IgA antibodies. The treatment of celiac disease requires a strict gluten free diet, but the observance to this diet is often difficult. In patients refractory to a strict gluten free diet, serious complications such as intestinal lymphoma or refractory sprue should be considered. PMID:11458609

  16. Celiac disease : towards new therapeutic modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in

  17. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  18. The Prevalence of Celiac Autoantibodies in Hepatitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Sima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has been associated with other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune hepatitis, moreover it is known that T cell mediated immune response to dietary gluten and released cytokines are important for the entheropathy seen in celiac disease. We investigated celiac autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, and chronic hepatitis B (CHB.Sera from 84 patients with Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH type 1 and 88 patients with Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB were tested for Immunoglobulin A and G antibodies to Gliadin, Immunoglobulin A antibodies to tissue transglutaminase using enzyme immunoassay, and Immunoglobulin A anti-endomysial antibodies by both indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme immunoassay. The patients positive for anti-endomysial antibodies and/or anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies were considered for deuodenal biopsy. The study was approved by Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease Ethics Committee and all patients gave their written informed consent to participate.Immunoglobulin A anti-endomysial and Immunoglobulin A anti-gliadin antibodies were positive in two out of 84 patients with AIH. Moreover, Immunoglobulin A anti-gliadin antibodies were positive in another patient who was also positive for anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in eight (9.1% of 88 patients with CHB, two of which were also positive for anti-endomysial antibodies. One of the patients with CHB was only positive for anti-endomysial antibodies.Compared with the general population, the prevalence of celiac autoantibodies in CHB and AIH patients is relatively high, and it is noteworthy that most positive patients were asymptomatic for celiac disease. We suggest screening for celiac disease before and during treatment in patients with viral and autoimmune hepatitis.

  19. Clinical characteristics analysis of interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease%结缔组织病相关的肺间质病变临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周明韬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To improve the understanding of clinical characteristics of interstitial lung dis-ease associated with connective tissue disease.Methods Clinical manifestations , imaging changes , treatment and prognosis in 12 patients with connective tissue disease associated with interstitial lung disease were retro -spective analyzed.Results There were 5 cases of patients with rheumatoid arthritis , 2 cases of mixed connec-tive tissue disease, 2 cases of Sjogren's syndrome, 1 case of systemic lupus erythematosus , 1 case of dermatomy-ositis and 1 case of polymyositis in 12 patients.Respiratory symptoms included cough , expectoration and short-ness of breath after activity; Main pulmonary physical signs were Velcro rales; pulmonary high-resolution CT ( HRCT) examination showed ground-glass opacities , cord-like shadow , reticular opacities , patchy shadow , pulmonary bulla and honeycomb -like shadow;full chest X-ray showed streak shadow and patchy shadow ;one case of Sjogren ’ s syndrome and one case of systemic lupus erythematosus patients with interstitial lung disease were discovered earlier and their symptoms decreased with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide treatment .Pa-tients whose pulmonary interstitial lesions found later , with glucocorticoids and immunosuppressant therapy ,had no obvious improvement of symptoms and imaging findings.Their prognosis were poor.Conclusion Early symptoms of respiratory system are not obvious in patients with interstitial lung disease of connective tissue dis -ease.Pulmonary HRCT examination is helpful for early diagnosis and early treatment of glucocorticoid and cy -clophosphamide to improve their condition and prognosis.%目的:提高对结缔组织病相关的肺间质病变临床特点的认识。方法回顾分析12例结缔组织病合并肺间质病变患者的临床表现、影像学改变、治疗与转归。结果12例患者类风湿关节炎5例,混合性结缔组织病2例,干燥综合征2

  20. Genes and environment in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, L M; McAdam, S N; Molberg, O; Quarsten, H; Arentz-Hansen, H; Louka, A S; Lundin, K E

    2001-06-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal disorder that develops as a result of interplay between genetic and environmental factors. HLA genes along with non-HLA genes predispose to the disease. Linkage studies have failed to identify chromosomal regions other than the HLA region which have major effects, indicating the existence of multiple non-HLA predisposing genes with modest effects. Association studies have shown that CTLA4 or a closely located gene is one of these genes. The primary HLA association in the majority of celiac disease patients is with DQ2 (DQA1*05/DQB1*02) and in the minority of patients with DQ8 (DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302). Gluten reactive CD4+ T cells can be isolated from small intestinal biopsies of celiac patients but not from controls. DQ2 or DQ8, but not other HLA molecules carried by patients, present peptides to these T cells. A number of distinct T cell gluten epitopes exist, most of them posttranslationally modified by deamidation. DQ2 and DQ8 bind the epitopes such that the glutamic acid residues created by deamidation are accommodated in pockets that have a preference for negatively charged side chains. There is evidence that deamidation in vivo is mediated by the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG). Overall, the results point to control of the immune response to gluten by intestinal T cells restricted by the DQ2 or DQ8 molecules. This is likely to be a critical checkpoint for the development of celiac disease and could explain the dominant genetic role of HLA in this disorder. The products of the other predisposing genes may participate in pathway(s) that lead(s) to lesion formation. The minor genetic effects of the non-HLA genes could indicate a lack of critical checkpoints along these pathways, or that there are several pathways leading to the lesion formation. PMID:11501889

  1. A Case with Acute Celiac Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Taner Özgür; Fatih Kılıçbay; Zeliha Yeğin

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms and signs. Some patients may be asymptomatic though some may present with acute celiac crisis, which is a rare and serious complication of celiac disease. Here we present a patient who presented with a physically ill appearance, hypokalemia, hypoalbuminemia and was treated successfully with gluten-free diet, steroids and electrolyte replacement therapy. Acute celiac crisis, which is a rare complication of celiac disease w...

  2. Anticorpos séricos na doença celíaca Celiac disease serum antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceres Concilio ROMALDINI

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico acurado da doença celíaca é muito importante porque os pacientes devem aderir a uma dieta sem glúten por toda a vida e diante do maior risco de complicações, como as neoplasias intestinais, que poderá advir do não cumprimento rigoroso da dieta. Nesta revisão são apresentados os novos conceitos referentes às formas de apresentação da doença (ativa, silenciosa, latente e potencial e sua associação com outras enfermidades e são focalizados principalmente o valor e a eficácia da determinação dos anticorpos séricos antigliadina e dos autoanticorpos anti-reticulina, antiendomísio e antitransglutaminase tecidual, no auxílio ao diagnóstico e seguimento da doença celíaca.Accurate diagnosis of celiac disease is important because patients are advised to adhere to a strict gluten-free diet for life. This management is critical to avoid disease complications such as malignancies. In this review the new terminology for the disease clinical features (active, silent, latent and potential celiac disease and the disease association with other conditions are commented. The value and efficacy of the assessment of serum antigliadin antibodies and of antireticulin, antiendomysial and tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies in the diagnosis and follow-up of the celiac disease are particularly evaluated.

  3. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Conditions What Is Celiac Disease? Search Symptoms and Systems Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific ... Now What Is Celiac Disease? Search Symptoms and Systems Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific ...

  4. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... RD Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist. A 2010 Peer Review Resesarch Grant from the Celiac Support Association made ... Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases Celiac ...

  5. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... CSA Leadership Professional Advisors History of CSA CSA Development Program Membership & Merchandise Order Forms Donate Now What ... Diagnosis Treatment Celiac Disease Research Celiac DDW 2015 Development of Therapies for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac ...

  6. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... CSA Leadership Professional Advisors History of CSA CSA Development Program Get CSA Membership/Shop Membership & Merchandise Order ... Diagnosis Treatment Celiac Disease Research Celiac DDW 2015 Development of Therapies for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac ...

  7. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MPH, RD Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist. A 2010 Peer Review Resesarch Grant from the Celiac Support Association made ... for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases Celiac ...

  8. Positive predictive value of serological diagnostic measures in celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftedal, Peter; Nielsen, Christian; Madsen, Jonas Trolle;

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) antibodies, immunoglobulin A (IgA) anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG), IgA endomysium antibody (EMA), IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and IgG AGA) are first-line diagnostic tools used in selecting patients for duodenal biopsy. The goal of this study was to evaluate...

  9. Endocrinological disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Pekka; Kaukinen, Katri; Välimäki, Matti; Salmi, Jorma

    2002-08-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to dietary gluten. Its well known features are abdominal symptoms, malabsorption of nutrients, and small-bowel mucosal inflammation with villous atrophy, which recover on a gluten-free diet. Diagnosis is challenging in that patients often suffer from subtle, if any, symptoms. The risk of clinically silent celiac disease is increased in various autoimmune conditions. The endocrinologist, especially, should maintain high suspicion and alertness to celiac disease, which is to be found in 2-5% of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or autoimmune thyroid disease. Patients with multiple endocrine disorders, Addison's disease, alopecia, or hypophysitis may also have concomitant celiac disease. Similar heredity and proneness to autoimmune conditions are considered to be explanations for these associations. A gluten-free diet is essential to prevent celiac complications such as anemia, osteoporosis, and infertility. The diet may also be beneficial in the treatment of the underlying endocrinological disease; prolonged gluten exposure may even contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases. The diagnosis of celiac disease requires endoscopic biopsy, but serological screening with antiendomysial and antitissue transglutaminase antibody assays is an easy method for preliminary case finding. Celiac disease will be increasingly detected provided the close association with autoimmune endocrinological diseases is recognized. PMID:12202461

  10. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune based disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The prevalence of celiac disease has risen in recent decades and is currently about 1% in most Western populations. The reason for this rise is unknown, although environmental factors related to the hygiene hypothesis are suspected. The pathophysiology of celiac disease involves both the innate and adaptive immune response to dietary gluten. Clinical features are diverse and include gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic bone disease, infertility, and many other manifestations. Although a gluten-free diet is effective in most patients, this diet can be burdensome and can limit quality of life; consequently, non-dietary therapies are at various stages of development. This review also covers non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The pathophysiology of this clinical phenotype is poorly understood, but it is a cause of increasing interest in gluten-free diets in the general population. PMID:26438584

  11. Celiac disease: Diagnosis of celiac disease in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Joseph A.; Rashtak, Shadi; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Children and adolescents with untreated celiac disease display disease-related, histological alterations in the duodenal bulb, according to a new study. In 16 of the 665 patients enrolled in the study, lesions were confined to the duodenal bulb.

  12. Celiac disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad

    2014-03-01

    Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease is the most common genetically based food intolerance in the world, with a prevalence among approximately 1% of the general population. This enteropathy may appear at any age and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms that go well beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In young children, gastrointestinal presentations are common and include chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and abdominal distention; however, extraintestinal manifestations are becoming increasingly more common. They include numerous conditions such as dermatitis herpetiformis, anemia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminase levels, and female infertility. Therefore, diagnosing celiac disease requires a high degree of suspicion, followed by correct screening and a confirmatory test with an intestinal biopsy. After diagnosis, a strict gluten-free diet must be followed, which in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. However, there are important compliance and quality-of-life problems, especially in adolescents. PMID:24395055

  13. Refractory Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Khatami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Refractory celiac disease (RCD is when malabsorption symptoms and villous atrophy persist despite strict adherence to a gluten free diet (GFD for more than 12 months and other causes of villous atrophy have been ruled out.  RCD is considered a rare disease and almost exclusively occurs in adults. Persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss are the most common symptoms in RCD. Also, anemia, fatigue, malaise, thromboembolic events and coexisting autoimmune disorders are frequent. Diagnosis of RCD is based on other causes of unresponsiveness to the GFD, particularly collagenous sprue, ulcerative jejunitis, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Many disorders such as autoimmune enteropathy, tropical sprue, common variable immunodeficiency, and intolerance to non-gluten dietary proteins may have similar histological findings but not necessarily identical with CD and therefore should be excluded. Repeat intestinal biopsy may help to differentiate causes of non-responsive CD associated with ongoing villous atrophy (e.g., gluten contamination, small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, RCD. There are 2 subtypes of RCD according to absence (type I or presence (type II of an abnormal intraepithelial lymphocyte population. RCD type 1 usually becomes better with a combination of aggressive nutritional support, adherence to GFD, and pharmacologic therapies such as prednisone, budesonide and azathioprine. For RCD type 2, more aggressive therapeutic approach is needed since clinical response to therapies is less certain and may evolve into aggressive enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma and the prognosis is poor.   Key words: Celiac Disease, Refractory.  

  14. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate's strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate's known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of "ripening" sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent

  15. A model of connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in rat%结缔组织病相关肺动脉高压模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳; 谢悦; 张昊; 王伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过成年SD大鼠腹腔一次性注射野百合碱,构建结缔组织病相关肺动脉高压模型方法的可行性.方法 实验组一次性腹腔注入1%野百合碱溶液,剂量为50 mg/kg,对照组腹腔注入同体积2:8无菌乙醇和0.9%氯化钠注射液.2、4周后通过计算机控制多功能生理仪行血流动力学检测,通过肺组织病理学观察异硫氰酸荧光素( FITC).凝集素灌注和抗α.平滑肌肌动蛋白(α-SMA)荧光标记了解肺血管重构情况.2组间比较采用t检验.结果 腹腔注射1%野百合碱溶液4周后,模型动物肺动脉测压[肺动脉收缩压(PASP)(41±6) mm Hg,肺动脉舒张压(PADP)(24.3±3.8) mm Hg,平均肺动脉压(mPAP)(29.8±4.2) mm Hg],与对照组[PASP (23±3) mm Hg;PADP (8.5±2.4) mm Hg;mPAP (17.1±2.5) mm Hg]比较,明显升高(P<0.05),实验组肺组织病理学检查显示肺小动脉管壁增厚、管腔狭窄,肺小动脉管壁厚度指数(TI) 0.723±0.034和面积指数(AI) 0.912±0.203明显高于对照组(0.314±0.023和0.414±0.021)(P<0.05).结论 SD大鼠腹腔注射野百合碱4周后,可形成肺动脉高压模型,该模型与临床结缔组织病相关肺动脉高压的病理生理相接近,且稳定、可靠、经济.%Objective To investigate the possibility of establishing a model of connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in rats.Methods PAH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline solution at a dose of 50 mg/kg.The rats of the control group were injected the same volume of 2:8 ethanol saline.After 2 and 4 weeks,a polyvinyl catheter was inserted into the pulmonary artery,and the hemodynamic variables were monitored continuously by Maclab/8 s.The pulmonary vascular pathologic remodelling was examined with hematoxylin and lectin perfusion.Thickness and area indices were calculated.Results Four weeks after intra-peritoneal injection of monocrotaline,the systolic,diastolic,and mean pulmonary arterial

  16. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic fatigue, joint pain, poor growth, delayed puberty, infertility, or repeated miscarriages. Neurological problems have also been ... North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition: Gluten-Free Diet Guide University of Chicago Celiac ...

  18. [Reproductive aspects of celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, Anna Velia; Trinti, Biagino

    2005-01-01

    In the past, celiac disease (CD), or intolerance to gluten, was considered a rare disease of infancy characterized by chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and delayed growth. Besides the overt enteropathy, there are other clinic and subclinical forms which appear later in life. Target organs are not limited to the gut, but include liver, thyroid, skin and female and male reproductive systems. CD interference on reproduction is related to the multifactorial nature of the disease, whose pathological manifestations can be modulated, besides gluten, by different concurrent genetic and environmental factors. CD induces malabsorption with consequent deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, folic acid and vitamin K, which are essential for organogenesis, and fat-soluble vitamins important for spermatogenesis. Regarding endocrine disorders, the deficiencies of specific trace elements on ovarian function could explain its involvement in the increased risk of female osteoporosis in CD patients. Affected males show a picture of tissue resistance to androgens; the increases of follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin, not associated with infertility, may indicate an imbalance at hypothalamus-pituitary level, with general effects on health. Since reproductive alterations are reversible, adoption of a gluten-free diet supported by early diagnosis is important. Therefore, the detection of early biomarkers, such as deficiencies of vitamins and/or iron and andrological or endocrinological dysfunctions, should trigger timely strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:16250182

  19. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  20. Recent advances in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman; Angeli Chopra; Michael Tom Clandinin; Alan BR Thomson

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease now affects about one person in a hundred in Europe and North America. In this review, we consider a number of important and exciting recent developments, such as clinical associations, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 predispositions, the concept of potential celiac disease, the use of new imaging/endoscopy techniques, and the development of refractory disease. This review will be of use to all internists, pediatricians and gastroenterologists.

  1. Hepatic manifestations of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hugh James Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Hugh James FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Different hepatic and biliary tract disorders may occur with celiac disease. Some have been hypothesized to share genetic or immunopathogenetic factors, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may occur with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption, ...

  2. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list of Celiac Disease Organizations​​ . Alternate Language URL Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease (For Health ... this page: Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Treatment Clinical Trials Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a chronic, intensely itchy, blistering ...

  3. Celiac disease: towards new therapeutic modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Mitea, Doina Cristina

    2011-01-01

    What is known about celiac disease? Celiac disease is one of the most common food intolerances, approximately 1% of the population being a celiac disease patient. It is now known that celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of gluten, the major storage proteins in wheat, and similar proteins in related cereals like barley, rye and triticale (hybrid between wheat and rye). The most common complains of patients consuming gluten are abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. Also neurological sy...

  4. Diagnostic Challenges in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not-performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be aware about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests. 2. The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3. The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing for DQ8 and DQ2 should be done. 4. The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN, positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5. In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6. In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7. Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  5. Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghighat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   1-The most important challenge in diagnosis of celiac disease is not- performing the diagnostic tests in suspected persons. Because of multi-organ damage and multiple manifestations of disease, diagnosis of celiac disease may be delayed. It seems general physicians should be awared about uncommon presentations of disease and indications of celiac tests 2-The second most important challenge is in patients with suspected disease but negative serologic tests. In these cases evaluating of HLA can be useful. 3- The third challenge is in cases with positive serologic tests but negative histopathological findings. There may be false positive serologic response or consumption of gluten before testing. We recommend introduction of gluten for at least 3 mo and re- endoscopy and if diagnosis is equivocal HLA-typing  for DQ8 and  DQ2 should be done. 4-The forth challenge is about performing endoscopy. Based on guideline from ESPGHAN if there are typical clinical manifestations of celiac disease, Anti-TTG more than ten times UPN , positive Anti-EMA and HLA DQ2, performing endoscopy may not be necessary, but many physicians don’t agree with this idea. 5-In people who are genetically predisposed to celiac disease antibody levels may be fluctuating thus endoscopy with biopsy should be done in these patients. 6-In children lower than 2years, Anti- TTG and Anti –EMA have low sensitivity. we recommend Anti-TTG and Anti-DGP in these patients. 7-Resolution of symptoms after gluten free diet is not necessarily a feature of celiac disease. This condition may be seen in patients with IBS or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.  

  6. Celiac disease : how complicated can it get?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon, Jennifer May-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common inflammatory disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by ingested gluten proteins. Previous studies identified crucial steps in the development of celiac disease and based on this knowledge, we propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease

  7. A Case with Acute Celiac Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Özgür

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms and signs. Some patients may be asymptomatic though some may present with acute celiac crisis, which is a rare and serious complication of celiac disease. Here we present a patient who presented with a physically ill appearance, hypokalemia, hypoalbuminemia and was treated successfully with gluten-free diet, steroids and electrolyte replacement therapy. Acute celiac crisis, which is a rare complication of celiac disease with increased mortality, should be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with chronic diarrhea, hypernatremia, hypokalemia, hypoalbuminemia and metabolic acidosis and appropriate treatment should be started as soon as possible.

  8. Microbial transglutaminases generate T cell stimulatory epitopes involved in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekking, E.H.A.; Veelen, P.A. van; Ru, A. de; Kooy-Winkelaar, E.M.C.; Gröneveld, T.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Koning, F.

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to gluten. In CD patients, gluten peptides cause an inflammation in the small intestine leading to tissue damage. Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is an enzyme involved in the repair of damaged tissue by crosslinking of extracellular matrix proteins. Under

  9. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the activ...

  10. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ideas Proclamation for Celiac Awareness National Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Library Series Learning Center Tax ... Ideas Proclamation for Celiac Awareness National Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Tax Deductions Bowker-CSADescription12307Endorsements3 Celiac ...

  11. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Celiac Awareness National Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Library Series Learning Center Tax Deductions Calendar Contact ... Celiac Awareness National Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Tax Deductions Bowker-CSADescription12307Endorsements3 Celiac Disease Facts CSA- ...

  12. Capsule endoscopy in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy is an attractive and patient- friendly tool that provides high quality images of the small bowel. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is the primary and most evaluated indication to capsule endoscopy; however, indications are expanding and a small number of preliminary reports have been presented concerning the role of video capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The purpose of this review is to update the current knowledge and to hypothesize on future perspectives of the use of video capsule endoscopy in patients with celiac disease.

  13. Possible association between celiac disease and bacterial transglutaminase in food processing: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of celiac disease is increasing worldwide, and human tissue transglutaminase has long been considered the autoantigen of celiac disease. Concomitantly, the food industry has introduced ingredients such as microbial transglutaminase, which acts as a food glue, thereby revolutionizing food qualities. Several observations have led to the hypothesis that microbial transglutaminase is a new environmental enhancer of celiac disease. First, microbial transglutaminase deamidates/transamidates glutens such as the endogenous human tissue transglutaminase. It is capable of crosslinking proteins and other macromolecules, thereby changing their antigenicity and resulting in an increased antigenic load presented to the immune system. Second, it increases the stability of protein against proteinases, thus diminishing foreign protein elimination. Infections and the crosslinked nutritional constituent gluten and microbial transglutaminase increase the permeability of the intestine, where microbial transglutaminases are necessary for bacterial survival. The resulting intestinal leakage allows more immunogenic foreign molecules to induce celiac disease. The increased use of microbial transglutaminase in food processing may promote celiac pathogenesis ex vivo, where deamidation/transamidation starts, possibly explaining the surge in incidence of celiac disease. If future research substantiates this hypothesis, the findings will affect food product labeling, food additive policies of the food industry, and consumer health education.

  14. Valvular disease associated with systemic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, C A

    1998-08-01

    clinical and prognostic implications of valvular disease associated with the connective tissue diseases, incomplete data are available about pathogenesis, relation to clinical features of the primary disease, evolution, and effect of steroid or cytotoxic therapy. Echocardiography, especially TEE, has the potential to redefine the prevalence rates and to characterize better the valve abnormalities associated with these conditions. Finally, future large cross-sectional and longitudinal studies using clinical and echocardiographic data may help to define better the presence, evolution, and therapy of the valvular disease associated with the connective tissue diseases. PMID:9742329

  15. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Login No Account? Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac ... know been recently diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? Do you need more information straight from ...

  16. Celiac Disease Changes Everything | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Celiac Disease Changes Everything Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... your thoughts when you were told you had celiac disease? I was actually thrilled when I was finally ...

  17. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available Account Login No Account? Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have you or someone you know been recently diagnosed with celiac ...

  18. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms Diagnosis Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease - Sensitivity/Specific Treatment CSA Medications Position Olmesartan Frequently Asked Questions Gluten- ... Sensitivity and Definitions Dermatitis Herpetiformis Defined Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Celiac Disease Research Celiac DDW 2015 Development of ...

  19. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  20. An extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M D; Smith, J R; Austin, R K; Kelleher, D; Nepom, G T; Volk, B; Kagnoff, M F

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. We previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II beta-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. We now report the isolation of this beta-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP beta chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP beta-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP alpha-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP alpha-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis; 84% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 patients had a 16-kb Xba I fragment that was present in only 36% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 controls. Moreover, 79% of these patients had both alpha- and beta-chain polymorphisms in contrast to 27% of controls. Thus, celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP alpha- and beta-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion. Images PMID:2893373

  1. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapies for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research ... - May 2005 Project Gut Reaction - 2004 / 2005 Gut Reaction Station Carriage ...

  2. Cardiomyopathy Associated with Celiac Disease in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Boskovic; Ivana Kitic; Dragan Prokic; Ivica Stankovic

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease is predominantly a disease of the small intestine characterized by chronic malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals who ingest grains containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Although previously believed to be uncommon, celiac disease may be present in up to 1% of the adult and children population. Celiac disease is associated frequently with iron-deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, selective IgA deficiency, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, a...

  3. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2006-01-01

    A variety of hepatic and biliary tract disorders may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. Some of these have been hypothesized to share common genetic factors or have a common immunopathogenesis, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune forms of hepatitis or cholangitis. Other hepatic changes in celiac disease may be associated with malnutrition resulting from impaired nutrient absorption,including hepatic steatosis. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, suchas hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Finally, pancreatic exocrine function may be impaired in celiac disease and represent a cause of treatment failure.

  4. Autoantibody frequency in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Caglar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: In our study, we investigated the levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (anti-GAD, islet cell antibody (ICA, thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO, thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG, antinuclear antibodies (FANA, antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-ds DNA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome A antigen (anti-SSA, antibody to Sjögren syndrome B antigen (anti-SSB, Smith antibody (anti-Sm, smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA, and antimitochondrial antibody liver-kidney microsome (AMA-LKM in patients with celiac disease as compared to healthy controls and autoimmune hypothyroid patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 31 patients with celiac disease, 34 patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism and 29 healthy subjects were included in this study. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, anti-GAD, anti-TPO and anti-TG were studied by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, and AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were studied by immunofluorescence. Clinical data and the results of free thyroxine-thyroid stimulating hormone (FT4-TSH were collected from the patients' files by retrospective analysis. SPSS ver 13.0 was used for data analysis, and the χ2 method was used for comparisons within groups. RESULTS: The frequency of anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-GAD, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA were not significantly different between the groups. Levels of anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies were found to be significantly higher (<0.001 in autoimmune hypothyroid patients when compared with other groups. CONCLUSION: In previous studies, an increased frequency of autoimmune diseases of other systems has been reported in patients with celiac disease. We found that the frequency of autoimmune antibodies specific for other autoimmune diseases was not higher in celiac disease.

  5. Coexistence of Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, Seppo; Kokkonen, Jourma

    1990-01-01

    Three Finnish patients with Down syndrome and celiac disease are described. The incidence of celiac disease among patients with Down syndrome was calculated to be 20 times greater than in children without Down syndrome, indicating that it should be kept in mind when patients suffer from recurrent diarrhea and/or delayed puberty. (Author/JDD)

  6. RICE BREAD FOR PEOPLE WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical bulletin was written to describe new process to make whole rice bread (WRB) for Celiacs, a disease caused by proteins found in wheat, barley and rye. The rice is free of these proteins and hence an ideal grain to develop foods for Celiacs. Absence of these proteins, however make it ...

  7. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease may be associated with rare hepatic complications, such as hepatic T-cell lymphoma. Because many celiac patients do not have overt gastrointestinal symptoms, a high index of suspicion is required. Simple methods of detecting celiac disease such as serum antibody tests help in the early identification of the disease, thus preventing serious complications of the disorder. The IgG DGP antibody test and IgA tTG antibody test used in combination are an excellent screening test for suspected cases of celiac disease.

  8. Birth outcomes of women with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine birthweight, low birthweight (celiac disease in relation to their first hospitalization for the disease. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on The Danish Medical Birth Registry...... data of celiac women discharged from Danish hospitals from 1977-1992. The study included 211 newborns to 127 mothers with celiac disease, and 1260 control deliveries. RESULTS: Before celiac women were first hospitalized the mean birthweight of their newborns was 238 g (95% confidence interval [95% CI......] = 150, 325 g) lower than that of the control women, after adjustment for potential confounders. After the first hospitalization the mean birthweight for newborns of diseased women was higher than that of controls, by 67 g (95% CI = -88, 223 g) after adjustment for potential confounders. Before celiac...

  9. Celiac disease in South-West of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Masjedizadeh, Rahim; Hajiani, Eskandar; Hashemi, Jalal; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Moula, Karim; Rajabi, Tahereh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Celiac disease is characterized by life-long gluten intolerance. Clinical features of patients with celiac disease are variable. Studies about the prevalence of celiac disease in our country are scarce and there is no study on the prevalence of celiac disease in southern Iran. In the current study, clinical, laboratory and histo-logical features of 52 patients with celiac disease were evaluated.

  10. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL MEDITERRANEAN FEVER

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Familial Mediterranean Fever and celiac disease are both related to auto-inflammation and/or auto-immunity and they share some common clinical features such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating and flatulence. Objectives We aimed to determine the association of these two diseases, if present. Methods Totally 112 patients diagnosed with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 cases as healthy control were included in the study. All participants were examined for the evidence of celiac disease, with serum tissue transglutaminase IgA levels (tTG IgA. Results Totally 144 cases, 112 with Familial Mediterranean Fever and 32 healthy control cases were included in the study. tTG IgA positivity was determined in three cases with Familial Mediterranean Fever and in one case in control group. In that aspect there was no significant difference regarding the tTG IgA positivity between groups (P=0.81. Duodenum biopsy was performed to the tTG IgA positive cases and revealed Marsh Type 3b in two Familial Mediterranean Fever cases and Marsh Type 3c in the other one while the biopsy results were of the only tTG IgA positive case in control group was Marsh Type 3b. In HLA evaluation of the celiac cases; HLA DQ2 was present in two celiac cases of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group and in the only celiac case of the control group while HLA DQ8 was present in one celiac case of the Familial Mediterranean Fever group. Conclusions We did not determine an association of Familial Mediterranean Fever with celiac disease. Larger studies with subgroup analysis are warranted to determine the relationship of these two diseases.

  11. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children

  12. No allelic variation in genes with high gliadin homology in patients with celiac disease and type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Hansen, Dorte; Husby, Steffen;

    2004-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a complex inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, induced by dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. CD is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and it has recently been established that gut-derived DQ2-restricted T cells from patients with CD predominantly...... recognize gluten-derived peptides in which specific glutamine residues are deamidated to glutamic acid by tissue transglutaminase. Recently, intestinally expressed human genes with high homology to DQ2-gliadin celiac T-cell epitopes have been identified. Single or double point mutations which would increase...... that gut-expressed human celiac epitope homologous peptides are unlikely to represent non-HLA risk factors in the development of celiac disease in Caucasians....

  13. Triagem sorológica de familiares de pacientes com doença celíaca: anticorpos anti-endomísio, antitransglutaminase ou ambos? Serological screening of relatives of celiac disease patients: antiendomysium antibodies, anti-tissue transglutaminase or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Ramos da Rosa Utiyama

    2007-06-01

    -negativas. O impacto desse fato implica que tais familiares deixarão de ser submetidos a biopsia intestinal para confirmação do diagnóstico da doença, e conseqüentemente, ao tratamento adequado e precoce.BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is the most common intestinal disorder of caucasian populations and presents a prevalence of 8% to 18% between the relatives of patients. The anti-endomysial (IgA-EmA and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG have represented an important non invasive and sensitivity method of screening and diagnosis of celiac disease in risk groups and populations. AIM: To investigate the prevalence of IgA-EmA and IgA-tTG antibodies in relatives of celiac patients and verify the degree of concordance between them. METHODS: One hundred and seventy seven relatives of celiac patients (76(feminino; 101(masculino; 2-79 years and 93 healthy individuals were evaluated (34(feminino; 59(masculino; 2-71 years. IgA-EmA were detected by indirect immunofluorescence, with human umbilical cord as substrate, while anti-IgA-tTG titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, using commercial kit. RESULTS: Total positivity to antibodies in relatives of celiac patients was of 21% (37/177, and showed significant difference compared to control group (0%; 0/93. Twelve percent (21/177 of celiac disease relatives were positive to IgA-EmA, 13.56% (24/177 to IgA-tTG, and 4.52% (8/177 to both assays simultaneously. The concordance between both methods was 83.6% (148/177 and the discordance was 16.4% (29/177, with a positive and significant correlation (r = 0.435. Among the concordant results, 79.1% (140/177 were negative and 4.52% (8/177 were positive to both antibodies. Among the discordant results, 7.34% (13/177 were positive to IgA-EmA and negative to IgA-tTG, while 9.04% (16/177 were negative to IgA- EmA and positive to IgA-tTG. CONCLUSION: Although the high positivity to IgA-EmA and IgA-tTG emphasizes the importance of the serological screening in

  14. Osteogenesis Imperfecta with Celiac Disease and Type II Diabetes Mellitus Associated: Improvement with a Gluten-Free Diet

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    Luis Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a genetic disease, with a connective tissue alteration, consisting in the presence of multiple spontaneous fractures or after minimal traumatism. Its association with other metabolic processes is rarely described. We present the clinical case of a female adult patient of 43 years. From her infancy, she has had multiple fractures, needing several surgical interventions, and she was diagnosed of OI type 2 at adolescence age. Due mainly to difficulties in walking remaining in wheel-chair in the last three years, she was overweight with morbid obesity (BMI=45.4 and had a type-II DM associated. She suffered from recurrent abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea and was diagnosed of celiac disease (CD with increased intraepithelial duodenal infiltration, being classified as lymphocytic enteritis, Marsh I type. She was put on a gluten-free diet (GFD, having lost 6 kg of weight after 6 months, with a good control of DM-II and presenting a significant clinical improvement. It is rewarding to search the presence of two coincidental metabolic diseases associated to OI, specially CD, because of the dramatic clinical benefit in the general found after putting on a GFD.

  15. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH IRON-DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CENTER AND SOUTH AREA OF IRAN

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    Mahmud BAGHBANIAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy due to a permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible people. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most widely experienced anemia in humans. Iron-deficiency anemia additionally is a common extra intestinal manifestation of celiac disease. Objective - To investigate correlation between tTg levels and histological alterations and then to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Center and South area patients of Iran with iron deficiency anemia. Methods - A total of 402 patients aged 12-78 years who presented with iron-deficiency anemia were included in this study. Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume and serum ferritin were determined. Venous blood samples for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody immunoglobuline A and G were obtained from these patients. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was recommended to patients who had positive serology. Results - Of 402 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, 42 (10.4% had positive serology for celiac disease. The small intestine biopsy of all patients with positive serology showed pathological changes (Marsh I, II & III. There was not significant difference in the mean hemoglobin level between iron-deficiency anemia patients with celiac disease and without celiac disease, duodenal biopsy results did not show significant relationship between the severity of pathological changes and levels of anti-tTG IgG (P -value: 0/869 but significant relationship was discovered between pathological changes and levels of anti-tTG IgA (P -value: 0/004. Conclusion - Screening of celiac disease by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody should be completed as a routine investigation in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Also physicians must consider celiac disease as a possible reason of anemia in all patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L Abenavoli; G Addolorato; I Proietti; L Leggio; A Ferrulli; L Vonghia; R Capizzi; M Rotoli; PL Amerio; G Gasbarrini

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations;among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed.

  17. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune p

  18. Coagulopathy as initial manifestation of concomitant celiac disease and cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdraveska Nikolina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Celiac disease and cystic fibrosis have many common manifestations, such as malabsorption, steatorrhea and growth failure, and were for many years recognized as one clinical entity. Since their recognition as two separate diseases, their co-existence in a patient has been described sporadically; around 20 cases have been described in the literature. Taking into consideration the incidences of the two diseases, the chance of them occurring together is one in 2,000,000 in the general population. Case presentation We describe the case of a five-year-old boy of Turkish ethnicity with both celiac disease and cystic fibrosis, who presented initially with a skin hemorrhage. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made with a positive serum anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody test and the presence of HLA-DQ2 heterodimer, and confirmed on histology with small intestinal villous atrophy. A positive sweat test confirmed the diagnosis of associated cystic fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge there has been no previous report of this rare presentation of associated celiac disease and cystic fibrosis. Conclusion The clinical significance of this case is the consideration of malabsorption with both celiac disease and cystic fibrosis in patients who present with unexplained coagulopathy.

  19. Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity is Modified by Non-HLA Genetic Markers During the First Year of Clinical Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H.; Hansen, Dorthe; Mortensen, Henrik B.;

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study plotted the prevalence of celiac disease associated antibodies in relation to demographic patterns, genetic and metabolic markers during the first year after diagnosis in a multinational cohort of children with T1D. Material and Methods: Sera from a total of 261 children (128 males...... measuring IgG-tTG. Children positive in both assays in two consecutive samples were defined as having celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). Associations between CDA and genotypes of HLA, IL18 rap, CCR 5, PTPN2 and correlations with islet autoantibodies (ICA, GADA, IA2 and IA) and HbA1C and C-peptide were...

  20. Clinical analysis of 59 cases with connective tissue disease associated pulmonary arterial hypertension%结缔组织病相关性肺动脉高压59例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰; 刘双; 杨京华; 许尚栋

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To understand the incidence, clinical features and prognosis of connective tissue disease (CTD) associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) , increase awareness and attention about the disease. Methods: all cases with pulmonary arterial hypertension in 715 cases with connective tissue disease were analyzed retrospectively. Results;The overall incidence rate of CTD-associated PAH is about8. 3%. In 59 CTD-associated PAH cases, there are 47 female cases and 12 male cases, aged 23 to 95 years with the mean age of (57 ± 19) years. The duration is 0. 1 to 30 years, and the average duration is (7. 4 ±7. 3) years. A-mong these cases, Behcet s disease had the highest incidence of pulmonary hypertension; it is 19. 2% , followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (13. 7% ) , Sjogren's syndrome (13. 5% ) , rheumatoid arthritis (7. 4% ) , ar-teritis (3.5%, P < 0. 01) . Age and pulmonary artery pressure was negatively correlated (correlation coefficient r = - 0. 490, P < 0. 01) ; The proportions of interstitial lung disease, anti-nuclear antibody ( ANA) -positive rates, rheumatoid factor (RF) positive rates between PAH group and non-PAH group had statistical difference (P < 0. 05). Conclusion: PAH is a common complication in connective tissue disease. In our study, Behcet's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus had the highest incidence of PAH; earlier age of onset, more serious PAH; the patients with pulmonary fibrosis, elevated inflammatory indicators, positive ANA and RF are more likely to suffer CTD-associated PAH.'%目的:了解结缔组织病(connective tissue diseases,CTD)相关的肺动脉高压(pulmonary arterial hypertension,PAH)的发生率、临床特点及预后,提高对该病的认识及重视.方法:从715例CTD患者中筛选出伴有PAH的患者59例,对其临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果:合并的PAH的总发生率约为8.3%.59例患者中女性47例,男性12例;年龄23~95岁,平均(57±19)岁;病程1个月~ 30年.其中

  1. Auxo-Endocrinological Approach to Celiac Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bozzola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a permanent genetically determined intolerance to gluten that generally presents with gastrointestinal symptoms in young children and extraintestinal manifestations (endocrinological, dermatological, neurological, etc. later. Furthermore, many studies demonstrate the close association between celiac and endocrine diseases, including growth and pubertal disorders, type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid diseases, probably due to the presence of a common genetic predisposition. Follow-up for celiac children after the start of gluten-free diet is mandatory to avoid complications such as growth hormone deficiency. The present review deals with the problem of the diagnosis of endocrine-associated diseases in celiac children and gives suggestions for correct management and follow-up of these patients.

  2. Is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160153.html Is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Real? Study finds distinctly different biological changes ... 29, 2016 FRIDAY, July 29, 2016, (HealthDay News) -- Gluten sensitivity appears to be a real medical problem, ...

  3. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  4. Association of celiac disease with multiple sclerosis

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    Abolfazli.R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS and the gluten intolerance disease, celiac disease, (CD are immune-mediated diseases. Better testing for antibodies associated with CD, including anti-gliadin antibody [AGA], as well as anti-endomysial and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, has improved the diagnosis of CD. Certain neurologic conditions have a reported association with CD. Previous researchers have investigated the role of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of MS and found no benefits. Here, we investigate the possible immunological association of CD with MS.Methods: Using ELISA, we estimated serum IgG and IgA anti-gliadin and IgA anti-endomysial antibodies in 34 MS patients, who were new or previous cases without immunosuppressant treatment for at least the last six months. The mean age was 29.6 years (range 15-46 years, with 30 patients relapsing-remitting, and four secondary-progressive MS. Thirty-four random anonymous blood donors were used as serologic controls (mean age 31.4 years, range 19-50 years. The individuals in both groups with elevated AGA (IgG or IgA or anti-endomysial antibody (IgA underwent duodenal biopsy.Results: In the MS group, high levels of IgG AGA were found in 5.9% of the subjects, and 5.9% had elevated IgA AGA. In the controls, elevated IgG AGA was detected in 5.9% of the subjects and IgA AGA in 2.9% (p=0.051 and 0.48, respectively. For IgG and IgA AGA levels, no significant differences were found between the patient and control groups. IgA anti-endomysial antibodies were not found in either group. Upon biopsy, the specific pathological features of celiac were absent.Conclusion: The same number of MS patients and controls had high levels of AGA, with normal levels of IgA anti-endomysial antibodies, which is more specific for CD, while the GI biopsies from both groups were not specific for CD. Therefore, AGA levels in any neurologic case should be interpreted with caution. The present study showed no

  5. Lack of serologic evidence to link IgA nephropathy with celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Moeller

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99, unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96, and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30. All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2. Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy.

  6. Occult celiac disease prevents penetrance of hemochromatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Geier; Siegfried Matern; Carsten Gartung; Igor Theurl; Guenter Weiss; Frank Lammert; Christoph G. Dietrich; Ralf Weiskirchen; Heinz Zoller; Benita Hermanns

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To report a patient with C282Y homozygocity, depleted body iron and intestinal atrophy caused by celiac disease (CD) who experienced resolution of the enteropathy with subsequent normalization of iron metabolism upon glutenfree diet.METHODS: To obtain information on the tissue distribution and quantitative expression of proteins involved in duodenal iron trafficking, we determined the expression of divalent-metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin 1 (FP1) and transferrin receptor (TfR1) by means of immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR in duodenal biopsies of this patient.RESULTS: Whereas in hereditary hemochromatosis patients without CD, DMT1 expression was up-regulated leading to excessive uptake of iron, we identified a significant reduction in protein and mRNA expression of DMT1 as acompensatory mechanism in this patient with HH and CD.CONCLUSION: Occult CD may compensate tot increased DMT1 expression in a specific subset of individuals withhomozygous C282Y mutations in the hemochromatosis(HFE) gene, thus contributing to the low penetrance of HH.

  7. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC. Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation.

  8. Celiac disease presenting with extraintestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikri Ak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a multiorgan involved systemic disease that most commonly affects the gut but also affects other organs. Up to 10% of patients with CD and gastrointestinal symptoms have otherwise unexplained neurological presentations. In this paper we report a case with the final diagnosis of celiac disease while being investigated for the underlying etiology of iron deficient anemia, peripheral neuropathy, and gait and speech disturbances. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(3: 211-213

  9. Hepatobiliary Disorders in Celiac Disease: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushal K Prasad; Uma Debi; Sinha, Saroj K.; Nain, Chander K.; Kartar Singh

    2011-01-01

    This communication reviews recent literature and summarizes hepatobiliary abnormalities that may complicate the clinical course of celiac disease. A wide spectrum of hepatobiliary diseases has been described, including asymptomatic elevations of liver enzyme levels, nonspecific hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. Moreover, in the majority of patients, liver enzyme levels will normalize on a gluten-free diet. In addition, celiac disease ma...

  10. Role of oats in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, an...

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  12. The widening spectrum of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J A

    1999-03-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to ingested gluten that results in immunologically mediated inflammatory damage to the small-intestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is associated with both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes and with other immune disorders, notably juvenile diabetes and thyroid disease. The classic sprue syndrome of steatorrhea and malnutrition coupled with multiple deficiency states may be less common than more subtle and often monosymptomatic presentations of the disease. Diverse problems such as dental anomalies, short stature, osteopenic bone disease, lactose intolerance, infertility, and nonspecific abdominal pain among many others may be the only manifestations of celiac disease. The rate at which celiac disease is diagnosed depends on the level of suspicion for the disease. Although diagnosis relies on intestinal biopsy findings, serologic tests are useful as screening tools and as an adjunct to diagnosis. The treatment of celiac disease is lifelong avoidance of dietary gluten. Gluten-free diets are now readily achievable with appropriate professional instruction and community support. Both benign and malignant complications of celiac disease occur but these can often be avoided by early diagnosis and compliance with a gluten-free diet. PMID:10075317

  13. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss – A Celiac Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chronic diarrhea • lightheadedness • weakness • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease – a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell’s Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient’s diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. Conclusions: Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679

  14. New aspects in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Torres; MA López Casado; A Ríos

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an immune response to ingested gluten and has a strong HLA association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules, but human HLA-DQ risk factors do not explain the entire genetic susceptibility to gluten intolerance. CD is caused by the lack of immune tolerance (oral tolerance) to wheat gluten. In this sense,the expression of soluble HLA-G in CD is of special interest because the molecule plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. The enhanced expression of soluble HLA-G found in CD may be part of a mechanism to restore the gluten intolerance. In this editorial, we review recent progress in understanding CD in relation to its prevalence, diagnosis and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  15. [Interstitial lung diseases associated with smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nová, Markéta; Hornychová, Helena; Matěj, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    There are many different interstitial lung diseases associated with smoking. This short review describes officially recognized disorders (desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and pulmonary Langerhans´cells histiocytosis) and entities with uncertain relationship to smoking, which have recently been published in the literature. Histopathological pictures and differential diagnosis of smoking-related diseases of the lungs are discussed. PMID:27223588

  16. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have ... professional on the gluten-free diet? These educational videos were built to help those looking for information ...

  17. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Account Login No Account? Register Now! Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos Real People Living with Celiac Disease - new Have you or someone you know been recently diagnosed with ...

  18. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nut Butter Sauce Goddess CSA Leadership Professional Advisors History of CSA CSA Development Program Get CSA Membership/ ... Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free ...

  19. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Passananti, V.; M. Siniscalchi; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; C Ciacci

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac...

  20. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Eu-ropeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called "general" celiac populations, however, there are...

  1. Celiac Disease and Overweight in Children: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Diamanti; Teresa Capriati; Maria Sole Basso; Fabio Panetta; Vincenzo Maria Di Ciommo Laurora; Francesca Bellucci; Fernanda Cristofori; Ruggiero Francavilla

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease in children is very variable and differs with age. The prevalence of atypical presentations of celiac disease has increased over the past 2 decades. Several studies in adults and children with celiac disease indicate that obesity/overweight at disease onset is not unusual. In addition, there is a trend towards the development of overweight/obesity in celiac patients who strictly comply with a gluten-free diet. However, the pathogenesis and clinical...

  2. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Europeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called “general” celiac populations, howe...

  3. Association between Celiac Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Ashish; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Duseja, Ajay; Chawla, Yogesh; Radha K. Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease affects the proximal small intestine and is caused by a local immune response to dietary gluten. Celiac disease usually presents with chronic diarrhea; however, presentations with elevated hepatic transaminase levels in blood or with iron-deficiency anemia have been described. Celiac disease has been reported to be associated with autoimmune liver diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can also initiate autoimmune disease process. Therefore, HCV infection and celiac disease may occu...

  4. Increased rates of pregnancy complications in women with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Moleski, Stephanie M.; Lindenmeyer, Christina C.; Veloski, J. Jon; Miller, Robin S.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Kastenberg, David; DiMarino, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel disorder that develops in genetically susceptible individuals upon exposure to dietary gluten. Celiac disease could have extra-intestinal manifestations that affect women’s reproductive health. The aim of this study was to investigate fertility and outcomes of pregnancy among women with celiac disease. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed information collected from patients at a tertiary care celiac center and from me...

  5. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naiyana Gujral; Hugh J Freeman; Alan BR Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases,resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and nonHLA genes].The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world.However,the population with diabetes,autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD,at least in part,because of shared HLA typing.Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium,and interact directly with the immune system,via both bans-and para-cellular routes.From a diagnostic perspective,symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical'; In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD,should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis.Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or antiendomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy.Currently,the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD.A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide,prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption,blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue,restore immune tolerance towards gluten,modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin,and restoration of intestinal architecture.

  6. Changing Spectrum of Celiac Disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kishor Prasad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Celiac disease is an important cause of chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and anemia in children. Mode of presentation of celiac disease has changed in last few years. Study was conducted to determine the mode of clinical presentation of a large group of patients with celiac disease and whether there has been a change in the presentation with the time. Methods:A prospective study was conducted on 134 children diagnosed to be having celiac disease in the Pediatric Gastroenterology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, from July 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007. Their detailed clinical profile was recorded on a pretested proforma and all patients underwent hemogram, liver function tests, IgA Anti tTG, and upper GI endoscopy. Findings:Major symptoms at presentation were diarrhea (54.5%, failure to thrive (52.2%, abdominal distension (41%, anemia (40%, pain abdomen (19.4%, vomiting (15.7% and constipation (2.2% of cases. 60.4% of patients had short stature. Anemia was microcytic hypochromic in 79.1% of patients, and dimorphic in 20.9%. Serum transaminases were raised in 38.8 % of cases. The mean serum anti tTG level was 164.24U/ml (Range 0-749 U/ml and levels correlated with the severity of small intestinal damage on biopsy. 15 patients were negative for the serology but 8 out of them had IgA deficiency and all had histopathology suggestive of celiac disease. Conclusion:Classical presentation of celiac disease is less commonly encountered these days probably related to the more widespread use of serologic testing and early recognition of atypical manifestations of celiac disease.

  7. High frequency of celiac disease in Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; Mearin, ML; Bouquet, J; vonBlomberg, ME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; deGraaf, EAB

    1996-01-01

    We screened 115 children with Down syndrome for celiac disease, using antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antireticulin serum antibodies and an intestinal permeability test, Celiac disease was diagnosed in eight children, giving a frequency of 7.0%. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all pers

  8. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  9. Markers of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Children with Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga M Lau

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in children with autism, drawing attention to a potential association with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. However, studies to date regarding the immune response to gluten in autism and its association with celiac disease have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess immune reactivity to gluten in pediatric patients diagnosed with autism according to strict criteria and to evaluate the potential link between autism and celiac disease.Study participants included children (with or without gastrointestinal symptoms diagnosed with autism according to both the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS and the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R (n = 37, their unaffected siblings (n = 27, and age-matched healthy controls (n = 76. Serum specimens were tested for antibodies to native gliadin, deamidated gliadin, and transglutaminase 2 (TG2. Affected children were genotyped for celiac disease associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles.Children with autism had significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to gliadin compared with unrelated healthy controls (p<0.01. The IgG levels were also higher compared to the unaffected siblings, but did not reach statistical significance. The IgG anti-gliadin antibody response was significantly greater in the autistic children with gastrointestinal symptoms in comparison to those without them (p<0.01. There was no difference in IgA response to gliadin across groups. The levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between patients and controls. An association between increased anti-gliadin antibody and presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 was not observed.A subset of children with autism displays increased immune reactivity to gluten, the mechanism of which appears to be distinct from that in celiac disease. The increased anti-gliadin antibody response and its association

  10. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss - A Celiac Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease - a celiac crisis. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell's Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient's diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679

  11. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  12. Role of oats in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino, Isabel; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sousa, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    A gluten-free diet is currently the only effective means of treating individuals with celiac disease. Such a diet enables celiac patients to control their symptoms and avoid various complications associated with this condition. However, while the quality of gluten-free foods has significantly improved during recent decades, maintenance of a gluten-free diet does not necessarily ensure adequate nutritional intake. Because oats are an important source of proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and fibre, their inclusion in a gluten-free diet might improve the nutritional status of a celiac patient. Although oats are included in the list of gluten-free ingredients specified in European regulations, their safety when consumed by celiac patients remains debatable. Some studies claim that pure oats are safe for most celiac people, and contamination with other cereal sources is the main problem facing people with this disease. However, it is necessary to consider that oats include many varieties, containing various amino acid sequences and showing different immunoreactivities associated with toxic prolamins. As a result, several studies have shown that the immunogenicity of oats varies depending on the cultivar consumed. Thus, it is essential to thoroughly study the variety of oats used in a food ingredient before including it in a gluten-free diet.

  13. Adult celiac disease in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is an increased awareness that celiac disease may occur in the elderly although presentations with either diarrhea, weight loss or both may be less common causing delays in diagnosis for prolonged periods.Higher detection rates also seem evident owing to active case screening, largely through serodiagnostic measures. In some elderly patients who are genetically predisposed, it has been hypothesized that celiac disease might be precipitated late in life by an antigen,possibly from an infectious agent. As a result, peptide mimicry or other poorly-defined mechanisms may precipitate an autoimmune gluten-dependent clinical state. Although diarrhea and weight loss occur, only isolated iron deficiency anemia may be present at the time of initial diagnosis. In addition, the risk of other autoimmune disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis, and bone disease, are increased. Osteopenia may also be associated with an increased risk of fractures. Finally, elderly celiacs have an increased risk of malignant intestinal disease, especially lymphoma.

  14. Elderly Onset Celiac Disease: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano C.; Licata, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Celiac sprue is a chronic disease, which usually occurs in children and young adults. However, it can develop in any age group, and the prevalence is increasing even in the elderly population. The atypical patterns of clinical presentation in this age group sometimes can cause a delay in diagnosis. Given the lower sensitivity and specificity of serological tests in the aged population, clinical suspect often arises in the presence of complications (autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy) and must be supported by endoscopic and imaging tools. In this review, we highlight the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population. PMID:27486350

  15. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Hugh J FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of these clinical disorders that involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestine may represent the initial clinical presentation of celiac disease. These disorders should be considered in patients with celiac disease who develop recurrent or refractory symptoms despite adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. Detection of collagenous disorders that affect the luminal mucosa of the stomach or intestinal tract may result in recognition of underlying celiac disease.Keywords: celiac disease, collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, collagenous colitis, gluten-free diet

  16. Bone Mineralization in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Larussa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates a well-established relationship between low bone mineral density (BMD and celiac disease (CD, but data on the pathogenesis of bone derangement in this setting are still inconclusive. In patients with symptomatic CD, low BMD appears to be directly related to the intestinal malabsorption. Adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD will reverse the histological changes in the intestine and also the biochemical evidence of calcium malabsorption, resulting in rapid increase of BMD. Nevertheless, GFD improves BMD but does not normalize it in all patients, even after the recovery of intestinal mucosa. Other mechanisms of bone injury than calcium and vitamin D malabsorption are thought to be involved, such as proinflammatory cytokines, parathyroid function abnormalities, and misbalanced bone remodeling factors, most of all represented by the receptor activator of nuclear factor B/receptor activator of nuclear factor B-ligand/osteoprotegerin system. By means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, it is now rapid and easy to obtain semiquantitative values of BMD. However, the question is still open about who and when submit to DXA evaluation in CD, in order to estimate risk of fractures. Furthermore, additional information on the role of nutritional supplements and alternative therapies is needed.

  17. Celiac disease customers' experiences of hotel breakfast

    OpenAIRE

    Välikangas, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Aim for this bachelor thesis is to collect the experiences of celiac disease customers’ about hotel breakfast in Helsinki and Tampere. The idea was to collect the thoughts of customers and what would they recommend to improve with the gluten-free products and with the quali-ty of service in the hotel breakfast. The study was made as a survey in spring 2015 and the total number of respondents was 62. Celiac disease is a sickness where protein in wheat, rye and barley causes an autoimmune ...

  18. Screening for celiac disease in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Anna; Skaaby, Tea; Kårhus, Line Lund;

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry is ∼50/100,000 persons. This is much lower than the reported prevalence of CD in other Nordic countries and underdiagnosis is suspected. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of CD in a population...

  19. Celiac disease: an immune dysregulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joseph; Bernstein, Leora; Silber, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic immune-mediated condition that develops in genetically predisposed individuals. It is characterized by the presence of circulating auto-antibodies in addition to an enteropathy and at times, other extra-intestinal manifestations triggered by exposure to the gliadin fraction of gluten, a family of proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. There seems to be a rise in reported adverse reactions to gluten, an entity currently termed non-celiac gluten (or perhaps more accurately, wheat) sensitivity, where neither the enteropathy nor the auto-antibodies are present. Celiac disease has protean extra-intestinal manifestations, and an accurate diagnosis should be sought in people suffering from seemingly unrelated complaints, such as fatigue, anorexia, delayed puberty, short stature, decreased bone density, unusual skin rashes, unexplained iron deficiency, and infertility. The presence of an enteropathy, in conjunction with the positive serology, is considered the diagnostic gold standard for making the diagnosis of celiac disease. It is important to stress that the elimination of gluten, even in asymptomatic patients, brings about health benefits, particularly in relation to bone health, as well as a decrease in the incidence of small bowel malignancy, especially lymphoma. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of celiac disease and the molecular mechanisms involved in antigen recognition and processing has provided the impetus for the development of pharmacologic agents that might block the recognition of gluten and its conversion to a toxic antigenic target. Inhibition of tight junction dysregulation could also prevent or minimize the damage triggered by gluten. Work on genetically modified wheat cultivars has progressed, and the possibility of a vaccine to block the immune mediated trigger is being actively investigated. Education and guidance by a knowledgeable nutritionist or registered dietitian can go a long way in minimizing the

  20. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  1. Celiac Disease Presenting with Bone Pain: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Nural Albayrak Aydın; Kamil Yazıcıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the small-bowel mucosa. As can be asymptomatic, involvement of the hematologic, gastrointestinal system, musculosceletal system, nervous system or endocrine system may occur as well. The presence of osteoporosis in celiac disease, may be the only sign of patients who have not been diagnosed yet. The direct effect of celiac disease on bones happens secondary to decreased absorbsion of calci...

  2. Selected luminal mucosal complications of adult celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2009-01-01

    Hugh J FreemanDepartment of Medicine (Gastroenterology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent intestinal disorder that appears to be associated with several clinical conditions. Some involve the luminal mucosa of the stomach and intestinal tract and may, occasionally, complicate the course of celiac disease. Collagenous colitis has been associated with celiac disease and may lead to chronic diarrhea. Conversely, some of t...

  3. A risk factor for female fertility and pregnancy: celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, A V; Mantovani, A

    2000-12-01

    Celiac disease is a genetically-based intolerance to gluten. In the past, celiac disease has been considered a rare disease of infancy characterized by chronic diarrhea and delayed growth. Besides the overt enteropathy, there are many other forms which appear later in life; target organs are not limited to the gut, but include liver, thyroid, skin and reproductive tract. It is now recognized that celiac disease is a relatively frequent disorder; the overall prevalence is at least 1:300 in Western Europe. Celiac disease may impair the reproductive life of affected women, eliciting delayed puberty, infertility, amenorrhea and precocious menopause. Clinical and epidemiological studies show that female patients with celiac disease are at higher risk of spontaneous abortions, low birth weight of the newborn and reduced duration of lactation. No adequate studies are available on the rate of birth defects in the progeny of affected women; however, celiac disease induces malabsorption and deficiency of factors essential for organogenesis, e.g. iron, folic acid and vitamin K. The overall evidence suggests that celiac disease patients can be a group particularly susceptible to reproductive toxicants; however, the pathogenesis of celiac disease-related reproductive disorders still awaits clarification. At present, like the other pathologies associated with celiac disease, the possible prevention or treatment of reproductive effects can only be achieved through a life-long maintenance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:11228068

  4. Preventing complications in celiac disease: our experience with managing adult celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, C J; Wierdsma, N J; Berkenpas, M; Jacobs, M A J M; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    Celiac disease is, as we know it, rather than being a rare and incurable disease until the 1950's, both quite common in screening studies and readily treatable. Three conditions are triggered by gluten consumption: celiac disease, the skin rash dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia. We describe our follow up for out clinic management, as evidence based data about such an approach are lacking in current literature. No food, beverages or medications containing any amount of gluten can be taken. Compliance is often difficult especially when patients are asymptomatic. We control a cohort, in daily practice, of over 700 adult patients. The majority of patients manage the diet without any problems. We describe our follow up in general, for serology, laboratory and histology. Forty percent of our newly diagnosed celiac patients do have a BMI over 25 kg/m(2). An appropriate attitude for this problem is lacking. The problem of slowly weaning off Dapsone over 5-10 years in DH is recognized. The bone density is checked in all newly diagnosed celiac patients. We control, if necessary, by telephone and lab controls done in local cities and see our patients only every two years face-to-face for follow up. The main question is if the adherence to a GFD, quality of life and prevention of complications is improved by visiting a dedicated celiac clinic. We hope to standardize this attitude on evidence data in the years to come. PMID:26060110

  5. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ch’ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patien...

  6. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also ac...

  7. Vitiligo and autoantibodies of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabihollah Shahmoradi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: There may be a relationship between celiac disease and vitiligo. This may indicate a common basic autoimmune mechanism that is an explanation for few case reports that gluten free diets were effective in the treatment of vitiligo patients. Both T test and exact fisher test showed no effect of age, sex and job on seropositivity of these patients (P = 0.56 and P = 0.74, respectively

  8. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  9. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  10. [Variations of the celiac trunk branches in the fetus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordei, P; Antohe, D S

    2002-09-01

    The study was performed on 60 human foetuses, aged between 4 to 9 months, using as methods dissection and plastic and contrast substances injection. We studied the celiac trunk in what concerns the division into its terminal branches, insisting on the possible morphological variations, some rare collateral branches starting from the common arterial trunk, the dimensional relations between the branches at their origin and the level of the celiac trunk origin from the aorta, in relation with the vertebral column, the diaphragmatic passage of the aorta and with the superior mesenteric artery. We also assessed the dimensional relations (calibers at origin) between the branches of the celiac trunk. Ass possible variations of the division of the celiac trunk, we assessed: gastro-hepatic trunk, with the splenic artery directly from the aorta or from the hepatic artery; gastro-splenic trunk, with the hepatic artery originating from the aorta; hepato-splenic trunk, with origin of the left gastric artery either directly from the aorta or from the hepatic artery. Rare variations: celiaco-mesenteric trunk; two arterial trunks, hepato-splenic and hepato-gastric; separate aortic origin for all three "classic" branches of the celiac trunk; two hepatic arteries, one from the celiac trunk and the other from the aorta or superior mesenteric artery; celiac trunk that divides into several terminal branches; one or two suprarenal arteries originating from the celiac trunk. PMID:12572348

  11. Latest In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoven, Samantha; Murray, Joseph A.; Marietta, Eric V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten free diet, and there is an increased desire for alternative therapies. In vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease have been generated in order to better understand the pathogenesis of celiac disease, and this review will discuss these models as well as the testing of alternative therapies using these models. Areas Covered The research discussed describes the different in vitro and in vivo models of celiac disease that currently exist and how they have contributed to our understanding of how gluten can stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients. We also provide a summary on the alternative therapies that have been tested with these models and discuss whether subsequent clinical trials were done based on these tests done with these models of celiac disease. Expert Opinion Only a few of the alternative therapies that have been tested with animal models have gone on to clinical trials; however, those that did go on to clinical trial have provided promising results from a safety standpoint. Further trials are required to determine if some of these therapies may serve as an effective adjunct to a gluten free diet to alleviate the adverse affects associated with accidental gluten exposure. A “magic-bullet” approach may not be the answer to celiac disease, but possibly a future cocktail of these different therapeutics may allow celiac patients to consume an unrestricted diet. PMID:23293929

  12. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease : lost in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Frederike

    2014-01-01

    Refractory coeliac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of coeliac disease. Whereas celiac disease can successfully be treated by the strict avoidance of gluten, refractory celiac patients show no remission despite a gluten-free diet. The pathology of RCDII is only partially understood,

  13. Celiac Disease--What Parents and Caregivers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disorder characterized by a heightened sensitivity to gluten, the protein in wheat, barley and rye. The disease is more common than most people think, affecting approximately 3 million in the United States, about 1 in 100. One of the most notable things about celiac disease is that up to 97 percent of…

  14. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Day Preparing for Disaster Library Series Learning Center Tax Deductions Calendar Contact Us Search Mission Statement Press ... Awareness National Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Tax Deductions Bowker-CSADescription12307Endorsements3 Celiac Disease Facts CSA-CAPFacts ...

  15. [Celiac plexus block: value of x-ray computed guidance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducable, G; Menguy, E; Jouini, S; Moisan, Y; Genevois, A; Lestrat, J P; Winckler, C

    1991-01-01

    Celiac plexus block is a good alternative of pain treatment in upper abdominal pain. Neurolysis of the celiac plexus by the percutaneous posterior route used CT guidance in 8 patients. Pain relief was obtained in 5 of 7 patients (70 per cent); no complication occurred. PMID:1759698

  16. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  17. Celiac Injury Due to Arcuate Ligament: An Endovascular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zini, Chiara, E-mail: zini.chiara@gmail.com; Corona, Mario, E-mail: mario.corona@uniroma.it; Boatta, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.boatta@yahoo.it; Wlderk, Andrea, E-mail: a.wlderk@virgilio.it; Salvatori, Filippo Maria, E-mail: filippomaria.salvatori@uniroma1.it; Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [' Sapienza,' -University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology, Oncology and Pathology Department (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Celiac trunk injures are rare events, with high mortality rates and difficult management. Endovascular treatment may be considered to avoid bleeding. We report a case of severe bleeding in a 37-year-old man resulting from celiac trunk stretching after a motorcycle crash. Because direct celiac trunk catheterization was not possible, a retrograde catheterization of the common hepatic artery was performed via the superior mesenteric artery. Two vascular plugs (type IV) were released, and the exclusion of the celiac trunk origin was completed with the deployment of an aortic cuff. The patient's clinical condition immediately improved, and after 6 months' follow-up, imaging confirmed the complete exclusion of the celiac trunk.

  18. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  19. 2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Astegiano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by small intestinal inflammation and villous atrophy after the ingestion of gluten by genetically susceptible individuals. Several extraintestinal manifestations have been associated to celiac disease. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a primary disorder of the esophagus characterized by upper gastrointestinal symptoms, absence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field in biopsy specimens. Both celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis are caused by aberrant, but distinct, immune responses to ingested antigens and can be responsive to restricted food intake. The aim of this review is to assess whether there is an association between these two pathologies. In the majority of the studies examined, including the studies in pediatric population, the prevalence of eosinophilic esophagitis in subjects with celiac disease was about 10-times that of the general population. We suggest searching for eosinophilic esophagitis in all children undergoing endoscopy for suspicious celiac disease.

  20. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; pdiseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  1. Mutants pave the way to wheat and barley for celiac patients and dietary health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat has two major nutritional problems for the consumer: (1) The flour or pasta produced from the grain is not acceptable to congenital celiac patients and may induce intolerance of dietary 'gluten' in people later in life. (2) The grain is highly deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Currently there is only one treatment for sufferers of celiac disease: the complete exclusion of wheat, barley and rye grains from their diets. Celiac disease is caused by an autoimmune reaction against undigested proline/glutamine rich peptides (epitopes) that are taken up through the intestinal mucosa and initiate an autoimmune response in human leucocyte antigen DQ2- or DQ8-positive individuals. This leads to chronic erasure of the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and to permanent intolerance of dietary 'gluten'. Cereal prolamins are of two types: high molecular weight glutenins (HMWG) with a molecular structure of elastic fibrils that form dityrosine cross-links during dough formation and baking, and gliadins. The gene promoters of the gliadin-type proteins are silenced by DNA methylation in vegetative tissues. This methylation is removed during grain development to permit protein synthesis. Inhibition of the demethylation by mutation specifically inhibits the synthesis of the gliadin-type proteins and only proteins consisting of elastic fibrils are produced. As a proof of principle, a barley cultivar called Lysiba already exists that has such a mutation and provides the rationale creating wheat varieties by mutation of the 5-methylcytosine deglycosylases in the endosperm. Celiac patients are sensitive to a wide variety of different epitopes, which are located in the gliadin-type prolamins. Gliadin-type prolamins are of no importance for baking because wheat HMW glutenin has been shown to be alone sufficient to produce high quality breads. (author)

  2. Mutants Pave the Way to Wheat and Barley for Celiac Patients and Dietary Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat has two major nutritional problems for the consumer: (1) The flour or pasta produced from the grain is not acceptable to congenital celiac patients and may induce intolerance of dietary 'gluten' in people later in life. (2) The grain is highly deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Currently there is only one treatment for sufferers of celiac disease: the complete exclusion of wheat, barley and rye grains from their diets. Celiac disease is caused by an autoimmune reaction against undigested proline/glutamine rich peptides (epitopes) that are taken up through the intestinal mucosa and initiate an autoimmune response in human leucocyte antigen DQ2- or DQ8-positive individuals. This leads to chronic erasure of the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and to permanent intolerance of dietary 'gluten.' Cereal prolamins are of two types: high molecular weight glutenins (HMWG) with a molecular structure of elastic fibrils that form dityrosine cross-links during dough formation and baking, and gliadins. The gene promoters of the gliadin-type proteins are silenced by DNA methylation in vegetative tissues. This methylation is removed during grain development to permit protein synthesis. Inhibition of the demethylation by mutation specifically inhibits the synthesis of the gliadin-type proteins and only proteins consisting of elastic fibrils are produced. As a proof of principle, a barley cultivar called Lysiba already exists that has such a mutation and provides the rationale for creating wheat varieties by mutation of the 5-methylcytosine deglycosylases in the endosperm. Celiac patients are sensitive to a wide variety of different epitopes, which are located in the gliadin-type prolamins. Gliadin-type prolamins are of no importance for baking because wheat HMW glutenin has been shown to be alone sufficient to produce high quality breads. (author)

  3. Prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in children with celiac disease compared to healthy 12-year olds.

    OpenAIRE

    vanderPals, Maria; Ivarsson, Anneli; Norström, Fredrik; Högberg, Lotta; Svensson, Johan; Carlsson, Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  4. Prevalence of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Children with Celiac Disease Compared to Healthy 12-Year Olds

    OpenAIRE

    Maria van der Pals; Anneli Ivarsson; Fredrik Norström; Lotta Högberg; Johan Svensson; Annelie Carlsson

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  5. Niemann - Pick disease associated with hemophagocytic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Serap Karaman; Nafiye Urgancı; Günsel Kutluk; Feyzullah Çetinkaya

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a disease characterized by phagocytosis of blood cells by macrophages within the lymphoreticular tissue. It can develop secondary to some diseases or be familial as a result of genetic mutations. Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) is a very rare lipid storage disease. A three-month-old girl presented with high fever (39°C), abdominal distension and paleness. The parents were consanguineous. The liver and spleen were palpable 10 cm and 11 cm below the costal...

  6. [Hypocholesterolemia and celiac disease: about one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neffati, S; Charfeddine, B; Smach, M Ali; Ben Othmen, L; Ltaief, A; Brahem, I; Dridi, H; Limem, K

    2009-01-01

    Hypocholesterolemia is a biochemical abnormality that often does not have much interest for clinicians. However its frequency varies from 2 to 5% according to the studied populations and can reveal a severe disease (cancer, sareopenia, malabsorption...). We report the observation of Miss HY, 17 year old, in whom the biological association of a hypocholesterolemie state with ferriprive anaemia revealed a celiac disease. Diagnosis was confirmed by the anatomopathologic examination and analysis of both anti-gliadine and anti-endomysium antibodies. The introduction of a strict diet without gluten allowed normalization of the biological parameters and the improvement of clinical symptomatology. PMID:19411241

  7. Oral findings in children with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    ERTEKİN, Vildan; SÜMBÜLLÜ, Muhammed Akif; Tosun, Mahya Sultan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether Turkish children with celiac disease (CD) show dental enamel defects (DEDs), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), teeth missing, and xerostomia, and to compare the results with age- and sex-matched healthy children. Materials and methods: The oral cavity was explored in 81 patients with CD (mean age 8.7 ± 3.7 years; age range 2.5 to 17 years) and in 20 healthy controls. Enamel defects, teeth missing, RAS, and xerostomia were established. Results: Forty-three (53....

  8. New strategies for diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Dyanne P; Gill, James M; Dave, Bhavin; DiPrinzio, Marie J; Quisel, Anna; Foy, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Celiac disease is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by inflammation, leading to injury to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. The inflammation occurs when gliadin, a protein found in such gluten-containing foods as wheat, rye, and barley, is ingested by genetically susceptible individuals. The mucosal damage and subsequent malabsorption of nutrients leads to various complications. Researchers estimate that more than 2 million people in the United States have celiac disease-a prevalence that is greater than was previously believed. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed annually with celiac disease. Until recently, diagnosis has been complicated by the fact that the indicators of celiac disease are nonspecific. However, because of the development of new, easy-to-administer serology tests, diagnosis has become much less complicated. After conducting a review of the literature, the authors recommend a serologic testing sequence for diagnosis of celiac disease and urge that adults and children with an assortment of symptoms be tested for this disease. Common signs and symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, arthralgia, fatigue, infertility, neuropathy, and weight loss, in addition to such gastrointestinal symptomatology as abdominal pain, anorexia, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The only treatment for patients with celiac disease remains a gluten-free diet.

  9. New strategies for diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Dyanne P; Gill, James M; Dave, Bhavin; DiPrinzio, Marie J; Quisel, Anna; Foy, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Celiac disease is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by inflammation, leading to injury to the mucosal lining of the small intestine. The inflammation occurs when gliadin, a protein found in such gluten-containing foods as wheat, rye, and barley, is ingested by genetically susceptible individuals. The mucosal damage and subsequent malabsorption of nutrients leads to various complications. Researchers estimate that more than 2 million people in the United States have celiac disease-a prevalence that is greater than was previously believed. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed annually with celiac disease. Until recently, diagnosis has been complicated by the fact that the indicators of celiac disease are nonspecific. However, because of the development of new, easy-to-administer serology tests, diagnosis has become much less complicated. After conducting a review of the literature, the authors recommend a serologic testing sequence for diagnosis of celiac disease and urge that adults and children with an assortment of symptoms be tested for this disease. Common signs and symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, arthralgia, fatigue, infertility, neuropathy, and weight loss, in addition to such gastrointestinal symptomatology as abdominal pain, anorexia, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. The only treatment for patients with celiac disease remains a gluten-free diet. PMID:16585382

  10. Celiac axis stenosis and lethal liver ischemia after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipska, Ludmila; Visokai, Vladimir; Levy, Miroslav; Koznar, Boris; Zaruba, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Celiac axis stenosis can lead to a fatal hepatic ischemia after pancreaticoduodenectomy unless a simultaneous revascularisation of the celiac circulation is performed. In the present study are reported three cases of celiac axis stenosis, all of which had histologically confirmed periampullary cancer. Case 1: a 50-year-old male with a history of myocardial infarction and liver steatosis; visceral arteriography prior to the surgery demonstrated a celiac axis stenosis. Whipple operation was performed. After removing the specimen, no signs of liver ischemia were found (liver was cholestatic) and pulsation of the hepatic artery was strong. The patient died on the second postoperative day after an abrupt irreversible cardiac arrest. Autopsy proved acute severe hepatic ischemia. Case 2: a 64-year-old female. Preoperative visceral angiography showed significant celiac axis stenosis. As a first step of surgery the root of the celiac trunk was exposed, a fibrotic ring around it was divided. Standard D1 pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Case 3: a 58-year-old female without preoperative angiography, indicated for surgery. After an occlusion test of the gastroduodenal artery the liver became ischemic. Division of the fibrotic ring around celiac axis was performed together with a standard D1 pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. No postoperative complications were reported in both case 2 and 3. PMID:19760970

  11. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  12. Celiac disease during pregnancy: to screen or not to screen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Rachel; Sheiner, Eyal

    2009-01-01

    Permanent intolerance to gluten, known as celiac disease, affects both fertility and pregnancy outcomes when left untreated. Recent research on celiac disease and reproduction urge increased screening for celiac disease. While this may be beneficial for couples facing idiopathic infertility or those from particular risk groups, screening involves its own risks and expenses, and has not been consistently proven effective for the general population while pregnant. The present editorial discusses the potential advantages and disadvantages of screening during pregnancy and examines when screening may be helpful. PMID:18818937

  13. Decreased prevalence of celiac disease among Brazilian elderly

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of Brazilian individuals over 60 years of age and compare it with the previously known prevalence in a pediatric group living in the same geographical area.

  14. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B;

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  15. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a professional on the gluten-free diet? These educational videos were built to help those looking for ... Grant from the Celiac Support Association made this educational tool a reality. Donor: Lodico Walk of CSA ...

  16. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a helpful video for Celiacs going off to college for the first time. The DVD below provides tips to help students navigate college dining services and maintain a gluten-free diet ...

  17. The Development of Hemochromatosis after Treatment for Celiac Sprue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mang Ma

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac sprue is a chronic disease characterized by maldigestion and malabsorption. Whereas many diseases have been reported in association with celiac sprue, hemochromatosis has not. A 62-year-old man with celiac sprue and a history of iron deficiency and osteopenic bone disease who developed hemochromatosis is reported. Liver biopsy showed portal tract fibrosis, early nodule formation and increased hepatic iron storage. The patient developed hemochromatosis with hepatic injury two years after his transferrin saturation became elevated and 10 years after he had been placed on gluten-free diet. Lifelong iron accumulation was prevented by chronic malabsorption of iron but hemochromatosis became manifest when his celiac sprue was treated.

  18. Assessing of Celiac Disease and Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ontiveros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication of papers on the topic of gluten related disorders has substantially increased over the last few years. This has motivated healthcare professionals to pay attention not only to celiac disease and wheat allergy but also to a condition termed nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. Until now this condition has been diagnosed clinically on the basis of exclusion criteria and clinical response to gluten withdrawal. In addition, recent research in this field has shown that other food components distinct from gluten are implicated in NCGS cases, thereby changing our general understanding of NCGS diagnosis in either individuals on gluten containing diets or those already following a gluten-free diet with no proper diagnostic work-up of celiac disease. With this in mind, the assessment of NCGS will require extensive knowledge of celiac disease manifestations and the laboratory tests commonly performed during diagnosis of celiac disease.

  19. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... put out a series of videos to help families. They have a helpful video for Celiacs going ... A Local Chapter Find a Resource Unit My Family Health History CSA Programs CSA Annual Contests Essay ...

  20. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten-Free ... Bay Baking Meisters Gluten-Free Mixtures One Source Nutrition Pro Bites Starfish World Wise Grains World Wise ...

  1. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Celiac Awareness Day Preparing for Disaster Library Series Learning Center Tax Deductions Calendar Contact Us Search Mission Statement Press Releases 2015 CSA Youth Ambassador PEER Grants Awarded Bountiful Pantry DNI Group, LLC Earth ...

  2. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten-Free Expos Membership Participate in Clinical Trials Cel Kids Cel Kids Doctor Visit Gluten-Free ...

  3. Identification of Non-HLA Genes Associated with Celiac Disease and Country-Specific Differences in a Large, International Pediatric Cohort.

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    Ashok Sharma

    Full Text Available There are significant geographical differences in the prevalence and incidence of celiac disease that cannot be explained by HLA alone. More than 40 loci outside of the HLA region have been associated with celiac disease. We investigated the roles of these non-HLA genes in the development of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA and celiac disease in a large international prospective cohort study.A total of 424,788 newborns from the US and European general populations and first-degree relatives with type 1 diabetes were screened for specific HLA genotypes. Of these, 21,589 carried 1 of the 9 HLA genotypes associated with increased risk for type 1 diabetes and celiac disease; we followed 8676 of the children in a 15 y prospective follow-up study. Genotype analyses were performed on 6010 children using the Illumina ImmunoChip. Levels of tTGA were measured in serum samples using radio-ligand binding assays; diagnoses of celiac disease were made based on persistent detection of tTGA and biopsy analysis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards analyses.We found 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 5 genes associated with celiac disease (TAGAP, IL18R1, RGS21, PLEK, and CCR9 in time to celiac disease analyses (10-4>P>5.8x10-6. The hazard ratios (HR for the SNPs with the smallest P values in each region were 1.59, 1.45, 2.23, 2.64, and 1.40, respectively. Outside of regions previously associated with celiac disease, we identified 10 SNPs in 8 regions that could also be associated with the disease (P<10-4. A SNP near PKIA (rs117128341, P = 6.5x10-8, HR = 2.8 and a SNP near PFKFB3 (rs117139146, P<2.8x10-7, HR = 4.9 reached the genome-wide association threshold in subjects from Sweden. Analyses of time to detection of tTGA identified 29 SNPs in 2 regions previously associated with celiac disease (CTLA4, P = 1.3x10-6, HR = 0.76 and LPP, P = 2.8x10-5, HR = .80 and 6 SNPs in 5 regions not previously associated with celiac disease (P<10

  4. Celiac disease manifested by polyneuropathy and swollen ankles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zlatko Djuric; Borislav Kamenov; Vuka Katic

    2007-01-01

    A 27-year-old male started to have his ankles swollen during his military service. He was examined at a military hospital where electromyoneurography showed the signs of distal sensory-motor polyneuropathy with axon demyelinization and weak myopathic changes,whereas histopathological examination of gastrocnemius muscle biopsy revealed some mild and nonspecific myopathy. Besides, he was found to have subcutaneous ankle tissue edemas and hypertransaminasemia. Due to these reasons, he was dismissed from the military service and examined at another hospital where bone osteodensitometry revealed low bone mineral density of the spine. However, his medical problems were not resolved and after the second discharge from hospital he was desperately seeing doctors from time to time. Finally, at our institution he was shown to have celiac disease (CD) by positive serology (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibodies) and small bowel mucosal histopathological examination,which showed total small bowel villous atrophy. Three months after the initiation of gluten-free diet, his ankle edema disappeared, electromyoneurographic signs of polyneuropathy improved and liver aminotransferases normalized. Good knowledge of CD extraintestinal signs and serologic screening are essential for early CD recognition and therapy.

  5. Patients with Celiac Disease Are Not Followed Adequately

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Margot L.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D.; Larson, Joseph J.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. It has been recommended that patients be followed, make regular visits to the clinic, and undergo serologic analysis for markers of celiac disease, although a follow-up procedure has not been standardized. We determined how many patients with celiac disease are actually followed. Methods We collected data on 122 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, diagnosed between 1996 and 2006 in Olmsted County, Minnesota (70% women, median age of 42 years) for whom complete medical records and verification of residency were available. We determined the frequency at which patients received follow-up examinations, from 6 months to 5 years after diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate event rates at 1 and 5 year(s). Patients were classified according to categories of follow-up procedures recommended by the American Gastroenterology Association (AGA). Results We estimated that by 1 and 5 year(s) after diagnosis with celiac disease, 41.0% and 88.7% of the patients had follow-up visits, 33.6% and 79.8% were assessed for compliance with a gluten-free diet, 3.3% and 15.8% met with a registered dietitian, 2.5% and 18.1% had an additional intestinal biopsy, and 22.1% and 65.6% received serologic testing for markers of celiac disease. Among 113 patients (93%) who were followed for more than 4 years, only 35% received follow-up analyses that were consistent with AGA recommendations. Conclusions Patients with celiac disease are not followed consistently. Follow-up examinations are often inadequate and do not follow AGA recommendations. Improving follow-up strategies for patients with celiac disease could improve management of this disease. PMID:22610009

  6. Value of Gluten Patch Test in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

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    Rouzbeh Taherian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Celiac disease is an intestinal disorder identified by mucus inflammation, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia. This disorder can be controlled by elimination of gluten from daily diet. Patients with celiac disease are at greater risk of gastrointestinal malignancy and non-Hodgkin lymphoma than are the general population. This study tries to present the value of gluten patch test for diagnosis of celiac disease.Methods: In this investigation, the study population was divided into case and control groups. The case group consisted of patients with celiac disease. The control group were patients involved in celiac disease but suffering from other gastrointestinal disorders. Both gluten patch and placebo patch were attached to the skin between the scapulas. The results were read twice: 48 hours and 96 hours after the patch was applied. Patients who showed irritation reactions were withdrawn from this study. The results were analysed by SPSS software, Spearman's test, chi square, and Mann-Whitney tests. Findings: The value obtained from the gluten patch test after 96 hours are as follows: specification at 95%, sensitivity at 8%, positive prediction value at 67%, and negative prediction value at 43%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the gluten patch test is not an efficient test for screening of celiac disease, however, it can be useful for diagnosis of celiac disease if employed and studied with clinical symptoms and serologic and biopsy tests. Furthermore, we should doubt our judgment if the result of gluten patch test for the patient with celiac disease is positive.

  7. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  8. Celiac Disease and Cystic Fibrosis: Challenges to Differential Diagnosis

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    Ramos Alessandra Teixeira Pessoa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis and celiac disease were considered a single clinical entity for many years. Differentiation between the diseases occurred some time in the 1930s of the 20th Century. Both diseases may present the intestinal malabsorption syndrome and similar clinical manifestations that contribute to difficulties with clinical distinction. We describe a report of two patients with initial diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, who were subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease.

  9. The impact of misdiagnosing celiac disease at a referral centre

    OpenAIRE

    Biagi, Federico; Bianchi, Paola I; Campanella, Jonia; Zanellati, Giovanni; CORAZZA, GINO R.

    2009-01-01

    In the past few years, the number of celiac disease diagnoses not confirmed at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, a tertiary referral centre, was particularly high. Therefore, a decision was made to investigate the reasons why these diagnoses were wrong and by whom they had been made. The clinical histories of all celiac patients referred to the centre were re-evaluated. Between December 1998 and January 2007, 614 patients who were diagnosed at other institutions and p...

  10. The Canadian celiac health survey – the Ottawa chapter pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease may manifest with a variety of symptoms which can result in delays in diagnosis. Celiac disease is associated with a number of other medical conditions. The last national survey of members of the Canadian Celiac Association (CCA was in 1989. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of surveying over 5,000 members of the CCA, in addition to obtaining more health related information about celiac disease. Methods The Professional Advisory Board of the CCA in collaboration with the University of Ottawa developed a comprehensive questionnaire on celiac disease. The questionnaire was pre-tested and then a pilot survey was conducted on members of the Ottawa Chapter of the CCA using a Modified Dillmans' Total Design method for mail surveys. Results We had a 76% response to the first mailout of the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 55.5 years and the mean age at diagnosis was 45 years. The majority of respondents presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue or weight loss. Prior to diagnosis, 30% of respondents consulted four or more family doctors. Thirty seven percent of individuals were told they had either osteoporosis or osteopenia. Regarding the impact of the gluten-free diet (GFD, 45% of individuals reported that they found following a GFD was very or moderately difficult. The quality of life of individuals with celiac disease was comparable to the mean quality of life of Canadians. Conclusion On the basis of our results, we concluded that a nationwide survey is feasible and this is in progress. Important concerns included delays in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the awareness of associated medical conditions. Other issues include awareness of celiac disease by health professionals and the impact of the GFD on quality of life. These issues will be addressed further in the national survey.

  11. Dental and Oral Considerations in Pediatric Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Sara; Karlin, Ellen; Meiller, Timothy; Bashirelahi, Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is the world's most common genetic food intolerance disorder. Children with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The first recognizable symptom in children is often an oral manifestation, rather than the typical gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the oral and dental manifestations of CD to help pediatric dentists identify and refer atypically symptomatic patients to their pediatricians. PMID:27620516

  12. The Implicitome: A Resource for Rationalizing Gene-Disease Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Eelke; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Mina, Eleni; Tatum, Zuotian; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; van Mulligen, Erik M.; Schuemie, Martijn; Aten, Emmelien; Li, Tong Shu; Bruskiewich, Richard; Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.; Kors, Jan A.; den Dunnen, Johan; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Roos, Marco; ‘t Hoen, Peter A.C.; Mons, Barend; Schultes, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimental methods such as medical sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify increasingly large numbers of potential relations between genetic variants and diseases. Both biological complexity (millions of potential gene-disease associations) and the accelerating rate of data production necessitate computational approaches to prioritize and rationalize potential gene-disease relations. Here, we use concept profile technology to expose from the biomedical literature both explicitly stated gene-disease relations (the explicitome) and a much larger set of implied gene-disease associations (the implicitome). Implicit relations are largely unknown to, or are even unintended by the original authors, but they vastly extend the reach of existing biomedical knowledge for identification and interpretation of gene-disease associations. The implicitome can be used in conjunction with experimental data resources to rationalize both known and novel associations. We demonstrate the usefulness of the implicitome by rationalizing known and novel gene-disease associations, including those from GWAS. To facilitate the re-use of implicit gene-disease associations, we publish our data in compliance with FAIR Data Publishing recommendations [https://www.force11.org/group/fairgroup] using nanopublications. An online tool (http://knowledge.bio) is available to explore established and potential gene-disease associations in the context of other biomedical relations. PMID:26919047

  13. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passananti, V.; Siniscalchi, M.; Zingone, F.; Bucci, C.; Tortora, R.; Iovino, P.; Ciacci, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC. PMID:24369457

  14. Prevalence of Eating Disorders in Adults with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Passananti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact social activities and emotional state. Aim was to investigate the prevalence of altered eating behaviour in celiac patients. Methods. Celiac patients and controls completed a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2, Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90. Results. One hundred celiac adults and 100 controls were not statistically different for gender, age, and physical activity. STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90 were higher in CD patients than controls. EDI-2 was different in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, ascetisms, and interpersonal diffidence between CD and HC women, whilst only in interceptive awareness between CD and HC men. A higher EAT-26 score was associated with the CD group dependently with gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAT26 demonstrated association between indices of diet-related disorders in both CD and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Conclusion. CD itself and not gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors may contribute pathological eating behavior in celiac adults. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in CD men and in HC.

  15. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY

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    Camilo VIEIRA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Neurological symptoms have been well-documented in patients with celiac disease, nevertheless, the presumption of a greater prevalence of epilepsy in celiac patients remains controversial. Objectives To determine the frequency of celiac disease in children and adolescents with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. Methods A cross-sectional study. One hundred pediatric patients with non-symptomatic epilepsy were followed-up at two public pediatric neurology clinics in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Screening for celiac disease was performed by serial measurements of IgA anti-transglutaminase and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies, followed by bowel biopsy in positive cases. HLA DQ02 and DQ08 were investigated in seropositive individuals, assessing the type of seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs used and the presence gastrointestinal symptoms. Results Three (3.0% patients tested anti-tTG-positive, two with normal duodenal mucosa (Marsh 0 and one with intraepithelial infiltrate (Marsh I. No villous atrophy of the duodenal mucosa (Marsh III celiac disease was found. Two patients tested positive for HLA DQ02; none were DQ08 positive. Conclusion The present study failed to prove the association between celiac disease and epilepsy.

  16. Celiac Disease in an Adoptive Child with Recurrent Giardia Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K; De Matteis, Arianna; Di Iorio, Laura; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine. A complete management and differential diagnosis of such disease includes food intolerances, intestinal infections, and irritable bowel syndrome. We describe an 8-years-old adoptive girl from Congo with negative medical history. Patient followed for recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea associated to Giardia infection, unresponsive to antiparasitic therapy. Persistence of symptoms despite antiparasitic therapy, prompted us to perform: 1- Blood screening of Celiac disease, which was negative; 2- Genetic evaluation of celiac disease, which revealed the presence of HLA-DQ2 heterodimer; and 3- Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, which showed duodenal villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, associated with Helicobacter Pylori infection. The child was treated in accordance with international recommendations using a Gluten-free diet and specific antibiotics, which lead to the resolution of the symptoms. Our patient's clinical history seems peculiar, considering that, recurrent Giardiasis may mimic the symptoms of Celiac disease and may simulate clinical and histological picture of active Celiac disease. Early diagnosis may help prevent the complications of untreated celiac disease. PMID:26309440

  17. Small bowel ultrasound in patients with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartusek, D. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: dbartusek@fnbrno.cz; Valek, V. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Husty, J. [Department of Radiology, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jhusty@fnbrno.cz; Uteseny, J. [Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, Masaryk University hospital Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: juteseny@fnbrno.cz

    2007-08-15

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is a common, lifelong disease with small bowel malabsorption based on genetically conditioned gluten intolerance. The clinical manifestation could be very heterogeneous. The proof of celiac disease is now based mainly on clinical and laboratory (antibodies and enterobiopsy) signs, which are in some cases problematic and inconvenient. Materials and methods: In our study we have examined 250 patients with suspection or with proven celiac disease and we evaluated specific ultrasound small bowel changes in this group. In the next step, we chose 59 patients with laboratory proved celiac disease and we statistically compared ultrasound, other laboratory and clinical findings in different forms and stages of the disease. Results: Specific small bowel pathologies in patients with celiac disease (like changes of intestinal villi in different parts of small bowel, abnormal peristalsis and mesenterial lymphadenopathy) can be well visualized by ultrasound and in combination with clinical and laboratory signs ultrasound examination could have an important role in screening, determination of diagnosis and monitoring of patients with different forms of celiac disease.

  18. Celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a review on the association with schizophrenia and mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Porcelli, Brunetta; Verdino, Valeria; Bossini, Letizia; Terzuoli, Lucia; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    An association between many psychiatric and gluten-related disorders has been known for some time. In the case of schizophrenia and mood disorders, the major psychiatric disorders, there is much evidence, not without contradictions, of a possible association between schizophrenia and celiac disease. The association between mood disorders and gluten-related disorders, especially celiac disease, has only been studied for depression, often coupled with anxiety, and very recently for bipolar diso...

  19. The Perceived Social Burden in Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ciacci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we discuss the change in celiac disease (CD awareness and perception through patients’ concerns and the most recent literature. Nowadays CD has moved in the public awareness (both doctors and population from a rare disease to a common one and the gluten free diet (GFD is no longer the exclusive therapy for CD patients but is becoming a popular health choice for everybody. Gluten-free food, once hard to find and requiring home preparation, is now available at restaurants and grocery stores. However, the quality of life of those affected by CD seems to be still compromised and this is particularly true for those who find it difficult to adhere to a GFD and those who were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. Intervention at diagnosis and follow-up to improve the patients’ adaptation to the condition and its limitations should be implemented.

  20. Differential Diagnosis of the pancreatic disease : significance of perivascular changes at celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryang; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Dong Guk; Lee, Sung Il; Ahn, Chang Soo; Oh, Sei Jung [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Kim, Young Hwan [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to classify perivascular change in the celiac trunk and SMA occurring in pancreatic disease and to evaluate its significance in differential diagnosis. In 73 patients with pancreatic disease (42, acute pancreatitis; 14, chronic pancreatitis; 17, pancreatic cancer) abdominal CT findings were retrospectively reviewed. We defined infiltration as linear or irregular density and thickening as presence of a soft tissue mantle surrounding the vessel, and statistically evaluated the usefulness of these factors for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. Thickening of the celiac trunk and SMA is a valuable finding in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic inflammatory disease and pancreatic cancer. When applied to the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease, perivascular change should be classified as either infiltration or thickening. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  1. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rakeshkumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA. Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase. Those with a positive titer (but < 10 times the upper limit of normal underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6% turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%, 15 (8.24% females and 9 (9.18% males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD.

  2. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharat Rakeshkumar; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.; Chadha, Manoj D.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Pawal, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD) with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD) in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA). Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase). Those with a positive titer (but duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males) patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6%) turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%), 15 (8.24%) females and 9 (9.18%) males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD. PMID:26904476

  3. Barriers impeding serologic screening for celiac disease in clinically high-prevalence populations

    OpenAIRE

    Barbero, Erika M; McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is present in ~1% of the general population in the United States and Europe. Despite the availability of inexpensive serologic screening tests, ~85% of individuals with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and there is an average delay in diagnosis of symptomatic individuals with celiac disease that ranges from ~5.8-11 years. This delay is often attributed to the use of a case-based approach for detection rather than general population screening for celiac disease, and ...

  4. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, ...

  5. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  6. Celiac disease presenting as the Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, W; McConnell, B

    1999-02-01

    We describe two patients with Paterson-Brown Kelly (Plummer-Vinson) syndrome whose iron deficiency anemia was due to celiac disease. They presented with dysphagia 13 and 9 yr, respectively, before celiac disease was diagnosed. Neither had gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of malabsorption. Celiac disease is a recognized cause of chronic iron deficiency and should be considered as an etiological factor for sideropenic dysphagia.

  7. Celiac disease: Management of persistent symptoms in patients on a gluten-free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David H Dewar; Suzanne C Donnelly; Simon D McLaughlin; Matthew W Johnson; H Julia Ellis; Paul J Ciclitira

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate all patients referred to our center with non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD),to establish a cause for their continued symptoms.METHODS:We assessed all patients referred to our center with non-responsive celiac disease over an 18-mo period.These individuals were investigated to establish the eitiology of their continued symptoms.The patients were first seen in clinic where a thorough history and examination were performed with routine blood work including tissue transglutaminase antibody measurement.They were also referred to a specialist gastroenterology dietician to try to identift any lapses in the diet and sources of hidden gluten ingestion.A repeat small intestinal biopsy was also performed and compared to biopsies from the referring hospital where possible.Colonoscopy,lactulose hydrogen breath testing,pancreolauryl testing and computed tomography scan of the abdomen were undertaken if the symptoms persisted.Their clinical progress was followed over a minimum of 2 years.RESULTS:One hundred and twelve consecutive patients were referred with NRCD.Twelve were found not to have celiac disease (CD).Of the remaining 100 patients,45% were not adequately adhering to a strict gluten-free diet,with 24 (53%) found to be inadvertently ingesting gluten,and 21 (47%) admitting noncompliance.Microscopic colitis was diagnosed in 12% and small bowel bacterial overgrowth in 9%.Refractory CD was diagnosed in 9%.Three of these were diagnosed with intestinal lymphoma.After 2 years,78 patients remained well,eight had continuing symptoms,and four had died.CONCLUSION:In individuals with NRCD,a remediable cause can be found in 90%:with continued gluten ingestion as the leading cause.We propose an algorithm for investigation.

  8. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

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    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  9. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. PMID:25925923

  10. Celiac disease: the situation on the Slovak market

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    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, non‐tropical sprue, idiopathic sprue, idiopathic steatorrhoea and gluten‐sensitive enteropathy, is a serious genetic autoimmune disease, which damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. The latest researches show that while in the 1970s the prevalence of celiac disease in the world was 0.03%, in the present years the estimated prevalence is 1%. In average, the prevalence of celiac disease in the Western countries is close to 1:100. The celiac disease occurs more often in the case of women than of men, at a ratio of 2.8:1. The aim of the present paper was to bring few information about the celiac disease, highlight the increasing number of celiacs, as well as to determine the Slovak celiacs opinion about the situation on Slovak market and their consumer behaviour on the market of gluten free products. As research methods, there have been used the methods of survey and structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. The total number of respondents was 130 randomly selected celiacs from all over the Slovak republic. For a deeper analysis of the obtained results, there have been set out four assumptions and ten hypotheses, which have been tested with the use of Pearson´s chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Cramer´s contingency coefficient. The results of the present paper show, that despite the fact that few of our findings are pleasing - almost 52% of our respondents stay that the labelling of gluten free products is sufficient, over 74% of respondents think that they have enough information about the availability of gluten free products and more than 89% of respondents think that the present scope of range of gluten free products is better as before; there are still some shortcomings, which has to be reduced or eliminated - only less than 7% of respondents think that the price of gluten free products is adequate, over 45% of respondents

  11. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SCREENING IN CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE

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    Şedat IŞIKAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The involvement of the peripheral nervous system in children with celiac disease is particularly rare. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the need for neurophysiological testing in celiac disease patients without neurological symptoms in order to detect early subclinical neuropathy and its possible correlations with clinical and demographic characteristics. Methods Two hundred and twenty consecutive children with celiac disease were screened for neurological symptoms and signs, and those without symptoms or signs were included. Also, patients with comorbidities associated with peripheral neuropathy or a history of neurological disease were excluded. The remaining 167 asymptomatic patients as well as 100 control cases were tested electro-physiologically for peripheral nervous system diseases. Motor nerve conduction studies, including F-waves, were performed for the median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial nerves, and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed for the median, ulnar, and sural nerves with H reflex of the soleus muscle unilaterally. All studies were carried out using surface recording electrodes. Normative values established in our laboratory were used. Results Evidence for subclinical neuropathy was not determined with electrophysiological studies in any of the participants. Conclusion In this highly selective celiac disease group without any signs, symptoms as well as the predisposing factors for polyneuropathy, we did not determine any cases with neuropathy. With these results we can conclude that in asymptomatic cases with celiac disease electrophysiological studies are not necessary. However, larger studies with the electrophysiological studies performed at different stages of disease at follow-ups are warranted.

  12. Description of the celiac artery in domestic pigeons (Columba livia

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    Cibele Geeverghese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to define the origin and distribution of the celiac artery and its collateral branches in 15 fowls from the Columba livia species, which were obtained from the Zoonosis Control Center of Brasilia, Brazil. In order to mark the arterial system of the specimens, the left brachiocephalic trunk was canullated and a colored water-latex solution was injected there. Afterwards, fowls were fixed in a 10% v/v formaldehyde solution and dissected with appropriate equipment, presenting the results described in this paper. The celiac artery originated from the ventral face of the descendent aorta. The first collateral branch arose from the celiac artery itself, forming the esophageal artery. Then, the celiac artery has bifurcated into two branches, named left and right branches of the celiac artery. The left branch emitted the proventricular ventral artery, followed by the splenic arteries, proventricular dorsal artery, and the left hepatic artery. The left branch has bifurcated into two branches, known as ventral and left gastric arteries. The right branch emitted the right hepatic artery, followed by the ileal artery and the right gastric artery. Finally, the right branch turned into the pancreaticoduodenal artery. Our findings showed a great similarity with the avian lineages of the Gallus gallus species, except for the lack of ileocecal artery, cystic branches, and dorsal gastric artery.

  13. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

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    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  14. Frequency of Celiac Disease in Patients with Hypothyroidism

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    Mojtaba Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Celiac disease (CD is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. The aim of this study was to find the frequency of celiac disease in patients with hypothyroidism in Guilan province, north of Iran. Methods. A total of 454 consecutive patients with hypothyroidism underwent celiac serological tests antiGliadin antibodies (AGA, antitissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA-tTG and antiendomysial antibodies (EMA-IgA. Small intestinal biopsy was performed when any of celiac serological tests was positive. Results. Eleven (2.4% patients were positive for celiac serology, and two patients with documented villous atrophy were diagnosed with classic CD (0.4%; 95%. Two patients with classic CD had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT (0.6%; 95%. Six (54.5% of 11 were suffering from overt hypothyroidism and 45.5% from subclinical hypothyroidism. Six (54.5% had HT, and 45.5% had nonautoimmune hypothyroidism. Conclusions. In this study, prevalence of CD was lower than other studies. Most of the patients with CD were suffering from HT, but there was no significant statistical relation between CD and HT.

  15. Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial: Gluten versus Placebo Rechallenge in Patients with Lymphocytic Enteritis and Suspected Celiac Disease.

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    Mercè Rosinach

    Full Text Available The role of gluten as a trigger of symptoms in non-coeliac gluten sensitivity has been questioned.To demonstrate that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS, which presented with lymphocytic enteritis, positive celiac genetics and negative celiac serology.Double-blind randomized clinical trial of gluten vs placebo rechallenge.>18 years of age, HLA-DQ2/8+, negative coeliac serology and gluten-dependent lymphocytic enteritis, and GI symptoms, with clinical and histological remission at inclusion. Eighteen patients were randomised: 11 gluten (20 g/day and 7 placebo. Clinical symptoms, quality of life (GIQLI, and presence of gamma/delta+ cells and transglutaminase deposits were evaluated.91% of patients had clinical relapse during gluten challenge versus 28.5% after placebo (p = 0.01. Clinical scores and GIQLI worsened after gluten but not after placebo (p<0.01. The presence of coeliac tissue markers at baseline biopsy on a gluten-free diet allowed classifying 9 out of the 18 (50% patients as having probable 'coeliac lite' disease.This proof-of-concept study indicates that gluten is the trigger of symptoms in a subgroup of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for NCGS. They were characterized by positive celiac genetics, lymphocytic enteritis, and clinical and histological remission after a gluten-free diet.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02472704.

  16. Problems and Challenges to Adaptation of Gluten Free Diet by Indian Patients with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Rajpoot; Makharia, Govind K.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is emerging in India and has become a public health problem. Almost 6–8 million Indians are estimated to have celiac disease. While there is a large pool of patients with celiac disease in India, until now, only a fraction of them have been diagnosed. With increasing awareness about celiac disease amongst health care providers and the general population, a massive increase in the number of patients with celiac disease is expected now and in the subsequent decade in India. While...

  17. Disease associated time consumption in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, IH; Prevoo, MLL; van Leeuwen, MA; van Riel, PLCM; Lolkema, WF; Postma, DS; van Rijswijk, MH

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the disease associated time consumption of normal activities of daily living and of treatment and monitoring activities in a cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with followup of at least 6 years. Comparison was made with a group of patients with asthma and

  18. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  19. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviewed are the history and organization, purpose and programs, and public services of the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, an organization geared toward eradicating Tay-Sachs disease (a hereditary disorder affecting primarily Jewish infants which generally leads to deterioration and death by the child's fifth year). (SBH)

  20. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Iranian Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain Referred to a Pediatric Referral Center

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    Farzaneh Moetamed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Clinical features of Iranian children with celiac disease (CD are still unknown and there is scant information about atypical presentation of celiac disease from Iran. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of CD in Iranian children presenting with functional abdominal pain (FAP. Methods:In this cross-sectional study, 301 children affected by FAP were screened for CD by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG IgA. IgA antibody was also measured to exclude IgA deficiency. The antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed by duodenal biopsy that was scored according to the Marsh classification in cases with abnormal titer of tTG antibody. Findings:A total of 301 children (138 males, 163 females with FAP were studied. Endoscopic duodenal biopsy was taken for patients with positive and borderline tTG test. Two out of 301 cases were IgA deficient and celiac disease was suspected for one of them based on histological findings. Four out of 299 patients with normal IgA had abnormal tTG titer; intermediate ranges (16-23 U/ml were detected in 1 and positive ranges (≥24 U/ml in 3 cases. CD was suggested in all patients with abnormal titer of tTG (1.33% based on histological findings. Conclusion:The prevalence of celiac disease in children with FAP is estimated 1.3% (nearly 2 times higher than in normal population in Iran.

  1. Immunogenetic Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease and Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Hernández, Celia; Peña, Amado Salvador; Bernardo, David

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is the most common oral intolerance in Western countries. It results from an immune response towards gluten proteins from certain cereals in genetically predisposed individuals (HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8). Its pathogenesis involves the adaptive (HLA molecules, transglutaminase 2, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T-cells) and the innate immunity with an IL-15-mediated response elicited in the intraepithelial compartment. At present, the only treatment is a permanent strict gluten-free diet (GFD). Multidisciplinary studies have provided a deeper insight of the genetic and immunological factors and their interaction with the microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disease. Similarly, a better understanding of the composition of the toxic gluten peptides has improved the ways to detect them in food and drinks and how to monitor GFD compliance via non-invasive approaches. This review, therefore, addresses the major findings obtained in the last few years including the re-discovery of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. PMID:27216895

  2. Histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac patients

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    Elena Bardellini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible subjects. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut's involvement in CD, other mucosal surfaces belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to be affected. Aim: Assuming that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological inflammatory alterations of the intestine in CD patients, this study wishes to assess the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with CD. Methods: A group of 37 patients (age range 20-38 years; female: male ratio 28:9 with CD were enrolled. Out of 37 patients, 19 patients (group A followed a gluten free diet (GFD -2 patients from less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years- while 18 patients (group B were still untreated. Fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, female: Male ratio 11:4 served as controls for the CD patients. Ethical approval for the research was granted by the Ethics Committee. Biopsy specimens were taken from normal looking oral mucosa. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and γδ-chains T cell receptor (TCR. Results: The T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate was significantly (p < 0.0001 increased in group B (both compared with group A and with the control group. Conclusion: This study confirms the oral cavity to be a site of involvement of CD and its possible diagnostic potentiality in this disease.

  3. [Celiac disease and abortion: focusing on a possible relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramaschi, P; Biasi, D; Carletto, A; Randon, M; Pacor, M L; Bambara, L M

    2000-02-01

    Celiac disease represents one of the most frequent chronic inflammatory diseases. In Italy the prevalence among school-age population has been calculated in 1:180 subjects. Along with typical forms of the disease characterized by overt symptoms and signs of malabsorption, many cases are undiagnosed because they are subclinical, atypical or even symptomless. In adults, the disease may present with infertility; in particular celiac disease may be responsible of multiple abortions. These manifestations, whose pathogenesis is unknown, are not related to the severity of the disease; the gluten-free diet strongly ameliorates the fertility. In this paper we have focused the connection between abortion and celiac disease. A better knowledge of this relationship may lead to correctly diagnose and consequently to treat the cause of some cases of abortion, previously labelled as cases of unidentified origin. PMID:10748651

  4. Celiac disease and its effect on human reproduction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shelly; Badawy, Shawky Z A

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by gluten in the diet. Patients present with a wide array of symptoms due to malabsorption that include diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss. In women, this disease may have implications on menstrual and reproductive health. The symptom complex includes delayed menarche, early menopause, secondary amenorrhea, infertility, recurrent miscarriages and intrauterine growth restriction. These women benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, celiac disease should be considered and screening tests performed on women presenting with menstrual and reproductive problems and treated accordingly. The objective of this article is to review the current literature on celiac disease and its association with the above-mentioned disorders. PMID:20337200

  5. Atypical Celiac Disease: From Recognizing to Managing

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    B. Admou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic clinical presentation of celiac disease (CD becomes increasingly common in physician’s daily practice, which requires an awareness of its many clinical faces with atypical, silent, and latent forms. Besides the common genetic background (HLA DQ2/DQ8 of the disease, other non-HLA genes are now notably reported with a probable association to atypical forms. The availability of high-sensitive and specific serologic tests such as antitissue transglutuminase, antiendomysium, and more recent antideamidated, gliadin peptide antibodies permits to efficiently uncover a large portion of the submerged CD iceberg, including individuals having conditions associated with a high risk of developing CD (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Down syndrome, family history of CD, etc., biologic abnormalities (iron deficiency anemia, abnormal transaminase levels, etc., and extraintestinal symptoms (short stature, neuropsychiatric disorders, alopecia, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent aphtous stomatitis, etc.. Despite the therapeutic alternatives currently in developing, the strict adherence to a GFD remains the only effective and safe therapy for CD.

  6. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  7. Celiac Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study

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    Giuseppe Mazzarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD is mandatory for celiac disease (CD but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12 or transamidated (35 flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (=0.04 whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, =0.06. On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (=0.63, Marsh-Oberhuber grading (=0.08, or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (>0.05. Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (=0.46. In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function.

  8. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori in Patients Referred to Endoscopy Section of Taleghani Hospital

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    P Mohammadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to previous studies celiac disease(CD is frequently associated with chronic gastritis. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CD and Helicobacter pylori in patients with dyspepsia. Methods: 325 patients were studied from April 2008 to April 2009 who underwent endoscopic procedures for dyspepsia. Gastric antrum, duodenal biopsies, serology with tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies(tTGA and total IgA were performed for detection of H. pylori and CD. Results: Out of 325 patients 312(96% had a positive H. pylori. Heart burn and bloating were the most prevalent symptoms in this study. Twenty one of 25 patients with positive histology for CD who had gastric biopsies were positive for H. pylori(84%. Duodenal biopsy specimens results have shown normal histology in 213(65.5%, hyperplastic polyps in 1(0.4%, duodenitis in 79(24.3% and abnormality in small bowel (Marsh I-IIIc in 25(10%. In term of the serological analysis, 9 of 26 tTGA positive patients had abnormal histology (Marsh I-IIIc(2.7%. Conclusion: Similar to previous reports, we found a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and celiac disease in dyspeptic patients. Therefore, further studies for screening occult CD in dyspeptic patients is seems necessary.

  9. Seroreactivity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae in patients with Crohn′s disease and celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; István Csípǒ; Gábor G. Szabó; Gyula Szegedi

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To explore whether there was anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) positivity in our patients with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease.METHODS: A cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (42 patients with Crohn's disease and 10 patients with ulcerative colitis) and gluten sensitive enteropathy (16patients) from Debrecen, Hungary were enrolled in the study.The diagnosis was made using the formally accepted criteria.Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA)and antiS-accharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA),antiendornysium antibodies (EMA), antigliadin antibodies (AGA) and anti human tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) were investigated.RESULTS: The results showed that ASCA positivity occurred not only in Crohn's disease but also in Celiac disease and in these cases both the IgG and IgA type antibodies were proved.CONCLUSION: It is conceivable that ASCA positivity correlates with the (auto-) immune inflammation of small intestines and it is a specific marker of Crohn's disease.

  10. Erythema Nodosum in a Child with Celiac Disease

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    Andrew Fretzayas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum is an acute, nodular, erythematous eruption usually limited to the extensor aspects of the lower legs. It could be idiopathic or associated with other systemic diseases. We, herein, report a phenotypically healthy, ten-year-old boy who presented with erythema nodosum in whom serological tests of autoimmunity and intestinal histological examination were compatible with celiac disease. The eruption resolved within 2 months following a gluten-free diet. Therefore, the possibility that erythema nodosum represents an extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease should be kept in mind accordingly in cases where other common causes of this rash are ruled out.

  11. Erythrocytic transglutaminase inhibition hemolysis at presentation of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar; Ivanovski; Dimitrije; Nikoli; Nikola; Dimitrijevi; Ivan; Ivanovski; Vojislav; Perii

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune condition.Previously it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder,but is actually considered a relatively common condition,present at any age,which may have multiple complications and manifestations.Hematological disorders of the disease are not uncommon.Among these disorders,the most frequently reported are anemias as a result of iron deficiency,often associated with folate and/or B12 deficiency.Anemias caused by hemolysis are very rarely reported in celiac p...

  12. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine changes in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of information on celiac disease and associated involvement of other nonintestinal sites, data on concomitant changes in the structure and function of the pancreas is limited. The present review critically examines pancreatic endocrine changes that have been well documented in the literature, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic exocrine alterations may also occur, and if severe, marked malnutrition with pancreatic failure and ductal calcification have been observed. Finally, other pancreatic disorders have been recorded with celiac disease.

  13. Celiac disease in South-West of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahim Masjedizadeh; Eskandar Hajiani; Jalal Hashemi; Ali Akbar Shayesteh; Karim Moula; Tahereh Rajabi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Celiac disease is characterized by life-long gluten intolerance. Clinical features of patients with celiac disease are variable. Studies about the prevalence of celiac disease in our country are scarce and there is no study on the prevalence of celiac disease in southern Iran. In the current study, clinical, laboratory and histological features of 52 patients with celiac disease were evaluated.METHODS: In a cross sectional study we retrospectively studied the characteristics of 52 celiac patients at Ahwaz JundiShapour University Hospitals (AJSUH)from November 1, 1999 to 1st Sep 2004. Intestinal biopsy and serum antigliadin and anti-endomysium antibodies were used for the diagnosis of patients.Mucosal lesions were classified according to the criteria of Marsh. Antigliadin antibodies were measured with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Anti-endomysium antibodies were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence with the use of a section of monkey esophagus. Routine hematological and biochemical analyses and measurement of immunoglobulin levels were undertaken.RESULTS: Male: female ratio was 1.08. The mean ± SD patient age was 21 ± 4.5 years (range 10-70 years) and the most common symptoms were diarrhea and weight loss (78.8%) followed by fatigue (73.1%), pallor (65.4%),anorexia (40.4%), abdominal distention (32.7%), and failure to thrive (23.1%). Diarrhea and weight loss and fatigue were the most common findings. Iron deficiency anemia was found in 63.2% of patients and this became normal after adoption of a gluten-free diet in all patients.Immunoglobulin A, IgG antigliadin antibodies and IgA anti-endomysium antibodies were found in 33 and 48cases, 78.8% and 85.4% of patients, respectively. Biopsy of the small intestine revealed that 90.4% of patients had typical lesions according to the Marsh classification.CONCLUSION: Although classical presentation was seen in most of the patients, atypical clinical manifestations of celiac disease should be kept in

  14. Disease-associated mutations prevent GPR56-collagen III interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Luo

    Full Text Available GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Mutations in GPR56 cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP. Using the N-terminal fragment of GPR56 (GPR56(N as a probe, we have recently demonstrated that collagen III is the ligand of GPR56 in the developing brain. In this report, we discover a new functional domain in GPR56(N, the ligand binding domain. This domain contains four disease-associated mutations and two N-glycosylation sites. Our study reveals that although glycosylation is not required for ligand binding, each of the four disease-associated mutations completely abolish the ligand binding ability of GPR56. Our data indicates that these four single missense mutations cause BFPP mostly by abolishing the ability of GPR56 to bind to its ligand, collagen III, in addition to affecting GPR56 protein surface expression as previously shown.

  15. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  16. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  17. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  18. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  19. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Lauret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D; others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  20. Evaluation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotype in patients with celiac disease hospitalised in 2012 at the Department of Paediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Szałowska-Woźniak, Dorota A.; Bąk-Romaniszyn, Leokadia; Cywińska-Bernas, Agnieszka; Zeman, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to gluten that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals and leads to small intestinal mucosa damage. According to ESPGHAN guidelines from 2012, CD can be diagnosed in a patient with characteristic clinical symptoms, in whom, anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (> 10 times the upper limit) are found, endomysial antibodies (EMA) is confirmed and a positive genetic test is obtained. In these conditions no small-bowel biopsies a...

  1. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastian LASA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Library databases. We analyzed two kinds of trials: those assessing the risk of infertility in subjects with already diagnosed celiac disease, and those evaluating the prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease in subjects with a diagnosis of infertility. Results The search yielded 413 potentially relevant studies for revision, 12 of which were finally included for analysis. A significant association was found between women with a diagnosis of infertility and undiagnosed celiac disease [OR 3.09 (95% CI 1.74-5.49]. When considering those studies assessing the occurrence of infertility in subjects with already-diagnosed celiac disease, no difference was found between celiac disease patients and control subjects [OR 0.99 (0.86-1.13]. Conclusions Undiagnosed celiac disease is a risk factor for infertility. Women seeking medical advice for this particular condition should be screened for celiac disease. Adoption of a gluten-free diet could have a positive impact on fertility in this group of patients.

  2. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1–56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic

  3. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Xiao Lianchun [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  4. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2007-01-01

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was deter

  5. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bountiful Pantry DNI Group, LLC Earth Cafe Living Foods Grandpa's Kitchen Lazy 8 Specialty Foods Once Again Nut Butter Sauce Goddess CSA Leadership ... Induced Diseases Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Videos Food Nutrition and Recipes Too Get Involved 2015 Gluten- ...

  6. Duodenal versus jejunal biopsies in suspected celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, WJ; van Baarlen, J; Kleibeuker, JH; Kolkman, JJ

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In the past, small-bowel biopsies for diagnosis of celiac disease were taken from the jejunum with a suction capsule, but nowadays most physicians take endoscopic biopsies from the distal duodenum. To validate that practice we compared the diagnostic yield of endoscopic du

  7. Multiple sclerosis or neurological manifestations of Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and celiac disease (CD are considered to be T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. We discuss about a known case of CD-showed relapsing - remitting neurological symptoms compatible with MS. In this rare co-occurrence subject, MS-CD patient, the interaction between MS - and CD-related inflammatory processes is open to discussion.

  8. Duodenal microbiota composition and mucosal homeostasis in pediatric celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.C.; Kalliomäki, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Palva, A.; Lähteenoja, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Salojärvi, J.; Satokari, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed (HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive) individuals. Only a fraction of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 positive individuals develop CD indicating that other factors have a role in the disorde

  9. Multiple immune disorders in unrecognized celiac disease: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio La Villa; Peietro Pantaleo; Roberto Tarquini; Lino Cirami; Federico Perfetto; Francesco Mancuso; Giacomo Laffi

    2003-01-01

    We reported a female patient with unrecognized celiac disease and multiple extra intestinal manifestations, mainly related to a deranged immune function, including macroamilasemia, macrolipasemia, IgA nephropathy,thyroiditis, and anti-b2-glicoprotein-1 antibodies, that disappeared or improved after the implementation of a gluten-free diet.

  10. Celiac disease is overrepresented in patients with constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelleboer, Rolf A. A.; Janssen, Rob L. H.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.; Wouters, Edward; Nissen, Annemieke C.; Bolz, Werner E. A.; Ten, Walther E. Tjon A.; van der Feen, Cathelijne; Oosterhuis, Koen J.; Rovekamp, Mechelien H.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is suggested that patients with constipation should be screened for celiac disease. Similarly, it is recommended to investigate these patients for hypothyroidism and hypercalcemia. However, no evidence for these recommendations is available so far. We therefore set out to determine the

  11. [Screening of celiac disease in patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtík, P; Novosad, P; Kliment, M; Hrdý, P; Bóday, A; Richterová, R; Urban, O

    2011-12-01

    The celiac disease is traditionally viewed as the children's disease with a typical form accompanied mainly by intestinal symptoms and malabsorption. This opinion is still generally accepted by the medical community. Findings based on the area-wide screening show that the prevalence has risen from the original 1 : 1 000-1 500 to 1 : 70-550. The average prevalence in the western countries is nearly 1 : 100. The prevalence of the celiac disease in the Czech republic is estimated to be approximately 1 : 200-250. It means that the number of people in the Czech republic who are likely to be affected is about 40,000-50,000 people. Currently only 10-15% of the total number of the ill people are diagnosed and monitored. Adult patients represent the main diagnostic problem because their clinical pictures are individual and the main symptoms are atypical (nonenteral). These are anaemia (mainly sideropnic), early/premature osteoporosis, herpetiformic (Duhring) dermatitis, polyneurititis, ataxia, depression, behavioural disorders, menstrual cycle disorders and infertility. Therefore our attention is currently focused on the screening of these groups of subjects. The purpose of our study was to check the frequency of the celiac disease with patients with diagnosed osteoporosis and osteopenia. In our study we have confirmed the assumption that the prevalence ofthe celiac disease in the group of subjects was 1 : 50, which means that 2.2% of patients with osteoporosis and osteopenia are affected by celiac sprue and therefore screening examination of these patients with the subsequent causal treatment (gluten-free diet) is recommended. PMID:22277032

  12. Serological screening for celiac disease in symptomatic 12 to 36 month-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Cristina Modelli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The correct diagnosis of celiac disease in environmentally deprived children is frequently hindered by the common presence of other causes for the classical celiac disease symptoms: malnutrition, failure to thrive and frequent diarrheas. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of 12 to 36 month-old children using immunoglobulin antibodies against gliadin (IgG and IgA-AGA, against endomysium (IgA-EMA, and against human tissue transglutaminase (IgA-tTG as screening method. METHODS: A total of 214 children (114 boys, aged 12 to 36 months, on gluten-containing diet, were admitted to the study. IgG and IgA-AGA, IgA-tTG and IgA-EMA tests were performed in all sera. Biopsy was obtained from all children showing positive result in one or more of the serologic tests, excluding those in which IgG-AGA had been the only positive result. In those cases, polymerase chain reaction (PCR HLA genotyping for the identification of celiac disease predisposing alleles was applied. HLA genotyping was also performed to confirm the diagnosis in children identified as celiac by means of positive serologic testing and compatible biopsy results. RESULTS: Normal results were obtained in 131 children. Ten children out of 68 identified as positive exclusively on the IgG-AGA test disclosed the presence of celiac disease predisposing alleles on PCR and underwent jejunal biopsy with normal results. All serologic tests were positive in four children. A fifth child showed positive IgG and IgA-AGA and IgA-tTG results but disclosed a negative IgA-EMA test. Jejunal biopsy of these five children revealed characteristic lesions of celiac disease. CONCLUSION: A prevalence of 2.3% was found among symptomatic 12- to 36-month-old children that had not been previously diagnosed as celiac.CONTEXTO: O diagnóstico correto da doença celíaca em crianças ambientalmente carentes é frequentemente dificultado pela presença usual de causas outras para os cl

  13. Meta-analysis on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, D F; Gerdes, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We used meta-analysis to test hypotheses concerning whether adult celiac disease is reliably linked with anxiety and/or depression. METHOD: We examined published reports on anxiety and depression in adult celiac disease. RESULTS: Eighteen studies on depression and eleven studies...... on anxiety in adult celiac disease met selection criteria. They show that depression is reliably more common and/or more severe in adults with celiac disease than in healthy adults (overall meta-analysis effect size: 0.97). The fail-safe margin of unpublished reports that would be required to negate...... the finding exceeds 8000. Adults with celiac disease do not, however, differ reliably in terms of depression from adults with other physical illnesses, nor do they differ reliably from healthy adults or adults with other physical illnesses in terms of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in adult celiac...

  14. Granulomatous disease associated with pulmonary deposition of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redline, S; Barna, B P; Tomashefski, J F; Abraham, J L

    1986-10-01

    A patient presented with granulomatous lung disease associated with the pulmonary deposition of various metallic particles. To evaluate the relation between the metallic dust and the granulomatous process, lymphocyte transformation tests to aluminium sulphate, titanium chloride, beryllium sulphate, and nickel sulphate were performed. A lymphocyte proliferative response to titanium chloride was observed on two separate occasions; no responses to the other metals were shown. These results are consistent with hypersensitivity to titanium, and suggest, in this individual, a possible aetiological role between the inhalation of titanium and a granulomatous disease process.

  15. HLA Typing and Histopathologic Features of Patients with Celiac Disease-A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gulay Ceylan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Celiac disease is the most common defect of nutrition intolerance. There is an increased sensitivity to the glutene. It is inherited multifactorial, because of this, genetic and enviromental factors are important in the evaluation. The existence of specific human leukocyte antigen alleles coding especially DQ2 and DQ8 are important at the diagnosis of celiac disease. In this study, it is aimed to determine human leukocyte antigens allel distribution for celiac disease in patients with ch...

  16. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Misra Asha; Ghoshal Ujjala; Ghoshal Uday C; Choudhuri Gourdas

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD). A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During...

  17. Psychosis and Silent Celiac Disease in a Down Syndrome Adolescent: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Morant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. It presents gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal manifestations as well as associated conditions. We report a 16-year-old Down syndrome girl who presented psychosis symptomatology, and she was diagnosed as having silent celiac disease. Olanzapine treatment and gluten-free diet were satisfactory. It is necessary to consider celiac disease in Down syndrome patients with psychiatric symptoms, mainly psychotic symptomatology.

  18. Modern diagnosis of celiac disease and relevant differential diagnoses in the case of cereal intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Markus; Hagel, Alexander F; Hirschmann, Simon; Bechthold, Caroline; Konturek, Peter; Neurath, Markus; Raithel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary At an incidence of 1:500, celiac disease (formerly sprue) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with malabsorption, abdominal discomfort, diarrhea and food intolerances. Celiac disease can induce a broad spectrum of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, e.g. dermatitis herpetiformis (Duhring’s disease). A variety of oligo- and asymptomatic courses (e.g. anemia, osteoporosis, depression) through to refractory collagenic celiac disease are seen. In HLA-DQ2 and...

  19. RISK OF INFERTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Sebastian LASA; Ignacio ZUBIAURRE; Luis Oscar SOIFER

    2014-01-01

    Context Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine associated with several extra-intestinal features, such as reproductive disorders. The relationship between celiac disease and infertility has been previously assessed, with conflicting results. Objectives We seek to determine the relationship between celiac disease and infertility. Methods Data was extracted from case-control or cohort design studies from 1966 to December 2013 using the MEDLINE-Pubmed, EMBASE, LILACS...

  20. HELICOBACTER PYLORI PREVALENCE IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE: results from a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan LASA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Some previously published studies have suggested an inverse relationship between celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori, raising the possibility of the protective role Helicobacter pylori could have against celiac disease development. Nevertheless, this association is inconclusive. Objectives To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in celiac subjects. Methods Between January 2013 and June 2014, patients over 18 years old undergoing upper endoscopy who required both gastric and duodenal biopsies were included for analysis. Enrolled subjects were divided in two groups: those with a diagnosis of celiac disease and those without a celiac disease diagnosis. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence was compared between groups. Among celiac patients, endoscopic markers of villous atrophy as well as histological damage severity were compared between those with and without Helicobacter pylori infection. Results Overall, 312 patients were enrolled. Seventy two of them had a diagnosis of celiac disease. Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence among celiac disease patients was 12.5%, compared to 30% in non-celiac patients [OR=0.33 (0.15-0.71]. There was not a significant difference in terms of the severity of villous atrophy in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection compared to those without it. There was a slight increase in the prevalence of endoscopic markers in those Helicobacter pylori-negative celiac subjects. Conclusion Helicobacter pylori infection seems to be less frequent in celiac patients; among those celiac subjects with concomitant Helicobacter pylori infection, histological damage degree and presence of endoscopic markers suggesting villous atrophy seem to be similar to those without Helicobacter pylori infection.

  1. An adult case of celiac sprue triggered after an ileal resection for perforated Meckel's diverticulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Firdevs Topal; Sabiye Akbulut; Ismail Cagatay Topcu; Yasemin Dolek; Ozlem Yonem

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease can be triggered by upper abdominal surgery,such as vagotomy,oesophagectomy,pancreaticoduodenectomy,and gastrojejunal anastomosis.Here we report a case of a 24 year-old woman who developed celiac disease after an ileal resection for perforated Meckel's diverticula.This is the first reported celiac case that has been triggered,not by upper abdominal surgery,but after ileal resection for Meckel's diverticula.

  2. Duodenal and faecal microbiota of celiac children: molecular, phenotype and metabolome characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Guerzoni Maria; Crecchio Carmine; Laghi Luca; Gagliardi Francesca; Ricciuti Patrizia; Vernocchi Pamela; Ndagijimana Maurice; De Pasquale Ilaria; De Angelis Maria; Di Cagno Raffaella; Gobbetti Marco; Francavilla Ruggiero

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiology of celiac disease (CD) is increasing. CD mainly presents in early childhood with small intestinal villous atrophy and signs of malabsorption. Compared to healthy individuals, CD patients seemed to be characterized by higher numbers of Gram-negative bacteria and lower numbers Gram-positive bacteria. Results This study aimed at investigating the microbiota and metabolome of 19 celiac disease children under gluten-free diet (treated celiac disease, T-CD) and 15 n...

  3. Psychosis and Silent Celiac Disease in a Down Syndrome Adolescent: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Morant, Amparo

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disorder. It presents gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal manifestations as well as associated conditions. We report a 16-year-old Down syndrome girl who presented psychosis symptomatology, and she was diagnosed as having silent celiac disease. Olanzapine treatment and gluten-free diet were satisfactory. It is necessary to consider celiac disease in Down syndrome patients with psychiatric symptoms, mainly psychotic symptomatology.

  4. Gluten-free diet and quality of life in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    SAMASCA, Gabriel; SUR, Genel; Lupan, Iulia; Deleanu, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many recent studies overshadow the effects of gluten-free diet. Gluten-free diet positive effects were observed in celiac disease patients: increase in body mass index, higher energy intakes, reducing adiposity gain, moderates the risk of the associated complications. However, adhering to a gluten-free diet is difficult for many people. A new solution is needed for quality of life of celiac disease patients, not for celiac disease treatment. Health education on gluten-free diet at ho...

  5. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  6. Firing of an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator: An Unusual Presentation of Celiac Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffry; Liu, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis, an atypical presentation of celiac disease, is characterized by acute diarrhea and severe metabolic derangements. This diagnosis is often missed in the differential of acute diarrheal illness. Our patient is a 69-year-old man who presented with ICD firing and was found to have profound metabolic derangements. Further evaluation revealed undiagnosed celiac disease and his symptoms resolved with a gluten-free diet. Celiac crisis should be considered in all patients presenting with acute diarrhea, metabolic acidosis, and severe electrolyte abnormalities as management can be life-saving. PMID:27761475

  7. Neurological Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present asone or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia,epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. Inthis study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease.

  8. The importance of determining human leucocyte antigens in preventing intestinal lymphoma in patients with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Samasca; Mihaela Iancu; Angela Butnariu; Andreica Mariana; Ileana Constantinescu; Doru Dejica

    2010-01-01

    Identification of celiac disease, by determining human leucocyte antigens DQ2/DQ8, is important since recent long-term studies have shown that the mortality of celiac disease is increased, if it is unrecognized and untreated. In this sense, we wanted to see the usefulness of genetic tests in celiac disease diagnosis and screening. Material and methods. During 2010 we determined by PCR, DQ2/DQ8 haplotype, in a group of 27 children with celiac disease and 9 of their brothers, serolo...

  9. Estimation of milk, dairy products and calcium intake in nutrition of the celiac patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Panjkota Krbavčić; Martina Sučić

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate a protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, rye, barley and possibly oats. The smallest amount of gluten in food damages the small intestine of these patients. In Croatia there is no data about nutrition and dietary habits of people with celiac disease. In celiac disease there is one and only cure: a gluten-free diet...

  10. Linking disease associations with regulatory information in the human genome

    KAUST Repository

    Schaub, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a large number of phenotypes. However, an associated SNP is likely part of a larger region of linkage disequilibrium. This makes it difficult to precisely identify the SNPs that have a biological link with the phenotype. We have systematically investigated the association of multiple types of ENCODE data with disease-associated SNPs and show that there is significant enrichment for functional SNPs among the currently identified associations. This enrichment is strongest when integrating multiple sources of functional information and when highest confidence disease-associated SNPs are used. We propose an approach that integrates multiple types of functional data generated by the ENCODE Consortium to help identify "functional SNPs" that may be associated with the disease phenotype. Our approach generates putative functional annotations for up to 80% of all previously reported associations. We show that for most associations, the functional SNP most strongly supported by experimental evidence is a SNP in linkage disequilibrium with the reported association rather than the reported SNP itself. Our results show that the experimental data sets generated by the ENCODE Consortium can be successfully used to suggest functional hypotheses for variants associated with diseases and other phenotypes.

  11. Pre-endoscopic screening for Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in young anemic women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucy Vannella; Debora Gianni; Edith Lahner; Antonio Amato; Enzo Grossi; Gianfranco Delle Fave; Bruno Annibale

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the usefulness of pre-endoscopic serological screening for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and celiac disease in women aged<50 years affected by iron-deficiency anemia (IDA).METHODS:One hundred and fifteen women aged<50 years with IDA were tested by human recombinant tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies (tTG) and anti- H pylori IgG antibodies.tTG and H pylori IgG antibody were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).All women were invited to undergo upper GI endoscopy.During gastroscopy,biopsies were collected from antrum (n=3),gastric body (n=3) and duodenum (n=4) in all patients,irrespective of test results.The assessment of gastritis was performed according to the Sydney system and celiac disease was classified by Marsh's System.RESULTS:45.2% women were test-positive:41 patients positive for H pylori antibodies,9 patients for tTG and 2 patients for both.The gastroscopy compl iance rate of test-posi t ive women was significantly increased with respect to those testnegative (65.4% vs 42.8%;Fisher test P=0.0239).The serological results were confirmed by gastroscopy in 100% of those with positive H pylori antibodies,in 50% of those with positive tTG and in 81.5% of testnegative patient.Sensitivity and specificity were 84.8% and 100%,respectively for H pylori infection and,80% and 92.8% for tTG.Twenty-eight patients had positive H pylori antibodies and in all the patients,an active H pylori infection was found.In particular,in 23 out of 28 (82%) patients with positive H pylori antibodies,a likely cause of IDA was found because of the active inflammation involving the gastric body.CONCLUSION:Anti- H pylori IgG antibody and tTG IgA antibody testing is able to select women with IDA to submit for gastroscopy to identify H pylori pangastritis and/or celiac disease,likely causes of IDA.2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng.All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term Fracture Risk in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    OpenAIRE

    Jafri, Mohammed R.; Nordstrom, Charles W.; Murray, Joseph A; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Melton, Lee J.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, but there are conflicting data regarding fracture risk. We determined the fracture incidence relative to matched controls in a population-based cohort with celiac disease before and after diagnosis. Olmsted County residents with celiac disease (n = 83) diagnosed between 1950 and 2002 were compared with 166 gender and age matched controls. Fracture histories were ascertained from each subject’s medical records. Celiac disease is linked ...

  13. A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Batur-Caglayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Since a correlation between gluten intake and incidence of MS had been reported, the relationship of antigliadin antibodies and MS was debated. Case Report. We report the case of a 45-year-old female MS patient who is under interferon treatment. After seven years of monitoring, during her routine gastroenterological assessment, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Conclusion. Beside the neurological manifestations that have been demonstrated in about 10% of celiac disease (CD patients, white-matter abnormalities in brain MRI are uncommon and controversial. But in the literature, MS seems to be associated with CD as in our patient. We suggest that MS patients with gastroenterological complaints should undergo an assessment for CD.

  14. Immunopathogenesis and therapeutic approaches in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shreya; Kovilam, Oormila; Zach, Terence L; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    Celiac Disease is an autoimmune enteropathy with increasing incidence worldwide in both adults and children. It occurs as an inflammatory condition with destruction of the normal architecture of villi on consumption of gluten and related protein products found in wheat, barley and rye. However, the exact pathogenesis is not yet fully understood. A gluten-free diet remains the main modality of therapy to date. While some patients continue to have symptoms even on a gluten-free diet, adherence to this diet is also difficult, especially for the children. Hence, there is continued interest in novel methods of therapy and the current research focus is on the promising novel non-dietary modalities of treatment. Here, we critically reviewed the existing literature regarding the pathogenesis of celiac disease in children including the role of in-utero exposure leading to neonatal and infant sensitization and its application for the development of new therapeutic approaches for these patients. PMID:26999328

  15. [Collagenous sprue: secondary or independent from celiac disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alventosa Mateu, Carlos; Larrey Ruiz, Laura; Pérez Zahonero, Maria Dolores; Navarro Gonzales, Atilio Javier; Canelles Gamir, Pilar; Huguet Malavés, José María; Luján Sanchís, María Soledad; Martorell Cebollada, Miguel Ángel; Medina Chuliá, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare disease that goes with persistent diarrhea, weight loss and bad absortion, because it affects the small intestine, mainly duodenum and proximal jejunum. Diagnosis is made by having clinical signs and histological proof of atrophy and subepitelial deposit of collagenous material. Its etiology is not known completely, it is proposed that the origin is autoimmune because its relationship with celiac disease. Also there is a proposal that is a celiac evolution to gluten free diet. Is because this is not clear that we present a case of a patient with bad absorptive diarrhea and a clinical expression of collagenous sprue, that had a great clinical response to corticosteroids with home parenteral nutrition center. PMID:25594758

  16. Esophageal stents, percutaneous gastrostomy, gastrojejunostomy and celiac ganglion block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Indications, contraindications, procedure and complications will be discussed along with the technical aspects. Interesting cases will be demonstrated. Fluoroscopic guided placement of a metallic (bare or covered) stent is increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal strictures. Percutaneously placed feeding catheters (e.g. gastrostomy) offer the best option for the patients who require long term nutrition. These procedures are generally simpler, have higher technical success rates and considered to be safer than endoscopic or surgical placement techniques. Celiac ganglia block is effective in relieving chronic abdominal pain, especially originating from the malignancies of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and alimentary tract from the stomach to the transverse portion of the large colon. The relevant anatomy, indications, contraindications, different application techniques and results of celiac blockade will be reviewed.

  17. Non-functioning Aortocaval Paraganglioma Masquerading as Celiac Lymphnodal Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulavani, Nikhil; Rodrigues, Gabriel; Prabhu, Raghunath; Kamath, Ganesh; Rai, Lavanya; Rao, Lakshmi

    2014-02-01

    An extra-adrenal paraganglioma is a rare tumour derived from chromaffin cells of sympathetic ganglia. This report documents a rare case of a non-functional aortocaval paraganglioma in a 24-year-old woman with persistent abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a solid mass, measuring 2.5x3cms, localized between the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery in aortocaval location along with right ovarian cystic mass. A clinical diagnosis of malignant ovarian tumour with celiac nodal metastasis was made. Excision and pathological analysis of both revealed an aortocaval extra-adrenal paraganglioma and benign ovarian cyst. On serial follow-up the patient was in a good health, asymptomatic and without evidence of tumour recurrence. This case emphasizes the necessity of including extra-adrenal paraganglioma in the differential diagnosis and management of retroperitoneal tumours, despite its rarity.

  18. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain; Celiac Truncus Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Birkan

    2016-01-01

    In this case we presented a patient who were admitted to surgery department with complaints of abdominal pain and nausea. There were no pathological findings on physical examination, direct abdominal x-ray, chest radiograph and biochemical parameters. At proximal of the celiac trunk, it was shown approximately 3x2 cm in size fusiform aneurysmal dilatation on the patient%u2019s abdominal ultrasonography and turbulence, arterial flow on the patient%u2019s abdominal doppler ultrasonography subsequently. In abdominal computed tomography we detected dense calcifications, dilatation and hypodensities that may belong to a thrombus in the lumen superior mesenteric vein (SMV. At the same time, approximately 3.5 cm segment of trunk celiak we observed aneurysm dilatation which reaching 2 cm at the widest point. Celiac trunk aneurysm is a rare cause of abdominal pain and often noticed after the complicated, thus it must always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  19. Celiac disease: Alternatives to a gluten free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiana; Zingone; Pietro; Capone; Carolina; Ciacci

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine caused by the ingestion of gluten or related rye and barley proteins. At present, the only available treatment is a strict gluten-exclusion diet. However, recent understanding of the molecular basis for this disorder has improved and enabled the identif ication of targets for new therapies. This article aims to critically summarize these recent studies.

  20. The intestinal B-cell response in celiac disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mesin, Luka; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Niro, Roberto Di

    2012-01-01

    The function of intestinal immunity is to provide protection toward pathogens while preserving the composition of the microflora and tolerance to orally fed nutrients. This is achieved via a number of tightly regulated mechanisms including production of IgA antibodies by intestinal plasma cells. Celiac disease is a common gut disorder caused by a dysfunctional immune regulation as signified, among other features, by a massive intestinal IgA autoantibody response. Here we review the current kn...

  1. Celiac disease diagnosis and gluten-free food analytical control

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Marta M. P. S.; González-García, María Begoña; Nouws, Henri P. A.; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa-García, Agustín

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by an inappropriate T-cell-mediated immune response to the ingestion of certain dietary cereal proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. This disorder presents environmental, genetic, and immunological components. CD presents a prevalence of up to 1% in populations of European ancestry, yet a high percentage of cases remain underdiagnosed. The diagnosis and treatment should be made early since untre...

  2. Celiac disease: an underappreciated issue in women’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sveta; Leffler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is secondary to gluten ingestion and classically associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Diagnosis is based on serology and confirmatory duodenal biopsy, and the only treatment is lifelong avoidance of gluten. CD has been increasingly recognized to encompass a wide variety of manifestations that are relevant to women’s health, including infertility, adverse pregnancy outcomes and reduced BMD. Currently, CD is underdiagnosed, largel...

  3. Demographics, clinical features and treatment of pediatric celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tapsas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing food in genetically predisposed subjects. The enteropathy is presented with a wide variety of clinical manifestations, which can occur even outside the gastrointestinal tract. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis of CD is based on a small intestinal biopsy showing mucosal alterations, i.e. intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy. The treatm...

  4. Celiac Disease in an Adoptive Child with Recurrent Giardia Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K; De Matteis, Arianna; Di Iorio, Laura; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine. A complete management and differential diagnosis of such disease includes food intolerances, intestinal infections, and irritable bowel syndrome. We describe an 8-years-old adoptive girl from Congo with negative medical history. Patient followed for recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea associated to Giardia infection, unresponsive to antiparasitic therapy. Persistence of symptoms despite antiparasitic therapy, prompted us...

  5. Glomerular Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Sara

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are a significant problem for clinicians and diagnostic pathologists. A wide variety of disorders, including a spectrum of immune-complex glomerulonephritides, has been reported in association with hepatitis and cirrhosis caused by HCV. For some of these diseases, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I and cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis, plausible links between HCV and the glomerular pathology have been proposed. In other cases, the role of the virus in the pathogenesis of the renal disease is less certain. This communication catalogues the renal manifestations of HCV infection, providing clinical and pathological descriptions of the most prevalent disorders. Where available, evidence implicating HCV in the causation of the disorders is also discussed.

  6. The broad spectrum of celiac disease and gluten sensitive enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Oana; Dumitraşcu, Dan L

    2016-01-01

    The celiac disease is an immune chronic condition with genetic transmission, caused by the intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein from cereals containing the following soluble proteins: gliadine, which is the most toxic, and the prolamins. The average prevalence is about 1% in USA and Europe, but high in Africa: 5.6% in West Sahara. In the pathogenesis several factors are involved: gluten as external trigger, genetic predisposition (HLA, MYO9B), viral infections, abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Severity is correlated with the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, cryptic hyperplasia and villous atrophy, as well as with the length of intestinal involvement. The severity is assessed according to the Marsh-Oberhuber staging. Diagnostic criteria are: positive serological tests, intestinal biopsy, the reversal after gluten free diet (GFD). Beside refractory forms, new conditions have been described, like the non celiac gluten intolerance. In a time when more and more people adhere to GFD for nonscientific reasons, practitioners should be updated with the progress in celiac disease knowledge. PMID:27547052

  7. The Spectrum of Differences between Childhood and Adulthood Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Ciccocioppo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An old saying states that ‘’children are not little adults” and this certainly holds true for celiac disease, as there are many peculiar aspects regarding its epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical presentations, associated diseases, and response to treatment in pediatric compared to adult populations, to such an extent that it merits a description of its own. In fact, contrary to the past when it was thought that celiac disease was a disorder predominantly affecting childhood and characterized by a malabsorption syndrome, nowadays it is well recognized that it affects also adult and elderly people with an impressive variability of clinical presentation. In general, the clinical guidelines for diagnosis recommend starting with specific serologic testing in all suspected subjects, including those suffering from extraintestinal related conditions, and performing upper endoscopy with appropriate biopsy sampling of duodenal mucosa in case of positivity. The latter may be omitted in young patients showing high titers of anti-transglutaminase antibodies. The subsequent management of a celiac patient differs substantially depending on the age at diagnosis and should be based on the important consideration that this is a lifelong condition.

  8. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has bigdata.ices.utexas.edu/project/gene-disease. Contact: naga86@cs.utexas.edu PMID:24932006

  9. Epidemiologic and demographic survey of celiac disease in khuzestan province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hajiani, Eskandar; Masjedizadeh, Rahim; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Sebghatollahi, Vahid; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Kadkhodae, Ahmad; Jasemi Zergani, Farzad; Asghari, Shahnaz; Farsi, Farnaz

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND Celiac disease presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms. This study clarifies different aspects of celiac disease along with the most common patterns of celiac presentation in Khuzestan Province, Iran. METHODS Patients' information was obtained by evaluation of their files from the archives of the Khuzestan Celiac Society and records at gastroenterologists' offices in this province. RESULTS Overall, there were 103 (40 males, 63 females) patients included in this study. Patients' mean ages were 33 ± 11 years (males) and 31.6 ± 11.7 years (females). In terms of geographic distribution, 54.1% resided in the center of the province followed by 26.5% who were residents of the northern area. The rate of employment among men was 70.6% whereas it was 8.3% for women. In terms of education, 21.9% of men and 33.3% of women had academic educations. The rate of matrimony was 80.6% (n=29) for men, 65.4% (n=38) for women and 3.4% (n=2) who were divorced. Mean height was 164 ± 14 cm in men and 157.5 ± 10 cm in women. Mean BMI at the time of presentation was 22.7 in men and 22.6 in women. The most common gastrointestinal (GI) complaints in male patients were diarrhea (35%), reflux (20%), bloating (17.5%), abdominal pain (15%), vomiting (15%) and constipation (7.5%). Female patients experienced diarrhea (49.2%), abdominal pain (31.7%), bloating (31.7%), vomiting (19%), constipation(9.5%) and reflux (7.9%). The most common concomitant non-GI disorders among male patients were anemia (17.1%), thyroid disease (14.3%), and weight loss (14.3%); women experienced anemia (33.9%), thyroid disease (12.5%), and weight loss (7.1%). Approximately half of the patients exhibited symptoms for more than five years prior to diagnosis and 90% were diagnosed by gastroenterologists. Of these, 43% had normal endoscopy results. The most common serologic markers were anti-TTG (69.9%), anti-EMA (27.7%). CONCLUSION Physicians, prior to attributing patients' symptoms to irritable bowel

  10. Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Roizen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of asymptomatic celiac disease identified in children with Down syndrome after being screened at around twenty-four months of age.  These cases raise the question as to what age is screening for celiac disease indicated in a child with Down syndrome and no symptoms.

  11. Should adults be screened for celiac disease? What are the benefits and harms of screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Pekka

    2005-04-01

    The symptoms of celiac disease are diverse, and the disease is often asymptomatic. Without active serologic screening, most cases probably remain undiagnosed. Recent serologic screening assays allow mass screening for the disease. However, there is no evidence as yet to suggest that symptom-free celiac disease patients run an increased risk of small intestinal lymphoma or other complications. The prevention of osteoporosis seems to be the strongest indicator for widespread screening today. Screening asymptomatic individuals for celiac disease may be even harmful. A lifelong gluten-free diet is not easy to maintain, and the subject's quality of life may deteriorate. It is also debatable whether patients found by active screening adhere to a gluten-free diet similarly to symptomatic ones. The cost-effectiveness of population screening is dubious. Serologic screening should be applied in individuals with even subtle symptoms indicative of celiac disease, such as subclinical-isolated iron deficiency. In various autoimmune conditions, the risk of celiac disease is approximately 5% and, in individuals with affected first-degree relatives, 15%. Infertility, neurologic symptoms such as polyneuropathy, ataxia, epilepsy with posterior cerebral calcification, and osteoporosis are conditions in which celiac disease should be kept in mind. Elevated aminotransferases and liver failure can lead to a diagnosis of celiac disease. Evidence today does not support mass screening of celiac disease. Instead, increased alertness should be observed in patients at risk of the condition. PMID:15825117

  12. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac d

  13. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  14. Celiac lesion T cells recognize epitopes that cluster in regions of gliadins rich in proline residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, Helene; McAdam, Stephen N; Molberg, Øyvind;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced enteropathy that shows a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8. Gluten-specific T cells, invariably restricted by DQ2 or DQ8, can be isolated from celiac lesions. Such gut-derived T cells have a preference for recognition of gluten that has...

  15. Levels of serologic markers of celiac disease in patients with reflux esophagitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bagcı, Sait; Ercin, C. Nuri; Yesilova, Zeki; Ozcan, Ayhan; Degertekin, Bulent; Dagalp, Kemal

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease serologic markers (antigliadin IgA, IgG, and anti-endomysial IgA) in patients with reflux esophagitis and to detect the relationship between reflux esophagitis and celiac disease (CD).

  16. CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphisms in celiac patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licul, Vanja; Cizmarević, Nada Starcević; Ristić, Smiljana; Mikolasević, Ivana; Mijandrusić, Brankica Sincić

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a life-long gluten sensitive autoimmune disease of the small intestine affecting genetically susceptible individuals. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype contributes to the genetic risk for CD, but "non-HLA" genes also play a role. Clinical presentation could be classical, but majority of patients present with non-classical, atypical signs and symptoms. Endocrine and/or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EXPI) is common in celiac patients. The aim of our study was to assess EXPI among our CD patients by measurement of faecal pancreatic elastase (FE1) and to find potential association of CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphism and EXPI. Eighty three patients entered the study. Tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti-TTG), faecal elastase-1 (FE1) assays and genotyping for the CTLA-4 +49A/G and TNF-alpha308 were performed. Of 83 patients with CD EXPI had 13 (15.6 %). There was no statistically significant difference in frequency of polymorphisms for both genes (CTL-4 +49 i TNF-alpha-308) in the group with and without EXPI. In conclusion, EXPI is common in symptomatic CD patients, but further genetic studies with larger number of patients are needed. PMID:24611333

  17. Quantitative diagnosis of connective tissue disease-associated interstitial pneumonia using thoracic computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuno, Nobuko Tosaka; Akamatsu, Hokuto; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoko; Yoshida, Shunji

    2015-12-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) frequently show interstitial pneumonia (IP), which is sometimes rapidly progressive or resistant to treatment, thereby significantly affecting the prognosis. The diagnosis and response evaluation of IP are commonly performed qualitatively based on imaging findings, which may cause disagreement among rheumatologists in the evaluation of early lesions and atypical interstitial changes. To determine whether IP could be diagnosed in a quantitative manner during the early stage of PM/DM using a workstation that allows quantitative image processing. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) images of 20 PM/DM patients were reconstructed into a three-dimensional (3D) image using an image processing workstation. The CT values of the constituent voxels were arranged in a histogram of -1000 to +1000 Hounsfield units (HU). The most frequent lung field density was -900 to -801 HU, and relative size was as follows: IP (+) group 0.45 and IP (-) group 0.53. Between -1000 and -701 HU, relative size was not significantly different between the IP (+) group and IP (-) group. Between -700 and -1 HU, the relative size of the lung field was significantly larger in the IP (+) than in the IP (-) group, demonstrating its IP-diagnosing ability. Particularly, within the range from -700 to -301 HU, the macroscopically-assessed ground glass opacity was consistent with the CT value, which, in turn, was closely correlated with KL-6, the pre-existing marker for IP diagnosis. The results of this study may lead to the establishment of quantitative methods of evaluating IP and possible elucidation of the pathogenesis of IP. PMID:26519047

  18. Osteoporosis in celiac disease and in endocrine and reproductive disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Velia Stazi; Antonello Trecca; Biagino Trinti

    2008-01-01

    As the increase in lifespan brings to light diseases that were previously not clinically detectable, osteoporosis has become an issue of worldwide significance. The disease is marked by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and more prone to fracturing. Because it is regulated by endocrine and environmental factors, osteoporosis presents a multifactorial etiopathogenesis, with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual variation in bone mass density (BMD), the principal determinant, with age, of fracture risk. Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss, so that the occurrence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects is of particular note: indeed, the screening of osteoporosis patients for this disease is advisable, since it may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. An increase in interleukin IL-1β, of the IL-1 system, in the relatives of celiac patients confirms the genetic predisposition to osteoporosis and its presence is evidence of an association between the two conditions. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, and it may follow prolonged breast-feeding and frequent pregnancies, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system. An appropriate lifestyle from adolescence onwards, together with early diagnosis of and treatment for CD and primary and secondary endocrine pathologies are important for the prevention of damage to the bones.

  19. Stroke and dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat; Dogan; Erdal; Peker; Eren; Cagan; Sinan; Akbayram; Mehmet; Acikgoz; Huseyin; Caksen; Abdurrahman; Uner; Yasar; Cesur

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease(CD) is manifested by a variety of clinical signs and symptoms that may begin either in childhood or adult life.Neurological symptoms without signs of malabsorption have been observed for a long time in CD.In this report,an 8-year-old girl with CD presented with rarely seen dilated cardiomyopathy and stroke.The girl was admitted with left side weakness.Her medical history indicated abdominal distention,chronic diarrhea,failure to thrive,and geophagia.On physical examination,short stature,pale ...

  20. Celiac Disease Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune enteropathy that occurs, in affected individuals, with exposure to gluten in the diet and improves with removal of dietary gluten. Although CD is readily considered in patients with classical presentations of the disease, atypical manifestations may be the only presenting symptoms. We present a case of CD in a 16-year-old female presenting as fever of unknown origin, which has not been reported previously. The postulated mechanism for fever in CD and the importance of clinicians having a low threshold for considering CD in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and other enigmatic clinical presentations is discussed.

  1. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelle G. Meseeha; Maximos N. Attia; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare present...

  2. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  3. Gut microflora associated characteristics in children with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tjellström, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Aim The over-arching aim of this thesis was to study some metabolic functions of the gut microflora in children with known or screening detected celiac disease (CD) and their first-degree relatives. Materials Study I. A number of 36 untreated CD children, 47 after at least 3 months on glutenfree diet (GFD) and 42 healthy controls (HC). Study II. A number of 76 first-degree relatives to CD children and 93 healthy controls (HC). Study III. A number of 17 screening de...

  4. [The relationship between celiac disease (CD) and dental problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davidi, M

    2011-10-01

    With a prevalence of 1% in western populations, Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common inflammatory disorders of the small intestine. CD is often assumed to have its onset in childhood, but it has recently been suggested that adults can also develop CD. Clinical manifestations vary according to age group: infants and young children present with diarrhea, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive, whereas adults that develop CD not only present with diarrhea, but also with silent manifestations such as anemia, osteoporosis, or neurological symptoms. In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. mmunohistochemistry of the small intestine of patients shows villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and elevated levels of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). The only therapy until now is a gluten-free diet, which will normalize the clinical and histological manifestations and allows the patients to live an otherwise normal life. part of the symptoms are oral manifestations as dental enamel defects, aphthous ulcers and Atrophic Glossitis. The prevalence of caries in CD patiens is law as compared to the healthy population and in some cases the normal eruption sequence of the teeth was damaged. Part of the undiagnosed CD patients are among our patients and the enamel defects they present are misdiagnosed as tetracycline pigmentation or white spot lesions it is the practitioners responsibility to add CD as a possible cause to the findings and refer the patient to further

  5. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  6. Burden of celiac disease in the Mediterranean area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Greco; Zrinjka Mi(s)ak; Eleftheria Roma; Raanan Shamir; Selma Terzic; Laura Timpone; Abdelhak Abkari; Mona Abu-Zekry; Thomas Attard; Faouzi Bouguerrà; Paskal Cullufi; Aydan Kansu; Dusanka Micetic-Turk

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the burden of undiagnosed celiac disease (CD) in the Mediterranean area in terms of morbidity, mortality and health cost. METHODS: For statistics regarding the population of each country in the Mediterranean area, we accessed authoritative international sources (World Bank, World Health Organization and United Nations). The prevalence of CD was obtained for most countries from published reports. An overall prevalence rate of 1% cases/total population was finally estimated to represent the frequency of the disease in the area, since none of the available confidence intervals of the reported rates significantly excluded this rate. The distribution of symptoms and complications was obtained from reliable reports in the same cohort. A standardized mortality rate of 1.8 was obtained from recent reports. Crude health cost was estimated for the years between symptoms and diagnosis for adults and children, and was standardized for purchasing power parity to account for the different economic profiles amongst Mediterranean countries.RESULTS: In the next 10 years, the Mediterranean area will have about half a billion inhabitants, of which 120 million will be children. The projected number of CD diagnoses in 2020 is 5 million cases (1 million celiac children), with a relative increase of 11% compared to 2010. Based on the 2010 rate, there will be about 550 000 symptomatic adults and about 240 000 sick children: 85% of the symptomatic patients will suffer from gastrointestinal complaints, 40% are likely to have anemia, 30% will likely have osteopenia, 20% of children will have short stature, and 10% will have abnormal liver enzymes. The estimated standardized medical costs for symptomatic celiac patients during the delay between symptom onset and diagnosis (mean 6 years for adults, 2 years for children) will be about €4 billion (€387 million for children) over the next 10 years. A delay in diagnosis is expected to increase mortal ity: about 600 000 celiac

  7. Is hyperhomocysteinemia relevant in patients with celiac disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Casella; Gabrio Bassotti; Vincenzo Villanacci; Camillo Di Bella; Fabio Pagni; Gian Luigi Corti; Giuseppe Sabatino; Mara Piatti; Vittorio Baldini

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether this might be related to the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia. METHODS: From January 1998 to December 2008, we evaluated the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia in a series of 165 adult celiac disease (CD) patients (138 females and 27 males, mean age 43 years). RESULTS: Hyperhomocysteinemia was evident in 32 patients (19.3%), although most of them had moderate levels (mean value 25 mcg/ml; range 15-30). Only one patient had a history of myocardial infarction (heterozygosis for N5-N10-metil tetrahydrofolate reductase mutation). CONCLUSION: The systematic assessment of hyperhomocysteinemia seems, at present, unjustified in CD patients.

  8. Homosistein, Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Levels in Patients with Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Beker Şanlı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our aim in this study was to investigate effects of vitamin B12 and folic acid malabsorption to homocysteine levels in celiac patients. Materials and Methods: Between 2-17 years of ages 32 celiac patients before treatment, 14 celiac patient in remission and 30 healthy controls involved in this study. Homocystein levels were evaluated in all groups. In addition plasma levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid determined in celiac and remission groups. Results: Homocysteine levels as arithmetic mean±SD found 22.8±1.69 µmol/L in celiac group, 17.31±1.94 µmol/L in remission group and 15.21±1.69 µmol/L in control group. Folic acid levels as arithmetic mean±SD found 7.04±0.74 ng/ml in celiac patients and 12.95±1.9 ng/ml in remission group. There is statistically significant difference between folic acid and homocysteine levels of two groups (p0.05. Conclusions: In our study homocysteine levels were found to be higher in celiac group than remission group. In this study, difference in folic acid levels between two groups may show that changes in folic acid levels related to changes in homocysteine levels.

  9. A morphometric study of the celiac trunk and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venieratos, Dionysios; Panagouli, Eleni; Lolis, Evangelos; Tsaraklis, Athanasios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2013-09-01

    The anatomy of the celiac trunk and its branches was examined in 77 adult human cadavers of Caucasian (Hellenic) origin. The celiac trunk followed the normal pattern, namely trifurcation to the common hepatic, splenic, and left gastric arteries, in 90.9% of the dissections (70/77). Two different types of trifurcation were observed: (a) a true tripod when the celiac trunk ended in a complete trifurcation (74.0%, 57/77) and (b) a false tripod when the three arteries did not have a common origin (16.9%, 13/77). Such a clear predominance of the true tripod is not reported elsewhere. Anatomic variations were found in 9.1% (7/77). Bifurcation of the celiac trunk into splenic and left gastric artery (splenogastric trunk) was observed in one specimen (1.3%), whereas the common hepatic artery emerged directly from the aorta. Absence of the celiac trunk was also found in two individuals (2.6%). The celiac trunk presented additional branches (lumbar and inferior phrenic arteries) in 5.2% (4/77). The median level of origin of the celiac trunk was at the upper third of L1 (22.7% to 17/75). The total length of the celiac trunk ranged from 1.1 to 5.0 cm, whereas the mean length was 2.8 cm (standard deviation = 0.80 cm, standard error of mean = 0.09 cm) irrespective of the existence of variations. The mean length of the celiac arteries which formed a false tripod was found to be larger than those of the arteries which formed a true tripod but only a weak statistically significant difference was established (P = 0.073).

  10. Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, A. B.; Corres, J. M.; Del Villar, I.; Matias, I. R.; Arregui, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development and test of an anti-gliadin antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm anti-gliadin antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  11. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    OpenAIRE

    Itziar Churruca; Jonatan Miranda; Arrate Lasa; María Bustamante; Idoia Larretxi; Edurne Simon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 +/- 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrie...

  12. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Hollon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal exposure to gliadin leads to zonulin upregulation and consequent disassembly of intercellular tight junctions and increased intestinal permeability. We aimed to study response to gliadin exposure, in terms of barrier function and cytokine secretion, using intestinal biopsies obtained from four groups: celiac patients with active disease (ACD, celiac patients in remission (RCD, non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity (GS and non-celiac controls (NC. Methods: Ex-vivo human duodenal biopsies were mounted in microsnapwells and luminally incubated with either gliadin or media alone. Changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were monitored over 120 min. Media was subsequently collected and cytokines quantified. Results: Intestinal explants from all groups (ACD (n = 6, RCD (n = 6, GS (n = 6, and NC (n = 5 demonstrated a greater increase in permeability when exposed to gliadin vs. media alone. The increase in permeability in the ACD group was greater than in the RCD and NC groups. There was a greater increase in permeability in the GS group compared to the RCD group. There was no difference in permeability between the ACD and GS groups, between the RCD and NC groups, or between the NC and GS groups. IL-10 was significantly greater in the media of the NC group compared to the RCD and GS groups. Conclusions: Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals. Following gliadin exposure, both patients with gluten sensitivity and those with active celiac disease demonstrate a greater increase in intestinal permeability than celiacs in disease remission. A higher concentration of IL-10 was measured in the media exposed to control explants compared to celiac disease in remission or gluten sensitivity.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, H.; Targan, S. [Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  14. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  15. Prevalence of Celiac Disease and its Effects on Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the coeliac disease(CD symptoms is infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, we are not cognizant of any CD reports in pregnancy in Iran. Therefore, this study aims to prospectively estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed CD in a population of pregnant women as well as its complications in pregnancy. Methods: 796 pregnant women with mean age of 26 years(SD= 26 and mean pregnancy duration of 5.4 months participated in this descriptive study from 2007 to 2008. Total IgA test and antitissue transglutaminase(tTGA antibodies were measured. Those with positive TGA underwent histological biopsy specimens according to modified Marsh classification. Results: A positive CD serology for tTGA was obderved in 17(2.1% out of 796 pregnant women. Out of the 17 seropositive patients, 10 had abnormal histology compatible with CD(Marsh I-IIIc symptoms. Two pregnant women had already experienced miscarriage. Moreover, 3 patients had born low birth weight babies. Conclusion: In this study, there was no significant relationship between CD and high incidence of adverse outcomes. Overall, 1 out of 66 pregnant women(1.5% rate of prevalence suffered from CD. Celiac disease shows different severity in different individuals. In other words, not every celiac patient is at high risk for its complications. This may propose that gluten free diet could be avoided in the patients who have a normal pregnancy

  16. The role of ultrasonography in patients with celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirella Fraquelli; Valentina Sciola; Chiara Villa; Dario Conte

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present review was to summarize the current evidence on the role of ultrasonography (US) and doppler-US in the diagnosis of celiac disease.Several ultrasonographic signs have been reported in the association with celiac disease in studies using realtime US. Firstly, case control studies identified some of these US signs and then in a prospective series some of these parameters, due to their high specificity, have been shown to be of value in confirming CD diagnosis,whereas others, due to their high sensitivity, have been demonstrated to be useful in excluding the presence of the disease.The pattern of splanchnic circulation in CD have extensively been investigated by several studies all of which reported similar results and identified a hyperdynamic mesenteric circulation that reverts to normal values after successful a gluten-free regimen.The last part of this review will deal with the possible role of US in identyfing the most severe and common intestinal complication of CD, i.e. the enteropathyassociated T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  17. Refractory celiac disease and sprue-like intestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-dependent small intestinal mucosal disorder that causes rnalabsorption,often with diarrhea and weight loss.Diagnosis is based on detection of tupical biopsy changes in the proximal small bowel,followed by evidence for an unequivocal response to a gluten-free diet.Refractoriness in celiac disease may be due to poor diet compliance,sometimes intentional,or consumption of ubiquitious sources of gluten.Alternatively,the original diagnosis may not be correct(eg.,duodenal Crohn's disease),or a second cause for symptoms may be present (eg.,collagenous colitis,functional bowel disorder).In some with recurrent symptoms,a complication may be present (eg.,collagenous sprue,small bowel carcinoma,lymphoma).In some,a response to a gluten-free diet can not be unequivocally defined,and more precise historical terms have been used including "sprue-like intestinal disease" or "unclassified sprue".Although a "wastebasket diagnosis",these likely represent a heterogeneous group,and some,but not all,may develop lymphorna.Precise definition will be critical in the future as an array of new treatments,induding biological agents,may emerge.

  18. Celiac disease and microscopic colitis: A report of 4 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zsolt Barta; Eva Zold; Arpad Nagy; Margit Zeher; Istvan Csipo

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine that occurs in genetically predisposed people at all ages. However, it can be associated also to other immunopathological disorders, and may be associated with abnormal histology in segments of the gut other than the small bowel including colonic inflammation. While guidelines for endoscopic investigation of the jejunum are well defined, no indication is defined for colonic investigation. We describe four cases of concurrent CD and microscopic colitis (MC) diagnosed at our department over a 10-year period and analyzed the main features and outcomes of CD in this setting. The symptoms of these patients were improved initially by a gluten-free diet before the onset of MC symptoms. Two of the patients were siblings and had an atypical form of CD. The other two patients with CD and MC also presented with fibrosing alveolitis and were anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody positive. The co-existence of immune-mediated small bowel and colonic inflammatory and pulmonary diseases are not well-known, and no systematic approach has been used to identify the lifelong patterns of these immune-based diseases. Patients can develop, or present with CD at any stage in life, which can co-exist with other gastrointestinal diseases of (auto-) immune origin. In addition, the familial co-existence and prevalence of MC in patients with a prior diagnosis of CD are unclear. Clinicians managing celiac disease should be aware of these associations and understand when to consider colon investigation.

  19. Features of intestinal T-cell lymphomas in Chinese population without evidence of celiac disease and their close association with Epstein-Barr virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-yan; LI Gan-di; LIU Wei-ping; OUYANG Qin; REN Xing-chang; LI Feng-yuan; XU Huan

    2005-01-01

    Background Intestinal T-cell lymphoma (ITCL) is a heterogeneous lymphoid neoplastic group with variable clinical and pathological features. ITCL in oriental countries is different from enteropathy-type intestinal T-cell lymphoma (ETCL) in relation to celiac disease and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The objective of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological features, immunophenotype, expression of cytotoxic molecule (TIA-1), T-cell receptor (TCR)-γ gene rearrangement, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection in primary ITCL without celiac disease in Chinese.Methods The clinical data of 42 patients were analyzed, and the patients were followed up. Compared with human reactive lymphoid tissues, in situ hybridization for EBER1/2, polymerase chain reaction for TCR-γ gene rearrangement, and immunohistochemical staining for immunophenotypes, TIA-1 and EBV latent membrane proteins (LMP-1) were investigated. Survival curves of different clinicopathological features, immuno-phenotypes, expression of LMP1, TCR-γ gene rearrangement and therapy were analyzed.Results Three fourths of the patients suffered from ITCL in China were men with a peak age incidence in the 4th decade. Common presenting features included fever and hemotochezia. The prognosis was poor with a median survival of 3.0 months. The lesions were mostly localized in the ileocecum and colon. About 38/42 (90.5%) patients demonstrated pleomorphic medium-sized on large cells. Histological features of celiac disease were rarely seen. All 42 patients with ITCL revealed CD45RO positive. Neoplastic cells partially expressed T-cell differentiated antigens (CD3ε, CD4, CD8) and NK cell associated antigen (CD56). The positive frequency of CD3ε, CD4, CD8 and CD56 was 28/42 (66.7%), 7/42 (16.7%), 10/42 (23.8%) and 12/42 (28.6%) respectively. Thirty-nine cells (92.9%) expressed TIA-1, but none expressed CD20 and CD68. More than half of the patients (64.3%, 64.3% and 59.5%) revealed TCR-γ gene rearrangement by

  20. Moyamoya disease associated with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery arising from a persistent trigeminal artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan); Koizumi, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The authors present a case of moyamoya disease associated with a persistent trigeminal artery from which the anterior inferior cerebellar artery arose. We reviewed previously reported cases of moyamoya disease associated with persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis and investigated the embryology of this rare arterial variation. (orig.)

  1. CELIAC DISEASE AS A CAUSE OF RECURRENT ANEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an immune mediated enteropathy with sensitivity to gluten. It is a disease with heterogenous presentation. We report a case of a 12 year old who presented with episodes of recurrent anemia. The patient had no gastro intestinal symptoms. Celiac disease should be considered in any child with iron resistant anemia even if no gastrointestinal symptoms are present. Celiac Disease is an immune mediated enteropathy with permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals.1 The clinical manifestation of the disease can be quite varied. The various clinical symptoms described with celiac disease include failure to thrive, diarrhea, vomiting, short stature, delayed puberty, iron deficiency anemia not responding to hematinics etc.1 In some patients anemia might be the sole presentation.2

  2. Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Oats: A Canadian Position Based on a Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vieille, Sébastien; Pulido, Olga M; Abbott, Michael; Koerner, Terence B; Godefroy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the latest scientific data related to the safety of uncontaminated oats (oats, this review concludes that oats uncontaminated by gluten-containing cereals (wheat, rye, and barley) can be safely ingested by most patients with celiac disease and that there is no conclusive evidence that the consumption of uncontaminated or specially produced oats containing no greater than 20 ppm gluten by patients with celiac disease should be limited to a specific daily amount. However, individuals with CD should observe a stabilization phase before introducing uncontaminated oats to the gluten-free diet (GFD). Oats uncontaminated with gluten should only be introduced after all symptoms of celiac disease have resolved and the individual has been on a GFD for a minimum of 6 months. Long-term regular medical follow-up of these patients is recommended but this is no different recommendation to celiac individuals on a GFD without oats.

  3. Traumatic Neuroma around the Celiac Trunk after Gastrectomy Mimicking a Nodal Metastasis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Ryu, Seung Wan; Kang, Yu Na [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Traumatic neuroma is a well-known disorder that occurs after trauma or surgery involving the peripheral nerve and develops from a nonneoplastic proliferation of the proximal end of a severed, partially transected, or injured nerve. However, in the abdomen, traumatic neuromas have been sporadically reported to occur in the bile duct. We present here a case of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk after gastrectomy that mimicks a nodal metastasis. In conclusion, the imaging finding of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk was a homogeneous hypovascular mass without narrowing or irregularity of encased arteries and without increased uptake on PET-CT. Although from a clinical standpoint, establishing an accurate preoperative diagnosis is difficult to perform, the presence of a traumatic neuroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a mass around the celiac trunk in a patient that has undergone celiac nodal dissection.

  4. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

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    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  5. Can Campylobacter jejuni play a role in development of celiac disease? A hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Sabayan; Farzaneh Foroughinia; Mohammad Hadi Imanieh

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an entropathy with malabsortive condition in which an allergic reaction to the cereal grain-protein (gluten) causes small intestine mucosal injury. CD is a multifactorial disorder in which both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the disease development. Mechanisms have been described to explain the pathology of CD. T cells specific for multiple gluten peptides are found in virtually all patients. Generation of such a broad T cell response may be a prerequisite for disease development. CD is associated with multiple extraintestinal presentations,including neurological deficits. Recent studies have shown a significant correlation between anti-ganglioside antibodies and neurological disorders in patients with underlying CD. Gangliosides are glycosphingolipids which are abundant in nervous system and in other tissues including gastrointestinal tract. It is not known what triggers the release of anti-ganglioside antibodies in people with gluten sensitivity. But, the mechanism is likely to involve the intestinal immune system response to ingested gliadin, a component of wheat gluten. Studies showed that mechanisms different from gluten exposure may be implicated in antibody formation, and other environmental factors may also exist. In addition, considering the fact that genetic predisposition dysregulating mucosal immune responses in the presence of certain environmental triggers like gastrointestinal infections may be strong etiological factors for developing chronic intestinal inflammation including CD, the hypothesis raised in our mind that antiganglioside antibody formation in CD may play a role not only in development of neurological complications in celiac patients, but also in development of CD itself. As presence of Campylobacter jejuni in other diseases with antigangliosides antibody formation has been established, we propose the possible role of Campylobacter jejuni in development of CD in association with other genetic and

  6. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

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    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  7. Prevalence and clinical profile of celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Rajesh Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease (CD in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM in follow-up in a Tertiary Care Referral Centre in Western India and to describe the clinical features indicative of CD in screened patients of TIDM. Study Design: In this single center observational cross-sectional study, 71 children who were diagnosed with TIDM were subjected to screening for CD with tissue transglutaminase antibody testing. Those who tested positive were offered intestinal biopsy for the confirmation of diagnosis. Clinical profiles of both groups of patients were compared and manifestations of CD were delineated. Results: The study revealed the prevalence of CD (based on serology in children with Type 1 diabetes as 15.49%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed CD was 7.04%. Of the diagnosed CD patients, one-third were symptomatic at the time of screening while the majority was asymptomatic. The major clinical features indicative of CD were intestinal symptoms, anemia, rickets, and short stature. Autoimmune thyroid disease was prevalent in 29.6% of the patients with TIDM followed by CD. Conclusions: The high prevalence of CD in children with Type 1 diabetes emphasizes the need for routine screening programs to be in place for these high-risk populations. The clinical profile of patients with CD further elaborates the indicators of CD and the need to screen for them.

  8. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

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    Natalia M. Bottasso Arias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs: intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs’ expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa.

  9. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  10. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon SA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Samantha A Scanlon1, Joseph A Murray1,21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions.Keywords: immune-mediated enteropathy, gliadin, gluten, epidemiology, CD diagnosis, therapy

  11. Exploring T Cell Reactivity to Gliadin in Young Children with Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease

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    Edwin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Class II major histocompatibility molecules confer disease risk in Celiac disease (CD by presenting gliadin peptides to CD4 T cells in the small intestine. Deamidation of gliadin peptides by tissue transglutaminase creates immunogenic peptides presented by HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 molecules to activate proinflammatory CD4 T cells. Detecting gliadin specific T cell responses from the peripheral blood has been challenging due to low circulating frequencies and heterogeneity in response to gliadin epitopes. We investigated the peripheral T cell responses to alpha and gamma gliadin epitopes in young children with newly diagnosed and untreated CD. Using peptide/MHC recombinant protein constructs, we are able to robustly stimulate CD4 T cell clones previously derived from intestinal biopsies of CD patients. These recombinant proteins and a panel of α- and γ-gliadin peptides were used to assess T cell responses from the peripheral blood. Proliferation assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed more CD4 T cell responses to α-gliadin than γ-gliadin peptides with a single deamidated α-gliadin peptide able to identify 60% of CD children. We conclude that it is possible to detect T cell responses without a gluten challenge or in vitro stimulus other than antigen, when measuring proliferative responses.

  12. Association of Celiac Disease With Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis; Lane Hamilton Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hikmet Tekin Nacaroglu; Ozlem Sarac Sandal; Ozlem Bag; Semiha Bahceci Erdem; Ozlem Bekem Soylu; Gulden Diniz; Aysel Ozturk; Demet Can

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage, which is seen primarily in childhood. Celiac disease is defined as a chronic, immune-mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. Association of IPH and celiac disease is known as Lane Hamilton syndrome. There are limited number of case reports of this syndrome in literature. ...

  13. The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down syndrome Children with and without Congenital Heart Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Mohammad Noori; Alireza Teimouri; Maryam Nakhaey Moghaddam; Touran Shahraki

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) is remarkably varied in Down syndrome(DS)patientscompared with other diseases.  This study aimed to assess celiac disease prevalence in Down syndrome children with and without congenital heart defects (CHD) and its comparison with controls. Materials and Methods This case-control study was performed at a single center on 132 participants in three groups. Clinical and genetic tests were performed on all patients suspected with Down syndrome to c...

  14. Clinical presentations and biochemical profile in adult celiac disease patients in Hyderabad: Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Naila; Ali Shaikh, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To see the various clinical presentations and biochemical profile in adult celiac disease patients of Hyderabad Sindh. Methods: A total 60 suspected cases of adult celiac disease, both males and females were screened out from Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences hospital and private clinics at Sadar Hyderabad Sind by non probability purposive sampling during a period from July 2011 to December 2012.Age ranged between 18 to 55 Years. A detailed history and clinical exam...

  15. Small bowel capsule endoscopy, a modern tool for celiac disease diagnosis - case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Suceveanu Andra Iulia; Mazilu Laura; Suceveanu A.; Paris S.; Voinea F.; Parepa Irinel; Catrinoiu Doina

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by an inadequate immunological response when patients with specific genetic phenotypes are exposed to gluten. This article presents a case of a young woman diagnosed in Gastroenterology Department of “ St. Andrew Apostle” Emergency Hospital of Constanta with celiac disease after multiple admissions into the hospital for unspecific symptoms such as pallor, fatigue, pirosis, weight loss and 1-2 soft stools/day. The history with ...

  16. Clinical Spectrum of Biopsy-Defined Celiac Disease in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Thirty patients (17 females and 13 males) with adult celiac disease initially diagnosed after age 60 were seen during a 12-year period. Diagnosis in each patient was based on small intestinal biopsy and a clinical as well as histological response to a strict gluten-free diet. Diarrhea, weight loss and/or anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, were present in the majority of patients and often lead to other diagnostic considerations, including colon cancer, prior to definition of celiac disea...

  17. Age-related differences in celiac disease: Specific characteristics of adult presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago; Vivas; Luis; Vaquero; Laura; Rodríguez-Martín; Alberto; Caminero

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease may appear both in early childhood andin elderly subjects. Current knowledge of the disease has revealed some differences associated to the age of presentation. Furthermore, monitoring and prognosis of celiac subjects can vary depending on the pediatric or adult stage. The main objective of this review is to provide guidance for the adult diagnostic and follow-up processes, which must be tailored specifically for adults and be different from pediatric patients.

  18. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: diagnostic value of specific radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomoschitz, F.; Schima, W.; Schober, E.; Turetschek, K. [Department of Radiology and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Radiologic Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kaider, A. [Department of Medical Computer Sciences, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vogelsang, H. [Department of Internal Medicine IV, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various radiographic findings at enteroclysis in adult patients with untreated celiac disease. Twenty-seven adult patients underwent enteroclysis because of unspecific intestinal symptoms before definitive biopsy proof of celiac disease. Enteroclysis of 123 subjects with similar clinical presentation, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, occult intestinal bleeding, and weight loss, who had a definitive diagnosis other than celiac disease, served as controls. The radiographic features previously described in the literature as indicative of adult celiac disease (i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds, increase of ileal folds, small bowel dilatation, flocculation) were evaluated in blinded fashion in all studies and the subjective likelihood of diagnosis of celiac disease was assessed. Assessing every finding separately, each feature proved to have a high specificity (78-100%) but low sensitivity (19-59%) for celiac disease. Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern was the single best feature (specificity 100%, 95% CI 97-100%; sensitivity 59%, 95% CI 40-78%); however, combination of criteria enables establishment of the diagnosis of celiac disease quite accurately (specificity 100%, 95% CI 98-100%; sensitivity 78%, 95% CI 58-91%). Reversal of jejunoileal fold pattern as a single finding as well as combination at least three of the following features, i.e., fold thickening, decrease of jejunal folds (''colonization''), increase of ileal folds (''jejunization''), dilatation, and flocculation, make enteroclysis an accurate tool for diagnosis of celiac disease in adult patients with suspected intestinal disease. (orig.)

  19. Traumatic Neuroma around the Celiac Trunk after Gastrectomy Mimicking a Nodal Metastasis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Ryu, Seung Wan; Kang, Yu Na

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic neuroma is a well-known disorder that occurs after trauma or surgery involving the peripheral nerve and develops from a nonneoplastic proliferation of the proximal end of a severed, partially transected, or injured nerve. We present a case of traumatic neuroma around the celiac trunk after gastrectomy in a 56-year-old man, which was confirmed by pathology. CT demonstrated the presence of a lobulated, homogeneous, hypoattenuating mass around the celiac trunk, mimicking a nodal metast...

  20. Practical considerations for the identification and follow-up of children with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks, Martha H

    2004-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy affecting 0.5% to 1% of children and is induced by dietary gluten in susceptible individuals carrying the human leukocyte antigen DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer. If serological screening is positive or if a patient displays suggestive symptoms, an endoscopic biopsy of the distal duodenum is required to confirm the diagnosis. Symptoms of celiac disease are often mild or absent. Overt malabsorption occurs in only 2% to 10% of children. Individuals with a...

  1. Dermatomyositis Associated with Celiac Disease: Response to a Gluten-Free Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Min Soo; Farber, David; Bitton, Alain; Jass, Jeremy; Singer, Michael; Karpati, George

    2006-01-01

    The association between dermatomyositis and celiac disease in children has been well documented. In the adult population, however, the association has not been clearly established. A rare case of concomitant dermatomyositis and celiac disease in a 40-year-old woman is presented. After having been diagnosed with dermatomyositis and iron deficiency anemia, this patient was referred to the gastroenterology clinic to exclude a gastrointestinal malignancy. Blood tests revealed various vitamin defi...

  2. Does gluten free diet have more implications than treatment of celiac disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Talaie, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to evaluate symptomatic as well as histopathologic response to GFD in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathies including celiac disease, lymphocytic duodenosis and non-specific duodenitis. Background: Gluten-free diet (GFD) is the main treatment of celiac disease. However, its impact on other disorders of gluten sensitivity spectrum is less clear. Patients and methods: In a prospective observational study in Modarres hospital Tehran, Iran, 35 patients with chroni...

  3. Prevalence of IgA Antibodies to Endomysium and Tissue Transglutaminase in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

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    Helen R Gillett

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis has been described in several case reports and small screening studies, with varying prevalence rates. Stored sera from 378 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were tested for immunoglobulin (Ig A endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Ten patients were positive for both antibodies (2.6%; five of these patients had had small bowel biopsies confirming celiac disease. A further 44 patients (11.6% had raised titres of IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody but were negative for IgA endomysium antibody. The increased prevalence of celiac-related antibodies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis suggests that the two conditions are associated, although the reason for the association remains unclear. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis should be considered to be at high risk for celiac disease. Although liver biochemistry does not improve when these patients are fed a gluten-free diet, the complications of untreated celiac disease warrant the identification and treatment of the condition in this population.

  4. Increased Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Unexplained Infertility in the United States: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Janet M.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Wang, Jeffrey; Lee, Susie K.; Murray, Joseph A.; Sauer, Mark V.; Green, Peter H. R.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder which can present with a variety of non-gastrointestinal manifestations. In women, it may manifest with an assortment of gynecologic or obstetric disorders. Some reports have linked female infertility with undiagnosed celiac disease. Though there are a number of studies from Europe and the Middle East, only two prior American studies have examined the prevalence of “silent” celiac disease in a female infertility population. We prospectively performed s...

  5. Gluten Introduction, Breastfeeding, and Celiac Disease: Back to the Drawing Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Murray, Joseph A; Verdú, Elena F; Crowe, Sheila E; Dennis, Melinda; Fasano, Alessio; Green, Peter H R; Guandalini, Stefano; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    This commentary by the leadership of the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease (NASSCD) concerns recent research findings regarding infant feeding practices. Celiac disease has increased markedly in recent decades, and seroprevalence studies indicate that this is a true rise, rather than one due to increased awareness and testing. Prior studies have suggested that infant feeding practices and timing of initial gluten exposure are central to the development of celiac disease. Two recent multicenter randomized trials tested strategies of early or delayed gluten introduction in infants, and neither strategy appeared to influence celiac disease risk. These studies also found that breastfeeding did not protect against the development of celiac disease. While disappointing, these results should spur the study of wider environmental risk factors beyond infant feeding, such as intrauterine and perinatal exposures as well as environmental influences later in life, including drug exposure, microbial infections, and the microbiome. Given that celiac disease can develop at any age, it is imperative to study these proposed triggers so as to elucidate the loss of tolerance to gluten and to develop future intervention strategies. PMID:26259710

  6. [T lymphocyte populations of the intestinal mucosa in celiac disease in children. Immunohistochemical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, J P; Voigt, J J; al Saati, T; Nonnenmacher, L; Brousset, P; Delsol, G; Ghisolfi, J

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in a pathologic intestinal mucosa, the authors, instead of using the classic method by counting the number of lymphocytes, present an original method permitting the exploitation of quantified data from labelled surface cells by texture analyser coupled with a computerized system. We investigated 25 children presenting with chronic diarrhea and villous atrophy and 5 control subjects. Fifteen of the 25 children had celiac disease (10 active with total villous atrophy and 5, celiac disease in remission with healing mucosa), 5 cow's milk protein intolerance with total or partial villous atrophy and 5, chronic diarrhea with partial villous atrophy. Immunohistochemical study with monoclonal antibodies was carried out on frozen sections using a three-step immunoperoxidase technique. Compared with the 5 controls, patients with food intolerance (celiac disease and cow's milk protein intolerance) showed a significant increase of T suppressor lymphocytes (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05) in the epithelium, whereas there were more T helper lymphocytes in the lamina propria (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01). Non-treated celiac disease was distinguished from treated celiac disease by a marked increase in intra-epithelial T cytotoxic-suppressors. These results suggest that T cytotoxic-suppressors may be the mediators of the lesions observed in celiac disease. PMID:2179007

  7. Increased Mercury Levels in Patients with Celiac Disease following a Gluten-Free Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Elli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Although mercury is involved in several immunological diseases, nothing is known about its implication in celiac disease. Our aim was to evaluate blood and urinary levels of mercury in celiac patients. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 30 celiac patients (20 treated with normal duodenal mucosa and 10 untreated with duodenal atrophy and 20 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Blood and urinary mercury concentrations were measured by means of flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Enrolled patients underwent dental chart for amalgam fillings and completed a food-frequency questionnaire to evaluate diet and fish intake. Results. Mercury blood/urinary levels were 2.4±2.3/1.0±1.4, 10.2±6.7/2.2±3.0 and 3.7±2.7/1.3±1.2 in untreated CD, treated CD, and healthy controls, respectively. Resulting mercury levels were significantly higher in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. No differences were found regarding fish intake and number of amalgam fillings. No demographic or clinical data were significantly associated with mercury levels in biologic samples. Conclusion. Data demonstrate a fourfold increase of mercury blood levels in celiac patients following a gluten-free diet. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in celiac mechanism.

  8. Estimation of milk, dairy products and calcium intake in nutrition of the celiac patients

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    Ines Panjkota Krbavčić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate a protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, rye, barley and possibly oats. The smallest amount of gluten in food damages the small intestine of these patients. In Croatia there is no data about nutrition and dietary habits of people with celiac disease. In celiac disease there is one and only cure: a gluten-free diet. Milk and dairy products are major source of calcium, and this population, because of malapsorptive syndrome is especially sensitive and predisposed for osteoporosis and osteopenya. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to establish milk, dairy products and calcium intake in celiac patients nutrition. Milk and dairy products was determined by using 3-day-dietary record (3DD combined with food frequency questionnaire (FFQ in 15 celiac patients. Energy share of milk and dairy products were 11,82 % kJ, twice less than recommendation. Average daily intake of calcium was also below the recommendation (62,64 % DRI, and 67 % of examinees did not achieve neither 2/3 of daily recommendation intake (DRI for calcium. From milk and dairy group examinees use milk and pudding the most, yoghurt and fruit yoghurt less. It is necessary to increase intake of calcium from milk and dairy products group because they are the best source of this nutrient.

  9. Prevalence of celiac disease in adult type 1 patients with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Burcu; Oner, Can; Bayramicli, Oya Uygur; Yorulmaz, Elif; Feyizoglu, Guneş; Oguz, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease, an autoimmune disease, is related to immune mediated intolerance to gluten. Some studies suggest that Celiac Disease was 20 times more frequent in type 1 patients with diabetes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease in hospital based type 1 diabetic adults. Methods: Our study was carried out retrospectively in Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Educational Hospital in Istanbul between 2012–2013. The cohort comprised 482 type 1 patients with diabetes attending the diabetes outpatient clinic. The data were analyzed by SPSS 10.5 package program. Student’s t tests is used for comparative analyses. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The cohort included 482 type 1 patients with diabetes. Fifty seven of them were not evaluated for Endomysium antibody positivity. Fifteen of the remaining 425 patients were positive for anti endomysial antibody (3.5%). The prevalence of biopsy proven celiac disease was 2.3% (10/425). There was no significant difference between Endomysial antibody positive and negative groups in regard of age, sex, or duration of the disease. Conclusion: This study confirms that the celiac disease is common in type 1 diabetic patients. Since a small proportion of celiac patients are symptomatic this disorder should be screened in all adult type 1 patients with diabetes by antiendomysium antibody. PMID:26430419

  10. Marked Increase in Flow Velocities During Deep Expiration: A Duplex Doppler Sign of Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia develop when the celiac artery is constricted by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. Lateral aortography is the primary modality for diagnosing ligamentous compression of the celiac artery. However, duplex Doppler sonography performed during deep expiration can cause a marked increase in flow velocities at the compressed region of the celiac artery and suggest the diagnosis of celiac arterial constriction due to the diaphragmatic ligament. RID='''' ID='''' Correspondence to: A. Erden, M.D., Hafta sokak. 23/6, Gaziosmanpasa, 06700 Ankara, Turkey

  11. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone mineral density (125I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups

  12. Celiac disease: an underappreciated issue in women’s health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sveta; Leffler, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is secondary to gluten ingestion and classically associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Diagnosis is based on serology and confirmatory duodenal biopsy, and the only treatment is lifelong avoidance of gluten. CD has been increasingly recognized to encompass a wide variety of manifestations that are relevant to women’s health, including infertility, adverse pregnancy outcomes and reduced BMD. Currently, CD is underdiagnosed, largely owing to lack of recognition of the diverse manifestations by general practitioners. Increased awareness of the clinical spectrum of this disease, as well as targeted testing in at-risk individuals (including women with unexplained infertility and previous adverse pregnancy outcomes, and in specific populations with reduced BMD) is greatly needed in order to improve rates of diagnosis. PMID:20887172

  13. Origin of celiac disease: How old are predisposing haplotypes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Gasbarrini; Olga Rickards; Cristina Martínez-Labarga; Elsa Pacciani; Filiberto Chilleri; Lucrezia Laterza; Giuseppe Marangi; Franco Scaldaferri; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2012-01-01

    We recently presented the case of a first century AD young woman,found in the archaeological site of Cosa,showing clinical signs of malnutrition,such as short height,osteoporosis,dental enamel hypoplasia and cribra orbitalia,indirect sign of anemia,all strongly suggestive for celiac disease (CD).However,whether these findings were actually associated to CD was not shown based on genetic parameters.To investigate her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ polymorphism,we extracted DNA from a bone sample and a tooth and genotyped HLA using three HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms for DQ8,DQ2.2 and DQ2.5,specifically associated to CD.She displayed HLA DQ 2.5,the haplotype associated to the highest risk of CD.This is the first report showing the presence of a HLA haplotype compatible for CD in archaeological specimens.

  14. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  15. Regression of conjunctival tumor during dietary treatment of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncer Samuray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with a hemorrhagic conjunctival lesion in the right eye. The medical history revealed premature cessation of breast feeding, intolerance to the ingestion of baby foods, anorexia, and abdominal distention. Prior to her referral, endoscopic small intestinal biopsy had been carried out under general anesthesia with a possible diagnosis of Celiac Disease (CD. Her parents did not want their child to undergo general anesthesia for the second time for the excisional biopsy. We decided to follow the patient until all systemic investigations were concluded. In evaluation, the case was diagnosed with CD and the conjunctival tumor showed complete regression during gluten-free dietary treatment. The clinical fleshy appearance of the lesion with spider-like vascular extensions and subconjunctival hemorrhagic spots, possible association with an acquired immune system dysfunction due to CD, and spontaneous regression by a gluten-free diet led us to make a presumed diagnosis of conjunctival Kaposi sarcoma.

  16. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic gastritis and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, M; De Petris, G; Palumbo, T P; Lev, R

    2001-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder, with only 8 cases reported in the literature, 2 in children and 6 in adults. We report an additional case of collagenous gastritis in a 42-year-old man with celiac disease. A thickened (>10 microm) subepithelial collagen band with entrapped capillaries, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells was seen in the stomach, associated with lymphocytic gastritis. The duodenal mucosa showed severe villous atrophy but no subepithelial collagen deposition. No evidence of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis was found in the colon. The patient became symptom-free on a gluten exclusion diet and showed partial improvement of histopathologic findings after 3 months. Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease, but a wider recognition of its histopathologic features and clinical associations may bring more cases to light and provide additional clues in determining its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:11735694

  17. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac DM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Migliarese Isaac,1 Jessica Wu,2 Diana R Mager,3,4 Justine M Turner1 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; 2Alberta Health Services–Child Health Nutrition Services, Stollery Children’s Hospital; 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Science; 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. Keywords: celiac disease

  18. Principles of Proper Nutrition in Children with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khajavikia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a hereditary disorder of the immune system which damages the mucosa of the small intestine caused by gluten consumption(even very small amounts. Villous atrophy, leads to malabsorption, which is due to decreased absorption levels. The first bowel symptoms are seen during the first 2 years of life. Currently, the only treatment is to compliance with a gluten-free diet lifelong. The purpose of this study was to introduce the principles of proper nutrition in children with CD to prevent complications of malabsorption.   Results: The patients do not tolerate the proteins of cereals in bread such as wheat, barley, black barley and rye. Substituting wheat flour with rice flour, corn and potatoes and using olive oil, sunflower, corn oil and peanut oil for cooking is recommended. Until the disappearance of symptoms, consumption of milk, fat and high-fiber foods should be avoided. Deficiency of folic acid, iron, vitamin B12 and calcium are common. If necessary, iron, folic acid and multivitamin can be used. These children need proper energy according to their personal needs and should have a diet high in protein. Consumption of potatoes, corn, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy and nuts (non- roasted in any form is allowed. Identifying foods which contain gluten (prepared sauces, sausages, salami, herbal supplements, all canned meat products, crushed barbecue, prepared soups, espresso and coffee , white vinegar, curd, dried milk, pasta, pastries prepared by wheat flour, compote and food supplements is recommended.   Conclusions: The identification of substances containing gluten by parents and children, and removal of harmful substances from the diet causes the intestines to quickly begin to rebuild itself. Keywords: Nutrition, Child, Celiac, Diet.

  19. Ages of celiac disease: From changing environment to improved diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Tommasini; Tarcisio Not; Alessandro Ventura

    2011-01-01

    From the time of Gee's landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into manyages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeperknowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time,these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the diseasein population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was notknown; later, the disease was proven to depend on anintolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosalchanges in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten(AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic "gluten infection". The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presenta-tion. More recently, the characterization of autoantibod-ies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disor-ders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further devel-opments for the next celiac age will be proposed.

  20. 雷公藤内酯醇对内毒素激活小鼠腹腔巨噬细胞分泌促炎症介质NO和IL-6的影响%Effect of triptolide on lipopolysaccharide-activated secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines NO and IL-6 in celiac macrophages of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 胡耑; 白祥军

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat autoimmune disease associated with increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine. Triptolide( TP) is a compound originally purified from T. wilfordii Hook f. and it has potent anti- inflammatory and immunosuppressant activities. In this study, we investigated the effect of TP on secretion of NO and IL-6 in celiac macrophages ( MΦ) activated by lipopolysaccharide ( LPS) in Kunming mice. Methods Celiac MΦ of mice were separated, purified, and activated by LPS, then cultured in vitro with TP of different concentrations. The level of NO in cellular supematants was determined by Griess reagent, and that of IL-6 was determined by ELISA. Results We found that pro-inflammatory cytokine NO activity in MΦ induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by TP ( 10-3-10 μg/ml) from 4-24 h in a time and dose- dependent manner (P < 0. 01). The level of IL-6 in MΦ was significantly inhibited by TP (10-3-10 μg/ml) at 12 h in a dose-dependent manner (P <0. 01). Conclusions We demonstrated that TP can inhibit levels of NO and IL-6 in celiac MΦ of Kunming mice activated by LPS.

  1. Concomitant Superior Mesenteric, Celiac, Renal, and Aortoiliac Aneurysm; Ultrasonography, CT and MRA Findings in A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Nabavizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Visceral artery aneurysms are rare vas-cular diseases whose pathogenesis and natural history remain incompletely understood. Herein we describe an 80 year-old man with concomitant superior mes-enteric, celiac, renal, and aorto-iliac aneurysms. To the best of our knowledge this constellation of arte-rial aneurysms has not been described yet."nCase Presentation: An 80-year-old man was referred to our institution due to presence of tarry stool and one episode of vomiting of coffee ground material. The patient underwent an upper GI endoscopy which revealed esophageal varicosities. Due to presence of esophageal varicosities and clinical suspicion of portal vein thrombosis an ultrasonographic Doppler study of portal venous system was performed in this patient which revealed normal diameter and flow in portal and splenic veins with no evidence of thrombosis; however incidentally aneurismal dilatation of celiac and superior mesenteric arteries and lower part of abdominal aorta and both iliac arteries were found during the ultrasonographic examination. Abdominal CT scan was performed in this patient, which re-vealed aneurismal dilatation of main celiac artery and its main branches. There was also aneurismal dilata-tion of superior mesenteric artery. Aneurismal dilata-tion of distal abdominal aorta with extension to both side common, external, and internal iliac arteries was also seen. MRA of abdomen was also performed which revealed the previous findings plus apparent dilatation of proximal part of right main renal artery which was not considered in previous abdominal CT scan. Since then; he has remained asymptomatic and stable, with no evidence of further expansion of his aneurysms in routine sonographic examinations."nDiscussion: Our patient was a hypertensive hyperlip-idemic old man with history of previous TIA and atherosclerotic carotid plaques, so the most important predisposing factor seemed to be atherosclerosis. Sev-eral work

  2. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations. PMID:26210237

  3. [Celiac disease and its endocrine and nutritional implications on male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, A V; Mantovani, A

    2004-06-01

    The problem of the interference of celiac disease (CD) with the male reproductive system is made evident both by the recognized adverse effects on female reproduction and by the multifactorial nature of the disease. It is important to consider CD as a multifactorial condition since its diverse effects can be modulated, besides gluten, by different concurrent genetic and environmental factors. The male CD patient has a greater risk of infertility and other reproductive disturbances, as well as a greater incidence of hypoandrogenism. In this paper the problems of CD associated to endocrine disorders and to deficiencies of micronutrients are discussed. Affected males show a picture of tissue resistance to androgens. Moreover, attention should be paid to increases of FSH and prolactin; these are not associated to infertility and/or impotence, but they may indicate an imbalance at hypothalamus-pituitary level, with general effects on health: an example is the increased risk of male osteoporosis in CD patients. Hormone alterations are reversible upon start of the gluten-free diet, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis; this should be performed in the case of clinical suspicion, e.g., unexplained hypoandrogenism. As regards nutritional aspects, the folic acid deficiency of CD can affect rapidly proliferating tissues, such as the embryo and the seminiferous epithelium. More attention should be paid to deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins, such as A and E, observed in CD. Vitamin A is important for Sertoli cell function as well as for early spermatogenetic phases. Vitamin E supports the correct differentiation and function of epidydimal epithelium, spermatid maturation and secretion of proteins by the prostate. Therefore, CD male patients should be considered as vulnerable subjects; thus, the detection of early biomarkers of andrological or endocrinological dysfunctions should trigger timely strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:15289752

  4. Inflammation-induced thrombosis: mechanisms, disease associations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Kenan; Donmez, Ayhan; Keser, Gokhan

    2012-01-01

    Although inflammation-induced thrombosis is a well-known entity, its pathogenesis remains complicated. There are complex interactions between inflammation and hemostasis, involving proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, tissue factor expression, platelet and endothelial activation, and microparticles. Inflammation increases procoagulant factors, and also inhibits natural anticoagulant pathways and fibrinolytic activity, causing a thrombotic tendency. Besides, chronic inflammation may cause endothelial damage, resulting in the loss of physiologic anticoagulant, antiaggregant and vasodilatory properties of endothelium. However, inflammation- induced venous thrombosis may develop even in the absence of vessel wall damage. On the other hand, coagulation also augments inflammation, causing a vicious cycle. This is mainly achieved by means of thrombin-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Platelets may also trigger inflammation by activating the dendritic cells. There are many systemic inflammatory diseases characterized by thrombotic tendency, including Behçet disease (BD), antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, Takayasu arteritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphosholipid syndrome, familial Mediterranean fever, thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) and inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammation-induced thrombosis may respond to immunosuppressive (IS) treatment, as in the case of BD. However effectiveness of this treatment can not be generalized to all other inflammatory diseases. For instance, IS agents do not have any beneficial role in the management of TAO. Heparin, antiplatelet agents such as aspirin and clopidogrel, colchicine and statins also have some antiinflammatory activity. However, decreased responsiveness to aspirin and clopidogrel treatments may be observed in inflammatory diseases, due to antiplatelet resistance caused by systemic inflammation. In the present

  5. LOWER BIFIDOBACTERIA COUNTS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CELIAC DISEASE ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisléia GOLFETTO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The ingestion of gluten is responsible for the symptoms of Celiac disease, but other environmental factors can also influence. Strains of the Bifidobacterium genus have been shown to afford protection against the inflammatory response and mucosal damage caused by gliadin peptides in vitro. Objectives This study was designed to compare the concentration of fecal bifidobacteria and pH of patients with celiac disease on gluten-free diet and control subjects in order to identify if the imbalance on fecal microbiota still remain during the treatment of celiac disease and identify the necessity of dietary supplementation with pre- or probiotics. Methods It was analyzed the feces of 42 healthy subjects and 14 celiac patients. The bifidobacteria count in feces was done in selective medium BIM-25. Microscopic analysis of the colonies was performed by Gram stain. The identification of the genus Bifidobacterium was performed by determination of fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase. Fecal pH was measured using a pH meter. Results The concentration of bifidobacteria per gram of feces was significantly higher in healthy subjects (controls (1.5 ± 0.63 x108 CFU/g when compared to celiac patients (2.5 ± 1.5 x107 CFU/g. The fecal pH was not different between celiac patients (7.19 ± 0.521 and controls (7.18 ± 0.522. Conclusions These results suggest that with lower levels of bifidobacteria, celiac patients have an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota, regardless of pH, even while on a gluten-free diet. This fact could favor the pathological process of the disorder.

  6. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  7. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijers, K.; Loayza-Puch, F.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Agami, R.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson's disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations oft

  8. Economic Burden of Disease-Associated Malnutrition at the State Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goates, Scott; Du, Kristy; Braunschweig, Carol A.; Arensberg, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-associated malnutrition has been identified as a prevalent condition, particularly for the elderly, which has often been overlooked in the U.S. healthcare system. The state-level burden of community-based disease-associated malnutrition is unknown and there have been limited efforts by state policy makers to identify, quantify, and address malnutrition. The objective of this study was to examine and quantify the state-level economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition. Methods Direct medical costs of disease-associated malnutrition were calculated for 8 diseases: Stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Coronary Heart Failure, Breast Cancer, Dementia, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Depression, and Colorectal Cancer. National disease and malnutrition prevalence rates were estimated for subgroups defined by age, race, and sex using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey. State prevalence of disease-associated malnutrition was estimated by combining national prevalence estimates with states’ demographic data from the U.S. Census. Direct medical cost for each state was estimated as the increased expenditures incurred as a result of malnutrition. Principal Findings Direct medical costs attributable to disease-associated malnutrition vary among states from an annual cost of $36 per capita in Utah to $65 per capita in Washington, D.C. Nationally the annual cost of disease-associated malnutrition is over $15.5 billion. The elderly bear a disproportionate share of this cost on both the state and national level. Conclusions Additional action is needed to reduce the economic impact of disease-associated malnutrition, particularly at the state level. Nutrition may be a cost-effective way to help address high health care costs. PMID:27655372

  9. A review of outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships: evidence for risk management.

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Bartram, Jamie K.; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Benembarek, Peter K.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Foodborne disease outbreaks on ships are of concern because of their potentially serious health consequences for passengers and crew and high costs to the industry. The authors conducted a review of outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with passenger ships in the framework of a World Health Organization project on setting guidelines for ship sanitation. METHODS: The authors reviewed data on 50 outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships. For each outbreak, ...

  10. Dough quality of bread wheat lacking ¿-gliadins with celiac disease epitopes and addition of celiac-safe avenins to improve dough quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeck, van den H.C.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Meer, van der I.M.; Hamer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated immune response in the small intestine of genetically susceptible individuals caused by ingested gluten proteins from wheat, rye, and barley. In the allohexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), gluten proteins are encoded by multigene loci present on the homoeol

  11. Celiac artery disease and fatal rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nat, Amritpal; George, Tanya; Mak, Gregory; Sharma, Amit; Nat, Amitpal; Lebel, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Isolated visceral arteriopathies of the celiac and hepatic artery are rare. We present a case of a Caucasian man who presented with abdominal pain and was found to have a spontaneous celiac artery dissection. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The patient died 2 months later from a spontaneous rupture of his hepatic artery. PMID:24688192

  12. Celiac artery disease and fatal rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Nat, Amritpal; George, Tanya; Mak, Gregory; Sharma, Amit; Nat, Amitpal; Lebel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Isolated visceral arteriopathies of the celiac and hepatic artery are rare. We present a case of a Caucasian man who presented with abdominal pain and was found to have a spontaneous celiac artery dissection. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The patient died 2 months later from a spontaneous rupture of his hepatic artery.

  13. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B.; Sumnik, Z.; Schober, E.; Waldhor, T.; Battelino, T.; Bratanic, N.; Kurti, K.; Lebl, J.; Limbert, C.; Madacsy, L.; Odink, R.J.H.; Paskova, M.; Soltesz, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  14. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  15. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  16. Screening detected celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus : Effect on the clinical course - (A case control study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rami, B; Sumnik, Z; Schober, E; Waldhor, T; Battelino, T; Bratanic, N; Kurti, K; Lebl, J; Limbert, C; Madacsy, L; Odink, RJH; Paskova, M; Soltesz, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical and metabolic characteristics of diabetic children with screening detected celiac disease in a multicenter case-control study. Methods: Cases: 98 diabetic patients were diagnosed as having silent celiac disease by screening with endomysial antibodies and subsequent

  17. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Asha

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD. A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During a three-year period, 12 adult patients with celiac disease were seen in the Luminal Gastroenterology Clinic in a tertiary referral center in northern India. Two of these 12 patients (16.6%, who did not fully respond to GFD initially, are presented here. Unresponsiveness resulted from SIBO in one and lactose intolerance in the other. The former patient responded to antibiotics and the latter to lactose withdrawal in addition to standard GFD. Conclusion In patients with celiac disease partially responsive or unresponsive to GFD, SIBO and lactose intolerance should be suspected; appropriate investigations and treatment for these may result in complete recovery.

  18. Long-term consumption of oats in adult celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, Katri; Collin, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäki, Markku

    2013-11-01

    Many celiac disease patients tolerate oats, but limited data are available on its long-term consumption. This was evaluated in the present study, focusing on small-bowel mucosal histology and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac adults maintaining a strict gluten-free diet with or without oats. Altogether 106 long-term treated celiac adults were enrolled for this cross-sectional follow-up study. Daily consumption of oats and fiber was assessed, and small-bowel mucosal morphology and densities of CD3+, αβ+ and γσ+ intraepithelial lymphocytes determined. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed by a validated Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale questionnaire. Seventy (66%) out of the 106 treated celiac disease patients had consumed a median of 20 g of oats (range 1-100 g) per day for up to eight years; all consumed oat products bought from general stores. Daily intake and long-term consumption of oats did not result in small-bowel mucosal villous damage, inflammation, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Oat-consumers had a significantly higher daily intake of fiber than those who did not use oats. Two thirds of celiac disease patients preferred to use oats in their daily diet. Even long-term ingestion of oats had no harmful effects.

  19. Managing Celiac Disease for Women: Implications for the Primary Care Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan; Grossman, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Although many people have symptoms of celiac disease, it can take a while to diagnose. Villous atrophy may be present long before any gastrointestinal symptoms. An important point to acknowledge is that celiac disease could be identified earlier in some women with a positive family history. The disease also could be the cause of some women's reproductive problems. Primary care providers, using comprehensive history taking, are in the unique position to identify individuals who may have celiac disease, assist women in gaining knowledge about a gluten-free diet, order diagnostic testing, and refer to a gastroenterologist. The positive change in fertility with a simultaneous improvement of nutrient deficiencies shortly after adopting a gluten-free diet indicates a possible link between such nutrients and sex hormone function. High levels of homocysteine, which can negatively impact fertility, have also been linked to individuals with problems, such as celiac disease, that decrease vitamin B12 absorption. The purpose of this article is to review the literature and the evidence-based care guidelines for comprehensive screening, diagnostics, and pathophysiology of celiac disease, with a specific focus on the female reproductive system, anemia management, and gluten-free diet integration. PMID:27258459

  20. MDCT angiography of anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery

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    Ognjanović Neda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect and describe the existence and incidence of anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery. The study was conducted on 150 persons, who underwent abdominal Multi- Detector Computer Tomography (MDCT angiography, from April 2010 until November 2012. CT images were obtained with a 64-row MDCT scanner in order to analyze the vascular anatomy and anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery. In our study, we found that 78% of patients have a classic anatomy of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery. The most frequent variation was the origin of the common hepatic artery from the superior mesenteric artery (10%. The next variation, according to frequency, was the origin of the left gastric artery direct from the abdominal aorta (4%. The arc of Buhler as an anastomosis between the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery, was detected in 3% of cases, as was the presence of a common trunk of the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery (in 3% of cases. Separate origin of the splenic artery and the common hepatic artery was present in 2% of patients. The MDCT scanner gives us an insight into normal anatomy and variations of the abdominal blood vessels, which is very important in the planning of surgical interventions, especially transplantation, as well as in the prevention of complications due to ischemia.

  1. Celiac disease in children: is it a problem in Kuwait?

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    Al-Qabandi W

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wafa'a Al-Qabandi,1 Eman Buhamrah,2 Dalia Al-Abdulrazzaq,1 Khaled Hamadi,2 Fawaz Al Refaee3 1Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait; 2Department of Pediatrics, Al Amiri Hospital, Kuwait; 3Department of Pediatrics, Al Adan Hospital, Kuwait  All authors contributed equally to the study Background: Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. The objective of this study is to describe our experience with CD children in Kuwait. Methods: The records of children with CD seen in the pediatric gastroenterology unit between February 1998 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were referred because of symptoms or positive CD antibody screening of a high-risk group (type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome. Results: Forty-seven patients were diagnosed: 53% were symptomatic and 47% were identified by screening. The median age at diagnosis was 66 (range 7–189 months. All cases were biopsy-proven except one. The symptomatic patients were significantly younger than those identified following screening (P<0.004. In the whole group, 66% were females and 77% were Kuwaitis; 9% had a positive family history of CD. The estimated cumulative incidence was 6.9/105. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.5 (range 2–54 months. Failure to thrive was the most common presenting complaint (72% followed by diarrhea (64% and abdominal distension (56%. Atypical manifestations were seen in 60% of patients. Underweight and short stature were confirmed in 19% and 17% of patients, respectively. Overweight and obesity were detected in 14% and 6%, respectively. CD serology was based on a combination of antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies. The median follow up was 24 (range 12–144 months. All patients were commenced on a gluten free diet, but good compliance was only achieved in 78%. Conclusion: The low frequency of childhood CD in Kuwait could

  2. Celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes: a condition with distinct changes in intestinal immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uibo, Raivo; Panarina, Marina; Teesalu, Kaupo; Talja, Ija; Sepp, Epp; Utt, Meeme; Mikelsaar, Marika; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Oivi; Vorobjova, Tamara

    2011-03-01

    Two common chronic childhood diseases-celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D)-result from complex pathological mechanisms where genetic susceptibility, environmental exposure, alterations in intestinal permeability and immune responses play central roles. In this study, we investigated whether these characteristics were universal for CD independently of T1D association. For this purpose, we studied 36 children with normal small-bowel mucosa and 26 children with active CD, including 12 patients with T1D. In samples from the small-bowel mucosa, we detected the lowest expression of tight junction protein 1 (TJP1) mRNA in CD patients with T1D, indicating an increase in intestinal permeability. Furthermore, these samples displayed the highest expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) mRNA, a marker for regulatory T cells, as compared with other patient groups. At the same time, serum levels of IgA antibodies specific for the CD-related antigens deamidated gliadin and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) were the highest in CD patients with T1D. In contrast, no significant differences were found in IgA or IgG antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin or Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083-derived proteins. There were also no differences in the transamidating activity of serum autoantibodies between patients and control individuals. Our results show that patients with T1D and newly detected CD exhibit severely altered intestinal permeability, strong local immune activation and increased immunoregulatory mechanisms in the small bowel. Further study is required to determine whether these extreme changes in this CD subgroup are due to some specific environmental factors (virus infections), unknown genetic effects or autoimmune reactions to antigenic targets in intracellular tight junctions. PMID:21317917

  3. Celiac disease: role of intestinal compartments in the mucosal immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacomino, Giuseppe; Marano, Angela; Stillitano, Ilaria; Aufiero, Vera Rotondi; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Schettino, Michele; Masucci, Armando; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; Mazzarella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Different approaches have been used to study the pattern of cytokines in celiac disease (CD). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a powerful tool for the isolation of specific tissue compartments. We aimed to investigate the mucosal immune response that takes place in different intestinal compartments of CD patients, dissected by LCM, analyzing cytokine expression profile. Frozen section of jejunum was obtained from 15 untreated CD and 15 control. Surface epithelium and lamina propria compartment were isolated by LCM. RNA from each LCM sample was extracted and, after a retrotranscription step, messenger RNA levels for MxA, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17α, IL-21, IL-10, and TGF-β were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Increased gene expression levels of MxA, IL-15, TNF-α, IL-10, and TGF-β was observed in the surface epithelium of untreated CD with respect to control. Furthermore, all the cytokines investigated were upregulated in the lamina propria of untreated CD as compared to control. Within the untreated CD group the expression of IL-15 was higher, in the surface epithelium than in the lamina propria, whereas the expression levels of IL-17 and IL-21 were higher in the lamina propria than in the surface epithelium. Finally, high levels of IL-10 and TGF-β were detected in both compartments of untreated CD biopsies. In CD, surface epithelium and lamina propria compartments, play a prominent role in determining innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. Conversely, surface epithelium and lamina propria produce high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that both compartments are involved in the immunoregulatory response. PMID:26541753

  4. Celiac Disease: Ten Things That Every Gastroenterologist Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxentenko, Amy S; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-08-01

    There are 10 things that all gastroenterologists should know about celiac disease (CD). (1) The immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase is the single best serologic test to use for the detection of CD. (2) CD can be recognized endoscopically, and water immersion enhances villi detection, although a normal endoscopic appearance does not preclude the diagnosis. (3) It is recommended that 4 biopsies be taken from the second part of the duodenum and 2 bulb biopsies be taken at the 9 o'clock and 12 o'clock positions to maximize the sensitivity for histologic confirmation of CD. (4) Consider serologic testing of first-degree relatives, patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, Down's, Turner's, and Williams' syndromes, as well as those with premature osteoporosis, iron deficiency, abnormal liver biochemistries, and other manifestations of CD. (5) Patients already on a prolonged gluten-free diet (GFD) should be tested for the presence of HLA DQ2 or DQ8, thereby avoiding the need for further evaluation of CD in non-allelic carriers. (6) The basic treatment of CD is a strict, lifelong GFD, enabled by an expert dietitian. (7) Newly diagnosed adults with CD should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies (iron, B12, folate, zinc, copper), fat soluble vitamin deficiencies (vitamin D), and bone densitometry. (8) All patients diagnosed with CD should have clinical follow-up to ensure response and adherence to a GFD. (9) In those with persistent or relapsing symptoms, the robustness of the original diagnosis should be reviewed, gluten exposure sought, and a systematic evaluation for alternative and associated diseases performed. (10) Evaluate those with refractory disease for malignant transformation. PMID:25051511

  5. Autism spectrum disorder and celiac disease: no evidence for a link

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    Icaro Camargo Batista

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possible association between celiac disease (CD and/or gluten sensitivity (GS and autism spectrum disorder (ASD. METHODS: Occurrences of CD were determined in a group of children and adolescents affected by ASD and, conversely, occurrences of ASD were assessed in a group of biopsy-proven celiac patients. To detect the possible existence of GS, the levels of antigliadin antibodies in ASD patients were assessed and compared with the levels in a group of non-celiac children. RESULTS: The prevalence of CD or GS in ASD patients was not greater than in groups originating from the same geographical area. Similarly the prevalence of ASD was not greater than in a group of biopsy-proven CD patients. CONCLUSION: No statistically demonstrable association was found between CD or GS and ASD. Consequently, routine screening for CD or GS in all patients with ASD is, at this moment, neither justified nor cost-effective.

  6. Reversible Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Celiac Disease: Is it A Coincidental Finding?

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    Kenan Çelik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is an autoimmune disease of the small intestine characterized by the immune response against ingested gluten. This response causes characteristic damage to the villi, which in turn results in malabsorption. Clinical signs and symptoms of CD may start early in childhood or in adulthood. Some people are completely asymptomatic. The term celiac crisis is used for patients with acute-onset severe abdominal pain which is potentially fatal. Although various extraintestinal signs and symptoms have been defined in CD, there are contradictory reports regarding hearing loss. We hereby report a patient with celiac disease who was investigated for malabsorption and was diagnosed with mild to medium temporary sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013;51:190-2

  7. Symptomatic Secondary Selective IgM Immunodeficiency in Adult Man with Undiagnosed Celiac Disease

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    Eli Magen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective IgM immunodeficiency (SIgMID is a heterogeneous disorder with no known genetic background and may occur as a primary or a secondary condition. Celiac disease has been reported in association with several humeral immunodeficiencies, including isolated severe selective IgA deficiency, panhypogammaglobulinemia, and isolated combined IgA and IgM deficiency. There are only few reported cases of pediatric and adult patients with SIgMID and celiac disease. In this paper, we describe an adult patient with a symptomatic secondary SIgMID associated with undiagnosed celiac disease, with a resolution of clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency and serum IgM normalization following a gluten-free diet.

  8. Is enteroscopy necessary for diagnosis of celiac disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taylan Kav; Bulent Sivri

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine as a result of reaction to wheat protein,gluten.Exclusion of dietary gluten is the mainstay of the treatment that necessitates a precise diagnosis of the disease.Serological screening may aid in identifying patients with suspected CD,which should be confirmed by intestinal biopsy.It has been shown that duodenal biopsies are good for detection of the disease in most patients.However,there is a group of patients with positive serology and inconclusive pathology.As a result of the widespread use of serology,many patients with equivocal findings grow quickly.Unfortunately current endoscopic methods can only diagnose villous atrophy,which can be present in the later grades of disease (i.e.,Marsh Ⅲ).To diagnose CD correctly,going deeper in the intestine may be necessary.Enteroscopy can reveal changes in CD in the intestinal mucosa in 10%-17% of cases that have negative histology at initial workup.Invasiveness of the method limits its use.Capsule endoscopy may be a good substitute for enteroscopy.However,both techniques should be reserved for patients with suspected diagnosis of complications.This paper reviews the current literature in terms of the value of enteroscopy for diagnosis of CD.

  9. Cytotoxicity of polyaniline nanomaterial on rat celiac macrophages in vitro.

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    Yu-Sang Li

    Full Text Available Polyaniline nanomaterial (nPANI is getting popular in many industrial fields due to its conductivity and stability. The fate and effect of nPANI in the environment is of paramount importance towards its technological applications. In this work, the cytotoxicity of nPANI, which was prepared by rapid surface polymerization, was studied on rat celiac macrophages. Cell viability of macrophages treated with various concentrations of nPANI and different periods ranging from 24 to 72 hours was tested by a MTT assay. Damages of nPANI to structures of macrophages were evaluated according to the exposure level of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and change of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. We observed no significant effects of nPANI on the survival, ROS level and MMP loss of macrophages at concentrations up to 1 µg/ml. However, higher dose of nPANI (10 µg/ml or above induced cell death, changes of ROS level and MMP. In addition, an increase in the expression level of caspase-3 protein and its activated form was detected in a Western blot assay under the high dose exposure of nPANI. All together, our experimental results suggest that the hazardous potential of nPANI on macrophages is time- and dose-dependent and high dose of nPANI can induce cell apoptosis through caspase-3 mediated pathway.

  10. Non-dietary forms of treatment for adult celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2013-01-01

    At present,treatment for celiac disease includes a strict gluten-free diet.Compliance,however,is difficult and gluten-free food products are costly,and,sometimes very inconvenient.A number of potential alternative measures have been proposed to either replace or supplement gluten-free diet therapy.In the past,non-dietary forms of treatment were used(e.g.,corticosteroids) by some clinicians,often to supplement a gluten-free diet in patients that appeared to be poorly responsive to a gluten-free diet.Some of new and novel non-dietary measures have already advanced to a clinical trial phase.There are still some difficulties even if initial studies suggest a particularly exciting and novel form of non-dietary treatment.In particular,precise monitoring of the response to these agents will become critical.Symptom or laboratory improvement may be important,but it will be critical to ensure that ongoing inflammatory change and mucosal injury are not present.Therapeutic trials will be made more difficult because there is already an effective treatment regimen.

  11. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  12. Celiac disease diagnosis and gluten-free food analytical control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neves, Marta Maria Pereira; González-Garcia, Maria Begoña; Nouws, Hendrikus Petrus Antonius; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa-García, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy, characterized by an inappropriate T-cell-mediated immune response to the ingestion of certain dietary cereal proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. This disorder presents environmental, genetic, and immunological components. CD presents a prevalence of up to 1% in populations of European ancestry, yet a high percentage of cases remain underdiagnosed. The diagnosis and treatment should be made early since untreated disease causes growth retardation and atypical symptoms, like infertility or neurological disorders. The diagnostic criteria for CD, which requires endoscopy with small bowel biopsy, have been changing over the last few decades, especially due to the advent of serological tests with higher sensitivity and specificity. The use of serological markers can be very useful to rule out clinical suspicious cases and also to help monitor the patients, after adherence to a gluten-free diet. Since the current treatment consists of a life-long gluten-free diet, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement, the standardization of an assay to assess in an unequivocal way gluten in gluten-free foodstuff is of major importance. PMID:20446081

  13. Evaluation of Cladribine treatment in refractory celiac disease type Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greetje J Tack; Wieke HM Verbeek; Abdul Al-Toma; Dirk J Kuik; Marco WJ Schreurs; Otto Visser; Chris JJ Mulder

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) Ⅱ. METHODS: An open-label cohort-study of RCD Ⅱ patients treated with 2-CdA was performed between 2000 and 2010. Survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, 32 patients were included with a median follow-up of 31 mo. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA had a statistically significant increased survival compared to those who were unresponsive. The overall 3- and 5-year survival was 83% in the responder and 63% and 22% in the non-responder group, respectively. The overall 2-year clinical, histological and immunological response rates were 81%, 47% and 41%, respectively. Progression into EATL was reported in 16%, all of these patients died. CONCLUSION: Treatment of RCD Ⅱ with 2-CdA holds promise, showing excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL.

  14. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G; Sensen, Christoph W; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F; Schriemer, David C

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  15. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G.; Sensen, Christoph W.; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F.; Schriemer, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  16. Is adult celiac disease really uncommon in Chinese?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling JIANG; Bing-ling ZHANG; You-shi LIU

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a type of intestinal malabsorption syndrome, in which the patients are intolerant to the gliadin in dietary gluten, resulting in chronic diarrhea and secondary malnutrition. The disease is common in Europe and the United States, but only sporadic reports are found in East Asia including China. Is CD really rare in China? We examined 62 patients by capsule endoscopy for chronic diarrhea from June 2003 to March 2008. Four patients with chronic diarrhea and weight loss were diag-nosed to have CD. Under the capsule endoscopy, we observed that the villi of the proximal small bowel became short, and that the mucous membrane became atrophied in these four patients. Duodenal biopsies were performed during gastroscopy and the pathological changes of mucosa were confirmed to be Marsh 3 stage of CD. A gluten free diet significantly improved the condi-tions of the four patients. We suspect that in China, especially in the northern area where wheat is the main food, CD might not be uncommon, and its under-diagnosis could be caused by its clinical manifestations that could be easily covered by the symptoms from other clinical situations, particularly when it came to subclinical patients without obvious symptom or to patients with ex-traintestinal symptoms as the initial manifestations.

  17. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  18. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

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    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  19. Effect of B vitamin supplementation on plasma homocysteine levels in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammed Hadithi; Chris JJ Mulder; Frank Stam; Joshan Azizi; J Bart A Crusius; Amado Salvador Pe(n)a; Coen DA Stehouwer; Yvo M Smulders

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vitamin supplements on homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease. METHODS: Vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and fasting plasma homocysteine levels were measured in 51 consecutive adults with celiac disease [median (range) age 56 (18-63) years; 40% men, 26 (51%) had villous atrophy, and 25 (49%) used B-vitamin supplements] and 50 healthy control individuals matched for age and sex. Finally, the C677T polymorphism of 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was evaluated in 46 patients with celiac disease and all control individuals. RESULTS: Patients with celiac disease and using vitamin supplements had higher serum vitamin B6 ( P = 0.003), folate ( P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 ( P = 0.012) levels than patients who did not or healthy controls ( P = 0.035, P < 0.001, P = 0.007, for vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12, respectively). Lower plasma homocysteine levels were found in patients using vitamin supplements than in patients who did not ( P = 0.001) or healthy controls ( P = 0.003). However, vitamin B6 and folate, not vitamin B12, were significantly and independently associated with homocysteine levels. Twenty-four (48%) of 50 controls and 23 (50%) of 46 patients with celiac disease carried the MTHFR thermolabile variant T-allele ( P = 0.89). CONCLUSION: Homocysteine levels are dependent on Marsh classification and the regular use of B-vitamin supplements is effective in reduction of homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease and should be considered in disease management.

  20. Association analysis of the extended MHC region in celiac disease implicates multiple independent susceptibility loci.

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    Richard Ahn

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease caused by sensitivity to the dietary protein gluten. Forty loci have been implicated in the disease. All disease loci have been characterized as low-penetrance, with the exception of the high-risk genotypes in the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genes, which are necessary but not sufficient to cause the disease. The very strong effects from the known HLA loci and the genetically complex nature of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC have precluded a thorough investigation of the region. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that additional celiac disease loci exist within the extended MHC (xMHC. A set of 1898 SNPs was analyzed for association across the 7.6 Mb xMHC region in 1668 confirmed celiac disease cases and 517 unaffected controls. Conditional recursive partitioning was used to create an informative indicator of the known HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 high-risk genotypes that was included in the association analysis to account for their effects. A linkage disequilibrium-based grouping procedure was utilized to estimate the number of independent celiac disease loci present in the xMHC after accounting for the known effects. There was significant statistical evidence for four new independent celiac disease loci within the classic MHC region. This study is the first comprehensive association analysis of the xMHC in celiac disease that specifically accounts for the known HLA disease genotypes and the genetic complexity of the region.

  1. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: an emerging syndrome with many unsettled issues

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    Umberto Volta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still an undefined syndrome with several unsettled issues despite the increasing awareness of its existence. Gluten is likely responsible for the clinical picture in a subset of patients, whereas in other cases it concurs to this syndrome together with fermentable mono-oligo-disaccharides and polyols and wheat proteins (e.g., amylase trypsin inhibitors. Innate immunity plays a pivotal role in the development of this syndrome, which is characterized by gut inflammation without villous atrophy and likely changes of intestinal barrier function. Data on its epidemiology are still undefined and largely variable. In the USA its prevalence varies from 0.6% to 6% in primary or tertiary care, respectively. Clinically, patients complain of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms triggered by the ingestion of gluten without evidence of celiac disease and wheat allergy. Intestinal symptoms resemble those of irritable bowel syndrome, whereas neurological signs are quite common among extra-intestinal manifestations. So far, there are no biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, but about half of patients shows anti-gliadin antibodies of immunoglobulin G class. Although not specific for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the detection of such antibodies can support the diagnosis in patients with gluten-related symptoms. In the absence of diagnostic biomarkers a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge is currently the best way for confirming non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Studies aimed at clarifying the pathophysiological, clinical and laboratory features of non-celiac gluten sensitivity will help a better management of patients with this novel and intriguing clinical entity.

  2. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

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    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, E-mail: pclopes@ulbra.br [Universidade Luterana do Brasil (Ulbra), Canoas, RS (Brazil); Pozzobon, Adriane [Centro Universitario Univates, Lajeado, RS (Brazil); Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Angela [Fundacao Serdil/Saint Pastous, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: to analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: one hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. (author)

  3. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

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    Gabriela Augusta Mateus Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject.

  4. Celiac disease in Middle Eastern and North African countries:A new burden?

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    Kassem; Barada; Abbas; Bitar; Mohamad; Abdul-Razak; Mokadem; Jana; Ghazi; Hashash; Peter; Green

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease(CD) is now recognized as a common disorder among Middle Eastern(ME) and North African(NA) populations.The aim of this review is to assess the available data regarding CD in the ME and NA and to compare this information with that of Western countries.A literature review was performed using the electronic databases PubMed and Medline(1950-2008) as search engines,and "celiac disease" was used as a Mesh term.The search was limited to ME and NA countries.The prevalence of CD in ME and NA countries...

  5. Anxiety and depression in adult patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet

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    Winfried; Huser; Karl-Heinz; Janke; Bodo; Klump; Michael; Gregor; Andreas; Hinz

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare anxiety and depression levels in adult patients with celiac disease (CD) on a gluten-free diet (GFD) with controls.METHODS: The levels of anxiety, depression and of a probable anxiety or depressive disorder were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 441 adult patients with CD recruited by the German Celiac Society, in 235 age-and sex-matched patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission or with slight disease activity, and in 441 adult persons of a representa...

  6. The Effects of Gluten-Free Diet on Body Weight in Children with Celiac Disease

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    Lukić, Marko; Šegec, Ana; Šegec, Igor; Pinotić, Ljerka; Milas Ahić, Jasminka; Gmajnić, Rudika; Pinotić, Krešimir; Včev, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at monitoring and controlling of body weight in children with diagnosis of celiac disease when established and after introducing gluten-free diet. Prospective clinical study included 42 children with celiac disease whose body weight was measured before introducing gluten-free diet, and after the period of six and 18 months of introducing gluten-free diet. The children were divided into three age groups. The first group consisted of 16 children, 8 females and 8 males in th...

  7. Doença celíaca: sua relação com a saúde bucal Celiac disease's relationship with the oral health

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    Michelle Soares Rauen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Doença Celíaca é uma intolerância permanente às proteínas contidas no glúten de alguns cereais, como o trigo, o centeio, a cevada e a aveia. A doença manifesta-se principalmente nos primeiros dois anos de vida, sendo o intestino delgado o principal órgão afetado, com manifestações clínicas de diarréia, vômitos e emagrecimento; porém, o diagnóstico, muitas vezes, é difícil, devido ao grande número de casos atípicos da doença. Nestes casos, os sintomas podem ser numerosos e diversificados, tais como baixa estatura, anemia, osteoporose, hipoplasia do esmalte dentário, além de sintomas próprios do quadro clínico de outras doenças imunológicas que podem associar-se à doença celíaca, tais como diabetes mellitus, dermatite herpertiforme, doenças da tireóide, alergia, estomatite aftosa recorrente, entre outras. Devido a essa associação, os profissionais da saúde procurados pelos pacientes podem não relacionar os sintomas à enteropatia; entretanto, esta, se não tratada, pode trazer várias outras complicações à saúde. O objetivo desta comunicação é demonstrar a importância das manifestações bucais, as quais, quando devidamente observadas, contribuem ao diagnóstico da doença celíaca.Celiac Disease is a permanent intolerance to proteins contained in the gluten of some cereals, such as wheat, rye, barley and oat. The disease appears mainly during the first two years of life, the small bowel being the main affected organ, with clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss. The diagnosis, however, is often difficult, due to the large number of atypical manifestations of the disease. In such cases, numerous and diversified symptoms, such as low stature, anemia, osteoporosis, and dental enamel hypoplasia, may be concurrent with symptoms of immune diseases associated to the celiac disease (diabetes mellitus, dermatitis herpetiformis, thyroid diseases, allergy, and recurrent aphtous

  8. Broad MICA/B Expression in the Small Bowel Mucosa: A Link between Cellular Stress and Celiac Disease

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    Allegretti, Yessica L.; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Cueto Rua, Eduardo; Chopita, Nestor; Fuertes, Mercedes; Zwirner, Norberto W.; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The MICA/B genes (MHC class I chain related genes A and B) encode for non conventional class I HLA molecules which have no role in antigen presentation. MICA/B are up-regulated by different stress conditions such as heat-shock, oxidative stress, neoplasic transformation and viral infection. Particularly, MICA/B are expressed in enterocytes where they can mediate enterocyte apoptosis when recognised by the activating NKG2D receptor present on intraepithelial lymphocytes. This mechanism was suggested to play a major pathogenic role in active celiac disease (CD). Due to the importance of MICA/B in CD pathogenesis we studied their expression in duodenal tissue from CD patients. By immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and flow cytometry we established that MICA/B was mainly intracellularly located in enterocytes. In addition, we identified MICA/B+ T cells in both the intraepithelial and lamina propria compartments. We also found MICA/B+ B cells, plasma cells and some macrophages in the lamina propria. The pattern of MICA/B staining in mucosal tissue in severe enteropathy was similar to that found in in vitro models of cellular stress. In such models, MICA/B were located in stress granules that are associated to the oxidative and ER stress response observed in active CD enteropathy. Our results suggest that expression of MICA/B in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients is linked to disregulation of mucosa homeostasis in which the stress response plays an active role. PMID:24058482

  9. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, A S M Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases. PMID:27073839

  10. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, A S M Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases.

  11. Small- bowel mucosal changes and antibody responses after low- and moderate-dose gluten challenge in celiac disease

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    Lähdeaho Marja-Leena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the restrictive nature of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients are looking for alternative therapies. While drug-development programs include gluten challenges, knowledge regarding the duration of gluten challenge and gluten dosage is insufficient. We challenged adult celiac patients with gluten with a view to assessing the amount needed to cause some small-bowel mucosal deterioration. Methods Twenty-five celiac disease adults were challenged with low (1-3 g or moderate (3-5g doses of gluten daily for 12 weeks. Symptoms, small-bowel morphology, densities of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs and celiac serology were determined. Results Both moderate and low amounts of gluten induced small-bowel morphological damage in 67% of celiac patients. Moderate gluten doses also triggered mucosal inflammation and more gastrointestinal symptoms leading to premature withdrawals in seven cases. In 22% of those who developed significant small- intestinal damage, symptoms remained absent. Celiac antibodies seroconverted in 43% of the patients. Conclusions Low amounts of gluten can also cause significant mucosal deterioration in the majority of the patients. As there are always some celiac disease patients who will not respond within these conditions, sample sizes must be sufficiently large to attain to statistical power in analysis.

  12. Humoral Responses to Diverse Autoimmune Disease-Associated Antigens in Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Kishore Malyavantham

    Full Text Available To compare frequencies of autoreactive antibody responses to endogenous disease-associated antigens in healthy controls (HC, relapsing and progressive MS and to assess their associations with clinical and MRI measures of MS disease progression.The study analyzed 969 serum samples from 315 HC, 411 relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS, 128 secondary progressive MS (SP-MS, 33 primary progressive MS (PP-MS and 82 patients with other neurological diseases for autoantibodies against two putative MS antigens CSF114(Glc and KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b and against 24 key endogenous antigens linked to diseases such as vasculitis, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease and primary biliary cirrhosis. Associations with disability and MRI measures of lesional injury and neurodegeneration were assessed.The frequencies of anti-KIR4.1a and anti-KIR4.1b peptide IgG positivity were 9.8% and 11.4% in HC compared to 4.9% and 7.5% in RR-MS, 8.6% for both peptides in SP-MS and 6.1% for both peptides in PP-MS (p = 0.13 for KIR4.1a and p = 0.34 for KIR4.1b, respectively. Antibodies against CSF114(Glc, KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides were not associated with MS compared to HC, or with MS disease progression. HLA DRB1*15:01 positivity and anti-Epstein Barr virus antibodies, which are MS risk factors, were not associated with these putative MS antibodies.Antibody responses to KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides are not increased in MS compared to HC nor associated with MS disease progression. The frequencies of the diverse autoreactive antibodies investigated are similar in MS and HC.

  13. Humoral immunity links Candida albicans infection and celiac disease.

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    Marion Corouge

    Full Text Available The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI.Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC. IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1.CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004 and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009 antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039. During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides.Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals.

  14. Increasing incidence of celiac disease in a North American population

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    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; van Dyke, Carol T.; Melton, L. Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Lahr, Brian D.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) varies greatly, potentially because of incomplete ascertainment of cases and small study samples with limited statistical power. Previous reports indicate that the incidence of CD is increasing. We examined the prevalence of CD in a well-defined US county. METHODS Population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, US. Using the infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, medical, histopathology, and CD serology records were used to identify all new cases of CD in Olmsted County since 2000. Age- and sex-specific and adjusted (to the US white 2000 population) incidence rates for CD were estimated. Clinical presentation at diagnosis was also assessed. RESULTS Between 2000 and 2010, 249 individuals (157 female or 63%, median age 37.9 years) were diagnosed with CD in Olmsted County. The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence of CD in the study period was 17.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 15.2–19.6) per 100,000 person-years, increasing from 11.1 (95% CI=6.8–15.5) in 2000–2001 to 17.3 (95% CI=13.3–21.3) in 2008–2010. The temporal trend in incidence rates was modeled as a two-slope pattern, with the incidence leveling off after 2004. Based on the two classic CD symptoms of diarrhea and weight loss, the relative frequency of classical CD among incident cases decreased over time between 2000 and 2010 (p=0.044). CONCLUSION The incidence of CD has continued to increase in the past decade in a North American population. PMID:23511460

  15. Celiac disease screening in southern and East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2015-01-01

    Until 1970s, celiac disease (CD) was considered to be an uncommon disease except in Western Europe. The global epidemiology of CD continues to evolve with improvement in the diagnostic tests, simplification of the diagnostic criteria and increase in awareness about the disease. The Asian region is currently at the crossroads of the frontier of knowledge and awareness of CD. In many Asian nations, CD is still considered to be either nonexistent or very rare. A notable exception is India, where CD has been well recognized, especially in the northern part, and 2 population-based studies have revealed a prevalence of 0.3-1.04%. Initial reports from Malaysia, China, Japan and Singapore suggest the existence of CD in these countries. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of the predisposing factors predicts a high probability of occurrence of CD in fair numbers in China. There are no formal reports on CD from Malaysia, Indonesia, Korea, Taiwan and many other nations in this region. With the impending CD epidemic in Asia, there are many challenges. Some of the efforts which are required include determination of prevalence of CD across the region, spreading of awareness among physicians and patients, training of dieticians for proper counseling and supervision of patients, creation of gluten-free food infrastructure in the food supply and creation of patient advocacy organizations. Although the absolute number of patients with CD at present is not very large, this number is expected to increase over the next few years/decades. It is thus appropriate that the medical community across Asia define the extent of the problem and get prepared to handle the impending CD epidemic.

  16. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  17. Enterocyte proliferation and signaling are constitutively altered in celiac disease.

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    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD occurs frequently, and is caused by ingestion of prolamins from cereals in subjects with a genetic predisposition. The small intestinal damage depends on an intestinal stress/innate immune response to certain gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P31-43 in association with an adaptive immune response to other gliadin peptides (e.g., A-gliadin P57-68. Gliadin and peptide P31-43 affect epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling and CD enterocyte proliferation. The reason why the stress/innate immune and proliferative responses to certain gliadin peptides are present in CD and not in control intestine is so far unknown. The aim of this work is to investigate if, in CD, a constitutive alteration of enterocyte proliferation and signaling exists that may represent a predisposing condition to the damaging effects of gliadin. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to study signaling in CD fibroblasts and intestinal biopsies. Western blot (WB analysis, immunoprecipitation, and quantitative PCR were also used. We found in CD enterocytes enhancement of both proliferation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ligand system. In CD enterocytes and fibroblasts we found increase of the phosphorylated downstream signaling molecule Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK; block of the ERK activation normalizes enterocytes proliferation in CD mucosa. In conclusion the same pathway, which gliadin and gliadin peptide P31-43 can interfere with, is constitutively altered in CD cells. This observation potentially explains the specificity of the damaging effects of certain gliadin peptides on CD intestine.

  18. Anti-microbial antibodies in celiac disease: Trick or treat?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Papp; Ildiko Foldi; Istvan Altorjay; Eszter Palyu; Miklos Udvardy; Judit Tumpek; Sandor Sipka; Ilma Rita Korponay-Szabo; Eva Nemes; Gabor Veres; Tamas Dinya; Attila Tordai; Hajnalka Andrikovics; Gary L Norman; Peter Laszlo Lakatos

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of a new set of anti-glycan and anti-outer membrane protein (anti- OMP) antibodies in a Hungarian cohort of adult Celiac disease (CD) patients. METHODS: 190 consecutive CD patients [M/F: 71/119, age:39.9 (SD:14.1) years], 100 healthy, and 48 gastrointestinal controls were tested for glycan anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA), anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside, anti-mannobioside, anti-OMP antibodies and major NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Thirty out of 82 CD patients enrolled at the time of diagnosis were re-evaluated for the same antibodies after longstanding gluten-free diet (GFD).RESULTS: 65.9% of the CD patients were positive for at least one of the tested antibodies at the time of the diagnosis. Except anti-OMP and ALCA, antimicrobial antibodies were exclusively seen in untreated CD; however, the overall sensitivity was low. Any glycan positivity (LR+: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.08-4.73)was associated with an increased likelihood ratio for diagnosing CD. Significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-glycan and anti-endomysial or anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Anti-glycan positivity was lost after longstanding GFD. Anti-glycan antibody titers were associated with symptoms at presentation, but not the presence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Patients with severe malabsorption more frequently had multiple antibodies at diagnosis ( P = 0.019).CONCLUSION: The presence of anti-glycan antibodies in CD seems to be secondary to the impaired small bowel mucosa which can lead to increased antigen presentation.Furthermore, anti-glycan positivity may be considered an additional marker of CD and dietary adherence.

  19. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

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    Akural, Etem [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Pain Clinic (Finland); Ojala, Risto O. [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland); Jaervimaeki, Voitto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (Finland); Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.blanco@oulu.fi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  20. Orthologs of Human Disease Associated Genes and RNAi Analysis of Silencing Insulin Receptor Gene in Bombyx mori

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    Zan Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., is an important economic insect that has been domesticated for thousands of years to produce silk. It is our great interest to investigate the possibility of developing the B. mori as human disease model. We searched the orthologs of human disease associated genes in the B. mori by bi-directional best hits of BLAST and confirmed by searching the OrthoDB. In total, 5006 genes corresponding to 1612 kinds of human diseases had orthologs in the B. mori, among which, there are 25 genes associated with diabetes mellitus. Of these, we selected the insulin receptor gene of the B. mori (Bm-INSR to study its expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages and tissues. Quantitative PCR showed that Bm-INSR was highly expressed in the Malpighian tubules but expressed at low levels in the testis. It was highly expressed in the 3rd and 4th instar larvae, and adult. We knocked down Bm-INSR expression using RNA interference. The abundance of Bm-INSR transcripts were dramatically reduced to ~4% of the control level at 6 days after dsRNA injection and the RNAi-treated B. mori individuals showed apparent growth inhibition and malformation such as abnormal body color in black, which is the typical symptom of diabetic patients. Our results demonstrate that B. mori has potential use as an animal model for diabetic mellitus research.

  1. Human Disease-Associated Genetic Variation Impacts Large Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Vinod; Westra, Harm-Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Esko, Tonu; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Almeida, Rodrigo; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofker, Marten H.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Fu, Jingyuan; Withoff, Sebo; Metspalu, Andres; Franke, Lude; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vosa, Urmo

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has become clear that only a small percentage (7%) of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are located in protein-coding regions, while the remaining 93% are located in gene regulatory regions or in intergenic regions. Thus, the understanding of how genetic variation

  2. Insight into neutral and disease-associated human genetic variants through interpretable predictors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan A van den Berg

    Full Text Available A variety of methods that predict human nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to be neutral or disease-associated have been developed over the last decade. These methods are used for pinpointing disease-associated variants in the many variants obtained with next-generation sequencing technologies. The high performances of current sequence-based predictors indicate that sequence data contains valuable information about a variant being neutral or disease-associated. However, most predictors do not readily disclose this information, and so it remains unclear what sequence properties are most important. Here, we show how we can obtain insight into sequence characteristics of variants and their surroundings by interpreting predictors. We used an extensive range of features derived from the variant itself, its surrounding sequence, sequence conservation, and sequence annotation, and employed linear support vector machine classifiers to enable extracting feature importance from trained predictors. Our approach is useful for providing additional information about what features are most important for the predictions made. Furthermore, for large sets of known variants, it can provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for variants being disease-associated.

  3. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... number). Comments should indicate that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO32--Disease... possible associations between the occurrence of a disease in humans and exposure to an herbicide...

  4. WBSMDA: Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xu; You, Zhu-Hong; Deng, Lixi; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are functionally associated with the development and progression of various complex human diseases. However, the roles of miRNAs in multiple biological processes or various diseases and their underlying molecular mechanisms still have not been fully understood yet. Predicting potential miRNA-disease associations by integrating various heterogeneous biological datasets is of great significance to the biomedical research. Computational methods could obtain potential miRNA-disease associations in a short time, which significantly reduce the experimental time and cost. Considering the limitations in previous computational methods, we developed the model of Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (WBSMDA) to predict potential miRNAs associated with various complex diseases. WBSMDA could be applied to the diseases without any known related miRNAs. The AUC of 0.8031 based on Leave-one-out cross validation has demonstrated its reliable performance. WBSMDA was further applied to Colon Neoplasms, Prostate Neoplasms, and Lymphoma for the identification of their potential related miRNAs. As a result, 90%, 84%, and 80% of predicted miRNA-disease pairs in the top 50 prediction list for these three diseases have been confirmed by recent experimental literatures, respectively. It is anticipated that WBSMDA would be a useful resource for potential miRNA-disease association identification. PMID:26880032

  5. 75 FR 54496 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 53202), an amendment to 38 CFR 3.309 to add hairy cell leukemia and other chronic... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN54 Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other Chronic B-Cell Leukemias, Parkinson's Disease and Ischemic Heart...

  6. Systematic identification of trans eQTLs as putative drivers of known disease associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Harm-Jan; Peters, Marjolein J.; Esko, Tonu; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Schurmann, Claudia; Kettunen, Johannes; Christiansen, Mark W.; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Schramm, Katharina; Powell, Joseph E.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Veldink, Jan H.; Van den Berg, Leonard H.; Karjalainen, Juha; Withoff, Sebo; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Reinmaa, Eva; Fischer, Krista; Nelis, Mari; Milani, Lili; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Homuth, Georg; Nauck, Matthias; Radke, Doerte; Voelker, Uwe; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Brody, Jennifer; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid; Gharib, Sina A.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Lumley, Thomas; Montgomery, Grant W.; Makino, Seiko; Prokisch, Holger; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Meitinger, Thomas; Strauch, Konstantin; Li, Yang; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Visscher, Peter M.; Knight, Julian C.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Teumer, Alexander; Frayling, Timothy M.; Metspalu, Andres; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Franke, Lude; Hoen, Peter A.C. ’t

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the downstream effects of disease-associated SNPs is challenging. To help overcome this problem, we performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) meta-analysis in non-transformed peripheral blood samples from 5,311 individuals with replication in 2,775 individuals. We identified a

  7. HLA Typing and Histopathologic Features of Patients with Celiac Disease-A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ceylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Celiac disease is the most common defect of nutrition intolerance. There is an increased sensitivity to the glutene. It is inherited multifactorial, because of this, genetic and enviromental factors are important in the evaluation. The existence of specific human leukocyte antigen alleles coding especially DQ2 and DQ8 are important at the diagnosis of celiac disease. In this study, it is aimed to determine human leukocyte antigens allel distribution for celiac disease in patients with chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and similar symptomes. Material and Method: The prevalance of human leukocyte antigens of 40 patients applied to our laboratory were searched using polimerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method. Marsh classification of the patients were also performed by a pathologist. Results: We determined human leukocyte antigens in 95% of the patients. The most common antigens were DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0201. The combination of DQA1*0501 and DRB1*04 was the least. According to Marsh classification, Grade 2 Marsh Type 4 hypoplastic was the most common type. Discussion: The human leukocyte antigen typing is helpful for the clinicians at the progression of the celiac disease and at the prediction of the tendency to the disease.

  8. Urinary NOx:creatinine ratios during gluten challenge in children with celiac disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster-Kamphuis, L.; Straaten, E.A. van; Kors, W.A.; Schrijver, J.E. de; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.; Meer, R. van der; Forget, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced small bowel enteropathy. Inflammation is known to be associated with enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production. An increase in urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) reflects increased NO production. The urinary NOx:creatinine ratio can be used as an indicator o

  9. Part of celiac population still at risk despite current gluten thresholds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins Slot, I.D.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Hamer, R.J.; Fels, van der Ine

    2015-01-01

    In order to assist celiac disease (CD) patients in making safe food choices, gluten-free food products are labelled as such. The exact meaning of the gluten-free label differs throughout the world. This paper discusses the different thresholds that are currently used to label products gluten-free

  10. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Miranda, Jonatan; Lasa, Arrate; Bustamante, María Á.; Larretxi, Idoia; Simon, Edurne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 ± 13 years) took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Their fulfillment of micronutrient intake recommendations was verified. Participants showed a Body Mass Index of 21.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. Energy Intake was slightly lower than the Dietary Reference Intakes. Excessive protein apart from over-consumption of fat was observed. More than three quarters of participants consumed meat in excess. Carbohydrate consumption along with that of fiber was below recommended levels. Vitamin D, iron, and iodine had a low percentage of recommendation compliance. In general, participants followed the recommendations of dairy products and fruit intake whereas vegetable consumption was not enough for the vast majority. We conclude that although the diet of celiac women does not differ much from the diet of general population, some considerations, such as reducing fat and protein consumption and increasing fiber intake, must be taken into account. PMID:26184289

  11. Health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjerning, Halfdan; Mahony, Ruth O; Husby, Steffen;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease requiring constant management with a gluten-free diet (GFD). Little is known about how CD impacts on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children and adolescents, and how they feel about and cope with CD and GFD. This qualitative study e...

  12. Immune response to hepatitis B virus vaccine in celiac subjects at diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, Martina; Garozzo, Maria Teresa; Capizzi, Antonino; Spina, Massimo; Manti, Sara; Tardino, Lucia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine response and correlation with human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and/or gluten intake in celiac patients at diagnosis. METHODS Fifty-one patients affected by celiac disease, diagnosed at the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Catania (Italy), were recruited. All patients were tested at admission for immunization against HBV, according to findings from analysis of quantitative HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs). The anti-HBs titer was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Following the international standards, subjects with antibody titer 0.05). With regard to the HLA haplotype, comparison of the distribution of vaccination response showed no statistically significant difference between the different genotypes (homozygosity for the HLADQ2 haplotype compared with HLADQ2/DQ8 heterozygosity or other haplotypes; P > 0.05). Moreover, distribution of the responders according to clinical features of celiac disease showed no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION This prospective study confirmed the lower percentage of response to HBV vaccine in celiac subjects. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear and further studies are needed. PMID:27660678

  13. The Tip of the "Celiac Iceberg" in China : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Juanli; Gao, Jinyan; Li, Xin; Liu, Fahui; Wijmenga, Cisca; Chen, Hongbing; Gilissen, Luud J. W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Until recently, celiac disease was considered to be rare in China. We aimed to estimate its true status. Methods: By searching the MEDLINE database and four Chinese full-text databases (CNKI, CBM, VIP and WANFANG) (up to August 2012), as well as two HLA allele frequency net databases and

  14. Evaluation of the health status in adult celiacs of the Valencian Community (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelegrí Calvo, C.; Soriano del Castillo; J. M., Mañes Vinuesa, J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In adult patients, the diagnostic process for coeliac disease (CD is usually very late (eleven years on average, which leads to health complications that could be avoided with earlier diagnosis.Therefore, we have studied some aspects about thehealth status of the celiac patients interviewed. Objectives: The objective of this study is to quantify the prevalence of health-related issues, such as reproductive problems, other associated diseases, possible triggers of CD, bone health, anemia and otherautoimmune diseases or tumors, and the presence ofCD in first grade relatives.Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study in 98adult celiac through a validated questionnaire specificfor coeliac patients. Results: The 23% of women had reproductive problems, most of the coeliac patients showed associatedconditions and 51% of CD cases was triggered after aphysical or psychological event. Conclusions: High prevalence of celiac disease inindividuals concomitant diseases as iron deficiency anemia, depression, hypothyroidism, lactose intolerance,IgA deficiency and type 1 diabetes mellitus suggest theneed of diagnostic tests to determine or rule out CD. The presence of one or more symptoms or conditions such as iron deficiency anemia, lactose intolerance, osteoporosis, hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or IgA deficiency in first-degree relatives of a celiac should raise suspicions abouta non-diagnosed EC.

  15. Analysis of Body Composition and Food Habits of Spanish Celiac Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Churruca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was both to analyze composition of Spanish celiac women and to study the food habits and gluten-free diet of these celiac patients, in order to determine whether they achieve a balanced and healthy diet as well as to highlight nutritional qualitative and/or quantitative differences. 54 adult celiac women (34 ± 13 years took part in the six-month study. Height, weight and body composition were measured. An analysis of energy consumption and of the macronutrient distribution of their diet was carried out. Their fulfillment of micronutrient intake recommendations was verified. Participants showed a Body Mass Index of 21.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2. Energy Intake was slightly lower than the Dietary Reference Intakes. Excessive protein apart from over-consumption of fat was observed. More than three quarters of participants consumed meat in excess. Carbohydrate consumption along with that of fiber was below recommended levels. Vitamin D, iron, and iodine had a low percentage of recommendation compliance. In general, participants followed the recommendations of dairy products and fruit intake whereas vegetable consumption was not enough for the vast majority. We conclude that although the diet of celiac women does not differ much from the diet of general population, some considerations, such as reducing fat and protein consumption and increasing fiber intake, must be taken into account.

  16. Co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis and celiac disease in Scandinavian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Olesen, H V; Gilljam, M;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported sporadically since the 1960s. To our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic screening is performed in a large cohort of CF patients. METHODS: Transglutaminase-IgA (TGA), endomysium-IgA (EMA...

  17. Co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis and celiac disease in Scandinavian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, Gjermund; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Giljam, Marita;

    2009-01-01

    Background: The co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported sporadically since the 1960s. To our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic screening is performed in a large cohort of CF patients. Methods: Transglutaminase-IgA (TGA), endomysium-IgA (EMA...

  18. Celiac disease in the developing countries: A new and challenging public health problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Cataldo; Giuseppe Montalto

    2007-01-01

    In the past, celiac disease was believed to be a chronic enteropathy, almost exclusively affecting people of European origin. The availability of new, simple, very sensitive and specific serological tests (anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibody assays) have shown that celiac disease is common not only in Europe and in people of European ancestry but also in the developing countries where the major staple diet is wheat (Southern Asia, the Middle East, North West and East Africa, South America), both in the general population and in the groups at risk. Gluten intolerance thus appears to be a widespread public health problem and an increased level of awareness and clinical suspicion are needed in the New World where physicians must learn to recognize the variable clinical presentations (classical, atypical and silent forms) of celiac disease. In the developing countries, both serological screening in the general population and serological testing in groups at risk are necessary for an early identification of celiac patients. The gluten-free diet poses a challenging public health problem in the developing countries, especially since commercial gluten-free products are not available.

  19. Mapping of HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group of Danish patients with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Hermansen, Mette N; Pedersen, Merete F;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A cost-effective identification of HLA- DQ risk haplotypes using the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technique has recently been applied in the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) in four European populations. The objective of the study was to map risk HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group...

  20. Screening rules for growth to detect celiac disease : A case-control simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommelen, P. van; Grote, F.K.; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer de; Schrama, S.M.P.F.; Boersma, B.; Damen, G.M.; Csizmadia, C.G.; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.; Buuren, S. van

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is generally assumed that most patients with celiac disease (CD) have a slowed growth in terms of length (or height) and weight. However, the effectiveness of slowed growth as a tool for identifying children with CD is unknown. Our aim is to study the diagnostic efficiency of several

  1. Fine mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Balcker, Paul I. W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger for celiac disease, risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and observe

  2. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Romanos, Jihane; Mistry, Vanisha; Szperl, Agata; Bakker, Sjoerd F.; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Castillejo, Gemma; de la Concha, Emilio G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Dias, Kerith-Rae M.; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Dubois, Patrick C. A.; Duerr, Richard H.; Edkins, Sarah; Franke, Lude; Fransen, Karin; Gutierrez, Javier; Heap, Graham A. R.; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Hunt, Sarah; Plaza Izurieta, Leticia; Izzo, Valentina; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Langford, Cordelia; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Mein, Charles A.; Midah, Vandana; Mitrovic, Mitja; Mora, Barbara; Morelli, Marinita; Nutland, Sarah; Nunez, Concepcion; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Pearce, Kerra; Platteel, Mathieu; Polanco, Isabel; Potter, Simon; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Rich, Stephen S.; Rybak, Anna; Luis Santiago, Jose; Senapati, Sabyasachi; Sood, Ajit; Szajewska, Hania; Troncone, Riccardo; Varade, Jezabel; Wallace, Chris; Wolters, Victorien M.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Thelma, B. K.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Urcelay, Elena; Ramon Bilbao, Jose; Mearin, M. Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Plagnol, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Using variants from the 1000 Genomes Project pilot European CEU dataset and data from additional resequencing studies, we densely genotyped 183 non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in 12,041 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 12,228 controls. We identified 1

  3. Contrasting the Genetic Background of Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease Autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Romanos, Jihane; Bakker, Sjoerd F.; Magadi Gopalaiah, Vinod Kumar; de Haas, Esther C.; Trynka, Gosia; Ricano-Ponce, Isis; Steck, Andrea; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Simsek, Suat; Rewers, Marian; Mulder, Chris J.; Liu, Ed; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CeD) cluster in families and can occur in the same individual. Genetic loci have been associated with susceptibility to both diseases. Our aim was to explore the genetic differences between individuals developing both these diseases (double autoimmunity) ver

  4. Competing Agendas in Upstream Engagement Meetings Between Celiac Disease Experts and Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.; Molder, te H.F.M.; Gremmen, B.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines discussions between innovators and patient users about emergent medical technologies in the field of celiac disease. Using discursive psychology and conversation analysis, the authors analyze participants’ talk with regard to the social activities performed. They find that the

  5. Holmes-Adie syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timea Csak; Aniko Folhoffer; Andrea Horvath; Judit Halász; Csaba Diczházi; Zsuzsa Schaff; Ferenc Szalay

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old female patient presented with the following symptoms of Holmes-Adie syndrome: photophobia,enlargement of the left pupil unresponsive to light,Achilles areflexia. The pilocarpine test was positive. No tumor or other neurological abnormality was found. She had a 19-year history of autoimmune hepatitis. Flares up were observed following each 3 deliveries. At age of 31she presented with diarrhea and weight loss. Abdominal tumor was detected by ultrasound. The surgically removed tumor was histologically a benign mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma. Simultaneously, celiac disease was diagnosed. Gluten-free diet resulted in a significant improvement of celiac disease, but not of autoimmune hepatitis. Autonomic neuropathy was proven by standard cardiovascular tests. The patient was a homozygous carrier for HLA DQ2 antigen characteristic for celiac disease and heterozygous for HLA DR3 B8 frequent in autoimmune liver diseases. Our novel observation on association of Holmes-Adie syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease is suggestive for a common immunological background for all three entities present in a patient with mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma.

  6. A Preliminary Investigation of ADHD Symptoms in Persons with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhofer, Helmut; Pittschieler, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Several studies report a possible association of celiac disease (CD) with psychiatric and psychological disturbances, such as ADHD. Method: The authors assess 132 participants from 3 to 57 years of age (M = 19.3 years) affected by CD for the possibility of an associated ADHD-like symptomatology, using the Conner Scale Hypescheme, a…

  7. Levels of serologic markers of celiac disease in patients with reflux esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sait Bagci; C Nuri Ercin; Zeki Yesilova; Ayhan Ozcan; Bulent Degertekin; Kemal Dagalp

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease serologic markers (antigliadin IgA, IgG, and antiendomysial IgA) in patients with reflux esophagitis and to detect the relationship between reflux esophagitis and celiac disease (CD).METHODS: This study was performed prospectively between January 2003 and January 2004. Sixty-eight adult reflux esophagitis patients and 40 people as control group for symptoms related with gastrointestinal system were enrolled in this study. The diagnostic work-up included an accurate medical history with gastrointestinal symptoms, routine laboratory measurements, the detection of antibodies against gliadin (IgA and IgG)and endomysium (IgA), and an upper endoscopy with postbulbar biopsy.RESULTS: IgA-AGA and IgG-AGA were positive at 8.8%and 10.3% in patients with reflux esophagitis. In control group, it was found that 10% people had positive IgAAGA, and 7.5% people had positive IgG-AGA. There was no significant relationship between patients and control group regarding positive IgA-AGA and IgGAGA. The patients and persons in control group had no positive IgA-EMA. On postbulbar biopsies, no finding was detected concerning celiac disease. There were no symptoms and signs for gluten enteropathy in patients and control group.CONCLUSION: This review supports that an association does not exist between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis. We think these diseases exist independently from each other.

  8. Quantification of peptides causing celiac disease in historical and modern hard red spring wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiac disease (CD) is prevalent in 0.5 to 1.26% of adolescents and adults. The disease develops in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of ingestion of gluten forming proteins found in cereals such as, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.) and barley (Hordeum sativum L.)...

  9. A universal approach to eliminate antigenic properties of alpha-gliadin peptides in celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitea, C.; Salentijn, E.M.J.; Veelen, van P.; Goryunova-Svetlana, V.; Meer, van der I.M.; Broeck, van den H.C.; Mujico, J.R.; Monserrat, V.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Dekking, L.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins, including the a-gliadins. It has been shown that a-gliadins harbor several major epitopes involved in the disease pathogenesis. A major step towards elimination of gluten toxicit

  10. Natural variation in toxicity of wheat: potential for selection of nontoxic varieties for celiac disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaenij-Dekking, L.; Kooy-Winkelaar, Y.; Veelen, van P.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Jonker, H.H.; Soest, van L.J.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Bosch, H.J.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Koning, de F.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims: Celiac disease (CD) is an intestinal disorder caused by T-cell responses to peptides derived from the gluten proteins present in wheat. Such peptides have been found both in the gliadin and glutenin proteins in gluten. The only cure for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. It is

  11. Prevalence of celiac disease in an urban area of Brazil with predominantly European ancestry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Angélica G Pereira; Sérgio O Ioshii; Sandra BM Valarini; Aytan M Sipahi; Carmen L Ortiz-Agostinho; Iêda Nishitokukado; Maria N Sato; Adérson OMC Dami(a)o; Marília L Alencar; Clarice P Abrantes-Lemos; Eduardo LR Cancado; Thales de Brito

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a group of volunteer blood donors at a blood bank in the city of Curitiba, Brazil through detection of the serum marker immunoglobulin A (IgA) antitransglutaminase antibody.METHODS: Blood samples collected from 2086 healthy and Hemotherapy in Curitiba were submitted to ELISA testing for the IgA antitransglutaminase antibody.Positive samples received IgA antiendomysium antibody test through indirect immunofluorescence using human umbilical cord as substrate. Subsequently, patients who were positive on both tests underwent small bowel (distal duodenum) biopsy.RESULTS: Six subjects, four males and two females,tested positive for the two serum markers. Five of the six were submitted to intestinal biopsy (one declined the procedure). Biopsy results revealed changes in the distal duodenum mucosa (three classified as Marsh Ⅲb lesions and two as Marsh Ⅱ lesions). Most donors diagnosed having celiac disease presented multiple symptoms (gastrointestinal tract complaints). One donor reported having a family history of celiac disease (in a niece).CONCLUSION: Among apparently healthy blood donors,the prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was approximately 1:417, similar to that seen in European countries.

  12. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is generally understood to be triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins of wheat and related cereals. The skin manifestation of the condition is known as dermatitis herpetiformis. Antibody response to native and deamidated seque...

  13. Avenin diversity analysis of the genus Avena (oat). Relevance for people with celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Londono, D.M.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Goryunova, S.V.; Salentijn, E.M.J.; Broeck, van den H.C.; Meer, van der I.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Oat is widely consumed by people with celiac disease (CD). Its safety has been disputed because two peptides from oat avenins can be recognized as T cell epitopes by some CD patients. Differential signals of gluten-specific monoclonal antibodies and in-vitro T cells to oat varieties have suggested t

  14. Natural variation in avenin epitopes among oat varieties: implications for Celiac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujico, J.R.; Mitea, C.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Ru, A.; Veelen, van P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Koning, de F.

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the small intestinal mucosa. The causative agents have been identified as gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye, and the only available treatment for CD patients is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Non-gluten containing cereals would b

  15. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smyth, Deborah J.; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M.; Cooper, Jason D.; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie H. M.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A.; van Heel, David A.; Todd, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Two inflammatory disorders, type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, cosegregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Since both diseases are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, we tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. Methods: We evaluated the associat

  16. Newly identified genetic risk variants for celiac disease related to the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Karen A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Turner, Graham; Heap, Graham A. R.; Franke, Lude; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Romanos, Jihane; Dinesen, Lotte C.; Ryan, Anthony W.; Panesar, Davinder; Gwilliam, Rhian; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; McLaren, William M.; Holmes, Geoffrey K. T.; Howdle, Peter D.; Walters, Julian R. F.; Sanders, David S.; Playford, Raymond J.; Trynka, Gosia; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Verbeek, Wieke H. M.; Trimble, Valerie; Stevens, Fiona M.; O'Morain, Colm; Kennedy, Nicholas P.; Kelleher, Dermot; Pennington, Daniel J.; Strachan, David P.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Mein, Charles A.; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Deloukas, Panos; McGinnis, Ralph; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Our genome-wide association study of celiac disease previously identified risk variants in the IL2-IL21 region. To identify additional risk variants, we genotyped 1,020 of the most strongly associated non-HLA markers in an additional 1,643 cases and 3,406 controls. Through joint analysis including t

  17. PROTEIN COMPLEX OF WHEAT, BUCKWHEAT AND MAIZE IN RELATION TO CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Chňapek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cereals are the most wide spread and very important plants utilized as a food source for mankind and for animals where they play role in energetical metabolism and proteosynthesis. Cereals contain proteins with unique properties. These properties allow us to produce leavened bread. Technological characteristic of cereal grain is determined by quantity and quality of storage proteins which represent alcohol soluble prolamins and glutenins soluble in acids and basis solutions. Celiac disease is one of the most frequent food intolerance caused by cereal storage proteins. Therapy consists of strict diet without consumptions of cereals or gluten. Pseudocereals are very perspective groups of plants in gluten free diet, due to absence of celiac active proteins, but on the other hand, flour from pseudocereals is not very suitable for baking. There are a lot of analytical methods applicable for detection of celiac active proteins in cereal and pseudocereal grain. Electrophoretical and immunochemical methods are the most utilized. Genotypes of wheat and maize were homogeneous and singlelined in contrast with genotypes of buckwheat. Average content of HMW-GS was highest in genotypes of bread wheat and lowest in buckwheat varieties. A celiac active fraction of storage proteins (LMW-GS and gliadins was detected at the highest content level in wheat genotypes. Genotypes of buckwheat and maize showed similar low content of this protein fraction. Presence of residual albumins and globulins in buckwheat varieties showed the highest value.

  18. Untreated celiac disease in a patient with dermatitis herpetiformis leading to a small bowel carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, M.H.M.; Bisseling, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Usually, celiac disease has a benign course, though the overall morbidity and mortality have increased. Treatment with a gluten-free diet restores the damaged intestinal mucosa. In rare cases a small bowel adenocarcinoma develops. Unfortunately, the clinical presentation is not always recognized and

  19. Small bowel capsule endoscopy, a modern tool for celiac disease diagnosis - case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suceveanu Andra Iulia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by an inadequate immunological response when patients with specific genetic phenotypes are exposed to gluten. This article presents a case of a young woman diagnosed in Gastroenterology Department of “ St. Andrew Apostle” Emergency Hospital of Constanta with celiac disease after multiple admissions into the hospital for unspecific symptoms such as pallor, fatigue, pirosis, weight loss and 1-2 soft stools/day. The history with period irregularities and infertility without a known cause, a recent unexplained bone fracture, the muscle weakness, neuropsychiatric symptoms characterized by sleep disturbances and irritability correlated with the biological features characterized by moderate feriprive anemia, Ca and Mg decreased level, thyroid autoimmune impairment and gastrointestinal symptoms raised the suspicion of an autoimmune disorder with multiple targets. The videcapsule endoscopy (VCE revealed the specific pattern of the celiac disease: villous atrophy of jejunum, scalloping, absent folds and cobblestone mucosal pattern. Results were correlated with immunology tests results. The patient was transferred on a gluten free diet and the clinical and VCE controlsrevealed the healing of the jejunum mucosa. The VCE can be the tool for positive diagnosis of an unusual and heterogeneous celiac disease in patients with various symptoms without an apparent cause.

  20. Serological screening for celiac disease in adult Chinese patients with diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Wang (Hongling); G. Zhou (Guoying); L. Luo (Linjie); J.B.A. Crusius; A. Yuan (Anlong); J. Kou (Jiguang); G. Yang (Guifang); M. Wang (Min); J. Wu (Jing); B.M.E. von Blomberg (Mary); S.A. Morré (Servaas); A. Salvador Pena; B. Xia (Bing)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCeliac disease (CD) is common in Caucasians, but thought to be rare in Asians. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in Chinese patients with chronic diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). From July 2010 to August 2012, 395 adult patients with IBS-D and 363 age an